Nine Types of Curriculum Adaptations[a]

Quantity *

Adapt the number of items that the learner is

expected to learn or number of activities student

will complete prior to assessment for mastery.

For example:

Reduce the number of social studies terms a learner

must learn at any one time. Add more practice

activities or worksheets.

Time *

 Adapt the time allotted and allowed for learning, task

completion, or testing.

For example:

Individualize a timeline for completing a task; pace learning

differently (increase or decrease) for some learners.

Level of Support *

Increase the amount of personal assistance to keep

the student on task or to reinforce or prompt use of

specific skills. Enhance adult-student relationship;

use physical space and environmental structure.

For example:

Assign peer buddies, teaching assistants, peer tutors,

or cross-age tutors.  Specify how to interact with the

student or how to structure the environment.

Input *

Adapt the way instruction is delivered to the

learner.

For example:

Use different visual aids, enlarge text, plan more

concrete examples, provide hands-on activities,

place students in cooperative groups, pre-teach key

concepts or terms before the lesson.

Difficulty *

Adapt the skill level, problem type, or the rules on how the learner may approach the work.

For example:

Allow the use of a calculator to figure math problems;

simplify task directions; change rules to accommodate

learner needs.

Output *

Adapt how the student can respond to instruction.

For example:

Instead of answering questions in writing, allow a

verbal response, use a communication book for some

students, allow students to show knowledge with

hands on materials.

Participation *

Adapt the extent to which a learner is actively

involved in the task.

For example:

In geography, have a student hold the globe, while

others point out locations. Ask the student to lead a

group. Have the student turn the pages while sitting

on your lap (kindergarten).

Alternate Goals z

Adapt the goals or outcome expectations while using the

same materials.  When routinely utilized, this is only for

students with moderate to severe disabilities.

For example:

In a social studies lesson, expect a student to be able to

locate the colors of the states on a map, while other students

learn to locate each state and name the capital.

Substitute Curriculum

Sometimes called “functional curriculum”

Provide different instruction and materials to meet a

learner’s individual goals.  When routinely utilized,

this is only for students with moderate to severe

disabilities.

For example:

During a language lesson a student is learning toileting

skills with an aide

Math Specific Recommendations

Quantity *

Time *

Level of Support *

Input *

  • Visual organizers
  • Highlighters
  • SMARTboard
  • Color coding
  • Multimodal presentation of content—visual, auditory, kinesthetic (hands-on), etc.
  • Connect the math to real life situations
  • Varying delivery during a class session (lecture, group work, ind work, Kahoot)
  • Making materials visually appealing

Difficulty *

Output *

  • Teacher modeling of student shared strategies
  • Variety in the methods that students can show what they know-posters, computer responses, journal writing, notebook entries
  • Livescribe pens
  • Apps such as Explain Everything
  • Verbal conferences with teacher
  • Structured talk moves with sentence stems (I agree/disagree because ______)[b]

Participation *

Alternate Goals z

Substitute Curriculum

Additional Recommendations to Support Diverse Learners in the Math Classroom

[a]Substantially altered by Diana Browning Wright with permission from Jeff Sprague, Ph.D.  from an original by DeSchenes, C., Ebeling, D., & Sprague, J. (1994).  Adapting Curriculum & Instruction in Inclusive Classrooms:  A Teachers Desk Reference.  ISDD-

CSCI Publication.

Diana Browning Wright, Teaching & Learning 2005

[b]ooo...good one!