Sunday October 25

12:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  Opening Plenary Luncheon

Harborside Room

Springboard to Action

Monique Lopez, Transportation Justice Policy Advocate for the Environmental Health Coalition

David Alvarez, Member, San Diego City Council

Genoveva Islas, Director, Cultiva La Salud - Presentation

Tribute to Deb Hubsmith

Deb Hubsmith was a California powerhouse -- the founding executive director of the Marin County Bicycle Coalition in the early 1990s and the national Safe Routes to School National Partnership most recently. In between, her energetic leadership and visionary intelligence helped to transform not just her home county but her state and her nation. She was instrumental along with the California Bicycle Coalition in creating California’s Safe Routes to School program, one of the few state-level programs in the United States. With U.S. House of Representatives Transportation Committee Chair James Oberstar, she created the National Non-motorized Pilot Program that serves as an inspiration for our current campaign to invest significant funds in communities to build whole bicycle networks. Deb died of leukemia in August at the age of 46. Dave Snyder and Jeanie Ward-Waller, two Calbike staffers who worked with her in different capacities, will offer a tribute to their friend and ally and inspiration.    

Dave Snyder & Jeanie Ward-Waller, California Bicycle Coalition

2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Porthole Room

Safe Moves Education for Kids and Adults

This session focuses on the latest generation of several established childhood safety programs. Safe MOVES is a comprehensive childhood education program that focuses on encouraging kids to become lifelong bike commuters. The North Natomas TMA has a new and entertaining video for the short-attention-span generation. The Bicycle Culture Institute has a “teaching the teachers” curriculum for adult safety education. Nona Varnado, Bicycle Culture Institute. Pat Hines, Safe MOVES.Abbey Stumpf, North Natomas TMA

2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Harborside Room

Let’s Talk about Equity

How do the problems of racism, sexism and economic inequality get in the way of our shared goal of including and empowering more Californians to join the bicycle movement? It’s the elephant in the room that many of us are challenged to talk about, but we won’t succeed unless we embrace the challenge. This workshop will help us to face those issues and discuss ways we can deal with racism, sexism, and access to opportunity in our own organizations and in the bicycle movement. The results of this panel will be shared with all summit participants during the Monday plenary. Norma Herrera, Janet LaFleur, and Tony Dang, California Bicycle Coalition.

2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Bay Room

Bike Kitchens, Bike Libraries, and Mobile DIY Programs Build Skills and Community

“Bike kitchens” have proliferated throughout the state, providing low-income Californians—especially youth—access to bicycles and opportunities to learn job skills and become leaders in their communities. Hear from programs like Fleet Street from Los Angeles and Bike Bakersfield’s two bike kitchens. The Berkeley, Oakland, and Mountain View Public Libraries are partnering with cycling advocacy groups to provide new services to the cycling community through bicycle outreach, pop-up bike libraries, repair clinics, skills workshops, bike craft parties and more. Learn how each of these programs are engaging and helping to build community in new and exciting ways. Dan Beringhele, Berkeley Public Library; Emily Weak, Reggie Burnett, Mountain View and Oakland Public Libraries; Cindy Parra, Jason Cater, Bike Bakersfield; Dana Sherman, Fleet Street

2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Embarcadero Room

Getting Started in Bicycle Advocacy

California’s large metropolises have well-established, effective bicycle advocacy organizations, and some great infrastructure to show for it. In many smaller cities around California, bicycle advocacy is just getting going. We’ll learn about the successes and challenges of nascent bicycle advocacy efforts in Turlock and Santa Ana, among other places. Elizabeth Claes, Bike Turlock; Marina Ramirez, Maribel Mateo, Kristopher Fortin; Santa Ana Active Streets

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Porthole Room

Collaborating with Your Local Caltrans District: Success Stories

Caltrans District 2, based in Redding, California, won the California Bicycle Coalition’s award for the “Best District Decision of 2014” for their construction of a new California Street in downtown Redding that replaced an excess traffic lane with a bike lane. Another smart district decision was District 8’s elimination of a barrier by opening a section of Interstate 40 to bicyclists, mostly on a shoulder separated from car traffic by rumble strips. In San Diego, a “Complete Corridor” advocacy approach has influenced the way Caltrans thinks of freeway corridors. What can we learn from the process that led to these decisions for sharing with leaders in all Caltrans districts? Anne Wallach-Thomas, Shasta Living Streets; Mark Friis, Inland Empire Biking Alliance; Randy Van Vleck, City Heights Community Development Corporation; Tony Dang, California Walks

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Harborside Room

Connecting Paths and Disadvantaged Communities: Two Innovative Examples

The Coachella Valley Association of Governments is planning the longest “alternative transportation” pathway in the nation: the 50-mile CV Link to connect desert communities with a safe and car-free route for bikes, runners, and electric vehicles such as golf carts. But disadvantaged communities won’t benefit if the path doesn’t include spurs to neighborhoods where most people live, nor if the project uses all the active transportation funding for the region. In this session, we will discuss the implications of this investment for transportation justice in Coachella Valley. We’ll also hear from WILDCOAST, who is planning to work with the San Diego Association of Government and local jurisdictions to connect disadvantaged border region neighborhoods to open space areas and the Bayshore Bikeway. Mike Rose, Alta Planning + Design; Michele Hasson, Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability; John Holder, Wildcoast; Juan Antonio Ramirez, Circulate San Diego

CV Link Presentation
Michele Hasson Presentation
Wildcoast Presentation
Circulate Presentation

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Bay Room

A Paradigm Shift for CEQA - Changing Level-of-Service to Vehicle-Miles-Traveled in Traffic Impacts Measurement

For years, the characterization of LOS as an environmental impact in CEQA has plagued bicycle (and transit and pedestrian) projects and plans.  Soon, VMT will be the primary metric of transportation impact across the state.  This session will provide a preview of the upcoming guidelines and technical advisory that will implement SB 743.  We’ll cover how it will apply to active transportation projects, land use projects, land use plans, transit projects and roadway projects.  We’ll also discuss Caltrans’ emerging shift in its approach to transportation analysis—and how you can get involved.Chris Ganson, Governor’s Office of Planning and Research; Steven Cliff, Caltrans

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Embarcadero Room

Winning Consensus Support for our Movement’s Most Ambitious Vision: Zero Traffic Fatalities

The Vision Zero Initiative started in Sweden in 1997 (yes, we’re 17 years behind). Its basic premise is simple: no loss of life from traffic collisions is acceptable. Communities around California are adopting Vision Zero. This session will explore whether the inspiring rhetoric will be matched by the bold action necessary to eliminate traffic fatalities. We’ll also discuss how Vision Zero campaigns can prevent profiling in the implementation of their enforcement strategies. Leah Shahum, Vision Zero Network; Kathleen Ferrier, Circulate San Diego; Chema Hernández Gil, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition

6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.  Opening Night Party—Music, Dancing, Cash Bar, Food Trucks

Location: SILO in Makers Quarter, 753 15th St, San Diego

Live Music: Tijuana and Elrío

Party at San Diego’s hip outdoor art space, SILO in Makers Quarter. We’ll dance in tribute to Deb Hubsmith.

Monday October 26

7:45 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. Breakfast Plenary
Harborside Room

Buffet Breakfast Served Until 8:15 a.m.

Welcome from Supervisor Greg Cox and Kaiser Permanente

Supervisor Greg Cox, San Diego County Board of Supervisors, Bay Trail proponent

Shreya Shah Sasaki, Kaiser Permanente

Equity in Motion at the State Level

Chanell Fletcher, Safe Routes to School National Partnership

Tony Dang, California Walks 

Michele Hasson, Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability

Estuardo David Mazariegos, TRUST South LA

9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Harborside Room

The New “Bike Project”—Building Whole Networks, Not Just One Lane at a Time

California is leading a new way to think about infrastructure improvements: whole networks at a time rather than one street at a time. This “network” approach is the only way we’ll triple bicycling quickly. Hear about exemplary projects in Mountain View around the Google campus and the downtown cycle track network in Calgary, Canada. Learn about various models to evaluate the connectivity of low-stress streets in a network. Christopher Kidd, Alta Planning + Design; Shiloh Ballard, Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition; Josh Mello, Chief Transportation Official with the City of Palo Alto; Rock Miller, Stantec; Don Mulligan, City of Calgary

Rock Miler Presentation

9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Bay Room

Show Your Community the Future with Pop-Up Demonstrations of Better Infrastructure

Bike East Bay has advanced the art of instant protected bike lanes and will share their secrets for successful pop-up demonstrations of bikeway projects. In San Diego, advocates have taken the idea one step further, popping up whole “Better Blocks” that show what a streetscape can look like with a little imagination. Also in San Diego, KTU+A has mixed mobility planning, landscape architecture and an open streets event (CicloSDias) to provide a firsthand experience of Better Infrastructure. This session will give people the tools to turn nos into yesses by creating their own pop-up versions of the future. Dave Campbell, Bike East Bay; Monique López, Placemaking Collective; Alison Moss, KTU+A.

Monique Lopez Presentation
Dave Campbell Presentation
Alison Moss Presentation

9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Porthole Room

Best Marketing and Promotion Practices

Infrastructure is the most important tool in enabling more people to bicycle, but marketing can also play a powerful role, if it’s well-done and effectively targeted to diverse audiences. Learn from the state’s most humorous video producers at the Orange County Transportation Authority and from leaders of Santa Ana’s successful multifaceted, multilingual bicycle safety outreach and education campaign. Nathan Wheadon, OCTA; Ryan Johnson, Alta Planning + Design; Cory Wilkerson, City of Santa Ana

9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Embarcadero Room

How to Win in the Media (Hint: Tell Stories)

Learn how to develop engaging stories for your organization and how to successfully pitch them the right way, to the right media for local, regional, statewide and national coverage. Damien Newton, Streetsblog California; Sahra Sulaiman Streetsblog LA, Samantha Ollinger, Bike San Diego; Melissa Balmer and Charlie Gandy, California Bicycle Coalition and Pedal Love; Jeff Rabin, former reporter for LA Times/Sacramento Bee

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Porthole Room

Collaboration to Build Bikeway Networks in Diverse Communities

The Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition (LACBC) partnered with six underserved cities in Southeast L.A. to win Active Transportation Program planning grants, and with T.R.U.S.T. South L.A. to develop a participatory planning process that engages community stakeholders to develop bike/ped project ideas for implementation by the City of L.A. Bike San Gabriel Valley (BikeSGV), in partnership with Alta Planning + Design, championed an extraordinary effort for five cities in L.A. County to advance the development of a safer, smart grid of complete streets, shared trails, and bicycle routes for people of all ages and abilities. Further south, the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) developed regional bikeway corridors across all 35 local jurisdictions through 4 bikeway collaboratives involving agency staff, public stakeholders, and elected officials. In Santa Ana and Desert Hot Springs, KTU+A used unique branding and tools to describe and design projects in order to build community support and educate on complete streets. Bryan Moller, LACBC; David Diaz, BikeSGV; Ryan Johnson, Alta Planning + Design; Paul Martin, OCTA; Joe Punsalan, KTU+A

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Bay Room

Police and Prosecutors:  Help or Hindrance in Safety Efforts?

Police officers can help save lives by enforcing the most dangerous traffic violations, which still claim thousands of lives each year. But they can also abuse their power, using it against people of color in profiling actions, against bicyclists in misguided attempts to “crack down” on illegal behavior, or by letting their bias against bicyclists obstruct justice. This session will explore the best approaches to encouraging police to be effective and just in their traffic law enforcement. Tamika Butler, LA County Bicycle Coalition; Najari Smith, Rich City Rides; Craig Davis, 3footcycling.com; Miles Cooper, Emison Hullverson LLP; Stephen Bingham, Sylvia Bingham Fund

Miles Cooper Presentation

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Embarcadero Room

On the Cutting Edge of Quantifying the Public Health Benefits of Bicycling  

Decisions about transportation planning are decisions about public health. This panel will discuss a framework for integrating health assessment into the transportation planning process using border health equity research in San Ysidro as a case study. We’ll also investigate the health co-benefits of bike share as expanding systems encourage many more people to bicycle. And even when controlling for other factors such as education and infrastructure, the “safety in numbers” hypothesis holds true: simply having more bicyclists in your community reduces the risk of injuries while bicycling. We’ll discuss some reasons why. Dan Gallagher, San Diego Association of Governments; Dr. Sherry Ryan, San Diego State University; David Flores, Casa Familiar; Peter Lyndon Jacobsen, Public Health Consultant; Sean Co, Toole Design Group; Carla Blackmar, Public Health Alliance of Southern California

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Harborside Room

Funding California’s Bikeways #1: State Investments

California has recently developed two dedicated state programs for funding bikeways—the Active Transportation Program (ATP) and the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Program (AHSC). Both programs are in flux as the lead agencies work to incentivize competitive and innovative projects that provide multiple benefits and respond to significant demand for limited funds, while under significant pressure to award funds quickly. In addition, California’s 2015-2016 budget allocates another $19 billion in state and federal funds for transportation for primarily highway purposes. We’ll hear the latest thinking from state leaders at Caltrans and the Department of Housing and Community Development, and discuss work by the California Bicycle Coalition, California Walks, and our allies to increase funding for bicycling and walking through the ATP, AHSC, and other state programs. Jeanie Ward-Waller, California Bicycle Coalition; Tony Dang, California Walks; Eugene Lee, Department of Housing and Community Development; Steven Cliff, Caltrans

Steven Cliff Presentation
Eugene Lee Presentation
Tony Dang Presentation

12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.  Welcome to San Diego Lunch Plenary

Harborside Room

Greetings from Leaders of America’s Finest City

Toni Atkins, California State Assembly

Serge Dedina, Mayor of Imperial Beach

Andy Hanshaw, Executive Director, San Diego County Bicycle Coalition

Samantha Ollinger, Executive Director, Bike San Diego

Cindy Parra, Board President, California Bicycle Coalition

San Diego’s Early Action Plan - Setting an Example for California

Chris Kluth, San Diego Association of Governments, presenting SANDAG’s ambitious plan to spend their 30-year bike infrastructure budget in ten quick years. Presentation

2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Harborside Room

Design for Convenient, Low-Stress Bikeway Networks: New Standards and More Flexibility

To triple bicycling, our streets must invite the “interested but concerned” people who cannot tolerate the stress of dealing with traffic. Design standards for streets and networks of streets must direct engineers and planners to build low-stress bikeways. This workshop will illuminate the latest in design standards at the federal level and the state level, including the standards for “class 4” protected bikeways that are legally due by December 31. Also, what wayfinding standards are best to direct bicyclists to the low-stress network? Emily Duchon and Bryan Jones, Alta Planning + Design; Janice Benton and Kevin Herritt, Caltrans; Rock Miller, US MUTCD Committee Member, Stantec

View Bryan Jones Presentation
Emily Duchon Presentation
Janice Benton Presentation 

2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Bay Room

The First and Last Several Miles: Bicycle Access to Transit

Transit systems are becoming more bike-friendly every year. The Bay Area Rapid Transit District permits bikes on board at all times, and provides thousands of bike parking spaces -- in the form of Bike Stations, shared-use electronic lockers and well-situated racks. Southern California systems are catching up, thanks to forward-thinking leaders and effective advocacy. This session will discuss best practices in advocating for and implementing bicycle/transit integration. Steve Beroldo, Bay Area Rapid Transit District; John Michael Kaiser, @bikecar101; Cuong Phu Trinh, #bikesonboard

#bikesonboard presentation-Caltrain
#bikesonboard presentation-Metrolink
BART presentation
BikeCar101 Presentation

2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Porthole Room

Making Connections in Low-Income Communities

In partnership with its local chapters throughout L.A. County, the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition distributes thousands of bike lights to people with bicycles, three-quarters of whom rely on their bicycles as their primary form of transportation. One-third of recipients speak Spanish as their primary language. Chico Velo in northern California operates a similar bike light giveaway. Multicultural Communities for Mobility organizes community health workers in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles to directly help residents learn the benefits of bicycling. We’ll also hear from leaders in the nearby City Heights neighborhood of San Diego. Colin Bogart, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition; Maryann Aguirre, Multicultural Communities for Mobility; Janine Rood, ChicoVelo; Monique Lopez, Environmental Health Coalition; Randy Van Vleck, City Heights Community Development Corporation

2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Embarcadero Room

¡Movimiento!: Advancing Transportation Equity and Preventing Chronic Disease Among Latinos in California’s Central Valley

Many low-income Latinos in California’s Central Valley do not get enough exercise. Contributing factors include safety challenges in low-income neighborhoods, infrastructure deficiencies, inadequate or non-existent public transportation and political disenfranchisement. These factors limiting safe physical activity contribute to a growing rate of chronic illness, including obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Cultiva La Salud, through Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) funding from the Centers for Disease Control, has embarked on a program to reduce sedentarism and promote health among Latinos. Through Cumbia Rides, Safe Routes to School, Bailes con Sabor and other culturally relevant engagement, Cultiva La Salud is working to affect policies, systems and the environment to allow Latinos to be more active on a regular basis. Whether it’s biking to work or biking to school, Latinos are moving and engaging in decision-making to direct more resources to their neighborhoods and communities. Genoveva Islas, Cultiva La Salud; Lourdes Perez, Ceres Partnership for Healthy Children; Yesenia Ocampo, Dolores Huerta Foundation

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Harborside Room

Modeling Benefits and Costs for Equity and Connectivity

Planners want to know the costs and benefits of bike infrastructure, and government grant applications often require it. When a new survey shows that 90% of Berkeley residents are open to bicycling (only 10% said “no way, no how”), it seems clear that the benefits of infrastructure projects could be much higher than most of us calculate. Learn about the most reliable models to understand user trends, and the cost, benefits, and impacts of bike, ped and trail projects on transportation and equity. The discussion will cover several ongoing and emerging count and modeling efforts including the National Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project, Seamless Travel Model in San Diego County, Alta’s Activity-Benefits-Cost (ABC) model, San Diego’s Bike/Ped Regional Count Program, the Trail Mapping & Assessment Platform (a suite of new trail network assessment tools being developed by the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy), and the City of Berkeley’s innovative effort to integrate the 4 types of cyclists survey with a Level of Traffic Stress network analysis. Laura Cohen, Rails to Trails Conservancy; Dr. Sherry Ryan, San Diego State University; Brett Hondorp and Michael Jones, Alta Planning + Design; Eric Anderson, City of Berkeley

Dr. Sherry Ryan Presentation
Eric Anderson Presentation
Laura Cohen Presentation
Alta Presentation

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Bay Room

Funding California’s Bikeways #2: Local Measures

More than half of transportation funding is generated locally. In regions with big sales taxes and tolls, local funding comprises as much as two-thirds of all funding for transportation. Getting bicycling included in the expenditure plans of local funding sources can be more important than winning state and federal funds. Bicycle coalitions and progressive transportation groups around the state are organizing to win billions of dollars for biking and walking from local measures. Learn from Bike East Bay, whose recently approved sales tax will generate $1 billion for bicycling and walking over the next 30 years; we’ll also learn from CirculateSD, the Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition, and the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition, who are all working on sales tax campaigns at their county transportation agencies. Dave Campbell, Bike East Bay; Colin Parent, CirculateSD; Shiloh Ballard, Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition; Eric Bruins, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Porthole Room

Bringing School-Based Cycling Education to Every Child

The goal of providing comprehensive bicycling education to every single elementary school student is getting closer and closer. Youth Educational Sports, Inc. has developed a sustainable, certified multi-week cycling class. We’ll also hear of a model from the United Kingdom, where the Department of Transport has trained 1.7 million children so far.  Tana Ball, Kellie Morris, Jim Rowton, Youth Educational Sports, Inc.; Jonny Rotheram, Steer Davies Gleave; Kristin Haukom, California Department of Public Health SRTS Technical Assistance Resource Center

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Embarcadero Room

More and Better Bicycles for Californians—Electric Bikes, Bike Rebates, and More

Electric bicycles offer an opportunity to enormously expand bicycling in California. They are especially important for parents with children, senior citizens, and people with disabilities, as well as ecologically-minded people with longer commutes, or whose trips involve steep hills or heavy loads. How will the new law governing e-bikes impact bicycling in California? How will a CalBike effort to encourage the State to fund bicycle subsidies make e-bikes and all types of bicycles more accessible to everyone, and especially low-income residents, to help California meet its greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals? Jonathan Weinert, Bosch eBike Systems; Larry Pizzi, Currie Technologies; Jeanie Ward-Waller, California Bicycle Coalition; Steven Cliff, Caltrans

Tuesday October 27

7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. Breakfast Plenary

Harborside Room

Go BronzevilleLessons from an Active Transportation Program in Chicago

Active transportation programs often end up serving primarily white middle- to upper-class audiences. Can we make these programs work, and work well, for a primarily African-American neighborhood that's had its share of economic knocks? Our speakers will share their stories and observations about what worked, what didn't, and how the program has left a visible, positive legacy in the neighborhood.

Jessica Roberts, Principal, Alta Planning + Design, Portland, OR

Ronnie Matthew Harris, Transit Future Campaign Manager, Center for Neighborhood Technology, Chicago

Equity in Motion at the National Level

Equity advocates nationwide are engaged in a critical conversation about enforcement. Hamzat Sani will share an emerging model for involving local communities in the transportation planning space to work collaboratively toward social justice solutions.

Hamzat Sani, Equity Initiative Director, League of American Bicyclists

Bicycle Advocacy as Anti-Oppression Work

This plenary will help us to define equity and other key terms and help attendees to refocus the lens with which we do our work in this diverse state and nationally. It will inspire us to push ourselves towards making bicycle advocacy anti-oppression work that encompasses fighting for equity, public health, and racial justice along with better transportation. Attendees will leave feeling confident that they can be informed equity advocates fighting for change.
Tamika Butler, Executive Director, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Porthole Room

Empowering Neighborhood Associations as Regional Advocates in Sacramento

It is time to get re-energized about working with neighborhoods. This session will highlight lessons learned across the nation and on the ground experience in low-income neighborhoods in Sacramento as we untangle current assumptions about community engagement and best practices to meaningful partnerships. Jim Brown, Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates; Katie Valenzuela Garcia, Breathe CA; Kirin Kumar, WALKSacramento

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Embarcadero Room

Creating Women-Identified Leadership Opportunities in Bicycling

Women ride bicycles at about a third of the rate that men do. The disparity is less in cities with better infrastructure, but participation in bicycling by gender is still far from equal. What are Californians doing about that? The Women Bike, Women Lead program of the League of American Bicyclists is the tip of the iceberg of women-led bicycling-related organizations. This is an open discussion for women leaders to share best practices and network.  Daniella Alcedo, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition.

View Presentation 

9:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Harborside Room

Open Streets Morning Session: The Policy Rationale behind Open Streets

• Why open streets are necessary and how to get it done

• Introduction to Liberating Your Streets for Walking, Bicycling, Dancing, Playing, and Socializing

Open streets events can be huge transformative events like CicLAvia in Los Angeles or Sunday Streets in San Francisco, but they can also be scaled appropriately for communities of any size. There are many policy rationales that municipalities can use to drive open streets programs including public health, active transportation, environmental impact, social connectedness and cultural engagement. This first extended session will cover the policies behind open streets, how to move from temporary to infrastructure change, the issues of moving this type of program through a community process with government support and how to start the ball rolling in your town. You will hear from large urban cities to small rural towns. Romel Pascual, CicLAvia; Aaron Paley, CicLAvia; Nathan Baird, Beach Streets; Anne Wallach Thomas, Shasta Living Streets; Ed Solis, San Jose

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Bay Room

Lobbying & Elections: How to Influence Legislation and Legislators Legally

Nonprofits, even 501(c)(3) charitable organizations, are allowed to do plenty of lobbying, if they follow the rules. Join this discussion with former and current elected officials and advocates to learn those rules and learn how to leverage more power on behalf of bicycling. We’ll also discuss how to get our allies elected, and get ourselves elected, within the limits of the law. Charlie Gandy, California Bicycle Coalition; Chema Hernández Gil, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition; Dan Rivoire, San Luis Obispo City Council

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Bay Room

New Plans: Turning the Big Ship of Caltrans

The Caltrans Strategic Management Plan 2015-2020 represents a culture shift toward mainstreaming the bicycle and pedestrian modes into the state transportation system. Under the Strategic Management Plan, the Sustainability goal target for non-auto modes is to triple bicycle, double pedestrian and double transit trips by 2020. Caltrans is developing the first ever California State Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan. The Strategic Highway Safety Plan has been updated with new goals and actions for bicycle safety. The Active Transportation Program, now in its second year, is awarding another $360 million toward bicycle and pedestrian projects across the state. This is a great opportunity to hear about Caltrans bicycle-related programs. Tracey Frost, Scott Forsythe, Paul Moore, and Teresa McWilliam, California Department of Transportation.

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Porthole Room

Helping Bike Share Expand to Serve All Californians, Not Just the Privileged Ones

A strategic priority for the California Bicycle Coalition, bike share programs represent a strong official statement that bicycling is part of the transportation mix for the public. They encourage the short trips that make public transit more effective, and stoke demand for better infrastructure. As currently implemented, however, they often fail to serve all Californians. They can be too expensive, and too focused on more privileged neighborhoods. What can we do to expand bike share programs equitably? Justin Wiley, SoBi Bike Share; Brett Hondorp, Alta Planning + Design; Kansas Waugh, Bay Area Bike Share; Adrian Witte, Toole Design Group

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Embarcadero Room

Video Bootcamp

Video is an effective way to communicate with your members, volunteers, staff, and the world at large. If you have a smartphone, you can learn to take advantage of the wide variety of powerful smartphone apps to inexpensively produce high-quality HD content for your organization. This interactive training will prepare you to storyboard, shoot, edit, score and share high quality, branded content. Steve Akers, Bike SLO

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. Lunch Plenary

Harborside Room

Pedaling Toward a Low Carbon Transportation System: As Easy As Riding a Bike

Malcolm Dougherty, Director, California Department of Transportation, on Caltrans’ strategic goal to triple bicycling in California.

1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Bay Room

Using Technology to Protect and Detect Bicyclists at Intersections

With more sophisticated technology, the tools to detect bicyclists and control signals are getting better all the time. Learn about bicycle detection technology options and sustainability in support of Vision Zero; Caltrans progress with a radar detection system that can distinguish between bicycles and cars as an alternative to existing inductive loop detectors; bicycle detection standards developed by the City of Palo Alto to support Connected and Autonomous Vehicle platforms and the Internet of Things (IoT) Image Sensor solutions developed to support the Safe Routes to School Program; Berkeley’s experience trying to create a bike-friendly “Bike HAWK” Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon for use at Bicycle Boulevard crossings of major streets and the effort to get the device into the CA MUTCD through the CTCDC review process. John Lower, Iteris;  Martha Styer, Caltrans; Jaime Rodriguez, Traffic Patterns;  Eric Anderson, City of Berkeley.

Martha Styer Presentation
Jaime Rodriguez Presentation
Eric Anderson Presentation
John Lower Presentation

1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Embarcadero Room

Strategies to Tackle Violence and Crime Deterrents to Bicycling and Walking

The threat of violence and crime, including harassment of people while bicycling or walking, deprives too many of the joy of being physically active in the community. What are communities doing to take back the streets and sidewalks? What are strategies for reducing the harassment of women, youth, and people of color? Learn how different organizations are working to improve personal safety and address the root causes of violence and crime in their communities. Michelle Lieberman, Safe Routes to School National Partnership; Shor Denny and Chekota Russell, Community Now; Andres Ramirez and Rio-Jill Contreras, Multicultural Communities for Mobility

View Community Now Presentation

Safe Routes to School Presentation
Multicultural Communities for Mobility Presentation

1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Harborside Room

Open Streets Afternoon Session: The Nuts & Bolts

• How to produce an open streets event

• Route planning and Programming

• Budgeting

With representatives from different open streets programs from around the state, this interactive session will attempt to answer all your questions regarding just how to put on your own open streets event. This panel will give you the tools to plan a successful open streets event, from A to Z. Topics covered will include: event and route planning, working with government and community stakeholders, community outreach, marketing, business engagement, traffic planning, safety, ancillary activities and events, and volunteers. This panel will focus on questions from the audience and their specific challenges and needs. Rachel Burke, Henny Alamillo, Malia Schilling - CicLAvia; Liza Pratt, Sunday Streets San Francisco; Saskia Lucas, Santa Cruz Open Streets

1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Porthole Room

Working with Local Chapters as Regional Advocates

“All politics is local”—except some of it is regional. Larger bicycle advocacy organizations in places like Los Angeles, San Diego, and the East Bay Area can be regionally influential, but may lack influence in the small cities where important decisions are made. Local chapters can fill the role of pushing for change at the local level. This workshop will discuss how regional groups work best with local chapters, examining models throughout California, including in Los Angeles and the East Bay. Cynthia Rose, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition and Santa Monica SPOKE; Howard LaGrange, Chair, San Diego County Regional Bike/Walk Alliance; Renee Rivera, Bike East Bay

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Embarcadero Room

Strategy Session: Setting CalBike’s 2016 Legislative Priorities

This is a workshop for the leaders and members of the California Bicycle Coalition to discuss the priorities of the next legislative session, which begins in December. Throughout the summit, notetakers will record ideas for legislation suggested at any of the workshops and report those to this session for consideration. Jeanie Ward-Waller, Dave Snyder, and Cindy Parra, California Bicycle Coalition

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Porthole Room

Bicycle Advocacy in Latin America

What can California learn from bicycling success stories from the countries to its south? With images, storytelling, and research, we’ll highlight the emerging Mexican bicycle movement and the remarkable open streets and bikeways accomplishments of Bogotá, Medellin, Buenos Aires, and Santiago. Denahi Valdez, BiciRed Mexico; Chris Morfas, Despacio, Bogota, Columbia

4:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Harborside Room

Delegations Convene

We’re providing this opportunity for people who came as delegations to convene and report back to each other, and make plans to collaboration in the transformation of their communities back home.

4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Loma Vista Terrace (outside the Harborside Room)

Electric Bicycle and Product Demo

Bosch, Dero, Iteris, BikeConnect, and more, presenting the latest technology in bicycles, bike security, signal detection, and other tools that will enable more people to bicycle.

6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Closing Party at Mission Brewery, 1441 L. Street, San Diego

The Bike Coalition of San Diego County and its members invite us to a party to celebrate the work of California’s bike advocates.

Wednesday October 28

7:00 a.m. - 12 noon

Bike Tours of San Diego

Breakfast on your own. Gather at the Wyndham Hotel for bike tours departing at varying times. The following three tours are planned.

7:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Coronado Bike Tour

Led by Coronado Active Transportation Planner Mariah Van Zerr and John Holloway, project manager for the Coronado Bicycle Master Plan for KTU+A, you’ll tour the bike lanes and paths that make Coronado a Bike League Silver-level Bicycle-Friendly Community, although the bike lanes give some of its residents vertigo! Ride with us and see what all the fuss is about!

This ride is limited to 20. Please use password CalBike2015 to register at: https://calbike2015-coronadobiketour.eventbrite.com

Meet at 7:00 a.m. at the Wyndham Parking lot on Harbor Drive to sign waivers and pick up your loaner bike from Deco Bike. Thanks Deco Bike! Ride departs at 7:45 a.m. and goes directly to the Broadway Pier. Ferry departs at 8:10 a.m. Riders to the Wyndham at 10:45 a.m. via the 10:30 return ferry.

8:30 a.m. - 12 noon

Cultivating Urban Youth as Community Leaders with Schools on Wheels

LA Rooted will show participants its mobile school that focuses on the strengths, resources and knowledge that exist in communities of color. The school takes participants by bus, bike, and feet to participate in interactive presentations at various program sites where elders, workers and youth have been working to create a more equitable society. Brenda Yancor, L.A. Rooted.

Meet at Loma Vista Terrace at 8:30 a.m. Bikes provided.

8:30 a.m. - 12 noon

Bikelash and Future Bicycle Bliss—A Tour of Urban San Diego  

This tour includes new buffered bike lanes and University Avenue, the epicenter of bicycle policy debate in San Diego. A cycle track proposal on University Avenue was severely scaled back by expensive lobbying by a few poorly-informed business owners, who have hired the same lobbying firm to turn back other bike lane proposals. Then we’ll tour Balboa Park where an ambitious proposal could transform this urban oasis.

Meet at Loma Vista Terrace at 8:30 a.m. Bikes provided.