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Foundations of Online Learning

A 6 Week online course with synchronous and asynchronous delivery between faculty and students.


Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Description of Course

Course Syllabus

Course Details: Theory and Practice in Online Instruction

The Readings:

The Text

Topics:

Learning Standards and Course Objectives:

Course Policies:

Computers:

Evaluation:

Graded Assignments and Activities:

Clarification of Assignments

Grading Scale

Teacher Presence and Course Communications

Services:

Tutoring:

Learning Differences:

Support of the Mercy Mission:

Course Map

Bibliography


Link to Marc D. Smith’s Vitae


Description of Course

Foundations of Online Learning is an exploration of established theories of distance learning and developing learning theories considering the 21st century learner. This course further studies the Semantic Web and current online learning pedagogy that focuses on student engagement, teacher-student interaction, and student learning diversity. Specifically, this course examines means at which professional educators can leverage technology for personal, professional and pedagogical use especially those technologies (hardware, software and otherwise) associated with communication (computer-mediated and other), productivity, online publishing, and current trends and future perspectives.


Course Syllabus

Course Details: Theory and Practice in Online Instruction

Instr:

Marc D. Smith

Office:

Virtual

Email:

balddaddieteach@gmail.com

Phone:  

540-850-8396

Class Time: Location:

Online - synchronous and asynchronous

Readings:

Anderson, Terry. The Theory and Practice of Online Learning. 2nd ed. Edmonton: AU, 2008. AU Press, Athabasca University, 2008. Web. 26 May 2015.

LINK TO SOURCE

Barbour, M., Siko, J., Sumara, J., & Simuel-Everage, K. (2012). Narratives from the online frontier: A K - 12 student's experience in an online learning environment. The Qualitative Report, 17(20), 1-19.

LINK TO SOURCE

Johnson, L., Adams Becker, S., Estrada, V., and Freeman, A. (2014). NMC Horizon Report: 2014 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.  

LINK TO SOURCE

Patrick, S., & Powell, A. (2009, June). A summary of research on the effectiveness of K-12 online learning (Rep.). Retrieved May 26, 2015, from International Association for K - 12 Online Learning website: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED509626 (ERIC Document Reproduction Service)

LINK TO SOURCE

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

The Readings:

The good news: all resources in this course are open sources, free, or attributed through Creative Commons. What does that mean? No cost to students.

Throughout the course we will focus on several readings that provide insight into online learning theory, online tools, online practices, and the k-12 online learner. The readings are mandatory and will be referenced in discussion boards, in article critiques, and projects. Feel free to print or access them electronically.

The Text

The following chapters are from Theory and Practice for Online Learning 2nd Edition This is an open source Creative Commons publication from Athabasca University. The following chapters are assigned and most applicable to K-12 online learning environment. Summaries were taken directly from the text.


Topics:

  • What foundations support online learning?
  • What evolutions are developing in online learning theories?
  • What predispositions do you hold toward online learning?
  • What will you have to defend or dispel about online learning?
  • Who are our online learners? What are their preferences?
  • What tools or emerging tools can be used to facilitate learning?
  • How do these tools facilitate learning or enhance the learning experience?
  • What foundations and/or infrastructure is necessary to facilitate an effective online experience?
  • What essentials are necessary in developing an online course?
  • How was this course developed - what would you change?
  • Is online learning effective?
  • What qualities and skills do effective online instructors have?  
  • What role does community play in online learning?
  • How are opportunities for  collaboration in small and large group developed in online learning?
  • What role does community play in online learning?
  • How can rubrics and assignment sheets be used to promote communication and expectations?

Learning Standards and Course Objectives:

The National Standards for Quality Online Teaching:

By the end of this course, students will have:

Course Policies:

Computers:

Students must have laptops or computers that meet the standards outlined by the University's technology requirements.

Evaluation:

Graded Assignments and Activities:

Total Points =  600

Clarification of Assignments

Grading Scale

Total Class Points

Percent %

Letter Grade

Interpretation  

756 - 800

95 to 100

A  

Exceptional

716 - 755

90 to 94

B+

Outstanding

669 - 715

85 to 89

B  

Very Good

620 - 668

78 to 84

C+

Good

556 - 619

70 to 77

C  

Satisfactory

516 - 555

65 to 69

D+  

Unsatisfactory

476 - 515

60 to 64

D-

Unsatisfactory

0 -  475

0 to 59

F

Failure

Student’s overall performance in the course is measured by the total number of points accumulated relative to the maximum 800 points possible. Student’s letter grade in this course will be based on the distribution above. Moreover, these are the only points possible in this class, there is no extra credit (or 'make up'), Students asking for extra credit is a clear indication that they have not read the student contract (this syllabus).

There will be a link to Student grades from our class web-page (these are NOT on blackboard). To check Students grade log-in with Student (Mercyhurst) email address as username and student student ID as student password. Students may change student password or email address once Students have logged in. Access to student grades will be further explained in class.

Teacher Presence and Course Communications

Each week an introductory video will be presented to review the content, explain course expectations,  and highlight student achievements. These videos are required viewing and commenting required. On larger assignment, screencasts will be provided as a resource.

Assignments submitted to the assignment folders on the course management system with have video and audio comments from the instructor. Be sure to check those.

Email will be address within 24 hours of receipt. Emails in and between course participants and instructor will be professional and cordial.

Group Chat/Text is available and should be used with same discretion as an email correspondence.

Services:

Tutoring:

The Writing Center assists students individually at any stage of the writing process, including:

Tutoring Center Office

Phone: (814) 824-3122

E-mail: tutoring@mercyhurst.edu

Technical Support - GET INFO

Learning Differences:

In keeping with college policy, any student with a disability who needs academic accommodations must call Learning Differences Program secretary at 824-3017, to arrange a confidential appointment with the director of the Learning Differences Program during the first week of classes.

Support of the Mercy Mission:

This course supports the mission of Mercyhurst University by creating students who are intellectually creative. Students will foster this creativity by: applying critical thinking and qualitative reasoning techniques to new disciplines; developing, analyzing, and synthesizing theoretical and foundational ideas; and engaging in innovative collaborative problem solving strategies.


Course Map

Tentative Schedule:

The course calendar is subject to change depending on the progress of the class. Revisions will be announced in class and/or posted electronically when necessary on Blackboard.

 

Hours in parentheses in assignment column indicate hours of allotted class for asynchronous class time.

Week & Module

Topic

Method of Delivery

Faculty to Student

Activities

Week 1: Module 1

(Intro)

What foundations support online learning? What evolutions are developing in online learning theories?

Introductions of course, participants, teams, and Blackboard course navigation

Synchronous (90 min) Scheduled on first day

Asynchronous:

Presentation: Foundations of learning theories


Email Introductory Activity - Screencast

Intro to Readings - Screencast

View/Review the Presentation On Foundations of Learning Theories

Readings:

PART I: Role and Function of Theory in Online Education Development and Delivery

  1. Foundations of Educational Theory for Online Learning by Mohamed Ally
  2. Towards a Theory of Online Learning by Terry Anderson

Complete Email Activity

Take Quiz 1

Week 2: Module 2

What predispositions do you hold toward online learning? What will you have to defend or dispel about online learning?

Who are our online learners? What are their preferences?

Asynchronous:

Presentation: Myths and Truths about online learning and the online learner

Screencast of Discussion 1

Introduction of the Lesson Plan Assignment - Screencast

View/Review the Presentation Myths and Truths about online learning and the online learner

Reading:

A summary of research on the effectiveness of K-12 online learning

View the Discussion Screencast

Complete the Discussion 1:

initial post by Wednesday, Replies by Sunday at 12 AM.

Complete Quiz 2

Week 3: Module 3

What tools or emerging tools can be used to facilitate learning? How do these tools facilitate learning or enhance the learning experience?

Synchronous:

Groups will participate in an open GoTo Meeting to discuss readings and the list of tools for online learning and the readings. Use Small Group GoTo to identify roles and guide you.

Asynchronous:

Presentation: Group Activity with Go to and

Introduction to Lesson Plan Assignment Due in Week 6

Article Critique 1 Screencast

Readings:

8: “In-Your-Pocket” and “On-the-Fly:” Meeting the Needs of Today’s New Generation of Online Learners with Mobile Learning Technology by Maureen Hutchison, Tony Tin & Yang Cao

9: Social Software to Support Distance Education Learners by Terry Anderson

Complete Article Critique 1

View Introduction to the Lesson Plan Assignment

Complete Quiz 3

Week 4: Module 4

What foundations and/or infrastructure is necessary to facilitate an effective online experience?

How was this course developed - what would you change?

Asynchronous:

Presentation:  Foundations to online learning - Teacher presence, Immediacy, and Sense of Community

Screencast of Discussion 2

Readings:

6: Developing an Infrastructure for Online Learning by Alan Davis, Paul Little & Brian Stewart

9: Social Software to Support Distance Education Learners by Terry Anderson

Complete the Discussion 2:

initial post by Wednesday, Replies by Sunday at 12 AM.

Complete Quiz 4

Week 5: Module 5

What qualities and skills do effective online instructors have?  

Asynchronous:

Presentation: The online instructor

Readings:

14. Teaching in an Online Learning Context by Terry Anderson

Complete Quiz 5

Week 6: Module 6

How to we provide opportunities for collaboration and team building?

How can we support the online learner?

Synchronous

Closing the course

Asynchronous:

Presentation: Supporting the online learner through collaboration and communication

Readings:  

17: Supporting the Online Learner by Susan D. Moisey & Judith A. Hughes

18: Developing Team Skills and Accomplishing Team Projects Online by Deborah Hurst & Janice Thomas

Complete the Discussion 3:

initial post by Wednesday, Replies by Sunday at 12 AM.

Lesson Plan is due

Exam

Exam

Comprehensive Exam

SYNCHRONOUS CLASS MEETINGS will be conducted using GoToMeeting online software. You will receive an access code to join the session the day before each synchronous class. Feel free to review to GoTo Meeting User Guide

At times whole group (WG GoTo) sessions will be held. Students are expected to log in at the assigned time. These sessions will last approximately 90 minutes and may include guest speakers in the field of practice of online learning.  You can join via Internet or using the telephone access code. Review the WG GoTo meeting expectations.

Other times, your group will meet (SM GoTo) sessions. These sessions are times when your group will meet to discuss topics, develop project ideas, or debate with other groups. These will be moderated by assigned members. Review the SM GoTo meeting expectations. These sessions are recorded and reviewed for participation, evaluation, and redirection by the instructor. Instructor holds the privilege to attend the group meetings if schedule permits.

 

ASYNCHRONOUS CLASSES will include participating in online group discussions and independent demonstrations of learning. For example: Quizzes, Article summaries, and Lesson Plan development.


Module 1 Foundations of Online Learning

Course#00000                            Session/Year: 1/2015

Learning Module 1                             Week 1                                    

Summary of Module:

This week is an introduction to online learning, each other, and the course.

Objective:

Students will. . .

  • Create and share an introductory presentation and respond to student presentations
  • Respond to a discussion question and peer threads
  • Accurately respond to terminology quiz
  • Consider personal predispositions to online learning

Topic(s):

Online Learning, Learning Theory, Jargon

Required Reading(s):

Patrick, S., & Powell, A. (2009, June). A summary of research on the effectiveness of K-12 online learning

Supplementary Reading(s):

None

Lecture Video Topics:

Course Introduction, history of online learning, exploration of course content, explanation of assignments and expectations.

Discussion Question(s):

What predispositions do you hold towards online learning?

Assignment(s):

Discussion 1 (Assignment Sheet): Post thread and replies to Team Discussion Board

Create an introductory presentation (See Assignment Sheet) with one of the following tools:

Level 1: Google Slides

Level 2: Prezi

Level 3: Haiku Deck or Slide

(See Tutorial Folder for links to tutorials)

Terminology Quiz: See Study Sheet

Assessment(s):

  • Discussion Board
  • Introductory Presentation
  • Glossary Quiz

Glossary of Terms:

List of Terms

Module 2 Foundations of Online Learning

Course#00000                            Session/Year: 1/2015

Learning Module 2                             Week 2                                    

Summary of Module

Objective

Topic(s):

Required Reading(s):

Supplementary Reading(s):

Lecture Video Topics:

Discussion Question(s):

Assignment(s):

Assessment(s):

Glossary of Terms:


Module 3 Foundations of Online Learning

Course#00000                            Session/Year: 1/2015

Learning Module 3                             Week 3                                    

Summary of Module

Objective

Topic(s):

Required Reading(s):

Supplementary Reading(s):

Lecture Video Topics:

Discussion Question(s):

Assignment(s):

Assessment(s):

Glossary of Terms:


Module 4 Foundations of Online Learning

Course#00000                            Session/Year: 1/2015

Learning Module 2                             Week 2                                    

Summary of Module

Objective

Topic(s):

Required Reading(s):

Supplementary Reading(s):

Lecture Video Topics:

Discussion Question(s):

Assignment(s):

Assessment(s):

Glossary of Terms:


Module 5 Foundations of Online Learning

Course#00000                            Session/Year: 1/2015

Learning Module 5                             Week 5                                    

Summary of Module

Objective

Topic(s):

Required Reading(s):

Supplementary Reading(s):

Lecture Video Topics:

Discussion Question(s):

Assignment(s):

Assessment(s):

Glossary of Terms:


Module 6 Foundations of Online Learning

Course#00000                            Session/Year: 1/2015

Learning Module 6                             Week 6                                    

Summary of Module

Objective

Topic(s):

Required Reading(s):

Supplementary Reading(s):

Lecture Video Topics:

Discussion Question(s):

Assignment(s):

Assessment(s):

Glossary of Terms:


References

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Anderson, T. (2004). Toward a theory of online learning. In T. Anderson & F. Elloumi (Eds.) Theory and practice of online learning (2nd ed.). Athabasca, Canada: Athabasca University. Retrieved from http://cde.athabascau.ca/online_book/index.html

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