Academics

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Moorhead High School

Grades 9–12

Registration and Planning Guide

2017–2018

Moorhead Area Public Schools’ mission is to develop the maximum potential
of every learner to thrive in a changing world.

Table of Contents

Welcome…….…….…….…….…….…….…….…….…….…….…….…………..

2

  Graduation Requirements ………………………………………………………….

3

Earning College Credit Options…………………………………………………….

4

Other Options………………………………………………………………………...

6

World’s Best Workforce……………………………………………………………..

8

Extracurricular Activities……………………………………………………………..

8

Post High School Planning………………………………………………………….

9

Student Support……………………………………………………………………...

14

Grade 9-12 District Wide Testing…………………………………………………..

17

Art……………………………………………………………………………………...

18

AVID…………………………………………………………………………………..

21

Business Education………………………………………………………………….

22

English/Theater Art…………………………………………………………………..

29

English Learners……………………………………………………………………...

34

Explore………………………………………………………………………………...

37

Family and Consumer Science……………………………………………………..

38

Health, Wellness and Physical Education………………………………………...

41

Industrial Technology………………………………………………………………..

45

Learner Support Services…………………………………………………………...

50

Mathematics………………………………………………………………………….

57

Music………………………………………………………………………………….

62

Reading……………………………………………………………………………….

66

Science……………………………………………………………………………….

67

Social Studies………………………………………………………………………..

71

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math – STEM…………………………….

76

Work Experience……………………………………………………………………….

77

World Language………………………………………………………………………..

79

Dear Students and Parents or Guardians:

Welcome to Moorhead High School and a world of opportunity in academics, activities, the arts and athletics! The possibilities are endless. Students can create their own avenues for success. There is so much to choose from at Moorhead High School, but it takes planning so that one does not miss an opportunity. Too often we will hear people say, “When I was in high school I wish I had…” You only get one chance at high school, and it is best to grab as many of the opportunities as possible and to create a strong foundation upon which to build your future and chase your dreams.

This planning and registration book contains a variety of options for high school and the future. You need to study this document to take full advantage of it. Some courses require that a student take other courses first. These prerequisites provide the skills, tools, and preparation to ascend to the next level of study. It is also useful to consider your goal(s) after high school and learn what is required for entrance into those area. A student may consider an apprenticeship, a gap year, the military, professional training, a two-year program of study, AmeriCorps, missionary work, a four-year degree — or more! It is useful to seek other options with regards to activities that can enrich one’s life with new friends, new learning and possible hobbies or vocational interest. Study the tools that are linked to this document, such as the World of Work Wheel, which offers information about possible careers in a trade or profession, as well as what the requirements might be in terms of classes and academic performance.  

The Moorhead High School staff is an outstanding collection of professionals. They are willing to answer questions and help a student through all phases of a high school career and beyond. Planning a program of study and life after high school is a team effort that involves the student, the family and the staff at the high school.  

Take the time to carefully read the information in this document. The information will help all students make good academic decisions while at Moorhead High School and will do much to create pathways to the future. If a student has any questions or uncertainty please ask a staff member, make an appointment with a counselor or get information from past graduates. The staff of Moorhead High School looks forward to seeing you in the fall of 2017. All staff join me in wishing you a successful high school career and remind you that we, the staff, are partners in your journey. We measure our success by your success!

Sincerely,

Dave Lawrence

Principal

Moorhead High School

Graduation Requirements

Moorhead High School students must successfully complete 26 credits and must meet state or district testing requirements. All students participating in the graduation exercises must have completed the required minimum number of credits, met all graduation requirements and completed the Senior Checkout Process to be allowed to participate in the graduation ceremony.

Required Subjects

Credits

Minimal Required Courses

Mathematics

3 credits

Intermediate Algebra (Algebra II), Geometry and Advanced Algebra

Science

3 credits

Physical Science, Biology and either Chemistry, Physics or Chemistry in the Community

Language Arts

4 credits

English 9, 10, 11 and 12

Social Studies

3.5 credits

World History, Geography, United States History, Economics and Government

Fine Arts

1 credit

Options are Visual Arts, Acting, Music, DigiTools I or II, Web Design I or II, or Housing and Design

Explore

.5 credit

Required in grade 9

Health

.5 credit

Health

Physical Education

1 credit

Physical Education 9 and an elective

Required Credit Total

16.5 credits

Elective Credits

9.5 credits

From any content area - either core or elective subjects

Total for Graduation

26 credits

Academic Awards

Academic Letters are awarded in grades 10-12. The purpose is to recognize academic achievement and effort as well as provide incentive. Academic Letters are awarded in May based upon the cumulative grade point average through the first semester of that academic year on a 4.0 scale.

Grade 10 - 3.7 cumulative grade point average through the first semester

Grade 11 - 3.65 cumulative grade point average through the first semester

Grade 12 - 3.6 cumulative grade point average through the first semester

Seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.7 or higher through the first semester of the senior year are considered Honor Students and are indicated as such on the graduation program and recognized in May at the Awards Night. Special Honors, Salutatorians and Valedictorians are determined by the high school administration. They are named at the Awards Night program and recognized on the graduation program.

Advanced Placement Award Levels - Recognized by the Advanced Placement Program

Earning College Credit While in High School

Students have a variety of paths available to reach graduation and prepare for the future. No one path is appropriate for every student. Think of your long-term goals, visit with older students, seek input from teachers and counselors, and gather as much information as possible before making a decision.

Advanced Placement (AP)   

Advanced Placement classes work to enhance a student’s individual skills in thinking, reading, writing and background knowledge in a variety of subjects. Those advanced skills come with effort, and a student can expect more homework in an AP than a regular class (a minimum of 30-45 minutes per night). According to the College Board website, AP classes help a student to stand out in college applications as a student who desires to take the most challenging classes to prepare for the next stage of life. A student may decide to take the AP examination. Many schools allow credit for satisfactory scores, but one only needs to send the scores to colleges after one has been accepted and it will help in placement. If a student is seeking college credit at a specific school be sure to check each school’s policy as to what is accepted. Just having the AP course and grade on your transcript is a benefit. The state of Minnesota pays a portion of the AP examination fee, but the amount may vary from year to year depending upon the action by the Minnesota legislature. Moorhead High School offers the following courses:

AP Human Geography
AP Macroeconomics
AP Microeconomics
AP European History
AP US Government
AP United States History
AP Comparative Government

AP Psychology
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Language and Composition
AP Literature and Composition
AP Statistics
AP Calculus AB / BC

        

Any student may take an Advanced Placement examination even if he or she is not enrolled in the course at Moorhead High School.

Return to the Table of Contents

Articulated Agreements 

Articulated Agreements enable high school students to earn college credit while in high school. For Moorhead High School, several business classes are articulated with Minnesota State Community and Technical College (M|State), with campuses in Fergus Falls, Detroit Lakes, Moorhead and Wadena, and Northwest Technical College, with a campus in Bemidji, and Northland Community College in Thief River Falls. Some automotive classes are articulated with M|State. A student must attend one of the listed schools to receive the credit. If, at some point a student is thinking of attending a school other than one in the M|State system please check to make sure the credits transfer. Currently, Moorhead High School offers articulation in the following classes:

Computer Applications
Web Design

Microsoft Office Applications        

Personal Finance

Accounting I and II (must take both)

Brakes/Steering and Suspension

Small Engines I & II

Introduction to Auto - when two auto classes are completed at Moorhead High School

Post-Secondary Enrollment Options

Under the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) program, qualifying Minnesota high school juniors and seniors may enroll in courses at Minnesota State University Moorhead, Concordia College or Minnesota State Community and Technical College - Moorhead (M|State) as part of their full-time high school enrollment and receive both college credit and credit toward high school graduation requirements. A student could really attend any school in the state in which he or she would be accepted. Students in grade 10 may enroll in Career and Technical Education courses if they meet the requirements. The admission criteria varies by school and availability of class space. There is no charge for tuition, fees or required textbooks. Students may decide to earn college credit and high school credit at the same time or to take courses that are not offered at the high school. This will generate a college transcript at the institution a student attends.

If students do not plan to attend the school at which the PSEO courses are taken, they should check with the school they plan to attend to ensure the credits will transfer to that particular school — if that is the goal of the student. The PSEO admissions requirements for the local schools are as follows:

Concordia College                     

Minnesota State University Moorhead

M|State

Students must notify Moorhead High School by May 30 if they want to participate in PSEO the following school year.

Concurrent Enrollment

Concurrent enrollment classes are college courses taught at Moorhead High School. However, the course is partnered with courses taught at local colleges or universities. It is often called College in the Schools. Classes are taught by trained high school teachers or college instructors. Because it’s free, students can save time and money as they work toward a degree. Studies have shown that students who take college-level/AP classes when they are still in high school are more likely to graduate with a degree from college in four years. Students need a 3.2 grade point average at the end of their sophomore year or a 2.8 at the end of the junior year. In addition students need an “acceptable” ACT score or to pass the Accuplacer Test with a 78. When students successfully pass these concurrent classes, they can earn both high school and college credit. It also gives students the chance to explore subjects at a more advanced level. This will generate a college transcript at the partnering institution. 

Options!

Independent Research Study

Students who are interested in taking a course as an independent study should contact a faculty adviser and establish the criteria that meets the state standards for relevant courses or create a rubric for a course that enables a student to pursue an area of interest. This may involve research, reading, interviews, online work, audio-visual resources or other options. Such courses demand a great deal of self-motivation and/or a keen interest in an area of study. Once the faculty contact is established, a principal must be contacted to complete the required paperwork. The student needs to create a schedule of meetings with the faculty adviser and meet the agreed upon criteria to earn credit. This can be a wonderful path to expand an interest, pursue creativity and more. Please note: the course is an “independent” study and demands a great deal of individual fortitude, but the path affords unlimited possibilities.

Online Learning: Online learning options may be provided by Moorhead High School to address scheduling conflicts or to provide courses not offered by Moorhead High School, credit recovery, alternative learning options, independent study options or home school options. The combination of online and traditional classes can never exceed 4 credits per semester or more than 50 percent online. An online learning student may enroll in additional courses with the online learning provider under a separate agreement that includes terms for payment of any tuition or course fees by the student. Online agreements can be made on an individual basis with your school counselor. Moorhead School Board Policy: Online Learning Options 610 applies to students participating in online courses.

Course Credit by Assessment: Students may test out of a class and receive credit in specified courses. A student may not test out of a course that is considered to be of a lower level sequence of a course in which they are currently enrolled. The student must make arrangements with his or her counselor and complete the Course Credit by Assessment application at least one month before the assessment is given. To gain credit the student is required to score a minimum of 80% on a version of the course final. For more information please see the counselor. This corresponds with Administrative Procedure 653.1, which is available on the school district website or in the counseling office.

Pass/Fail Option: Students taking a required course load are eligible to request pass/fail in one or more classes but must be graded in a minimum of four classes. Students should check with their counselor for the correct forms. The deadline for a pass/fail option is 15 days from the start of the class. Once a student has been graded, the student may not change the pass/fail option. Students who fail a course and then retake it at a later time will have the original failure replaced by the more recent grade. Students who are missing credits that would place them two grade levels below the average student’s credit level will have this option removed.

Internships Within the District and Mentorships

Moorhead Area Public Schools offers a number of competitive internships that also include life skills and potential recommendations for future jobs. Juniors and seniors can support the Spuds and earn skills and experience at the same time! These positions are open to any junior or senior student who has the desire to be a team player, learn, and do the best possible job every time. These positions have the potential to earn credit and be placed on a student’s transcript. Interns may apply for the positions below by completing this application.

Activities Office Student Information Director: working for the activities director. In this role a student(s) would write articles/stories about student activities, athletic events, students, coaches, trainers, musicians, actors, speech team members, student council, Key Club or anything else that is a student activity. A website run by the Minnesota State High School League has a spot for each school to post stories, articles, pictures, etc. and articles could be used for district communication.  

Communication Intern: working with the journalism teacher and the district’s communication coordinator.  This role is like the one described above but would work at the district level, i.e. cover stories about more than Moorhead High School…yes, it could include stories about Moorhead High School, but great things are happening at the elementary schools, middle school and Red River Area Learning Center that deserve attention. Both this internship and the one above provide a wonderful basis for further work at the post high school level.

Mentorship offers an opportunity to follow or work with local businesses or agencies. Students who participate in such programs can get a feel for what the job entails and get first-hand information from the professionals with whom they might work. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the agency or business and to follow the guidelines established for the program. While these mentorships are unpaid, they do offer hands-on-experience that can result in not only real-life experience but also exposure to career interests, recommendations and possible future jobs. A student would sign up for this like any other course but the possibilities are endless! A student may enroll through the social studies or business department.

Peer Tutoring is designed for juniors and seniors who meet qualifications and are interested in tutoring in academic subject areas. Students are encouraged to gain placement in the district elementary schools and Horizon Middle School. Tutors are responsible to find tutoring placement and provide their own transportation.

Peer Tutoring Qualifications:

  1. Complete application (available in the counseling office)
  2. Be a junior or senior in good standing (on track to graduate)
  3. Have a 3.0 GPA or higher by the end of the sophomore year
  4. Have transportation to another school building when needed
  5. Sign a confidentiality agreement with regard to student(s) working with you

World’s Best Workforce 

College, Career and Life Readiness” – Minnesota strives to prepare every student to be career and college ready. A number of reasons are driving this attention:

Every student will benefit from taking time to consider career options and crafting a track to reach their self-defined goals. The tricky part is that most students are unaware of career possibilities. Students only know the careers they have seen, heard or read about. There are tens of thousands of jobs that students do not even know exist that are rewarding in purpose and financially. Students and families are encouraged to access the tools available in the district, the state and online to help plan career trajectories. While in high school, students may want to consider courses offered at Moorhead High School that will enhance their understanding of career paths. Moorhead Area Public Schools believes in the need to help students chase their dreams.  

Moorhead High School is committed to the following:

Opportunities Through the Arts, Activities and Athletics

Year-Long Activities

Apollo Strings        
Jazz Band        

Pep Band                        

Marching Band
Chess Club
Intramurals
Robotics

Cho-Kio / Yearbook
The Spud / Newspaper
Knowledge Bowl
Mathematics League
(Sept.-March)
Philanthropy and Youth (PaY)
Students Against Destructive
 Decisions (SADD)

Student Council
Key Club
Ford AAA Auto Skills        
Economics Challenge
Writer’s Club
SkillsUSA/Small Engines Club

Fall Activities

School Musical

Debate

Winter Activities

Science Olympiad

Carolers

Destination Imagination

Speech/National Forensics

One Act Play

Spring Activities

Spring Play

Fall Athletics        
Boys:

Cross Country        
Football        
Soccer

Girls: 
Cross Country        
Soccer        
Swimming
Tennis        
Volleyball                          

Winter Athletics
Boys:
        
Basketball
Hockey
Nordic Skiing
Swimming
Wrestling

Weight Lifting

Girls:
Basketball
Competitive Dance
Gymnastics
Hockey

Nordic Skiing

Weight Lifting

Spring Athletics
Boys:
Baseball
Golf
Tennis
Track and Field

Adapted Bowling

Trap Shooting

Girls:        
Track and Field
Softball
Golf

Adapted Bowling

Trap Shooting

                                

Post High School Planning

The graduation requirements for Moorhead High School do much to prepare a student for college or career. The course work in language arts, social studies, mathematics and science provides a good base. Most colleges also will require a study of a world language. If a student does well in these courses, he or she may reasonably expect to score adequately well on the college entrance examinations. Taking rigorous course work strongly correlates to higher scores on the college entrance examinations.

To learn the requirements of a school of your interest, it is suggested that you visit the school’s website or check in the Moorhead High School counseling office. Entrance requirements for the more selective schools will demand more challenging coursework, involvement in activities, and demonstration of leadership or community involvement. The most selective schools will expect some Advanced Placement classes or other evidence of seeking the most rigorous possible curriculum. It is also wise to develop positive relationships with one’s teachers and counselors. Many schools require recommendations from the staff at Moorhead High School, and the better the staff know a student the more complete the recommendation can be. Many factors and many tools go into a search for a post high school plan. Graduates from Moorhead High School are fortunate to have a full spectrum of opportunities available within a small geographical area — or a graduate can always chase his or her dream no matter where it might be or what path is taken to get to that goal. The following information might be helpful to a student considering local options or to get an idea about what might be required for post high school planning.  

Important: Please note that each college or university sets standards of preparation that it believes will provide the background necessary for students to succeed. In addition to academic preparation and background, for example, a school may consider other factors in making admissions decisions such as activities, leadership potential and work experiences. This is particularly true at more selective schools. If a student plans to be college-bound, he or she is strongly advised to research specific requirements for admission to the schools of her or his choice.

The following information was provided by the colleges and universities and is current as of January 2017.

Minnesota State University Moorhead

High school graduation or the GED and the following qualifications are necessary for admission to MSUM.

  1. A composite ACT score of 21 or higher

OR

A composite ACT score of 17-20 and either:

AND

  1. Complete Preparation Standards as described below. New entering freshmen who have met preparation standards for university admission in their respective states will be deemed to have met Minnesota preparation standards.

North Dakota State University

Applicants must complete the following high school college preparatory courses (one unit equals one year of study):

In addition to fulfilling the college preparatory courses, grade point average (GPA) and ACT or SAT scores are considered in evaluating an application. The ACT writing test is not required. The general guidelines used in making admission decisions include a cumulative GPA of 2.75 (4.0 scale) with strong consideration given to grades earned in college preparatory courses. An ACT composite score of 22 or higher or SAT score (math and reading) of 1100 (evidence-based reading and writing + math combined score) or higher is recommended. Students who do not meet these guidelines will be considered if other supporting factors show potential for success.

Concordia College

Concordia College reviews the application, test scores (ACT or SAT), GPA, and additional documentation to determine a student’s admissions status. Concordia does not have any set ACT or SAT scores or GPA requirements.

 

              Concordia recommends the following curriculum for admissions:

4 years English

3-4 years mathematics

3-4 years science

3-4 years social science

                       World Language - two years encouraged

Solid additional college-prep type courses are recommended with additional considerations given for

Advanced Placement or Honor courses.

           

University of North Dakota

Applications are evaluated on an individual basis. Admission decisions are based on a student’s total high school record. The university uses selective criteria to assure adequate preparation, which will enable students to be successful in their academic pursuits.

Applicants must complete the following high school college preparatory courses (one unit equals one year of study):

Minnesota State Community and Technical College (M|State)

A wide variety of programs and courses are available at Minnesota State Community and Technical College - Moorhead (M|State). Students can review current programs here. The programs listed are by campus but a student can readily identify those at the Moorhead campus. These programs are designed to meet the changing job market and student interest.

Some students find it financially prudent to start their education at M|State for general course work or to explore interests to take advantage of tuition and expenses that may be lower than other schools. After one or two years the students may then transfer, having saved money and time in exploring career interests. It is always recommended that a student check to ensure credits earned at M|State would transfer to any other school when the decision to transfer is made.

A number of programs have a separate application for admissions. Many of the articulation agreements that Moorhead High School offers are through M|State and enable a smooth transition of credits. Classes taken at M|State may lead to careers, associate degrees and job opportunities. Money earned from those jobs may fund further education as a student travels a career path.

University of Minnesota Twin Cities

Students planning to attend the University of Minnesota, or any of its branches, as freshmen should complete, at a minimum, the following in grades 9-12:

In addition, the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities requires one year in visual and performing arts, including instruction in the history and interpretation of the art form (e.g., theater arts, music, band, chorus, orchestra, drawing, painting, photography, graphic design, etc.). Students are strongly encouraged to take courses beyond these minimum requirements. Additional coursework beyond these minimums increases a student’s chances for admission. The rigor of a student’s schedule is a factor in admissions. Indeed, while not requiring more courses, almost all, successful applicants present additional classes.

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA: College of Biological Sciences, Carlson School of Management, and College of Science and Engineering have greater requirements -

Students planning to enter the Carlson School of Management, College of Biological Sciences or the Institute of Technology at the University of Minnesota are required to complete the following courses in grades 9-12:

Rigorous coursework is expected. Evidence of leadership or community engagement is sought for the Carlson School of Management. A profile of students admitted to the various schools is a useful tool in measuring one’s preparation...but, please, understand, there are always unusual cases in every admission process.

National Collegiate Athletic Association

The NCAA has established a well-defined set of criteria for eligibility in college athletics. Any student who is considering participation in college athletics needs to be mindful of the criteria and work purposefully toward fulfilling the prescribed requirements. By clicking in the NCAA title above one will be taken to the portal that gives access to qualifications for all NCAA divisions. Another source is included here, and it goes step by step. The PDF document can be printed to give the complete requirements in a booklet format. Requirements listed are for the Class of 2016 and after. Each potential student athlete must review and follow the rules outlined by the NCAA. It is not Moorhead High School’s responsibility to ensure the rules have been followed. The rules can change annually so it is necessary to check each year.

Common Application

Applying to a college or a list of colleges can be daunting. The Common Application can save a student time if the college or university is a member institution. There are more than 500 member institutions. A student completes the process once, and the application is available to all schools to which a student applies. A student can track his or her application online, check to see if all information has been received and if all recommendations have been submitted. The cautionary note is that a student should not merely apply randomly to schools but try to limit one’s scope to about five schools. Select one or two that might be a “stretch,” two that are good solid choices and one that is a safe and secure selection. One has to consider not only the factor of being selected, but also the financial aid package that is offered. A student may get into a highly selective school but then find that the aid package is not sufficient for the student’s need.

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the CSS College Profile

The FAFSA is a federal financial aid form that must be filled out by every family who has a senior planning on furthering their education after high school. This form can be filled out online. The submitted form will allow the federal government and the college you attend to calculate your financial package for your college choice. The FAFSA form can now be completed any time after October 1 of a student's senior year.

This following video might be helpful, or one can find other help online that will guide a family in completing this form. A family must have filed its income tax for the previous year before the form can be completed.

The CSS College Profile is an alternative tool used by some colleges to determine the level of financial aid and support. Like the FAFSA there is much online support for this tool. Both FAFSA and the Profile require much information regarding a family’s and student’s financial status. It is useful to gather the information prior to completing the forms. The College Profile website lists supporting resources on the right-hand side.

Military

Each branch of the Service has different requirements. Minimum entrance-age requirements are 17 with parental consent or 18 without parental consent. Because of the varying physical demands on service members in each branch, physical requirements vary greatly. These differences can vary even within each branch of the Service. Generally speaking, potential service members should be in good physical condition, of appropriate weight and able to pass a standard physical screening prior to entry. Success in any branch of the Military depends on a good education, and a high school diploma is most desirable. Candidates with a GED (General Education Development certificate) can enlist, but some Services may limit opportunities. It is very difficult to be considered a serious candidate without either a high school diploma or accepted alternative credential. In any case, staying in school is important for entering the military.

The ASVAB is a multiple-aptitude battery that measures developed abilities and helps predict future academic and occupational success in the military. It is administered annually to more than one million military applicants and high school and postsecondary students. The information can help students chart a course of training in any of the branches of the military or be used for career planning even if a student decides against entering the military.  

Military Academies

The United States has five different academies — United States Air Force, Annapolis (Navy and Marine), Coast Guard Academy, Merchant Marine Academy, and West Point (Army). Nominations must come from government officials (except for Coast Guard Academy), and each has its own application process. Students should check the website of the Senator, member of the House of Representatives or Vice President of the United States. The nomination process is long so it is recommended to start the research process in the junior year and begin making contacts with government representatives. A synopsis of each academy and relevant information is provided with the link above. The academies offer an outstanding education but expect a lot. Be prepared!

AmeriCorps

AmeriCorps offers students a chance to provide community service, travel and explore America. At the same time young people gain valuable life experience while developing the skills that will last a lifetime. Students earn a stipend for living expenses and normally share living expenses with other AmeriCorps members. Participants who complete the program may earn a Segal AmeriCorps Education Award of up to $5,815 that may be used for education. Many colleges will match this award or students may sometime serve for two years and earn a larger stipend. Three programs are available, but it is suggested that recent high school graduates should check out the National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC).

Other Opportunities

Many local and national businesses will hire high school graduates and provide in-house training. Students are hired and trained at company expense. These jobs in the trades offer competitive salaries, benefits and training, and after a good job performance these businesses will pay for further education. These positions can be found in electrical work, plumbing, sheet metal, heating, cooling and ventilation (HVAC), construction and more. Many banks, after a one-year period, will offer tuition reimbursement for courses that apply to the banking business, e.g., human relations, business, security, accounting, etc. Furthermore, such introductory jobs offer a career. As employees increase their skills, their opportunities and income grow with the company, or an employee may decide to start his or her own business. See the Career Counselor for options.

Another thought might be to consider alternative paths to careers. The book Roadtrip Nation inspired the series based upon the premise that young people do not always know the realistic options that are open to them. The book and the series Roadtrip Nation interview a variety of people about how they got their jobs and how they pursued their passions. It is worth the consideration of every student and family – too often we do not know the possibilities that exist and in truth there are possibilities that still do not exist – but will!

Student Support

Students have access to a full range of support for registration and all aspects of their high school career and post high school planning. Students are encouraged to use the contacts and the staff at Moorhead High School. All staff members love to help students! Do not hesitate to ask input from teachers, counselors, administrators, etc. There is a team among staff and families to help each student reach her or his goals.

High School Counselors

High school counselors have a number of responsibilities, but their largest concern is the growth of the individual student — the whole student and person. Counselors help with course selection, crisis intervention and resource information, information about community support and resources, conduct support groups, help with credit and graduation questions, post-secondary questions and enrollment, accessing Red River Area Learning Center, accessing educational support tools and personal student support.

Updates and news from the counseling office can be accessed by clicking on the counseling department’s Haiku page. A person will find deadlines for testing and dates for visits from schools, the military, college fairs and more. Registration note: Two weeks prior to the new semester, a schedule change day will be held.

Students may talk with any counselor however, for administrative purposes students have been divided alphabetically:

        A-D / AVID:       Keith Hartleben, 284-2319, khartleben@moorheadschools.org

        E-J:                      Maret Kashmark, 284-2316, mkashmark@moorheadschools.org

            K-P                      Toni Bach, 284-2313, tbach@moorheadschools.org

            Q-Z:                     Sarah Miller, 284-2315, smiller@moorheadschools.org

            Student Assistance: Scott Matheson, 284-2314, smatheson@moorheadschools.org

                Designated counselor helping students and families with dropout prevention, alternative

                        education, credit recovery and chemical health concerns.

A number of additional support staff are available to help all students, however some do require a counselor’s referral.

           

Barb Scaub - 284-2469 Lakeland Mental Health - students who have a mental health diagnosis may receive support in terms of skills and therapy with a referral from a counselor or a member of the learner support services staff.

Debbie Grant - 284-2391 or dgrant@moorheadschools.org  Monday, Wednesday and Friday - Career Planning Often students think of careers from what they think they know and do not have the knowledge of all that is available and the variety of paths that could be followed as one develops a career. This is where assistance from Career Planning is invaluable.

Additional resources:

        School Social Worker: Joni Hubrig, 218-284-7116

        School Psychologist: Tammi Fortney, 218-284-2468

Vocational Rehabilitation Services: If you have a disability, Vocational Rehabilitation Services (Voc Rehab) can help you prepare for, find and keep a job, and live as independently as possible. With the right kind of training, preparation and workplace accommodations, competitive employment is within reach. Contact your LSS case manager or counselor for further details.

Gifted and Talented Coordinator - Leigh Dornfeld, 218-284-3789, ldornfeld@moorheadschools.org

The gifted and talented coordinator:

  • Helps students and families to select different options available at the high school;
  • Helps students and families in addressing the unique social and emotional challenges facing the gifted and talented student;
  • Helps educators in providing options to gifted and talented students; and
  • Serves as an advocate and partner to students as they seek alternative paths and resources to maximize their educational social growth.

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Naviance is a comprehensive college and career readiness solution for high schools that helps connect academic achievement to post-secondary goals. All students grades 9-12 have access to Naviance by logging in through SPUDS Landing.  

Available options through Naviance include:  

College Visit Schedule

College Lookup

College Search

College Resources

College Compare

Scholarship List

National Scholarship Search

Explore Careers and Clusters

Success Plan

Course Planner

Roadtrip Nation

Resume Building

Goal Setting

Career Exploration

Aptitude/Interest Inventories

Scholarship List


Grades 9-12 District-wide Testing

Test

Grades Tested

Objectives/Uses

Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in

To provide information about instructuction of the Minnesota Academic Standards and help schools and teachers determine program improvements and individual student progress.

Reading MCA

10

Mathematics MCA

11

Science MCA

Biology Students

ACCESS for ELs (WIDA)

English Learners 9-12

To assess the progress in the acquisition of academic English in the areas of reading, writing, listening and speaking for  English Learners 9-12.  

Minnesota Test of Academic Skills (MTAS)

Specific special education students in 9-12 as identified in IEP.

To provide a measure of progress in reading, mathematics and science skills for specific special education students using alternative assessments instead of MCA.

Special Education Tests as applicable

Specific students in all grades

To assess student needs for referral and special help; to assist with classroom placements and course adjustments.

Entrance tests for students new to the district

Specific students in all grades

PSAT (pre SAT)

11 (optional)

To provide information and assist in counseling individual college-bound students; all are norm referenced achievement tests; PSAT is the National Merit qualifying test

ACT

11

SAT / SAT II

11-12 (registration offered online)

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)

11-12 (optional)

To determine students’ vocational aptitude and interests; one option to meet the graduation requirement.

Advanced Placement Exams

9-12

To determine college credit related to student scores for students enrolled in AP coursework.

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Art

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The Minnesota Department of Education notes, “The interrelationship of artistic knowledge and processes defines artistic literacy.” The Art Department of Moorhead High School seeks to develop “artistic literacy” in all students. At the same time, the Art Department seeks to promote creativity, self-assessment and personal growth. Satisfaction grows when creating a piece of artistic expression. It takes a great deal of effort to take an idea and turn it into a reality that adequately reflects the artist’s goals and thinking while seeking to share those feelings with others in a compelling manner. Much can be learned from studying art and through the production of a personal piece of art — skills that can last a lifetime and tell a story.

The arts state standards can be reviewed on the Minnesota Department of Education website, and the arts national standards can be reviewed on the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards website.

Minnesota requires one art credit (two ½ credit classes or one 1 credit course) for graduation and that can be taken any year between grades 9-12. Foundations of Art must be taken prior to registering for any other art courses. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering taking upper-level courses.

 

Progression of Visual Arts courses

Foundations of Art

9-12

Crafts 9-12

2 Dimensional

Foundations of Art

9-12

Painting 10-12

Mixed Media 10-12

Advanced Art

    11-12

3 Dimensional

Foundations of Art

9-12

Sculpture 9-12

Pottery 10-12

Advanced Art

     11-12

Drawing/Graphic Design

Foundations of Art

9-12

Drawing and    

     Design I   9-12

Drawing and

     Design II  10-12

Advanced Art

     11-12

21st Century Skills in visual arts:

Critical Thinking

Communication

Collaboration

Creativity

Artist statements

Nonverbal communication

Confidence

Studio production

Problem solving

Visual

Focus

Perseverance

Self-assessment

Multi-mediums at once

Cooperation

Dedication

Accountability

Written critiques

Interpersonal

Technique

Research

Presentation

Feedback

Medium

Perspective

Interpersonal

Teamwork

Practice

Setting goals

Literacy development

Critique

Repetition

Brainstorming

Individualized instruction

Digital skills

Risk taking

Decision making

Receiving constructive feedback

Exploration

Jobs involving the visual arts:

Art administration
Artistic director
Freelance artist
Educator
Industrial designer
Floral designer
Illustrator
Merchandise display
Glass work
Medical illustration

Printmaker
Fashion designer
Interior design
Photography
Set design
Video / film editor
Game design
Advertising
Product design
Art therapy
Painter                

Graphic / web design
Culinary arts
Museum work
Animation
Architecture
Art education
Art history
Landscape design
Glass blower
Photojournalism

Art history
Ceramics
Curatorial practice
Sculptor
Digital photography
Drawing
Film
Furniture design
Toy design

                        

Course Descriptions


FOUNDATIONS OF ART (ART01F)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

This course is a prerequisite for all art classes.

The primary objective of this course is to explore a broad range of mediums and techniques. Students planning on taking more art classes will receive a visual arts foundation that will prepare them for success in upper-level classes. Students will gain a basic understanding of the art elements and principles of design. A variety of media and techniques will be explored through research, creative problem solving and studio work. Mediums include pencil, acrylic paint, clay, and mixed media. Projects include shape and form drawing, shading, color design, sculpture, mixed media, and gallery critique. Creativity and craftsmanship are important for success in this class. A sketchbook is required for drawings, notes, and problem solving.

CRAFTS (ART01C)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Foundations of Art

This course is a basic foundations of art with emphasis on crafts, adapting the elements and principles of design to various craft projects. Composition and structure is emphasized in this course. Students will learn to construct artwork through the proper use of tools, techniques, and products in clay, fiber, paper, and other media. Some of the projects included are jewelry, picture frames, altered book boxes, and greeting cards. Students will learn to express themselves through a variety of mediums and application of craft procedures. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering this course.

SCULPTURE (ART04)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Foundations of Art

Basic hand-building techniques and decorative methods are primary concerns for Sculpture students. Exploration and elaboration on the fundamental methods of building sculpture by hand should lead students to higher levels of individual expression and creativity. Along with clay, other media will be explored, such as fiber, wire, papier måché, and wood. Students learn various sculptural skills such as clay-slab, coil, and drape. A multicultural mixed media project allows students to research and investigate cultures other than their own. Along with learning the techniques of the various mediums, students will learn the terminology used in the three-dimensional areas of art. Students will be encouraged to enter art shows and competitions. Self-expression and creative thinking is a continued focus of instruction. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering this course.

POTTERY (ART05)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Sculpture

This course is offered to students who were particularly successful in Sculpture and desire to increase their understanding and further their skills. Throwing on the pottery wheel will be introduced along with additional advanced hand-building projects not covered in Sculpture. Students will be encouraged to enter art shows, exhibits, and competitions. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering this course.

PAINTING (ART06)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Foundations of Art

Painting is primarily a two-dimensional class focusing on water-based and oil-based painting mediums. These include acrylics and oils. Acrylic techniques included are opaque, transparent, and translucent. Oil techniques are based off  monochromatic painting and historical research of master paintings. Drawing and other design elements and principles will be incorporated into the paintings with an emphasis on composition, application and originality. A thorough understanding of color is reviewed and emphasized. Application of terminology is used to increase students’ understanding and familiarity of the mediums and techniques covered within the course. Students analyze the composition, color scheme, techniques and styles by masters. Historical background of painting is studied through the use of various visual media, including Internet exploration, reference books, demonstrations, and videos. Students are encouraged to enter art shows, exhibits, and competitions. Self-expression and creative thinking is a continued focus of instruction. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering this course.

MIXED MEDIA (ART07)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Foundations of Art

Mixed Media is an extension of Painting. The studio focus of this class will be on the use of multiple media. Combining mediums, such as watercolor, pen and ink, pastel, acrylic, and other materials will be used to create original pieces of art. Students will continue to analyze, research and study masters from various periods in history. Originality and self-expression is highly encouraged. Students will have the freedom to explore various directions within their personal creativity. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering this course.


DRAWING AND DESIGN I (ART02)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Foundations of Art

The primary objective of this course is to discover how to develop art that has impact and the ability to communicate. A systematic approach to creative problem solving is emphasized and effective use of the art elements and principles of design is constantly reinforced. Critical-thinking skills are challenged through design projects such as logo/symbol design, type style design, and trading card design. Projects are created using a variety of media including pencil, colored pencil, charcoal, and Adobe Photoshop. Examples from art history, student work, and everyday life will be used as references and idea spring boards. In this course, students have the opportunity to heighten their drawing skills and learn about the world of graphic design. Career opportunities in the design world are investigated. Students will be encouraged to enter and compete in art shows. Self-expression and creative thinking are a continued focus of instruction. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering this course.

DRAWING AND DESIGN II (ART03)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Drawing and Design I

This class allows students who have taken Drawing and Design I to continue to develop their design knowledge and skills to an advanced level. Creative problem solving is a continued focus and effective use of the art elements and principles of design is constantly reinforced. Creative-thinking skills are challenged through various design projects based on the elements and principles using a variety of mediums. Some of the projects included are mixed media drawing, quote design, and graphite drawing. Examples from art history, student work, and everyday life will be used as references. In this course, students will have the opportunity to continue to heighten their drawing skills and focus on the impact of the elements of art on the graphic design world. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering this course.

ADVANCED ART (ART08)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Any four (4) Art Courses

Students who take Advanced Art will be better prepared for college-level art courses.
Students will have an opportunity to work in specific areas of concentration and focus on their medium of interest. They will have an opportunity to produce a portfolio of their work to be used for possible preparation for college entrance review. Students write up individual contracts, which include their area of concentration, artist influences, and their individual goals and intents. Students will learn terminology, techniques, and materials at an advanced level of instruction. They will learn to budget time and meet deadlines, which play a large role in college art courses. Students will learn to critique and exhibit their work. Through advanced instruction, students will learn to use critical and technical thinking. Students will learn to create from self, rather than by the use of total reference. Individual and group art exhibits are highly encouraged. It is highly recommended that students have maintained a C or above in their previous art classes when considering this course.


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AVID

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is an elective program that helps students achieve the necessary requirements and skills to be eligible for university acceptance. AVID’s mission is to close the achievement and opportunity gap by preparing all students for college readiness and success in a global society. The program has two major components: tutorials and AVID curriculum. Tutorials occur two times per week. Tutorials are small study groups facilitated by college students who assist students with their studies. Each AVID student is to come prepared for the tutorial with questions from their core or college classes. Field trips may be scheduled to visit local colleges and universities, providing students with the opportunity to visit the institutions firsthand.

AVID students are expected to be motivated and determined to achieve university acceptance at the end of their high school career. It will be necessary for AVID students to manage their time so that school and studies become a top priority. This means they will need to be responsible for making wise and sometimes difficult choices.  

Learn more about AVID curriculum on the AVID website.

Course Description

AVID (AVID01)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

This college preparedness and readiness course is designed to provide students with the necessary writing/study skills known to be beneficial for success in college. AVID students will receive academic instruction and personal support from the AVID elective teacher, AVID coordinator, and AVID college tutors who will assist the students in academic tutorial sessions two times per week. In addition, AVID students receive intensive college placement test preparation, information on colleges and careers, and engagement in philosophical chairs/Socratic seminars. Students must apply for admittance in AVID.

AVID II (AVID02)

Grade 10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

This college preparedness and readiness course is designed to provide students with the necessary writing/study skills known to be beneficial for success in college. AVID students will receive academic instruction and personal support from the AVID elective teacher, AVID coordinator, and AVID college tutors who will assist the students in academic tutorial sessions two times per week. In addition, AVID students receive intensive college placement test preparation, information on colleges and careers, and engagement in philosophical chairs/Socratic seminars. Students must apply for admittance into the AVID program.

AVID III (AVID03)

Grade 11; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

AVID III is the first part in a junior/senior seminar course that focuses on writing and critical thinking expected of first- and second-year college students. This course is organized around the theme of “Leadership as a Catalyst for Change in Society.” Students study, in depth, exceptional leaders in contemporary society and examine the effect these individuals have had on culture, politics, education, history, science, and the arts. The course requires that students read essays, speeches, articles and letters by these leaders, as well as at least one full-length work by the leader or about the leader. In addition, each student is required to conduct a research project that is presented in the senior year. In addition to the academic focus of the AVID Seminar, there are college-bound activities, methodologies and tasks that should be undertaken during the junior year to support students as they apply to four-year universities and confirm their post-secondary plans.

AVID IV (AVID04)

Grade 12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

AVID IV is the final part in a junior/senior seminar course that focuses on writing and critical thinking expected of first- and second-year college students. Each week, students receive instruction utilizing a rigorous college preparatory curriculum provided by AVID Center, tutor-facilitated study groups, motivational activities, and academic survival skills. The course emphasizes rhetorical reading, analytical writing, collaborative discussion strategies, tutorial inquiry study groups, preparation for college entrance and placement exams, college study skills and test-taking strategies, note-taking, and research.

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Business Education

Watch the video to learn more about the Business Department.

Business Education courses relate academic subjects to the real world.  Whether it is the jobs one might have or taking care of one’s money no one can escape the need for business education and the skills these  courses offer.

Coursework in business education enables one to navigate a complex financial and digital world that is changing rapidly. Business education helps students to develop the skills needed to survive in all that we do now and in the future.

The business education department offers skills in accounting, digital technology and design, computer applications, marketing, management, finance, law and related programs and business experience that will last a lifetime. These courses combine knowledge, analysis and creative thinking with opportunities for hands-on application and technology that allows students to experience learning activities in a memorable manner. As students learn these important skills they also will learn communication skills, cooperation, creativity and critical thinking. Partnerships with local businesses enable students to gather real-life experiences while in high school — plus the business education department offers college credit for a number of classes through articulation agreements. Explore what the business education department can offer you — there is something for everyone!

The business national standards can be reviewed on the National Business Education Association website.

Articulation Agreements offer college credit while enrolled in high school. The Moorhead High School Business Department has worked with local colleges to enable students to earn college credit in the following classes:        

Computer Applications (1 Credit)
Microsoft Office Applications (3 Credits)                

Accounting I and II (must take both) (3 Credits)
Web Design (3 Credits)
Personal Finance (3 Credits)


Articulation agreements with M|State (Minnesota State Community & Technical College campuses in Fergus Falls, Moorhead, Detroit Lakes and Wadena), Northwest Technical College (campus in Bemidji), and Northland Community & Technical College have been approved for dual credit. Students in grades 9-12 passing any of these courses with a B or higher will be allowed to receive credit at any of the above institutions, free of charge, at the time of their admission.

Area of Study

9

10

11

12

Business

Courses

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Personal Law & Ethics

Personal Law & Ethics

Personal Law & Ethics

Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management

Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management

Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management

Finance Courses

Personal Finance

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Personal Finance

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Personal Finance

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Personal Finance

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Accounting I

Accounting I

Accounting I

Accounting II Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Accounting II

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Accounting II

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Accounting III

Accounting III

Accounting IV

Accounting IV

Careers/

Workplace

Skills

Business Mentorship

Business Mentorship

Community Interactions (Service Learning)

Community Interactions (Service Learning)

Community Interactions (Service Learning)

College Prep & Career Readiness

College Prep & Career Readiness

College Prep & Career Readiness

Technology

Courses

Computer Applications

Articulation Agreement
(1 cr.)

Computer Applications

Articulation Agreement
(1 cr.)

Computer Applications

Articulation Agreement
(1 cr.)

Computer Applications

Articulation Agreement
(1 cr.)

Microsoft Office Applications

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Microsoft Office Applications

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Microsoft Office Applications

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Microsoft Office Applications

Articulation Agreement
(3 cr.)

Beginning Computer Skills

Beginning Computer Skills

Beginning Computer Skills

Beginning Computer Skills

DigiTools I (meets fine arts requirement)

DigiTools I (meets fine arts requirement)

DigiTools I (meets fine arts requirement)

DigiTools I (meets fine arts requirement)

DigiTools II (meets fine arts requirement)

DigiTools II (meets fine arts requirement)

DigiTools II (meets fine arts requirement)

TV Productions I

TV Productions I

TV Productions I

TV Productions II

TV Productions II

TV Productions II

Web Design I

Articulation Agreement (3 cr.) (meets fine arts requirement)

Web Design I

Articulation Agreement (3 cr.) (meets fine arts requirement)

Web Design I

Articulation Agreement (3 cr.) (meets fine arts requirement)

Web Design II (meets fine arts requirement)

Web Design II (meets fine arts requirement)

Web Design II (meets fine arts requirement)

Coding / Computer Programming

Coding / Computer Programming

Coding / Computer Programming

Combined

Courses

(year-long skinny)

Personal Finance/Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Personal Finance/Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Personal Finance/Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Personal Finance/Sports & Entertainment Marketing

21st Century Skills in Business:

Critical Thinking

Communication

Collaboration

Creativity

Decision making

Nonverbal communication

Confidence

Perseverance

Problem solving

Visual

Focus

Storyboards

Self-assessment

Multi-mediums at once

Cooperation

Risk taking

Accountability

Written critiques

Interpersonal

Design

Research

Presentation

Feedback

Design prototypes

Perspective

Interpersonal

Teamwork

 

Setting goals

Literacy development

Critique

 

Brainstorming

Individualized instruction

Digital skills

 

Jobs involving business:

Business:

Accountants & auditors

Appraisers & assessors

Financial analysts

Claims adjusters/appraisers

Bank examiners & investigators

Banking & finance

Loan officers

Financial advisors

Compensation, benefits and job analysis specialists

Economic development specialists

Administrative support

Human resource management

Labor relations specialist

Insurance underwriters

Contract law

Market research analysts

Management

Entrepreneurship/small business

Purchasing managers, buyers & agents

Tax examiners & collectors

Revenue agents

Training & development specialists

Meeting, convention & event planners

Technology:

Software developer

Web developer

Photography

Graphic design

Digital publishing

Video production

Computer animation

Computer and information research

Computer networks architect

Computer programmer

Computer support specialist

Database administrator

Information security analysis

Network and computer systems

Course Descriptions

ACCOUNTING I (BUS08)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

This course will introduce accounting concepts and practices. Students will work with journals and ledgers to prepare financial statements manually and will have hands-on experience completing problems on the computer. Students will work with bank reconciliation statements and various other areas of banking and checking accounts. The course will provide a foundation for further study in business and/or accounting in college or vocational school. Time is spent on an overview of career opportunities in the area of accounting. It is strongly recommended that students registering for this course complete the sequence by taking Accounting II immediately following Accounting I.

ACCOUNTING II (BUS09)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Accounting I

This course is especially recommended for students interested in a career in accounting, administration, management, finance, or any business career. The course builds upon the financial accounting concepts and practices developed in Accounting I. The areas covered are accounting control systems, professional accounts, departmentalized accounting, and automated accounting. Students also will work with completing a payroll for a company and work with taxes withheld. They will complete a simulation for a small company using all the skills learned. Students will receive credit at M|State and Northwest Technical College through articulation agreements approved by the state. See explanation in the first part of this Business Education section.

ACCOUNTING III COMPUTERIZED (BUS10)  

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Accounting I & II

This course is especially recommended for students interested in a career in accounting, administration, management, or finance. The course builds upon the financial accounting concepts and practices developed in Accounting I and II. The areas covered are accounting control systems, professional accounts, departmentalized accounting, and automated accounting. Students will review all concepts learned in Accounting I and II and complete an accounting simulation.

ACCOUNTING IV COST & MANAGERIAL (BUS11)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Accounting I & II, Accounting III Computerized

This course builds upon the financial accounting concepts and practices developed in Accounting III Computerized. The areas covered are general accounting adjustments, management accounting, and cost accounting. Students will complete an automated accounting simulation utilizing departmental accounting. They also will study cost accounting and complete a cost accounting simulation. These accounting classes will be a definite asset to students taking college accounting.


PERSONAL FINANCE (BUS17)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Personal Finance is a course that would benefit everyone. This class will prepare students for a lifetime of worthwhile personal financial planning. The tools students will learn are useful, realistic, and easy to work into their regular routine. They will help students gain control over the financial impact of the choices they make. Students learn to create and use a budget, borrow and invest wisely, make intelligent decisions about insurance, and plan for their financial future. Students will develop a retirement savings plan and will be better prepared to make large purchases and plan for taxes. Areas covered are  personal money management and budgeting; savings and investing, money and banking; credit; taxes; real estate and housing Issues; and insuring against loss. Students will receive 3 credits for BUS1146 at M|State through an articulation agreement approved by the state. See explanation in the first part of this Business Education section.

SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING (BUS12)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Explore the intriguing world of sports and entertainment from the perspective of marketing. Sports and entertainment topics are used to learn foundational marketing concepts. Emphasis is on sports and entertainment as a business, marketing strategies, communication, sales, promotion, advertising, international business and e-commerce. Marketing functions are incorporated throughout the sports and entertainment industries and are the perfect vehicles to showcase how marketing plays out in our everyday lives.

PERSONAL FINANCE/SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING (BUS25)

Grade 9-12; 1 credit (Skinny) (Year)

Personal Finance

Skinny (Semester)

Personal Finance is a course that would benefit everyone. This class will prepare students for a lifetime of worthwhile personal financial planning. The tools students will learn are useful, realistic, and easy to work into their regular routine. They will help students gain control over the financial impact of the choices they make. Students learn to create and use a budget, borrow and invest wisely, make intelligent decisions about insurance, and plan for their financial future. Students will develop a retirement savings plan and will be better prepared to make large purchases and plan for taxes. Areas covered are  personal money management and budgeting; savings and investing, money and banking; credit; taxes; real estate and housing Issues; and insuring against loss. Students will receive 3 credits for BUS1146 at M|State through an articulation agreement approved by the state. See explanation in the first part of this Business Education section.

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Skinny (Semester)

Explore the intriguing world of sports and entertainment from the perspective of marketing. Sports and entertainment topics are used to learn foundational marketing concepts. Emphasis is on sports and entertainment as a business, marketing strategies, communication, sales, promotion, advertising, international business and e-commerce. Marketing functions are incorporated throughout the sports and entertainment industries and are the perfect vehicles to showcase how marketing plays out in our everyday lives.

COMMUNITY INTERACTIONS (BUS19)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

This course provides the student the opportunity to develop life and work skills through a partnership with a business, school or community agency. The student will volunteer to help in one of our numerous community agencies helping our community to grow in service to others. The course will focus on students becoming active citizens in meeting the needs of our school and community through service learning — they can make a difference! Students will assist in the agency an average of four hours per week. Class will meet one day per week and will focus on reflection and growing opportunities as well as goal setting, choices, ethics, working with others, decision making, and conflict resolution. Students are responsible for their own transportation. This course may be taken more than once for credit.

BEGINNING COMPUTER SKILLS (BUS011)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit Skinny (Semester)

This is an arranged class and tailored to the needs of each student.

This course is for the student with limited or no previous computer experience, or those keying at a speed of 25 words per minute or lower. It will focus on the basics of operating a computer, learning the keyboard touch, and introducing basic word processing and communication applications.


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (BUS02 Block) (BUS02S Skinny)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter) or Skinny (Semester)

Students will improve keyboarding skills and use the computer to prepare term papers in MLA report style, personal business letters, spreadsheets and presentations. In this course they will discover the many features of Microsoft Office Suite focusing on Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Knowledge and use of Microsoft Office is becoming an expected skill in the workplace. Students will receive credit at M|State through an articulation agreement approved by the state. See explanation in the first part of this Business Education section.

MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS (BUS03)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Computer Applications

This class is essential for anyone interested in working in the business world. Students learn introductory and advanced skills using Microsoft Office. Concepts and techniques will cover Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. The student will learn how word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentations can integrate to create many types of business and home documents. Learn to feel comfortable and confident using the current technology used in the business world today. Students will be prepared for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification Exam that is required by many employers. Students will receive 3 credits at M|State and Northland Community & Technical College through articulation agreements approved by the state. See explanation in the first part of this Business Education section. 

DIGITOOLS I (BUS07)

Grades 9-12, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

*Meets Fine Arts Requirement

This course is for everyone! Students will learn computer skills that are expected of them in their classes. They will be exposed to the newest software and skills needed to complete high school assignments and simplify their lives. Complete units in a variety of topics including photography, image editing (Photoshop), animation (Flash), and music production (GarageBand).

 

DIGITOOLS II (BUS072)

Grades 10-12, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: DigiTools I (with a final grade of a “C” or higher)

*Meets Fine Arts Requirement

Are you fascinated and intrigued by the design of magazines, posters, and digital art? Students let their imaginations go wild as they learn about design software and techniques used in the area of graphic design. Add creativity and interest to publications by learning how to arrange text and graphics in an attractive, eye-catching fashion. Students also will explore the area of manual photography. Emphasis will be placed on photo composition, camera settings and equipment. This course would be very helpful for students who have an interest in advertising or journalism, enjoy using the computer, or plan a career in graphics or business.

WEB DESIGN I (BUS05)

Grades 10-12, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: DigiTools

* Meets Fine Arts Requirement

In Web Design I, students will incorporate their knowledge of web design principles, web standards, and browser compatibility to make websites that are compliant with industry standards. Students will learn to plan the structure of their websites using Inspiration, plan the overall design of the site and the graphics throughout the site using Photoshop, and then carry out the creation of their websites using XHTML and CSS. Students will receive credit at M|State through articulation agreements approved by the state. See explanation in the first part of this Business Education section.

WEB DESIGN II (BUS06)

Grades 10-12, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Web Design I (with a final grade of a “C” or higher)

* Meets Fine Arts Requirement

This course is recommended for students interested in furthering their experience in web design. A more in-depth look at web layout and design using CSS will be studied, and students will use Dreamweaver, Flash and Photoshop more extensively. This is a great class for those looking at a career in web technology.

CODING / COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (BUS28)

Grades 10-12, ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

This course is an introduction to coding and computer programming for all students interested in developing software applications. Through a project-based approach, students will explore a variety of programming systems and languages to create interactive applications and systems. By collaborating in a hands-on environment, students will practice problem solving, software design, debugging strategies and the foundations of computer programming.

 
ENTREPRENEURSHIP & SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (BUS16)  

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Small Business Management is designed to enable students to examine the proper approach to the problems and responsibilities of managing and/or owning a small business. The topical areas covered include: business organization, production, marketing and distribution, employment and personnel management, banking and financing, along with work-related laws. Small Business Management offers students an opportunity to develop a better understanding of the business community and the role that each of us plays in the business world. Students will create a Business Plan, a layout and go through the hiring process for a company of their creation.

PERSONAL LAW AND ETHICS (BUS15)  

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Personal Law and Ethics provides students an opportunity to obtain a better understanding of everyday law, the structure of our general law, the legal processes available when rights have been violated and the operation of our court system. Students will be able to see that law is a force in everyone's life and that business activities, personal activities and the law are all interdependent. This course is designed for personal use and will help students to develop the power to think clearly and logically and to express themselves accurately and concisely. The area of ethics will be covered in depth with topics such as ethics in the workplace; government and citizenship; technology; bioethics; cultural diversity; nature and entertainment.

COLLEGE PREP AND CAREER READINESS (BUS18C)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

This course equips students with the study and learning skills required in today's academic and workplace environments. Focus is on learning how to learn, critical thinking, reading comprehension, time management, and managing information. This course prepares students to make successful learning an ongoing part of their academic and career development. Time is also spent on preparing for college testing (ACT, SAT), scholarship applications, and college applications. The area colleges and universities are invited to speak to the class regarding admissions and financial aid. The career component addresses career assumptions, major courses of study, the career skills employers require, workplace ethics, professionalism and communication skills.

BUSINESS MENTORSHIP (BUS13)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Explore a variety of business systems and prepare yourself for the future. Students will be given time to research, explore and experience the different opportunities provided in careers in the field of business. Career areas covered are accounting, law, law enforcement, management, banking, finance, insurance, realty, entrepreneurship and all areas of technology. This course may be taken more than once for credit.

 

TV PRODUCTION I (BUS23)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Interested in being behind the scenes or in front of a camera? This course will introduce a number of technical and non-technical skills related to TV production such as camera work, scripting, editing, appearing on camera, and developing stories into broadcast quality news segments. This class will introduce students to state-of-the-art digital editing and studio equipment. This course will also prepare students for the opportunity to be a member of Spud News. Class projects will include news-oriented material and creative assignments. This course is a prerequisite for students wishing to sign up for the TV Production II class.

TV PRODUCTION II (BUS24)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: TV Productions I (with a final grade of a “C” or higher)

The mission of this course is to inform viewers of events and activities in an accurate and entertaining way through a weekly student newscast (Spud News) that airs throughout Moorhead High School with the possibility of also airing on local cable access television. This course is for highly motivated students with a sincere interest and commitment to television journalism who thrive on independent initiative and work well in high-pressure situations. Students should be willing to learn complex technical skills and apply those skills creatively in communicating with others. A flexible schedule and the ability to work with a variety of people are essential for success in this course. Sophomores may register for up to two quarters each year. Juniors and seniors may register for up to four quarters. 

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English/Theater Arts


Coursework in English language arts and theater help students develop skills for life. Students will be engaged in reading, writing, research, and speaking. Behind each of those skills is the fundamental skill of thinking. English classes help students think from different perspectives and connect with the ideas and thinking of people throughout the world and throughout time.

These same classes help students enhance their analytical thinking by evaluating evidence and citing examples to defend their thinking. Each of these components increases a person’s vocabulary, which provides flexibility in thinking and communicating with others.

English classes help students evaluate communication, whether it be in everyday life, advertisements, business or through material received in a variety of formats and media. Additionally, strong writing skills provide a competitive advantage in the workforce and college. A variety of writing skills not only helps one build a thought structure but also promotes a point of view; writing skills help all students become better at thinking, and thinking is fundamental to all we do in life.

The English language arts state standards can be reviewed on the Minnesota Department of Education website.

9

10

11

12

Required

English 9

English 10

American

      Literature and

       Composition

World Literature

         and

         Composition

Advanced Placement

Honors English 9

Honors English 10

AP Language and        

      Composition

AP English

     Literature and

     Composition

College Writing


Electives

Beginning Acting

Intermediate

   Acting/Beginning

   Directing

Mythology

Yearbook I

Yearbook II

Beginning Acting

Intermediate

   Acting/Beginning

     Directing

Advanced Acting/

    Intermediate

    Directing

Communication

     Arts

Creative Writing

Journalism I

Mythology

Yearbook I

Yearbook II

Beginning Acting

Intermediate

   Acting/Beginning

     Directing

Advanced Acting/

      Intermediate

      Directing

Arts Alive

Communication  

      Arts

Creative Writing

Journalism I

Journalism II

Mythology

Film Studies

Pre-College

     Composition

Yearbook I

Yearbook II

Beginning Acting

Intermediate

   Acting/Beginning

     Directing

Advanced Acting/

    Intermediate

    Directing

Arts Alive

Communication

     Arts

Creative Writing

Journalism I

Journalism II

Mythology

Film Studies

Pre-College

     Composition

College Writing

21st Century Skills in English:

Critical Thinking

Communication

Collaboration

Creativity

Verbal reasoning

Speaking

Group work

Writing

Research

Writing

Presentations

Acting

Textual analysis

Reading

Prepare for assessments

Speaking

Understand evidence

Summarize

Sensitivity

 

Understand perspective

Write creatively

 

 

Build background

Vary with audience

 

 

 

Work with digital media

 

 

 

Correct grammar and syntax

 

 

                                

Jobs involving English:

Law
Politics
Social media manager
Teacher
Broadcast
Sales
Editor
Computer work

Writer
Lobbyist
Grant / proposal writer
Retail
Public relations
Stock broker
Corporate communications
Congressional aide

Corporate blogger
Sales account manager
Web design
Policy analyst
eCommerce analyst
Proposal manager
Public service
Nonprofit agencies        

Researcher
Church work
Museum work
Marketing

Human resources
Technical writer
Librarian

Business

Choose any field you want! Go chase your dreams!

Course Descriptions


Required Courses for Grade 9 (Select One):

ENGLISH 9 (ENG019)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

English 9 is a required class for all incoming grade 9 students. The major units that students will study include public speaking, literature (short stories and novels), drama (“Romeo and Juliet”), and learning the formal research process. Throughout the course, students also will study grammar and parts of speech, and they will continue to work on becoming strong writers.  

HONORS ENGLISH 9 (ENG02)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Honors English 9 is an accelerated-level English class that grade 9 students can choose to take with the recommendation of middle school teachers. The major units of study include public speaking, literature (short stories and the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird”), Shakespearean drama and poetry, and an overview of the formal research process. Throughout the semester, students will continue to hone their writing skills by studying grammar, punctuation, parts of speech, the writing process (including revising and peer editing), and writing essays of various lengths and topics.  

Required Courses for Grade 10 (Select One):


ENGLISH 10 (ENG03)

Grade 10; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: English 9 

Students enrolled in English 10 will read “To Kill a Mockingbird” and independent library books. The composition exercises and projects in this class will emphasize the difference between spoken and written language and encourage students to become more confident, effective writers. The Six Traits of Writing will be used to prepare students to write a variety of writing genres concentrating on structure and logical paragraph construction. With this knowledge, students will write a formal research paper. Expanding the vocabulary of English 10 students plays a significant role in helping these students to grow and develop in the use of written language. Students will explore examples of drama, poetry, and nonfiction materials. Learners will build skills in critical reading, independent thinking, knowledge of literary terms and introductions to various authors, poets and playwrights.

HONORS ENGLISH 10 (ENG04)

Grade 10; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Available by a combination of counselor placement, teacher recommendation, and standardized test scores. The objectives of the Honors English 10 course are similar to those of English 10; however, the approach is more suited to the accelerated learner.

Required Courses for Grade 11 (Select One):

AMERICAN LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (ENG06)

Grade 11; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

American Literature and Composition is a survey course primarily devoted to the study of American and contemporary literature and composition. The class will investigate major themes and ideas in literature, various writing styles, literary devices, and historical eras. Tests and writing assignments are given periodically to help evaluate students’ progress. Students will study vocabulary related to the selections read and will be asked to practice writing skills in response to the literature being studied.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (ENG07)

Grade 11; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

This course will engage students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. The goal of the AP English Language and Composition course is accomplished through emphasis on expository, analytical and argumentative writing. This course is intended to prepare grade 11 students to take the AP English Language and Composition exam offered by the College Board.

Required Courses for Grade 12 (Select One):

WORLD LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (ENG09)

Grade 12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

World Literature and Composition will focus on and feature authors and selections from a variety of time periods and places from around the world. Literature selected for study includes novels, poetry, short stories, drama, myths, and legends. A major outcome of the class is a development not only of the literature of other cultures but also the gaining of a global perspective. Stressing the organization of an idea into written form and the development of an effective style of writing also will be a focus in this course. One major research paper and a number of expository essays are required writing.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (ENG10)

Grade 12; 1 credit, Block (Semester) 

This course will engage the students in careful reading and critical analysis of literature. It will encourage them to appreciate and understand the writers’ use of language to provide both meaning and satisfaction through the consideration of structure, style and themes. AP Literature and Composition will encourage a wide and deep reading of literature accompanied by thoughtful discussion and writing. This course is intended to prepare grade 12 students to take the AP English Literature and Composition exam offered by the College Board.

Elective Courses Offered by the English Department

Fill Your Schedule With These:

JOURNALISM I (ENG11)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Completion of English 9 with grade average of B or higher. This course is only available to grade 9 students with the instructor’s approval.

Journalism I explores the many aspects of journalistic writing and newspaper production. The class assumes the responsibility of writing and proofreading for the school newspaper, The Spud. The main emphasis of Journalism I is placed on the improvement of individual writing. Students work on the development of organization, unity, conciseness, spelling, grammar and journalistic style. Through the year the class will develop additional skills connected with newspaper production such as editing, layout and design, photography, artwork, graphics and the use of the computer to produce a paper. The course examines the newspaper business from the First Amendment to today. Journalism students will write and help produce both the online and print versions of The Spud.

JOURNALISM II (ENG12)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Completion of Journalism I, with a grade average of a B or higher. 

Journalism II students are responsible for producing a high quality newspaper under conditions of commercial production. They serve as production staff, editor-in-chief and section editors. Students experience hands-on learning as they produce the school newspaper. Students design the nameplate and banners and determine the style to be used for production. Journalism II students have the opportunity to continue to develop their writing skills with special assignments. Content selection, layout and design, copy editing, photography and graphics, advertising and computer layout will be performed by Journalism II students. The major emphasis of the class is to continue to develop and refine journalistic skills with the actual production of both print and online versions of The Spud.

PRE-COLLEGE COMPOSITION (ENG15)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Pre-College Composition provides the college-bound junior or senior with writing experiences intended to prepare them for the entry-level requirements of college-level academic and research writing. The focus is on the development of independent thinking and expression of that thinking in writing. The initial portion of the quarter is devoted to multi-paragraph writing assignments drawn from student interest, experience, and observation. During a major portion of the quarter, students are assigned a research paper. At this time, the techniques of investigation are examined, and the elements of style and organization are emphasized.

COLLEGE WRITING (ENGL1101)

Grades 11-12 ; 1 credit (high school) Block (semester); 3 credits (college credit) through M|State

Prerequisite: Passing score on the Accuplacer Test.

Concurrent Credit College Writing: Meets Minnesota Transfer Curriculum Goal Area 1.

This is an introductory writing course designed to prepare students for later college and career writing. The course focuses on developing fluency through a process approach, with particular emphasis on revision. Students will consider purpose and audience, read and discuss writing and further develop their own writing processes through successive revisions to produce polished drafts. Course work will include an introduction to argumentative writing, writing from academic sources and a short research project. This course earns both high school and college writing credit through M|State.

COLLEGE WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (ENGL1205)

Grade 12 ; 1 credit (high school) Block (semester); 3 credits (college credit) through M|State

Prerequisite: College Writing (ENGL1101)

Concurrent Credit College Writing:  Meets MnTC Goal Area 1.

This course builds on the foundations of College Writing and provides students with additional opportunities to develop fluency in their writing through a process approach. Students will read critically from a variety of literary genres, explore meaning through academic research, and respond through discussion and writing.

CREATIVE WRITING (ENG16)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Creative writing is a course open to students who are interested in writing poetry, plays, short stories, and nonfiction. Students try their hand at various types of narrative writing, including poetry, personal experiences, short stories, and plays. They also will work with imaginative and factual descriptive writing, in both poetry and prose. Most of the shorter assignments are written in class. In addition, all students are expected to help critique others’ work and to share their own. For these reasons, regular attendance is a must. While students are required to complete all major assignments, they may choose which assignments are to be included in their portfolio.

COMMUNICATION ARTS (ENG17)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Semester)

Communication Arts is a one-semester elective open to all students who have successfully completed English 9. The course is designed to give students opportunities to develop good speaking and listening skills. All of the activities and projects involve class members in individual or group presentations. Work requires student preparation in planning, organizing and rehearsing. This course is designed to help students develop their interpersonal and public speaking skills.

FILM STUDIES (ENG18)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Film studies is a class designed for students capable of interpreting literature within the genre of film and being able to analyze it as work of art from the perspective of the filmmaker, society, and the audience. Students will study films from a variety of different eras and genres and explore how filmmakers shape ideas differently from writers, musicians, visual artists, and theater directors.The goal for this course is to give students an understanding of how the history, innovations, and artistry of filmmaking affects society. Students will learn the history of filmmaking, including the directors/producers who have influenced the medium most profoundly. At the end of the course, students will be able to identify key genres, influential authors, and significant works.

YEARBOOK I (ENG19)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Skinny (1st Semester)

The Yearbook I course will concentrate ultimately on the production of the Moorhead High School yearbook. Students will work collaboratively throughout the yearbook’s publication. The primary objectives of this course are effective photographic composition, creative desktop layout methods, and appropriate writing techniques for captions and other featured pieces of writing within the publication. Students will utilize electronic desktop-publishing programs for the creation of each page. As students work together on the yearbook, the course will also concentrate on the individuals’ ability to direct their creativity in correlation with the yearbook’s chosen theme.

YEARBOOK II (ENG20)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Skinny (2nd Semester)

Prerequisite: Yearbook I

The Yearbook II course is for students returning after participating in yearbook from the preceding year or preceding semester. The primary objective of the Yearbook II student is to ensure the production of a yearbook of the highest quality in a timely fashion. In order to accomplish this, Yearbook II students will focus their efforts on the yearbook planning process, which includes the entire order of the publication. Yearbook II students also will work with the composition of pages within the yearbook.

MYTHOLOGY (ENG21)

Grade 9-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

Percy Jackson, Harry Potter, Link, Luke Skywalker, Thor — these are the characters of modern myth popularized in books, films and games. Their stories are not new. They are as old as language itself. In this course we will look at contemporary stories and films, which are the primary ways we experience mythology today, and explore the ancient sources of these stories in Greek, Norse, Native American, African, British and Indian legend. The course will examine the ways myth is repackaged and repurposed to better understand our culture and the stories we tell ourselves about what constitutes heroism, conflict, redemption and love. The course will focus on meeting Common Core Standards in reading, writing and media literacy and is open to all students. The class will focus on reading and discussion and will require unit projects analyzing a specific modern/ancient mythological connection.

BEGINNING ACTING (THT01)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Beginning acting will focus on the development of individual skills relating to acting on the stage. Performance areas will include movement, characterization, vocal quality, and interpretation of dramatic literature. Students will prepare monologues and scenes of their choice and participate in theater games and improvisations. May be repeated for credit. Beginning acting culminates in a final lip sync performance.

INTERMEDIATE ACTING/BEGINNING DIRECTING (THT02)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Beginning Acting

This class will build on skills acquired in Beginning Acting. Students will practice focus and concentration as it pertains to acting and directing work, invent and portray characters, develop stage presence and vocal projection, and understand the technical aspects of theatrical performance. Performance units include: slam poetry, Shakespearean scenes, extended improv/“The Harold,” acting for film, and an independent project created, performed and critiqued.

ADVANCED ACTING/INTERMEDIATE DIRECTING (THT03)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Intermediate Acting

The Advanced Acting class will utilize skills learned in Beginning Acting and past theater experience. Students will choose one full-length play or two one-act plays to produce. Focus will be on studying, organizing, rehearsing, advertising and producing the play. Students will be in charge of directing, publicity, costumes and makeup, setting up rehearsal and production schedules, building a simplified set, and designing and running lights. Opportunities for public performances will be provided. May be repeated for credit.

ARTS ALIVE (THT04)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Arts Alive is an advanced arts study course available to junior and senior students actively involved in the theater arts at Moorhead High. Students will design a performance-based project to challenge their artistic interests, positively impact the community, and completely engage in the artistic process. Examples of past projects include play direction, choreography, set design, film study and creation, and national scholarship competition. Self-motivated students who may be considering a future career involving theater arts are encouraged to enroll. The semester course may be repeated for credit.


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English Learners

The goal of Moorhead Area Public Schools is to help every student to quickly learn English while helping students to be successful in classes where English is spoken. Moorhead Area Public Schools has developed a comprehensive plan of service that is useful in understanding the scope of English Learner services and processes available in the Moorhead Schools. The English Learner Plan of Service is an important tool for all English Learner students and families.

Read more about English Learner services on the Minnesota Department of Education website.

The classes listed below will be offered in the 2017-2018 school year. Students will start with the class that best fits their score on the ACCESS Test of English Proficiency from WIDA.


WIDA Levels 1- 2

WIDA Levels 2-3

9-12

9-12

Language Development Classes

English Language Development - Foundations

English Language  Development - Level A

English Learner -

Language Acquisition

English Learner - Study Lab

English Learner - READ 180

Sheltered classes are classes that support English-learning students to gain skills in vocabulary and English usage while also learning the material for a specific course like math, social studies, science and English / Language Arts. For the 2017-2018 school year, sheltered classes will be offered in United States History, Physical Science and Math Skills. Courses in Sheltered English / Language Arts I and II will be offered each year. Students are advised to sign up for a sheltered course when it is offered. Sheltered classes are not grade specific, and students who need a specific credit should sign up when the course is offered.

English

Social Studies

Science

Mathematics

2015-16

Sheltered English I

           and II

Sheltered United States History

Sheltered Physical

       Science

Sheltered

Intermediate Algebra

2016-17

Sheltered English I

           and II

Sheltered World History

Sheltered Biology

Sheltered Intermediate Algebra

2017-18

Sheltered English I

           and II

Sheltered United States History

Sheltered Physical

       Science

Sheltered Math Skills

21st Century Skills: The 21st Century Skills gained from enrollment in any of the sheltered courses and the English language development courses are the same as those gained from a non-sheltered course.  

Course Descriptions

Language Development Courses

ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT - FOUNDATIONS (ELDF)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

English Language Development - Foundations is a class designed for students who are at the beginning and/or emerging stages of English language proficiency. ELD: Foundations uses materials that are aligned with the Common Core Standards from National Geographic Edge and will develop and increase English language skills in the areas of listening, understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. This course helps new English learners develop the language skills needed to achieve social and academic success. Learners develop social and academic literacy skills through content, images, video, and daily oral language practice that are connected to the real world. A clear connection between reading and writing skills helps students master both skills naturally. At the heart of the course is thinking. The objective of this class is to move students toward the English proficiency level necessary to successfully access the curriculum of core classes required for graduation from Moorhead High School. Placement is dependent upon student scores from the English proficiency assessments WIDA ACCESS or W-APT.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT - LEVEL A (ELDA)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

English Language Development - Level A uses materials that are aligned with the Common Core Standards from National Geographic Edge to promote an intensive program in all areas of language acquisition: vocabulary, grammar, comprehension, reading, writing, and speaking using academic language forms. The objective of this class is to move students toward the English proficiency level necessary to successfully access the curriculum of core classes required for graduation. Students will increase their English language proficiency skills in all areas of language acquisition necessary to become career and college ready with the skills needed to be successful in the next phase of their lives. Placement is dependent upon student scores from the English proficiency assessments WIDA ACCESS or W-APT.

COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 9 (ELL009), 10 (ELL010), 11 (ELL011)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

College and Career Success is a required course for English language learners who have not previously taken Explore.  Students will work on study skills, practice organization skills, research career opportunities, and explore their learning style. Students will also study the 7 Mindsets, which will help them create meaningful goals for the future and a positive outlook that will help them reach their biggest dreams.  Sections of this course may vary in content focus as needed.

LIFE SMARTS  (ELL012)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Life Smarts is a course designed for students who have recently arrived in the United States.  With language support and academic vocabulary, students will learn 21st century skills to help them succeed outside of the school environment.

ENGLISH LEARNER: STUDY LAB (WLG100)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

The English Learner - Study Lab is designed to provide support in the content classes. Students will have help with the acquisition of content and academic vocabulary, assignment completion and study skills. Each student is responsible for his or her own work, but the study lab can help students get answers to questions that may stand in their way of completing the tasks for a particular course.

ENGLISH LEARNER: READ 180 (READ180)

Grades 9-12; 2 credits, Block (Year)

READ 180 is a research-based, comprehensive reading program that accelerates the reading skills necessary for students to attain grade-level reading proficiency. This is done through four daily components: whole group instruction, small group skill instruction, independent reading at the student’s individualized reading level, and computer-generated instruction, also differentiated for each student. Through READ 180, students will develop reading skills that transfer to other course work in the core classes needed for graduation and increase the ability to comprehend a wide variety of reading materials.

Sheltered Courses

SHELTERED ENGLISH I and II (ENG22)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Students will address the same content and standards found in a non-sheltered English course, but these courses are designed to make the content accessible and to accelerate language acquisition in the content area and in the area of academic vocabulary.

English I - English I is a semester-long block class. The major units the students will study include public speaking, literature (short stories and novels), drama (“Romeo and Juliet”), and learning the formal research process. Throughout the course, students also will study grammar and parts of speech, and they will continue to work on becoming strong writers.  

English II - Students enrolled in English II will read “To Kill a Mockingbird” and independent library books. The composition exercises and projects in this class will emphasize the difference between spoken and written language and encourage the students to become more confident, effective writers. The Six Traits of Writing will be used to prepare students to write a variety of writing genres concentrating on structure and logical paragraph construction. With this knowledge, students will write a formal research paper. Expanding the vocabulary of English II students plays a significant role in helping these students to grow and develop in the use of written language. Students will explore examples of drama, poetry, and nonfiction materials. Learners will build skills in critical reading, independent thinking, knowledge of literary terms and introductions to various authors, poets and playwrights.

SHELTERED SOCIAL STUDIES - UNITED STATES HISTORY (SOC01S)

Grades 9-12; Skinny (Year)

Students will address the same content and standards found in a non-sheltered American history course, but the course is designed to make the content accessible and to accelerate language acquisition in the content area and in the area of academic vocabulary. The first half the course will be a survey of United States history to about 1876. This will include such topics as indigenous peoples, exploration, colonial times, the American Revolution and Constitution, the young republic, growth of democracy, territorial expansion, slavery, Civil War, and Reconstruction. The second half of the course will survey United States history from about 1877 to the present. This will include such topics as industrialization, Populist protest, U.S. imperialism, progressivism, the Great War, the Great Depression, the New Deal, WWII, and the Cold War era.

SHELTERED SCIENCE - PHYSICAL SCIENCE (SCI19S)

Grades 9-12; Skinny (Year)

Students will address the same content and standards found in a non-sheltered Physical Science course, but the course is designed to make the content accessible and to accelerate language acquisition in the content area and in the area of academic vocabulary. Physical Science is an introduction to the fields of chemistry and physics. Students will be reviewing and covering topics such as the phases of matter, the atom, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and acids and bases during the chemistry semester. The physics semester will include motion, forces, Newton's Laws, work, energy and power calculations. Problem solving using the scientific method will prepare the student for further study in science and will emphasize the scientific principles that surround us in our daily lives.

SHELTERED MATHEMATICS - MATH SKILLS (Foundational Skills) (ELL15.1)

Grades 9-12; Skinny (Year)

This course is offered to grades 9-12 SLIFE and Foundations leveled EL students and is designed to teach math curriculum in a manner that is more accessible for English learners while at the same time promoting their English language development. Teachers highlight key language features and incorporate strategies that make the content more comprehensible to students. Teachers scaffold instruction to aid student comprehension of content topics and objectives by adjusting their speech and instructional tasks and by providing appropriate background information, vocabulary, and filling in any voids these students have in their math development. The objective of this class is to prepare students to join the mainstream math class.  

SHELTERED MATHEMATICS - INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (formerly Algebra II) (MTH18S)

Grades 9-12; Skinny (Year)

Students will address the same content and standards found in a non-sheltered Intermediate Algebra (formerly Algebra II) course, but the course is designed to make the content accessible and to accelerate language acquisition in the content area and in the area of academic vocabulary. Intermediate Algebra is primarily concerned with further developing students’ understanding of topics discussed in Algebra I, including (but not limited to) solving equations and linear and absolute value functions as well as introducing students to piecewise-defined, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, topics necessary to prepare students for advanced mathematics-based courses such as probability and statistics, calculus, chemistry, and physics. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to these topics with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is required.

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Explore

It sounds like a cliché but — life is a journey. No one knows what opportunities will arise or what opportunities one can create for himself or herself. Chances are good that young people will not have the same job all of their lives. The world is changing  so fast that jobs will too. The trick is to prepare for change. Know yourself! Each individual must determine her or his aptitude, abilities, likes and dislikes. From that foundation students start to plot a course that can change as students learn more about themselves and develop new interests and abilities.

The Explore class is a start. This class is about the students! Students begin to quantify what they value and begin to understand what they really are seeking in life. There are hundreds of jobs in the world that the average students know nothing about. Sometimes students may think they know what they may want to do but have no understanding, or appreciation, of what the job entails. The Explore class is an opportunity for students to start a meaningful process that creates a “career vision.” Moorhead High School offers other opportunities after Explore to continue the process. Careers (Family and Consumer Science) and College Prep & Career Readiness (Business) are other classes that can help students define maps for their journeys. Our advice is to take every positive opportunity possible and gather experiences — one never knows where it may lead.

ACT’s World-of-Work map shows how occupations relate to each other based on work tasks.

Course Description

EXPLORE (ELE13)

Grade 9 Required; 1/2 credit, Block (Quarter)

Explore is a required course for all grade 9 students. Students will develop a four-year academic plan, work on study skills, explore career opportunities, participate in service learning, explore their learning style and develop rapport with the Explore teacher. Students also will explore the 7 Mindsets, which will help them to create meaningful goals for the future and a positive outlook that will help them reach their biggest dreams. Studies Strategies 9 maybe substituted for Explore with permission from a Child Study Team or the administration.

Family and Consumer Science

Watch the video to learn more about the FACS department

Family and Consumer Science courses offer opportunities that prepare students for life. Subject matter in these courses help students as they move through the different stages of their lives and prepare for their careers and community involvement.  Courses address specific content skills, 21st century workforce skills, and relationship skills that students will need to be successful in their careers, community and family life.

Family and Consumer Science classes prepare students for the rest of their lives!

The FACS national standards can be reviewed on the National Association of State Administrators of Family and Consumer Sciences website.


Please observe the prerequisites listed in the course descriptions.

Category

9

10

11

12

Foods

Food Basics

Food Basics

Food Basics

Food Basics

Advanced Foods

Advanced Foods

Advanced Foods

International Foods

International Foods

International Foods

Nutritional Food Choices

Nutritional Food Choices

Nutritional Food Choices

Life Management Skills

Relationships

Relationships

Relationships

Relationships

Living in Family Environments (LIFE)

Living in Family Environments

(LIFE)

Living in Family Environments

(LIFE)

Living in Family Environments

(LIFE)

Child Development

Child Development

Child Development

Living on Your Own (L.O.Y.O.)

Living on Your Own (L.O.Y.O.)

Housing and Design

(meets fine arts requirement)

Housing and Design

(meets fine arts requirement)

Careers

Careers

Careers

Careers

21st Century Skills in family and consumer sciences:

        

Critical Thinking

Communication

Collaboration

Creativity

Perspective

Nonverbal communication

Teamwork

Design

Problem solving

Interpersonal communication

Feedback

Personal expression

Self-assessment

Presentations

Cooperation

Flexible thinking

Accountability

Written critiques

Interpersonal

Research

Digital literacy

Shared responsibility

 

Brainstorming

Listening skills

Management

 

Goal setting

 

Time management

 

Decision making

 

 

 

Inventive thinking

 

 

 

Organization

 

 

 

Prioritizing

                                

Jobs involving family and consumer sciences:

Management
Child care
Social work
Food service

Hospitality industry
Foster care
Designing
Financial consultant

Counseling
Teaching
Nutrition
Sales

Interior design
Chef / Culinary skills
Career counseling
Job services

Family therapy
Marriage counseling
Personal finance
Retail

Real estate
Negotiator
Pediatric care
Psychology

Architecture
Caterer
Event manager
Grocery store owner

Produce manager
Grocery warehouse

Life itself — food, children, family, housing, personal living including a career. Skills needed to function in society today!        

                

Course Descriptions

Foods

FOOD BASICS (FCS01)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)
Let’s cook! Food Basics is a beginning foods class, recommended for all students who would like to improve their skills in the kitchen. This class will help students learn the basics of food preparation, including proper measuring techniques, food/kitchen safety, nutritional value of food, selection and storage of food, and more. Areas of study include resource management, fruits and vegetables, eggs, breads, and pastry. The class will give students a chance to learn interpersonal and small-group skills that will allow them to function as part of the team. Working in the foods lab will provide an excellent opportunity for students to work cooperatively.

ADVANCED FOODS (FCS02)

Grades 10-12 (Grades 9-12 if taken Food Basics), ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: MUST have had Food Basics

Have you heard of Rachel Ray or Chopped? This class is designed for students who want to expand their food preparation knowledge and skills. Emphasis is on planning and preparing well-balanced meals while including advanced resource management and food/kitchen safety and sanitation skills. Students learn about small appliances, knife skills, the art of seasoning, salad and soup preparation, pasta making, and cake decoration. Come and enjoy the aroma that will surely delight your appetite. Let’s cook!

INTERNATIONAL FOODS (FCS03)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Food Basics; Advanced Foods encouraged

Pack your bags and here we go! Students gain exposure to the foods and cultures of the world. Students will study and prepare foods from Mexico, British Isles, France, Germany, Scandinavia, Italy, China, and country of choice. For each country, students will learn about the climate, geography and culture and how they relate to the development of food customs and cuisine. Students should come with a desire to learn how to cook exciting new foods while exploring new tastes and adventures in the world of foods.

NUTRITIONAL FOOD CHOICES (FCS10)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter) or Skinny (Semester)

Prerequisite: Food Basics

Whether students are athletes who need to fuel an active lifestyle or are simply hoping to learn how to make smarter food choices, Nutritional Food Choices will give students the tools they need to fuel their bodies right. In this class students will investigate their current eating habits and how small changes can help to make a big difference in how they feel and even think while at school or work. Students will learn about the basics of nutrition and the importance of the six classes of nutrients through study, in-class activities and labs, which will have them exploring the methods and foods that will lead to a healthier lifestyle for them and their families.

Life Management

LIVING IN A FAMILY ENVIRONMENT (LIFE) (FCS04)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit; Skinny (Semester) or Block (Quarter)

This class is for you because it is about you! Students learn about the power and effectiveness of communication by strengthening their communication skills. Students begin to examine themselves by exploring their personal values, goals and responsibilities they have to themselves and to others. They will examine their self-concept and self-esteem and how to improve it. Through class discussions, group work, and individual study, students learn more about meaningful relationships they will establish with peers, their families and adults. The importance and quality of friendships are studied, which are a valued asset in your life.

LIVING ON YOUR OWN (LOYO) (FCS05)

Grades 11-12, ½ credit, Skinny (Semester) or Block (Quarter)

Will your paycheck cover your needs? Do you have renters insurance? No worries, use a credit card and charge it! Living On Your Own prepares students for finding a place to live and living with roommates, buying a car, using and managing credit wisely, understanding insurance, planning, choosing and purchasing food and clothing on a budget, doing laundry to extend the life of clothes, and managing online checking and saving accounts, including reconciling checkbooks. Students will learn about experiencing life on their own, visiting community sites and listening to the experts in the industry. Topics will be covered through the use of websites, class discussions, videos, field trips, guest speakers, projects, group and individual research.

RELATIONSHIPS (FCS07)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester) or Block (Quarter)
Students learn lifelong skills for building and maintaining relationships. This course focuses on social and personal issues that provide an opportunity for students to better understand themselves regarding their relationships. Personal growth occurs as students strive to achieve goals and work to improve themselves and their relationships with others. These efforts will impact the individual, his or her family, their employer, and the community. Relationships class covers personality analysis, dating, healthy and unhealthy relationships, ending a relationship, love and infatuation, engagement/marriage and building a strong relationship. Both males and females can benefit from this course, as everyone is involved in relationships in their lives.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT (FCS08)

Grades 10-12, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Ever wonder why babies chew on books and toddlers throw temper tantrums? Child Development is a course that will prepare students for child-related occupations and parenthood or will help anyone who wants to learn more about children. A real understanding of the “world of a child” is achieved by observing children at licensed child care centers. The fascinating development of a child from conception to age four is studied, including social, emotional, intellectual, and physical developmental patterns. This class generates involvement and activities in the community. This class is for students interested in a career with children or for those hope to be exceptional parents someday.

HOUSING AND DESIGN (FCS09)

Grades 11-12, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

*Meets Fine Arts Requirement

Your neighborhood will never look the same to you again! Students learn to identify architectural styles, read and evaluate floor plans, and choose furnishings. Students show their unique personalities and interests while coordinating their living space by using color, design elements and principles, and use of backgrounds. Enjoy an onsite visit to an apartment and a newly built home, and talk with the experts at flooring and wall covering businesses. In culmination of all that students have learned they will construct design boards using appropriate scale and design principles to share with the class.

Careers

CAREERS (FCS11)

Grades 10-12, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)                                                                                                                            
Do you know what you want to do with your future? Are you career and college ready? Whether you plan to be a nurse, dentist, culinary artist, or entrepreneur this class is designed to help students learn to discover who they are, what they want to do, and how to go about getting there. This class is all about YOU. Students look into the World of Work, identify key aspects of themselves in self-discovery, and find career options that fit. Local post-secondary education representatives will visit and inform students how they would fit with them, and they will give tips on what to do to be successful during post-secondary experience. Finally, students will learn places to look for a job and what to do to prepare for that job opportunity. This course has the potential to open important doors into your future. Students will create a portfolio to use after high school for the endeavor of their choosing. Take this class and "Get Ready!"

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Health, Wellness and Physical Education

We are only given one body, and if we want it to last for all that we hope to do then we have to take care of it! Coursework in health, wellness and physical education helps students make responsible decisions that can help them to live healthier and more fulfilling lives. A healthy person must be healthy mentally as well as physically. A healthy person must provide the body with the tools to grow and sustain itself into the future. A combination of the required health class with additional department coursework will help any student lead a more fulfilling and productive life. In addition, the department offers courses that can help athletes improve their performance and maximize the opportunities for each sport’s season and for life.

The health and physical education state standards can be reviewed on the Minnesota Department of Education website.

Minnesota requires ½ credit in health and 1 credit in physical education for graduation. Please note that some courses have a prerequisite that must be completed.

9

Select one

10  

11

12

Required

PE 9 - Coed

PE 9 - Girls

PE 9 - Boys

Human Performance 9

Health

One of the following is required or may be an elective class

• Advanced Health

• PE Sports 10

• Weight Training I

• Weight Training /  

 Acceleration

• Weight Training II

• Team Sports

• Individual Sports -

 Off-campus

• Self-Defense

• Human Performance

• Advanced Health

• Weight Training I

• Weight Training /  

 Acceleration

• Weight Training II

• Team Sports

• Individual Sports-         Off-campus

• Self-Defense

• Human Performance

• Advanced Health

• Weight Training I

• Weight Training /  

 Acceleration

• Weight Training II

• Team Sports

• Individual Sports-             Off-campus

• Self-Defense

• Human Performance

21st Century Skills in health, wellness and physical education:

Critical Thinking
Data analysis        
Skills for healthy living
Practice is needed
Social skills

Communication
Positive reinforcement
Vocabulary of health/fitness
Sportspersonship

Collaboration
Teamwork
Safety
Positive attitude

Creativity
Strategies in sports
Alternative paths to a goal
Variety in exercise and eating

Jobs involving health, wellness and physical education:

Gerontology
Education
Coaching
Fitness instruction
Sports development
Physical therapy
Sports medicine
Dietician

Sports entertainment
Life coach
Respiratory therapist

Nutrition
Corporate health / fitness
Sports sales        

Medicine
Advocacy groups
Nursing
Parks and recreation
Sports physician
Athletic trainer        
Sports facilities        

Professional sports
Hospital work
Epidemiologist
Strength and conditioning
Occupational therapist
Community health

Course Descriptions

HEALTH (HPE01)
Grade 10, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)
Required course for graduation to be completed
sophomore year

Personal Health: wellness, fitness, self-assessment, decision making

Mental and Emotional Wellness: emotions and behavior, communication skills, stress management, suicide prevention and intervention, conflict resolution

Nutritional Wellness: label reading, weight management, disordered eating

ATOD: alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, club drugs, chemical dependency, alcohol poisoning, intervention

Sexuality and Healthy Relationships: abstinence, teen pregnancy prevention, STDs, sexual violence, love and infatuation, and establishing boundaries.

Emergency First Aid and CPR: triage, AHA AED/CPR and First Aid certification, choking, adult and child rescue.

ADVANCED HEALTH (HPE02)
Grades 11-12;
½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Health (HPE01)

This class is designed for students who would like the opportunity to investigate, participate in and discuss current health and wellness topics. Students will get actively involved in promoting community health and creating a student Wellness Fair. Students will need to provide for their own transportation to and from the facilities that may be attended.

Required Courses for Grade 9 (choose one of the following):

PE 9 COED (HPE03)

PE 9 GIRLS (HPE04)

PE 9 BOYS (HPE05)

Grade 9; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

In this course students will participate in a wide variety of activities and will develop skills for recreation. The course is co-educational and may include the following activities: tennis, soccer, softball, football, ultimate frisbee, lacrosse, volleyball, swimming, basketball, badminton, pickleball, and boot hockey.  

HUMAN PERFORMANCE 9 (HPE07)
Grade 9; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)
In this co-educational course students will participate and will be divided into a wide variety of team activities and individual fitness. They will develop skills for recreation by combining individualized weight training and cardio exercises based on ability.

Grades 10-12 students must select .5 credit of PE for graduation

HUMAN PERFORMANCE 10-12 (HPE08)

Grades 10-12, ½ credit, Block (Quarter)
Prerequisite: PE 9 or Human Performance 9
In this co-educational course students will participate and will be divided into a wide variety of team activities and individual fitness. They will develop skills for recreation by combining individualized weight training and cardio exercises based on ability.


PE 10 SPORTS (HPE06)
Grade 10; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: PE 9 or Human Performance 9

In this course students will participate in a wide variety of activities and will develop skills for recreation. The course is coeducational and includes the following activities: tennis, soccer, softball, football, ultimate frisbee, lacrosse, volleyball, swimming, basketball, badminton, pickleball, and boot hockey.  

WEIGHT TRAINING/SPORT ACCELERATION (HPE15Y)
Grades: 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

WEIGHT TRAINING/SPORT ACCELERATION (HPE15S)
Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

Prerequisite: PE 9 or Human Performance 9

This class is a coeducational physical education course in which students will participate in a supervised program of basic weight training activities. A combination of weight training, plyometrics and speed training are the main focus of this course.  This course is a great option for multi-sport athletes. Measurement of fitness, core strength and endurance will be a part of this course. Students will be responsible for recording daily progress.

WEIGHT TRAINING I (HPE13S)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

Prerequisite: PE 9 or Human Performance 9

This class is a coeducational physical education course in which students will participate in a supervised program of basic weight training activities. Measurement of fitness, core strength and endurance will be part of this course. Group stretching, plyometric routines and core workouts will be a standard part of the weekly routine. Students may incorporate one or more of their preferred lifts. Students will be responsible for recording daily progress.

WEIGHT TRAINING II (HPE14S)  
Grades 10-12; ½ credit; Skinny (Semester)
Prerequisite: Weight Training I
Students must:
1.  Successfully complete weight training I and have instructor approval.
2.  Have no physical limitations that would limit the student from performing the required lifts.
3.  Not substitute this class for a required physical education course.

Advanced weight training routines and techniques will be used extensively. There will be no deviation from class core lifts.  Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in core strength and olympic lifts. Group stretching, plyometric routines and core workouts will be a standard part of the weekly routine. Students may incorporate one or more of their preferred lifts.  Students will be responsible for recording daily progress.

INDIVIDUAL SPORTS OFF CAMPUS (HPE10)
Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: PE 9 or Human Performance 9

Are you interested in a different type of physical education? Activities may include horseshoes, tennis, frisbee golf, golf, snowshoeing, billiards, bowling, rock climbing, skiing, sand volleyball, paintball and various aerobic activities at local fitness centers. An activity fee of $40 is required for this course, and students need to provide their own transportation to and from each of the facilities attended. This course cannot be used to substitute for a required physical education course.

TEAM SPORTS FALL & SPRING (HPE11)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)
TEAM SPORTS WINTER (HPE12)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: PE 9 or Human Performance 9

Activities included are softball, flag football, team handball, badminton, pickleball, boot hockey, eclipse ball, basketball, volleyball, soccer, ultimate frisbee, and water sports. Activities will vary depending on the time of the year the course is offered. This course cannot be used as a substitute for a required PE 9 course.

SELF-DEFENSE (HPE16)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: PE 9 or Human Performance 9

This class is designed for students to acquire a knowledge of personal safety. Students will understand principles of training necessary to improve mental and physical fitness. Students will be taught the basic fundamentals of self-defense and will be able to apply these skills if needed. Personal and community violence will be taught through lecture, videos, guest speakers and current media resources. Issues such as sexual harassment, sexual violence, and date rape will be units covered throughout the course. Students will receive hands-on experience through simulations. This course cannot be used as a substitute for PE 9.  

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Industrial Technology

Watch the video to learn more about Industrial Technology

Industrial Technology Logo.jpg

Industrial Technology coursework includes studies in areas that readily lead to immediate careers in high demand jobs. Industrial technology coursework can lead to careers as engineers, technicians, business owners and more. A student could try a little piece of each area or immerse one’s self in an area of study like automotive, woodworking, and drafting. Engineering and Industrial Technology courses offer additional opportunities to explore careers of high interest and high demand.  

The safety and well-being of each student is of paramount concern. Safety information and assessment is given to every student prior to any lab work and each student MUST pass all safety tests. Should a student transfer into a class after the safety preparation has been completed, additional work may be required of the student before participating in lab work. Please note that a lab fee will be applied to all “take home” projects.

Special note: Automotive classes are designed to serve both the beginning student who seeks a basic automotive knowledge and the student who wants to gather additional skills. Those additional skills could lead to immediate employment or further education at a two-year or four-year college.

The automotive program is nationally certified by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF), an arm of the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). The program is also a national high school Automotive Youth Educational Systems (AYES) program. This is a tremendous opportunity for high school students to earn certification and work experience that will lead to high-paying jobs after high school or create a fast track to other careers or certification.

Articulation Agreements offer college credit while enrolled in high school. The Moorhead High School Industrial Technology Department has worked with Minnesota State Community and Technical College - Moorhead to enable students to earn college credit in the following classes:                

Brakes / Steering and Suspension

Introduction to Auto (when two auto classes are completed at Moorhead High School)

Small Engines I & II - for TRNS 1100 (4 credits) at M|State Detroit Lakes Campus

Students must attend M|State to have the credit entered on their transcript.

The International Technology Education Association has developed standards for technology.

Please note that some courses have a prerequisite.

9

10

11

12

Drafting

Introduction to

       Drafting

Introduction to

       Drafting

Architectural

       Drafting

Technical Drafting

Introduction to

       Drafting

Architectural

       Drafting

Technical Drafting

Introduction to

       Drafting

Architectural

       Drafting

Technical Drafting

Welding

Welding I

Welding II

Welding I

Welding II

Welding I

Welding II

Welding I

Welding II

Automotive

Automotive

       Technology I

Automotive

       Technology I Automotive Brakes,

    Steering and

    Suspension

Auto Electrical /

     Electronics and

     Engine

     Performance I

Maintenance and

     Light Repair

Automotive

       Technology I Automotive Brakes,

    Steering and

    Suspension

Auto Electrical /

     Electronics and

     Engine

     Performance I

Maintenance and

     Light Repair

Automotive

     Internship

Automotive

       Technology I

Automotive Brakes,

    Steering and

    Suspension

Auto Electrical /

     Electronics and

     Engine

     Performance I

Maintenance and

     Light Repair

Automotive

     Internship

Woodworking

Woodworking and

     Cabinetry

Woodworking and

     Cabinetry

Advanced

      Cabinetry

Exploring

      Carpentry

Woodworking and

     Cabinetry

Advanced

      Cabinetry

Exploring

      Carpentry

Woodworking and

     Cabinetry

Advanced

      Cabinetry

Exploring

      Carpentry

Small Engines

Small Engines I

Small Engines II

Small Engines I

Small Engines II

Small Engines I

Small Engines II

Small Engines I

Small Engines II

Engineering /

STEM / PLTW

Introduction to

      Engineering

      Design

Digital Electronics

Principles of

      Engineering

Introduction to

      Engineering

      Design

Digital Electronics

Principles of

      Engineering

Introduction to

      Engineering

      Design

Digital Electronics

Principles of

      Engineering

Introduction to

      Engineering

      Design

Digital Electronics

Principles of

      Engineering

21st Century Skills in Industrial Technology:

Critical Thinking
Organization
Self-assessment

Communication
Planning
Constructing

Collaboration
Design        
Problem Solving

Creativity
Prototyping
Troubleshooting

Jobs involving industrial technology

Machinist
Parts manager
Fabricator

Cabinet maker
Engine technician
Welder
Diesel technician

Cabinet installer
Mechanical drafter
Welding inspector

Finish carpenter
Technical drafter
Architect

Plumber
3D prototyper
Civil engineer

Electrician
Sheet metal fabricator
Electrical engineer

Carpenter
Industrial technology teacher
Automotive technician
Concrete finisher
Vocational - agriculture teacher

Course Descriptions


Project Lead the Way (PLTW) (STEM) 

 

PLTW / STEM - DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (STEM01)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Digital Electronics students will spend time exploring electrical circuitry and how it affects their daily lives. Students will evaluate real-world circuit designs utilized in our everyday electrical devices. Students create and send their electrical designs to a circuit board where they wire and test the circuits — similar to a real-world example of designing electronics and solving problems. This course is an excellent option for students looking to further their organization skills, learn more about electricity and circuitry, test their problem-solving skills, learn the Binary number system, and learn to write programming code to control robots.

PLTW / STEM - INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING (STEM02)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Introduction to Engineering students will explore many careers categorized as engineering. The focus of this course is real-world problem solving through the Engineering Design Process (EDP). On a regular basis, students will be given an example of a real-world problem, devise a strategy to solve the problem, and design, build and test their solutions. After testing, they will evaluate whether their solution was adequate or needs to be modified. Students will brainstorm ideas and evaluate different solutions for solving problems found in society today. This course is a great option for students looking to explore engineering and related careers, enhance their organization skills, and hone their practical real-world problem-solving skills. Students also will have the opportunity to work with and utilize the same 3-D printing technology used in industry to prototype and test designs.

PLTW / STEM - PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (STEM03)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

This survey of engineering exposes students to some of the major concepts they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students have an opportunity to investigate engineering and high tech careers and to develop skills and understanding of course concepts. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to peers and members of the professional community. This course is designed for students who have completed Algebra I.

Drafting

INTRODUCTORY DRAFTING (INT09)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Introductory drafting will teach students how to turn sketches into technical drawings and floor plans. In this course students will learn how to create detailed drawings of parts and objects by hand, with an emphasis on basic skills such as organization, neatness, line quality, accuracy in measuring, technical representation, and dimensioning procedures. Once students have gained the skills necessary to produce detailed technical drawings they will learn how to use the AutoCAD Inventor software to create 3D working parts. Students will design a project of their choice. AutoCAD REVIT will be used to design floor plans. This course also utilizes 3-D printing technology. Note: Introductory Drafting is a prerequisite for both Technical Drafting and Architectural Drafting.

TECHNICAL DRAFTING (INT11)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Introductory Drafting

Do you enjoy taking things apart to understand how they work? Technical Drafting is the study of drafting as it relates to the manufacturing industry. In this course you will learn to analyze different objects so that you can recreate them using AutoCAD Inventor 3D computer-aided design software; you also have the option to learn the AutoCAD 2D software. It is a practical course for students considering a career in the engineering field, or students who are interested in any type of manufacturing or fabrication. Students will learn to analyze different parts and objects to understand how they work together, they will create detailed drawings of different parts, build the parts using the AutoCAD Inventor software, and put the parts together to make a working 3D computer-aided project of their choice, complete with an animation of their creation. After you have made a 3D design you will have an opportunity to 3D print your design. Note: Introductory Drafting is a prerequisite for Advanced Technical Drafting.

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING (INT10)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Introductory Drafting

If you enjoy drawing floor plans or have an interest in the construction industry this course is for you. You will design floor plans and create within a set of given constraints. You also will be able to design floor plans of your choice and turn those designs into 3D computer-aided designs by modeling with the AutoCAD REVIT software. After you have made a 3D design you will have an opportunity to bring your concept to life using a 3D printer. Note: Introductory Drafting is a prerequisite for Advanced Architectural Drafting.

Automotive

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY I (INT16)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Automotive Technology I is the first class in auto and is a prerequisite to all the other automotive classes. The class is for anyone who plans to own or drive an automobile and wishes to learn more about how automobiles operate, how to maintain them, and how to perform some repair work. Students study the principles of operation and service of today’s automobile, shop skills, and hand tools. They will learn to check, rotate, mount, repair, and balance tires and wheels. Students learn engine basics and how to check the mechanical condition of engines using electronic and mechanical test equipment. Students learn about cooling and lubrication systems as well. Students apply these skills in Moorhead High School’s modern lab on shop and student/customer-owned vehicles.

AUTOMOTIVE BRAKES AND STEERING AND SUSPENSION (INT17)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Automotive Technology I

The first half of this class is Automotive Brakes and the second half is Steering/Suspension. In the brakes unit, students will learn the hydraulic and mechanical theory and operation of automotive brake systems. Students will then learn how to check, service, and repair drum and disc brake systems. Students will perform work in the lab on brake components, shop vehicles, and other vehicles. During the second nine weeks, they will study vehicle steering and suspension systems. This will include wheel and tire service, front and rear suspension systems, and alignment and handling problems and repair. Students will perform work on these systems in the lab using components, shop-owned vehicles, and other vehicles. The National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) program is followed for this class.

MAINTENANCE AND LIGHT REPAIR (INT19M)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Automotive Technology

This auto class is taken after Automotive Technology and focuses on maintaining and performing light repair work on modern automobiles and trucks. After a refresher on general shop safety, the students learn how to perform multi-point inspections on vehicles including battery and charging system condition, belt and hose condition, steering and suspension condition and lubrication, fluid level and condition, tire wear and condition, general brake inspection, and the operation of interior and exterior lights. The rest of the course is focused on the repair and maintenance of the above systems based on the findings of the inspection. The students will repair leaks, flush fluids, perform tune ups, and replace light bulbs, hoses, filters and belts. The students also will be able to identify brakes and steering/suspension issues. The repairs of these systems are taught in Brakes/Steering and Suspension. The Maintenance and Light Repair class is designed to teach students to inspect and care for the modern automobile and truck.

AUTO ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONICS & ENGINE PERFORMANCE I (INT18)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Automotive Technology I

Students study the National Automotive Technician Education Foundation (NATEF) standards for the areas of Electronics and Engine Performance for this class. They will study basic electrical circuits and general electrical system testing and repairs. Students will work with the starting, ignition, and fuel systems of the vehicle. They will learn the theory and operation of each system, including testing and repair. The course covers computerized engine controls including emission systems and OnBoard Diagnostics. Students will apply these skills to shop vehicles and student/customer-owned vehicles.

AUTOMOTIVE INTERNSHIP (INT20I)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit

Prerequisite: Automotive Technology I & one more auto class & Instructor Approval

A student may qualify for an internship during his or her junior or senior year in the auto program. A student has to have taken at least two auto classes. The student may receive 1 credit for work done at an automotive or diesel repair facility. The work has to be documented and reported to the instructor and must cover a broad range of repair categories under maintenance and light repair. The work must also be done under the supervision of a mentor. The internship can take place during the student’s junior or senior year or in the summer between. The work should be equivalent to at least 135 hours of a mix of light repair work.

Welding

WELDING I (INT12)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Students who want to learn how to join metal together by melting it, should register for the welding class. Students will learn how to weld steel with multiple welding processes, work with sheet metal, and apply those skills to fabricate projects. They will tour manufacturing facilities and explore career and educational opportunities in the manufacturing field.

WELDING II (INT13)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Welding I

Students extend their welding skills in this advanced welding course. Students will spend more time in the lab fine-tuning their welding skills, learning new techniques and welding processes. This class is geared toward fabricating skills, and students will design and manufacture their own project designs using their fabrication skills. Examples of fabrication projects include go karts, mini bikes, trailers, deer stands, tree stands, benches, stools, tables, furniture, tool boxes, and other custom projects. Students will be financially responsible for the materials/projects they fabricate.

Small Engines

SMALL ENGINES I (INT14)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Are you interested in working on gas engines? Take small engines classes to learn more about power equipment like ATVs, dirt bikes, snowmobiles, mowers, chainsaws, and snow throwers. In this class students will be working on engines, doing important maintenance, disassembling, and discovering the inner working of engines so they will be able to thoroughly understand how to fix power equipment. Fixing your own equipment can save you thousands of dollars over the course of your life! Students also tour and explore education and future careers in the power equipment industry.

SMALL ENGINES II (INT15)

Grades 9-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Small Engines I

Want to do more troubleshooting to fix power equipment and recreational powersports equipment like dirt bikes and ATVs? This class is about 75% lab and hands-on learning for troubleshooting and fixing lawn, garden, snow and recreational power equipment. Students also will tour and explore careers and educational opportunities for future occupations.

Woodworking

WOODWORKING AND CABINETRY (INT06)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

This woodworking technology class will incorporate textbook information and basic hands-on skills in the construction of low-cost projects. The course will guide students through principles of shop safety and the proper use of hand tools and shop equipment in the construction of a variety of projects. Throughout the course, students will develop and demonstrate an understanding of project planning, design, and the basics of cabinet construction. Students will select a project from a variety of options taking into consideration the time available, level of difficulty, the size of the project, and the cost of the project.

ADVANCED CABINETRY (INT07)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Woodworking and Cabinetry

Advanced Cabinetry is open to all students who have successfully completed Woodworking and Cabinetry. Students will progress beyond the basic machine operations to more intricate operations. The students will then proceed to a lab situation, choosing a major project that will be a challenge to their woodworking abilities. Examples of projects would be entertainment centers, gun cabinets, wood turnings, china hutches and other types of cabinets. A unit on the use and application of plastic and wood laminates will be included to make students aware of innovative ways that plastic and wood laminates can be used to enhance the beauty and practicality of cabinetry.

EXPLORING CARPENTRY (INT08)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Woodworking and Cabinetry

Students will be given the opportunity to explore the more intricate woodworking procedures used commercially and in residential construction. They will observe firsthand construction methods through field trips to various industries and M|State’s carpentry program. After being introduced to basic construction procedures the students will construct a small storage shed. Six to seven students will work as a group to construct each shed. The storage sheds will be sold, with the students being given first opportunity to purchase them. This project will give the students experience in construction of a framed structure, and they will gain skills in home maintenance, home repair, and remodeling.

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Learner Support Services

All courses listed below serve to help students enhance their learning opportunities. Students must meet state disability criteria and have a specific need to enroll in these programs. Case managers, parents/guardians, and students will work together to schedule classes that meet individual student needs. The goal of Learner Support Services is to increase students’ ability to facilitate their transition toward independent living (community participation), employment, and postsecondary training. Students’ progress will be reviewed annually to ensure the best individualized education plan is developed and followed. This will occur through programming at Moorhead High School.  

Please note that some classes have prerequisites or require permission prior to enrollment.

9

10

11

12

Fundamental

Academics

Foundation of

English 9

Strategic Mathematics

Strategic Algebra

Strategic  Geometry

Physical Education

Foundation of

English 10

Strategic Mathematics

Strategic Algebra

Strategic Geometry

Physical Education

Foundation of

English 11

Strategic Mathematics

Strategic Algebra

Strategic Geometry

Physical Education

Foundation of

English 12

Strategic Mathematics

Strategic Algebra

Strategic Geometry

Physical Education

Work Experience

Discovering

Careers I

Community and

         Work

Discovering            Careers I

Discovering

         Careers II

Community and

         Work

Community Work

          Experience

Vocational

       Seminar I

Volunteer

         Experience

Community and

         Work

Community Work

          Experience

Vocational

          Seminar I

Vocational

           Seminar II

Volunteer

         Experience

Community and

         Work

Community Work

          Experience

Support Skills

Instructional

        Studies

Study Strategies 9

Strategies for

        Interpersonal

        and Academic

        Success (SIAS)


Social Emotional Learning Strategies

(SELS)

Language

        Connections I

Language

        Connections II

Life Skills

       Strategies

Instructional

        Studies

Study Strategies 10

Strategies for

        Interpersonal

        and Academic

        Success (SIAS)


Social Emotional Learning Strategies (SELS)

Language

         Connections I

Language

        Connections II

Life Skills

       Strategies

Instructional

        Studies

Study Strategies 11/12

Strategies for

        Interpersonal

        and Academic

        Success II  

         (SIAS)


Social Emotional Learning Strategies (SELS)

Language

         Connections I

Language

        Connections II

Instructional

        Studies

Study Strategies 11/12

Strategies for

        Interpersonal

        and Academic

        Success II  

        (SIAS)


Social Emotional Learning Strategies (SELS)

Language

         Connections I

Language

        Connections II

Functional Skills

Independent Functional Education

Functional Living

       Skills

Consumer

       Life Skills

Independent Functional Education

Functional Living

       Skills

Consumer

       Life Skills

Independent Functional Education

Applied Life Skills Math

Applied Life Skills English

ExCEED Transition

        Setting

Independent Functional Education

Applied Life Skills Math

Applied Life Skills English

ExCEED Transition

        Setting

21st Century Skills from Learner Support Services

Critical Thinking
Problem solving
Planning ahead
Self-assessment

Communication
Writing        
Speaking
Listening

Collaboration
Group projects
Working with adults
Team member

Creativity
Projects
Writing
Presentations        

Four Transitional Pathways

1. Supported Employment and Independent/Supported Living

2. Competitive Employment and Independent Living

3. Career Technical Training (certificate program, apprenticeship, two-year college)

4. Academic (four-year college)

Careers from the skills learned in Learner Support Services:

Health care
Art
Law enforcement
Construction
Auto
Maintenance

Electrical
Welding
Dental assistant
Farm management
Retail
Graphic design

Cosmetology
Home health care
Custodial
Assembly work
Child care
Veterinary Tech

Chef
Business
Education
Plumbing
Cashier
Nursery/Greenhouse

Course Descriptions

        

FUNDAMENTAL ACADEMICS

FOUNDATION OF ENGLISH 9 (LSS41)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Foundations of English 9 is a small group English class taught in the resource room setting. It can fulfill the graduation credit requirement for English 9. Reading and writing instruction is provided using curriculum adapted from the general education grade 9 English program, as well as supplemental materials and strategies to meet individual student needs.  Accommodations such as reading aloud together in class, extra time to complete assignments, and more guided practice are routinely employed in the classroom. Work includes phonics instruction/review, spelling instruction, vocabulary development, reading comprehension strategies, writing strategies, short stories, novels, plays, essay writing, research process skills, and public speaking. The curriculum is modified to meet student needs. Teacher and counselor recommendation is required.

FOUNDATION OF ENGLISH 10 (LSS42)

Grade 10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Foundations of English 10 builds on the skills taught in Foundations of English 9. It can fulfill one credit toward English requirements for graduation. The overall goal of this class is to continue to increase student independence in reading and writing skills. Students will increase the depth and breadth of their vocabularies while improving their ability to comprehend informational/expository text. Reading and writing instruction is provided using curriculum adapted from the general education grade 10 English program, as well as supplemental materials and strategies. Work includes the review and further development of vocabulary, reading comprehension strategies, writing strategies, short stories, novels, plays, essay writing, and research process skills. The curriculum is modified to meet student needs. Teacher and counselor recommendation is required.

FOUNDATION OF ENGLISH 11 (LSS43)

Grade 11; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

In this small group English class taught in the resource room setting, students will further develop their knowledge and skills in reading, writing, and American literature. Students will read and respond (both orally and in writing) to a variety of types of literature (short stories, novels, poetry, biographies, plays, etc.) using correct sentence structure, paragraph development, and essay composition to demonstrate their knowledge of the writing components (clear ideas, organization, voice, word choice, and conventions) and processes (plan, organize, write, evaluate/edit, revise). Students also will be graded on classroom behavior/participation and organization/time management. The curriculum is modified to meet student needs. Teacher and counselor recommendation required.

FOUNDATION OF ENGLISH 12 (LSS44)

Grade 12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Students will further develop their knowledge and skills in reading, writing, and world literature. Students will read and respond (both orally and in writing) to a variety of types of world literature (short stories, novels, poetry, biographies, plays, etc.) using correct sentence structure, paragraph development, and essay composition and will complete a research paper to demonstrate their knowledge of the writing components (clear ideas, organization, voice, word choice, and conventions) and processes (plan, organize, write, evaluate/edit, revise). Students also will be graded on classroom behavior/participation and organization/time management. The curriculum is modified to meet student needs. Teacher and counselor recommendation required.

STRATEGIC MATHEMATICS (LSS48)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Strategic Mathematics is specially designed to provide extra help in understanding pre-algebraic concepts. The course teaches the building blocks of algebra using a sequential approach and strategies for problem solving. The needs of the individual learner are met by adjusting the pace of instruction based on student performance.

STRATEGIC ALGEBRA (LSS46)

Grade 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Strategic Algebra is specially designed to provide extra help in understanding algebraic concepts. The course teaches the key elements of algebra using a sequential approach and strategies for problem solving. It meets the needs of the individual learner by adjusting the pace of instruction based on student performance.

STRATEGIC GEOMETRY (LSS45)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Strategic Geometry is specially designed to provide extra help in understanding geometry concepts. The course teaches the key elements of geometry using a sequential approach and strategies for problem solving. It meets the needs of the individual learner by adjusting the pace of instruction based on student performance.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (LSS31)

Grades 9-12; 2 credits, Block (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This adaptive fitness class is designed to develop and prepare students physically and mentally for their successful integration and participation in as many lifetime recreational and leisure activities as possible. Activities include darts, swimming, horseshoes, volleyball, bowling, basketball, weightlifting, badminton, frisbee and golf activities, archery and various adaptive games. Through the carefully planned programs of special and regular physical education activities, the aims of the adaptive physical education class are directed toward the physical, mental, emotional and social development of each student to reach his or her potential.

WORK EXPERIENCE

DISCOVERING CAREERS I (LSS251)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Career Readiness: In Discovering Careers I, students will focus on developing their communication skills, self-advocacy, self-awareness, career interests, and exploration of careers expectations. Students will learn more about their learning styles and interests. Students will read their I.E.Ps and become familiar with goals, objectives and accommodations and start creating transitional goals. Students will start using this information to brainstorm occupational matches to their skills and interests.

DISCOVERING CAREERS II (LSS261)

Grade 10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Discovery Careers I

Special Services Team Approval Required

Finding a Job: In Discovering Careers II, students will review previously taught communication skills, self-awareness and career explorations. The focus of the class will address understanding job requirements, how to complete an application, mock interview practice, workplace expectations, and skills needed to live independently.

VOCATIONAL SEMINAR I (LSS271)

Grades 11-2; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Advocating for Your Future: Vocational Seminar I students will use a transition curriculum to empower students with skills, goals, and choices they will need to make for a full life in their communities. Students will address the question, “What action can I take to have the future I want?” Vocational Seminar I will focus on developing skills used to advocate for oneself and steps needed to take to enter the careers they have chosen.

VOCATIONAL SEMINAR II (LSS272)

Grade 12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Vocational Seminar I

Special Services Team Approval Required

Succeeding as an Employee: Vocational Seminar II will use a transition curriculum to empower students with skills, goals, and choices they will need to make for a full life in their communities. Students will address the question, “What action can I take to have the future I want?” Vocational Seminar II will focus on actions it takes to become a valued, successful employee, and ways to become responsible members of the community.  

VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE (LSS47)

Grades 11-12; 2 credit, Block (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This class will assist student development of soft skills. Soft skills include communication, enthusiasm/attitude, teamwork, networking, problem solving/critical thinking, and professionalism and will be addressed in a supported community volunteer site. The school-based program is designed for students to improve and gain skills needed to be successful as an adult in the workforce and to make connections with community agencies and members. Students in grades 11 and 12 may experience two to three volunteer opportunities in a given year. Support is provided as needed to ensure student success.

COMMUNITY AND WORK (LSS32)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Community and Work is a resource class for students who have Individual Education Planned Programs. The curriculum pertains to soft skills needed to be more successful at school, work, and in the community. Skills explored may include communication, attitude, teamwork, networking, problem solving, and professionalism.

COMMUNITY WORK EXPERIENCE (LSS33)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Community Work Experience is a resource class for students who have Individual Education Planned Programs. Students who participate in this program may be placed at school or community volunteer sites. The community sites offer students an alternative setting to work on various skills. The main focus of this experience will be on the soft skills needed to be more successful on the job. Students must be 16 years old or older to participate in the program.

SUPPORT SKILLS

INSTRUCTIONAL STUDIES (LSS17)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Instructional Studies focuses on social skills and organizational strategies that assist students in understanding and dealing with emotional/behavioral/organizational challenges. Issues covered in the social skills curriculum include, but are not limited to, assertiveness, independent coping strategies, conflict resolution, and dealing with peer pressure and bullying. Organizational strategies focus on consistency and planning skills.

INSTRUCTIONAL STUDIES 11-12 (LSS17B)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Instructional Studies focuses on social skills and organizational strategies that assist students in understanding and dealing with emotional/behavioral/organizational challenges. Issues covered in the social skills curriculum include, but are not limited to, assertiveness, independent coping strategies, conflict resolution, and dealing with peer pressure and bullying. Organizational strategies focus on consistency and planning skills.

STUDY STRATEGIES 9 (LSS01)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

Study Strategies 9 is a class in the resource room. It is not a study hall. Students who successfully complete the class earn one credit toward graduation. Through participation in lessons and activities in SS9, students learn valuable strategies related to helping them achieve their IEP (Individual Education Plan) goals such as improving academic, organizational, and self-advocacy skills, with a long-term goal of reaching independence and being successful on their own after completion of high school.  Students will be expected to participate in all IEP meetings and transition activities in order to facilitate a better understanding of their educational program.

STUDY STRATEGIES 10 (LSS02)

Grade 10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This course is designed for grade 10 students and focuses on learning strategies that continue to improve reading, writing, and self-advocacy skills and assist students in their organizational process. Students also will learn and practice prioritizing their coursework to meet the students’ mainstream curriculum requirements. Students are graded on participation in strategy and transition lessons and activities, keeping an accurate system for organization, prioritizing work, and using their time wisely. Curriculum is driven by the individual needs of the students and the goals and objectives within a student's Individual Education Plan (IEP).

STUDY STRATEGIES 11/12 (LSS03)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This course focuses on learning strategies to continue to improve reading, writing, organization, and/or self-advocacy/transition skills. Students are graded on participation in academic strategies as well as self-advocacy/transition lessons and activities, keeping an accurate and complete assignment book, prioritizing their work, setting and completing goals, and using their time wisely. It is important to remember that the curriculum is driven by the individual needs of the students and the goals and objectives within a student's Individual Education Plan (IEP).

STRATEGIES FOR INTERPERSONAL AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS I (SIAS) (LSS34S)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

The purpose of this course is to help students be successful in their academic courses and throughout their adult life. Students will learn strategies to become better learners and strategies to interact with others. Students will learn how to regulate their behavior/emotions, adhere to social expectations in a variety of settings, focus and maintain their attention, stay organized, maximize their memory, and plan for short and long-term goals. These skills play into every aspect of a student’s life, including school. This course is here to help students  be successful in high school and get ready for the next stage of their lives.

STRATEGIES FOR INTERPERSONAL AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS II (SIAS II) (LSS34S2)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

The purpose of this course is to help students continue to be successful in their academic courses and to focus on skills they will need when they enter their adult life. Students will learn strategies to become better learners, become ready for life after high school, and interact with others in a variety of settings. Students will learn how to regulate their behavior/emotions, adhere to social expectations in a variety of settings, focus and maintain their attention, stay organized, maximize their memory, and plan for short and long-term goals. These skills play into every aspect of a student’s life, including school. This course is here to help students be successful in high school and get ready for the next stage of their lives. It is a continuation of Strategies for Interpersonal and Academic Success I.

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING STRATEGIES (SELS) (LSS40)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

The purpose of this course is to provide students with strategies to develop awareness, understanding, and management of their behavior to facilitate positive interactions and success in current and future environments. Instruction specifically designed to teach these strategies will be integrated into class activities according to individual student needs. The class will also incorporate decision making and leadership curriculum to allow application of strategies to school expectations and daily living needs.

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING STRATEGIES II (SELS II) (LSS40B)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

The purpose of this course is to provide students with strategies to develop awareness, understanding, and management of their behavior to facilitate positive interactions and success in current and future environments. Instruction specifically designed to teach these strategies will be integrated into class activities according to individual student needs. The class will also incorporate decision making and leadership curriculum to allow application of strategies to school expectations and daily living needs.

LANGUAGE CONNECTIONS I (LSS30)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

The English language can be confusing and complicated. This course is designed to to target transition skills through improving expressive and receptive language skills, self-advocacy, and developing language through content. Targeted language skills are reinforced by reviewing strategies related to reading, writing and speaking/signing and how they relate to the English language. Classroom assignments, academic content, projects and real-life experiences are incorporated into Language Connections I & II to practice and reinforce targeted language development.

LANGUAGE CONNECTIONS II (LSS30B)

Grades 9-12; 2 credit, Block (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

The English language can be confusing and complicated. This course is designed to to target transition skills through improving expressive and receptive language skills, self-advocacy, and developing language through content. Targeted language skills are reinforced by reviewing strategies related to reading, writing and speaking/signing and how they relate to the English language. Classroom assignments, academic content, projects and real-life experiences are incorporated into Language Connections I & II to practice and reinforce targeted language development.

LIFE SKILLS STRATEGIES (LSS24S)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This course is designed to support students who are currently enrolled in life skills classes. The focus of this course is to familiarize students with different strategies to assist them in becoming more independent in their daily lives. A large focus of instruction is on social and life skills. The second half of the period is focused on organization and completing mainstream coursework.

FUNCTIONAL SKILLS

INDEPENDENT FUNCTIONAL EDUCATION (LSS34P)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

The focus of this course is on life skills curriculum with an emphasis on achieving the maximum level of functional independence (based on each individual) in each of the three transition areas. The three areas are community (home living and recreation), post-secondary planning, and employment. A portion of this program is community based.

FUNCTIONAL LIVING SKILLS (LSS23)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This course is designed to instruct students in the skill area of using functional reading and writing in their daily lives. The goal is to maximize their independence across all settings. There is a strong focus on increasing the students’ vocabulary. Some of the units covered are using the newspaper and phone book, reading for information, following instructions, completing forms and applications, reading schedules, and journaling. Students work on increasing skills at their level of independence during the second half of the period.

CONSUMER LIFE SKILLS (LSS22)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This course is designed to instruct students in the functional skill area of math used in their daily lives. The goal is to maximize their independence across all settings. Some of the units covered include checking accounts, budgeting, money, time, and consumer skills. There is a strong focus on decoding word problems to determine the needed operations. Students work on increasing skills at their level of independence during the second half of the period.

APPLIED LIFE SKILLS MATH (LSS24M)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This course makes math relevant for students in transition from school to adult life. The practical course content helps students improve their computational skills by applying them to real-life experiences to offer learning necessary for living independently.  

APPLIED LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH (LSS24E)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

This course makes reading and writing relevant for students in transition from school to adult life. This course content targets reading and writing skills students will need in real-life situations. Students will use practical course content in both purposeful and leisure activities designed for improving their skills necessary for living independently.

ExCEED TRANSITION SETTING (LSS38)

Grades 11-12; 2 credit, Block (Year)

Special Services Team Approval Required

The ExCEED setting is an on-campus mock-apartment setting within the high school serving as a transition component for students to generalize daily and functional living skills outside the typical classroom setting. Through this setting and its options for learning transition skills, students can optimize their successful transition into adult life outside the high school.

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Mathematics

“Why do I need to know this?” is a common phrase heard in every math class. Cardiff University gives a sound response: “Mathematics is a universal part of human culture. It is the tool and language of commerce, engineering and other sciences – physics, computing, biology etc. It helps us recognize patterns and to understand the world around us. Mathematics plays a vital, often unseen, role in many aspects of modern life. As society becomes more technically dependent, there will be an increasing requirement for people with a high level of mathematical training. Analytical and quantitative skills are sought by a wide range of employers. A background in mathematics provides you with a broad range of skills in problem solving, logical reasoning and flexible thinking. This leads to careers that are exciting, challenging and diverse in nature.”  

Mathematics is called the “Queen of Sciencebut that statement could be expanded to suggest that mathematics is instrumental in all that we do in life. The Moorhead High Math Department is dedicated to enriching your life.

Minnesota requires three credits in mathematics for graduation: Intermediate Algebra, Geometry and Advanced Algebra.

The mathematics state standards can be reviewed on the Minnesota Department of Education website.

Please check the prerequisites needed for each course. Courses may be taken in any year as long as the prerequisites have been met.

9

10

11

12

Required for Graduation

Intermediate

Algebra

Geometry

Advanced Algebra

(Recommended)

Pre-College

    Algebra and/or

Trigonometry or College Algebra or College Functions and Trigonometry

AP

(* Honors Geometry
Grade 8)

Honors Intermediate Algebra

Honors Pre-Calculus and Honors Trigonometry

Advanced Placement Statistics

AP Calculus or Calculus or

College Algebra or

College Functions and Trigonometry

Developing

Beginning Algebra

Intermediate Algebra

Geometry

Advanced Algebra

21st Century Skills in mathematics:

Critical Thinking
Deductive thinking
Problem solving
Manipulate ideas
Probability
Check for mistakes
Problem solving
Attention to detail

Communication
Mathematical language
Present a process
Read for meaning
Extract meaning from symbols or words
Present a solution
Listen effectively
Note taking
Use diagrams

Collaboration
Teamwork 
Working with a teacher
Learn a sequence
        

Creativity
Tackling problems with many steps
Seeing more than 1 solution
Not giving up
Interpret data / analyze

Jobs involving mathematics: One would be challenged to find any career or component of life that does not use mathematics. The following is a listing of potential career choices:

Actuarial work
Biotech work
Welding
Statistics
Biomathematics
Teaching - any level
Petroleum work
Sales / marketing

Security work
Stock broker
Environmental work
Aeronautics

Electrician
Investments
Computer science
Systems analyst

Cryptography
Operations research
Web development
Electrical
Finance
Plumbing
Athletics
Carpentry

Statistics
Political research
Pollster
Surveying

Electrical
Nursing
Information technology
Heating and cooling

Course Descriptions

BEGINNING ALGEBRA  (MTH20)

Grade 9; 1 credit; Skinny (Year)

Students expand their problem-solving abilities by learning problem-solving strategies, logical reasoning skills and modeling methods. Topics examined in depth are field properties, linear equations and linear models. Students will be exposed to graphing calculators and Geometer's sketchpad as ways to deepen the conceptual understanding of mathematics. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is recommended.

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA  (MTH21)   

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA FOR FRESHMEN (MTH21F)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Linear or Beginning Algebra

Intermediate algebra is primarily concerned with further developing students’ understanding of topics discussed in Beginning Algebra, including (but not limited to) solving equations and linear and absolute value functions and introducing students to piecewise-defined, quadratic and polynomial functions, which are topics necessary to prepare students for advanced mathematics-based courses such as probability and statistics, calculus, chemistry, and physics. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to these topics with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is required.

HONORS INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA  (MTH21H)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Beginning or Linear Algebra (grade 8) and recommendation of teacher

This is a strong Intermediate Algebra course for students who do well in math. This course includes an in-depth study of piecewise, quadratic, exponential and rational functions. Honors Intermediate Algebra is intended for students who (1) are interested in covering topics in a greater depth and at a faster pace; (2) have a serious intent to pursue a career in mathematics, science, engineering, or similar areas; and/or (3) enjoy the structure and rigor of formal mathematics. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is required.

GEOMETRY (MTH04)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite:  Intermediate Algebra

Geometry is designed for students to review and expand basic mathematical knowledge introduced in Intermediate Algebra such as problem-solving equations and linear functions, as well as enhance visual thinking while improving    

logical reasoning and deductive thinking. The course explores two- and three-dimensional figures, including angles, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, polygons, similarity, circles, solids and transformations and coordinate geometry.  A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is recommended.

ADVANCED ALGEBRA  (MTH22)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite:  Intermediate Algebra

Advanced Algebra is primarily concerned with reviewing topics discussed in Beginning Algebra  and Intermediate Algebra, including (but not limited to) linear, quadratic, absolute value, piecewise-defined, and polynomial functions and further developing students’ understanding of rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions as well as sequences and series. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to these topics with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Additionally, this course will introduce students to the basics of probability and statistics, including data collection, exploratory data analysis, measures of central tendency and spread, theoretical probabilities in simple and compound events, basics of experimental design, and evaluating predictions and arguments of data. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84) is required.

TRIGONOMETRY (MTH07)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra, Geometry

The study of Trigonometry covers six right triangle functions, the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. Emphasis is given to practical applications of trigonometry such as navigation and physics. Trigonometry is necessary for students planning to take calculus and for students planning further work in electronics and other technical fields. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is required.

HONORS TRIGONOMETRY (MTH08)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

Prerequisite: Honors Intermediate Algebra, Geometry

This course utilizes a graphing approach to the study of trigonometric functions. The course develops the theory, skill and    applications of right triangle trigonometry, the Law of Sines and Cosines, circular functions including modeling real-world    data, and the application of trigonometry to complex numbers, vectors and the use of trigonometric functions. Students    should have obtained an A or B in prerequisite courses. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is required.

PRE-COLLEGE ALGEBRA (MTH09)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra, Geometry

In this course, students are introduced to the standard concepts and language needed for beginning college mathematics courses. The course will extend and review algebraic concepts, especially functions and graphs. Topics may also include sequences and series, logarithmic and exponential functions, rational functions, and conic sections. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is required.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA (MTH1114) (Concurrent Enrollment through MState)

GRADES 11-12; 1 credit (high school) Block (semester); 4 credits (college credit) through MState

Prerequisites:  Geometry, Advanced Algebra and an acceptable score on the Accuplacer exam, which is determined by the college registrar.

The competencies for this course include: analyzing characteristics of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and radical functions, their graphs and inverse (where appropriate), solve systems of equations, determine real and complex zeros of polynomials, perform operations, including compositions and use of mathematical modeling to solve application problems. A graphing calculator is required (TI-83 or 84 is recommended).

COLLEGE FUNCTIONS & TRIGONOMETRY (MTH1115) (Concurrent Enrollment Through MState)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit (high school, Block (Semester); 4 credits (college credit) through MState

Prerequisite:  College Algebra

The competencies for this course include: the circular method and right triangle method to define trigonometric functions, analyze the characteristics of trigonometric functions, their graphs and inverse, solve trigonometric equations, use trigonometric identities to evaluate functions and simplify expressions, solve applications involving trigonometric concepts, explore the Law of Cosines, apply vector concepts to find solutions in the plane and in three dimensional space, explore complex numbers, and their trigonometric form, analyze the characteristics of parabolas, ellipses, and hyperbolas and explore polar coordinates, equations and their graphs. A graphing calculator is required (TI-83 or 84 is recommended).

HONORS PRE-CALCULUS (MTH10)

Grades 10-12; ½ credit, Skinny (Semester)

Prerequisite: Honors Intermediate Algebra, Geometry

This course strengthens and extends mathematical concepts learned in previous classes and prepares students for calculus and college mathematics courses. Topics include review of all basic algebraic and transcendental  functions, including polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, sequences and series, and probability topics. An emphasis is placed on graphing approaches to most of these topics. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is required. Students should have obtained an A or B in prerequisite courses.

AP STATISTICS (MTH17)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite:  Advanced Algebra OR Honors Pre-Calculus OR Pre-College Algebra.

A grade of either an A or B is recommended in these courses.  

At many universities, students are taking at least one introductory statistics course in response to the many different occupations that apply statistical concepts. This course will introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. It will cover four major themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. The course follows the College Board’s statistics course syllabus, the Advanced Placement course expectations, and Advanced Placement grading practices. The course’s homework expectations is generally 45 minutes to an hour each day. Students also will be expected to complete reports and projects outside of class time. By successfully scoring on the Advanced Placement statistics exam, a student may receive college credit, advanced placement or both for a one-semester introductory college statistics course. A graphing calculator (TI-83+ or TI-84+) is required.  

CALCULUS (MTH11)

Grade 12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite:  Honors Pre-Calculus and Honors Trigonometry OR Pre-College Algebra and Trigonometry

Calculus is fundamentally different from the mathematics students have studied previously. Calculus is less static and more dynamic; it is concerned with change in motion; it deals with quantities that approach other quantities. This course is primarily concerned with developing students’ understanding of topics including functions and models, limits, derivatives, integrals, differential calculus, and infinite sequences and series. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Through the use of these unifying themes, the course becomes a cohesive whole rather than collections of unrelated topics.  Technology (graphing calculators: TI-83+ or TI-84+) will be used regularly to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.   Unlike AP Calculus, a student may earn only high school credit by successfully completing the class.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS  (MTH12)

Grade 11 & 12; 1 credit; Block (Semester)

Prerequisites: Honors Precalculus and Honors Trigonometry

Calculus is fundamentally different from the mathematics that students have studied previously (calculus is less static and more dynamic; it is concerned with change in motion; it deals with quantities that approach other quantities).  This course is primarily concerned with developing students’ understanding of topics including functions and models, limits, derivatives, integrals, and differential calculus.  The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally.  Through the use of these unifying themes, the course becomes a cohesive whole rather than a collection of unrelated topics.  Technology (required graphing calculators: TI-83+ or TI-84+) will be used regularly to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.

 

In order to fully comprehend daily material, it is imperative to complete homework assignments.  Students should expect to spend on average 30-45 minutes per day reviewing notes and other resources and working all assigned problems.

 

Students may earn high school credit, advanced placement credit (for a one-semester college Calculus 1 course) or both by successfully scoring on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam.  

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS  AB (MTH12A)

Grade 11 & 12; 1 credit; Block (Semester)

Prerequisites: AP Calculus

AP Calculus AB is an extension of AP Calculus  rather than an enhancement.  This course is primarily concerned with developing students’ understanding of topics including functions and models, limits, derivatives, integrals, and differential calculus.  The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally.  Through the use of these unifying themes, the course becomes a cohesive whole rather than a collection of unrelated topics.  Technology (required graphing calculators: TI-83+ or TI-84+) will be used regularly to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.

 

In order to fully comprehend daily material, it is imperative to complete homework assignments.  Students should expect to spend on average 30-45 minutes per day reviewing notes and other resources and working all assigned problems.

 

Students may earn high school credit, advanced placement credit (for a one-semester college Calculus 1 course) or both by successfully scoring on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam.  

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC (MTH12B)

Grade 11 & 12; 1 credit; Block (Semester)

Prerequisites: AP Calculus

AP Calculus BC is an extension of AP Calculus rather than an enhancement.  This course is primarily concerned with further developing students’ understanding of topics including functions and models, limits, derivatives, integrals, and differential calculus, and introducing students to infinite sequences and series.  Technology (required graphing calculators: TI-83+ or TI-84+) will be used regularly to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.

 

In order to fully comprehend daily material, it is imperative to complete homework assignments.  Students should expect to spend on average 30-45 minutes per day reviewing notes and other resources and working all assigned problems.

 

Students may earn high school credit, advanced placement credit (for a one-semester college Calculus 2 course) or both by successfully scoring on the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam. 


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Music

Watch a video regarding registration for music classes

Victor Hugo observed that “Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.” For anyone who has practiced and produced a musical note this is all so true. Music offers so much to enhance an individual. Beyond the realm of personal satisfaction and joy from music is the gain from the study of music and musical production.

The study of music has been proven to increase vocabulary acquisition, nurture advanced reading skills and carry additional skills that readily transfer to all studies. Furthermore, students in music advance teamwork and communication within their section and the larger musical group. There is even a strong correlation between music and mathematics plus a myriad of scholarship opportunities in the field of music. The possibilities with music are endless and serve to provide a lifetime of satisfaction.

The arts state standards can be reviewed on the Minnesota Department of Education website, and the arts national standards can be reviewed on the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards website.

Minnesota requires one art credit (two ½ credit classes or one 1 credit course) for graduation and that can be taken any year between grades 9-12. Be sure to read this registration catalog carefully. Some of the music options are based upon auditions or advanced experience in the respective music area.

9

10

11

12

Choir

Varsity Choir

Music Theory

Varsity Choir

Treble Choir

Concert Choir

Chorale

Vocal Chamber

        Music

Vocal Sectional

Music Theory

Varsity Choir

Treble Choir

Concert Choir

Chorale

Vocal Chamber

        Music

Vocal Sectional

Music Theory

Varsity Choir

Treble Choir

Concert Choir

Chorale

Vocal Chamber

        Music

Vocal Sectional

Music Theory

Orchestra

String Ensemble

String Sectional

Freshman  

        Orchestra

Music Theory

String Ensemble

String Sectional

Concert Orchestra

Symphony

         Orchestra

Chamber

         Orchestra

Music Theory

Independent  

   Studies in    

   Strings

String Ensemble

String Sectional

Concert Orchestra

Symphony

         Orchestra

Chamber

         Orchestra

Music Theory

Independent  

   Studies in

   Strings

String Ensemble

String Sectional

Concert Orchestra

Symphony

         Orchestra

Chamber

         Orchestra

Music Theory

Independent  

   Studies in

   Strings

Band

Concert Band

Band Sectional

Symphonic Band

Music Theory

Concert Band

Band Sectional

Symphonic Band

Wind Ensemble

Music Theory

Concert Band

Band Sectional

Symphonic Band

Wind Ensemble

Music Theory

Concert Band

Band Sectional

Symphonic Band

Wind Ensemble

Music Theory

Apollo Strings, Carolers, Jazz Band, Marching Band and Pep Band are extracurricular activities that afford additional music experience and fun!

21st Century Skills in music:

Critical Thinking
Confidence
Perseverance
Constructive feedback
Accountability
Self-correction

Communication
Non verbal
Symbolic

Collaboration
Cooperation        

Creativity
Self-discipline
Improvisation
Problem solving
Self-confidence

Jobs involving music:  (also - see the report from Berklee College of Music)

Performance instrumental
Recording
Commercial
Radio shows
Performance vocal
Composition
Film scoring
Marketing/Advertising

Performance conducting
Arranger
TV shows
Video games
Music editor
Instrument maker
Instrument repair
Music sales

Piano tuner
Education
Music distributor
Recording industry
Publishing
Music attorney
Sound production
Musical therapy

Artist manager / agent
Accompanist
Church musician
Event coordinator
Wedding coordinator
Audiology/Acoustic technician

Course Descriptions

MUSIC THEORY I & II (MUS20) & (MUS202)

Grades 9-12; 1/2 credit, Skinny (Semester) each class

Music Theory is open to any grades 9-12 student. In Music Theory I, students will learn basic music fundamentals, ear-training, melodic dictation, and four-part writing. In Music Theory II, students will learn chord analysis, counterpoint, and composition. Music Theory II is open to students who have successfully completed Music Theory I.

CONCERT BAND (MUS01C)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Concert Band is open to students in grades 9-10 who have previous experience on a band instrument. Students will

continue to develop tone and technique on their chosen instrument and play daily in a large group ensemble

setting. Concert band performs a variety of styles of music for several public performances throughout the year.

SYMPHONIC BAND (MUS02S)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)
Students selected through audition

Symphonic Band is an advanced instrumental ensemble which is comprised of students who have been selected by

audition. Students in Symphonic Band will continue to develop tone and technique on their chosen instrument, as

well as play daily in a large group ensemble setting. Students will perform a variety of music styles at several public performances throughout the year. Students are encouraged to be involved in the Moorhead High School Marching Band and Pep Band. This group tours every other year.

WIND ENSEMBLE (MUS03)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)
Students selected through audition

The Wind Ensemble is the most advanced instrumental ensemble for students in grades 10-12 who have been selected through audition. Students in Wind Ensemble will participate daily in rigorous rehearsals that focus on tone and technique building as well as ensemble musicianship. Students will perform a variety of music styles at several public performances throughout the year. Students should anticipate being involved in the Moorhead High School Marching Band and Pep Band. This group tours every other year.

BAND SECTIONAL

(MUS05) 1ST SEMESTER

(MUS052) 2ND SEMESTER

Grades 9-12; 1/2 credit, Skinny (Semester) (offered both semesters)

This course will offer more intensive, small group study of ensemble literature and performance issues specific to individual instruments. Various ensembles will be formed based on the instrumentation available. Students who wish to audition for various state honor bands or participate in solo and ensemble contest are encouraged to register for this course. This course is open to any instrumental music student.

FRESHMEN ORCHESTRA (MUS06)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Freshmen Orchestra is open to grade 9 students who have previous experience on a string instrument. Students will improve on fundamental musical skills including bowing technique, quality tone production, intonation, second through fifth positions, and vibrato. The Freshmen Orchestra performs several concerts throughout the school year and participates in the MNSOTA Tier I Orchestra Festival.

CONCERT ORCHESTRA (MUS062)

Grades 10-12; 1 Credit, Skinny (Year)

Concert Orchestra, an intermediate ensemble, is open to any grades 10-12 string student. Concert Orchestra is intended to be a preparatory ensemble for Symphony and Chamber Orchestras. Concert Orchestra meets daily and performs a variety of string literature ranging from Baroque to contemporary works. Performances will be scheduled throughout the year.

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (MUS08)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)
Students selected through audition

Students auditioning for Symphony Orchestra are required to demonstrate proficiency in the fundamentals of string performance. Symphony Orchestra meets daily and performs a variety of string literature ranging from Baroque to contemporary works. Performances will be scheduled throughout the year. The Symphony Orchestra tours every other year.

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA (MUS07)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)
Students selected through audition

The Chamber Orchestra is comprised of serious instrumental students selected through audition and meeting the required proficiency standards of the ensemble. Emphasis will be placed on advanced orchestral literature and techniques. The Chamber Orchestra tours every other year.

STRING ENSEMBLE (MUS09)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

This course will offer an intensive, small group study of ensemble literature and performance issues specific to individual instruments. This course is open to any orchestra student.

STRING SECTIONAL

(MUS10) 1ST SEMESTER

(MUS102) 2ND SEMESTER

Grades 9-12; 1/2 credit, Skinny (Semester)

This course is designed to address technical aspects of string instrument playing. Emphasis will be placed on playing technique, tone production, sight-reading, and advanced string skills.This course is open to any orchestra student.

VARSITY CHOIR (MUS11)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Varsity Choir is the place for all students to begin singing at MHS. The course includes instruction in the fundamentals of singing, music theory, music reading and sight-singing. The choir performs mixed music from a variety of genres. No audition or prior singing experience needed. Peer tutors are often sought for the Varsity Choir.

TREBLE CHOIR (MUS12)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

This is an intermediate ensemble open to all treble voices grades 10-12 with a focus on vocal training and preparation. Performs a variety of music from all cultures. No audition needed.

CONCERT CHOIR (MUS13C)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)
Students selected through audition

The Concert Choir is open to students who demonstrate a high level of proficient singing and open by audition only. Please contact the choir director to set up an audition time and obtain audition material. This ensemble performs music from all eras and will tour every two years.

CHORALE (MUS14)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)
Students selected through audition

The Chorale is comprised of the most serious choral students, selected by audition and meeting the required proficiency standards of the ensemble. Students will perform advanced level repertoire from all genres and will tour every two years.

VOCAL CHAMBER MUSIC (MUS15)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

The Vocal Chamber ensemble is open to students in grades 10-12 with permission from the director to register. It performs a variety of small chamber music such as vocal jazz and pop music.

INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN STRINGS (MUS16)

Grades 9-12; 1/2 credit, Skinny (Semester)

This course allows students to independently discover a variety of string repertoire from etudes to solo works. Technical aspects of string instrument playing including playing technique, tone production, and sight-reading, and advanced string skills will be emphasized. This course is open to any orchestra student.

MUSIC SECTIONAL (MUS17)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Music sectional is open to all music students grades 10-12 and is designed to provide individual practice time, small

ensemble or sectional practice time on performance music, and audition preparation time.


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Reading

Becoming a strong reader is a key to success in all other classes and careers. Reading is much more than merely “knowing the words.” Reading is thinking! Reading is getting meaning from what is read and being able to apply the ideas to other thoughts and other classes. Every reader can become a stronger reader. This may mean reading more complex articles or books. It may mean becoming more fluent or better able to understand what is read. To be a “better reader” means different things to different people, and the reading classes at Moorhead High School are designed to help each student to achieve his or her own unique reading goals.

Parents are encouraged to contact the reading teachers at anytime with concerns of their students or concerns that they might have. The reading program staff want to work in a partnership with families to improve the reading skills of all students.

The Minnesota state reading standards can be reviewed on the Minnesota Department of Education website.

Course Descriptions

READ 180 / SYSTEM 44 (READ 180)

Grades 9-12; 2 credits, Block (Year)

Placement is based upon reading scores and district criteria. As such, the course may become a required course. The READ 180 course is intensive and based upon sound national research designed to improve the reading, comprehension and writing skills of students. It is intended to be a “turnaround” point for students who struggle with reading and comprehension by focusing on specific reading strategies. The staff for this course are specifically trained to use the Scholastic products READ 180 and System 44 approved by the U.S. Department of Education. Using a combination of large group, small group, computer assistance and independent work, students can grow to become confident readers. Students may take this course for two years if they meet the district criteria.

READING ENHANCEMENT (ELE07)

Grade 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Placement is based upon reading scores and district criteria. This course targets students who possess reading skills but need improvement to be successful with the intense reading requirements of high school. Reading Enhancement uses the research-based program Reading Plus to accelerate the reading capability of a student. The course is designed to assist students to improve their reading efficiency, comprehension and application of specific skills to what is read. The course addresses both fiction and content reading skills as well as reading for enjoyment and educational purposes. The program is customized for each student, targets areas for improvement, and provides constant feedback to measure how a student is mastering the skills needed to be a better reader. Successful students leave the course with increased confidence in their reading skills. The course may be taken more than once with the permission of the instructor.

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Science

Science is composed of what one knows about the “stuff” of life from the smallest subatomic particle in an atom to the human body and the nature of the environment and space that surrounds each of us. Science also explores the processes of our environment and the space around us. Another crucial component of science is the process by which observers learn about the “stuff” in the universe and how that “stuff” relates to other things in the universe. However, science is different from many other ways of learning because of the way it is done. Science relies on testing ideas with evidence gathered from the natural world.

In science classes students will learn about the “stuff” that creates the world around us as well as skills in organization, communication, intellectual thinking, numeracy, research, critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, application of principles and more. These are the skills of life!

The science state standards can be reviewed on the Minnesota Department of Education website.

Please check the prerequisites needed for each course.

9

10

11

12

Required for Graduation

Physical Science

Biology

Chemistry or Physics or ChemCom

(one of these must be taken to meet the Minnesota graduation standards)

Chemistry or Physics or ChemCom)

(one of these must be taken to meet the Minnesota graduation standards unless completed in an earlier grade)

AP/Advanced

The path is flexible and can be used to meet your future goals.

Honors Physical Science / Honors Biology

Honors Biology

AP Biology

Chemistry

Chemistry

AP Chemistry

AP Biology

Physics

AP Chemistry

AP Biology

Physics

Electives

Zoology

Botany

Human Anatomy and

     Physiology I

Zoology

Botany

Human Anatomy and

     Physiology I

Human Anatomy and

     Physiology II

Biochemistry

Environmental

      Science

Forensic Science

Zoology

Botany

Human Anatomy and

     Physiology I

Human Anatomy and

     Physiology II

Biochemistry

Environmental

      Science

Forensic Science

Twenty-First Century Skills in science:

Critical Thinking
Searching
Investigation
Evaluating
Tabulating
Comparing
Contrasting
Classifying

Communication
Listening
Observing
Asking questions        
Discussing
Explaining / defending
Graphing / charting
Writing
Reporting

Collaboration         
Gathering data
Experiments        
Caring for equipment        

Creativity
Planning ahead
Designing
Inventing
Synthesizing
Calibrating
Constructing

                        

Jobs involving science:

Aquacultural manager
Aquarist
Electrician
Power production
Patent lawyer
Chemist
Forensics
Technical writer
Game design
Engineer

Zoologist

Cartographer
Education
Mortician
Micro / nano scientist
Plumber
Computer science
Athletic trainer        
Environmental scientist
Geographic information
Meteorologist

Alternative energy
Aerospace
Surveyor
Heating and cooling

Geoscientist
Sound / lighting
Automotive
Hydrologist
Park ranger
Health and safety engineer

Medical science
Agronomist
Landscape architecture
Veterinarian
Food science
Security                Robotics
Disease control
Wildlife / Marine biologist        

                                                

Course Descriptions

PHYSICAL SCIENCE (SCI019)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Physical Science is an introduction to the fields of chemistry and physics. Students will be reviewing and covering topics such as the phases of matter, the atom, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and acids and bases during the chemistry semester. The physics semester will include motion, forces, Newton's Laws, work, energy and power calculations. Problem solving using the scientific method will prepare the student for further study in science and will emphasize the scientific principles that surround us in our daily lives.

HONORS PHYSICAL SCIENCE (SCI15)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Honors Math (Grade 8)

This course is to teach students scientific theory with emphasis on research, discussion, and problem solving. Students will work in laboratory investigations to acquire the skills of the scientist. Scientific theory will be examined as how it applies to everyday life situations. The course will show the importance of using science and technology in rapidly advancing society.  This study will prepare students for additional science coursework during high school in preparation for post-secondary education.

BIOLOGY (SCI03)

Grade 10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Physical Science

Biology is a course that studies life. Course topics includes the nature of science, biochemistry, cellular biology, ecology, genetics and evolution. Emphasis is placed on the biochemical processes of life, including life cycles and the interaction of life with nonliving things.

HONORS BIOLOGY (SCI05)

Grades 9-10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Physical Science or evidence of middle school science excellence

The focus of the class will be equipping students with knowledge and skills to successfully complete AP Biology and/or Human Anatomy and Physiology. Normal biology curriculum will be followed with added emphasis in the areas that will enhance student performance in future science classes. Course may be taken at the same time as Honors Physical Science.

AP BIOLOGY (SCI07), (SCI072), (SCI073) REGISTER FOR ALL THREE

Grades 10-12; 1.5 credits, Block (Three Quarters)

Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology, Chemistry (Chemistry can be concurrent)

AP Biology is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college biology course, usually taken by biology majors during their first year of college. This course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of a first course in high school biology and one in high school chemistry. AP Biology will include topics regularly covered in a college biology course, including molecular biology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and anatomy/physiology of both plants and animals. The college course in biology differs significantly from the usual first high school course in biology with respect to the textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the type of laboratory work done, and the time and effort required outside of class by the students. It is recommended that students are prepared for 30-45 minutes of work daily outside of the classroom. Students who complete the Advanced Placement Biology course will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam for determination of college credit.

CHEMISTRY (SCI09S)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Geometry, Physical Science, grade 9 teacher recommendation for grade 10 students

Chemistry is a study of the composition of materials and the changes these materials undergo. It is the design of the course that the students may gain more than just knowledge of materials. Proper thought processes and useful habits will be developed. Laboratory work is emphasized as an important means of learning scientific methods. Fundamental knowledge of algebraic concepts is necessary to understand the principles of stoichiometry, gas laws and the Laws of Conservation. The nature of chemistry is such that students must be willing to apply themselves diligently if they are to successfully complete the requirements of the course.

CHEMCOM - CHEMISTRY IN THE COMMUNITY (SCI08)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Geometry, Physical Science

Chemistry is the study of what substances are made of and the changes they undergo. In this class, chemistry is taught as students learn how it applies to real-life situations. Students will learn many of the concepts taught in a regular chemistry course, but topics will be addressed using real-life examples. This is a lab course in which students will get hands-on experience using chemicals and doing experiments while applying the scientific method. Topics are broken down into units based on resources, water, petroleum, air, and food.

AP CHEMISTRY (SCI10), (SCI102), (SCI103) REGISTER FOR ALL THREE

Grades 11-12; 1.5 credits, Block (Three Quarters)

Prerequisite: Chemistry, Honors Pre Calc or Pre College Algebra (can be concurrent)

The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year in college. This course is to be taken after the successful completion of a first course in high school chemistry. Students enrolled in the class will be expected to develop an understanding of the following topics: structure and states of matter, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics. The course involved in-depth discussion on each of the topics along with extensive lab experience that requires the student to maintain their own lab manual. It would be expected that the student spend 30-45 minutes daily outside of class. Students who complete the Advanced Placement Chemistry course will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam for determination of college credit.

BIOCHEMISTRY (SCI09B)

Grades 10-12; 1/2 credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Chemistry

Biochemistry is intended to build upon those concepts students learned in chemistry and biology courses and expose students to current biochemical lab techniques. This course would be helpful to those students interested in a career involving chemistry, biology or medicine. Topics covered will include an overview of organic chemistry including lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins.

PHYSICS (SCI11)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Geometry and Trigonometry (concurrent enrollment useful but not required)

Physics is the study of matter and energy and how various forms of energy are interrelated. Physics is the fundamental science as it develops principles applied in all other sciences. This course gives a theoretical and and practical introduction to essential physics topics including kinematics in one and two dimensions, force and dynamics, bodies in equilibrium, and linear momentum. Class and laboratory assignments will use algebraic and trigonometric methods to analyze data, illustrate the relationships between variables, and solve written and applied problems. An understanding of physics is important for success in many scientific and technical areas such as biological science, chemistry, computer design, dentistry, engineering, forestry, geological science, health and medical sciences, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and others. Physics classes help develop the verbal and math skills needed to do well on the ACT and SAT tests.

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (SCI06)

Grades 10-12; 1 Credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology (Biology or Honors Biology can be concurrent)

The focus of this course is the human body. It is excellent preparation for students interested in a career in the medical field such as sports medicine, athletic trainer, nursing, doctor, physical therapist, veterinarian, dentist, etc. It is also excellent preparation for students interested in any major in science. Students will use labs to study human tissues and organ systems including integumentary, skeletal, muscular, digestive and circulatory. The labs will include the use of preserved specimens, computer-assisted technologies and the testing of the students’ own bodies.

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (SCI062)

Grades 11-12; 1 Credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This course continues the study of the human body. It is excellent preparation for students interested in a career in the medical field such as sports medicine, athletic trainer, nursing, doctor, physical therapist, veterinarian, dentist, etc. It is also excellent preparation for students interested in any major in science. Students will use labs to study organ systems including nervous, lymphatic and immunity, endocrine, urinary, reproductive, and a continuation of circulatory. The labs will include the use of preserved specimens, computer-assisted technologies and the testing of the students’ own bodies.

ZOOLOGY (SCI13)

Grades 10-12; 1/2 credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology

This class will explore the animal kingdom. Topics studied include the scientific method, classification, development and evolution of the various animal phyla and classes. This class will require students to actively participate in dissections, which will include, but are not limited to, worms, clams, crayfish, grasshoppers, sea-stars, squid, fish and various mammals.

FORENSIC SCIENCE (SCI12F)

Grades 11-12; 1/2 credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology

Forensic Science is an interdisciplinary science, which will bring in topics from physics, biology, chemistry, anthropology, psychology, mathematics, engineering and law. In addition, reasoning, critical thinking, reading, and writing skills will be developed. The units in this course will include crime labs, evidence collection, hair and fiber analysis, blood typing and blood spatter, fingerprinting, DNA fingerprinting, toxicology, document analysis, and accident reconstruction.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (SCI12)

Grades 11-12; 1/2 credit, Skinny (Semester)

Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology

Environmental Science studies the natural world and how humans interact with the environment.  It is an interdisciplinary study, which will bring in topics from biology, chemistry, geology, sociology and economics.  Throughout the semester we will explore how our environment affects us and in turn how we affect the environment.  Topics that will be covered include:  ecology, biodiversity, conservation management, human population dynamics, renewable and nonrenewable resources and climate.

BOTANY (SCI14)

Grades 11-12; 1/2 credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology

This class will study plants and their importance as food and their role in the ecosystems around us. Plant structure and function will be covered. Different plant groupings also will be examined. Labs will include microscope examination of plant structures and developing studies of the effects of environmental conditions on plant growth.

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Social Studies

Preparing students for the 21st century cannot be accomplished without a strong and sustaining emphasis on the social studies. The social studies provide cornerstone skills that are the key to opening doors for a more diverse, competitive workforce and responsible citizenry. Students use critical thinking, self-assessment, reasoning, problem-solving, collaboration, research, and investigation to make connections in new and innovative ways as they progress through social studies education. These standards outline the knowledge and skills needed to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world. These same skills do much to prepare future citizens for further education and careers.

The courses required for graduation are listed below in the corresponding row. The social studies department is the only department at Moorhead High School to offer a four-year continuum in Advanced Placement (AP) coursework. The AP courses will count for graduation in lieu of the corresponding courses needed for graduation. Alternative course work may be taken through independent study with a faculty adviser and department chair approval.

The social studies state standards can be reviewed on the Minnesota Department of Education website.

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Required for graduation

World History  

Modern Geography

United States History

Economics Government

AP

AP course work may be applied toward graduation

AP Human Geography

(counts as Modern Geography credit)

AP European History

(Counts as World History credit)

AP United States History

AP Microeconomics and / or

AP

Macroeconomics

-------------------------

AP US Government and / or AP Comparative Government

Electives

• AP Human Geography

• Contemporary

Public Policy

• AP Human Geography

• AP Psychology

• Contemporary Public Policy

• Mentorship

• Sociology

• Psychology

• AP Human Geography

• AP Psychology

• Contemporary Public Policy

• Mentorship

• Sociology

• Psychology

21st Century Skills in social studies:

Critical Thinking
Acquire information
Listening
Use of primary sources
Expository reading
Use information
Problem solving
Evaluation
Analysis
Historical awareness        

Communication
Presentations        
Speaking
Writing
Listening
Vocabulary - academic
Online communication

Collaboration
Group work
Global awareness
Perspective
Participatory skills
Online collaboration

Creativity
Writing
Innovation
Creativity
Technology innovation
Software development

Jobs involving social studies

Business
Publishing
Politics
Government
Grant writer
Writer / editor
Sales
Archeology
Non-profit
Economist
Anthropology        

Human resources
National / State Parks
Real estate

Fashion marketing

Youth work
Law
Art work
Intelligence work

College professor
Teacher
Museum work

Linguistic anthropologist
Consultant
Insurance/reinsurance
Fashion design
City manager
Business
Environmental work
Social activist        
Trades        
International field
Research analyst
Investments

Military        
Management
Ministry
Broadcast
Paralegal
Pollster
Market research
Agriculture economist
Psychologist
Police officer

        

Course Descriptions

REQUIRED COURSES FOR GRADE 9 (choose one of the following)

WORLD HISTORY (SOC059)

Grade 9; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

This course will provide a solid understanding of world history. It will enable students to better understand and evaluate the world and time in which they live by having a fundamental understanding of the past. This course will also cover major events and trends from ancient civilizations to the turn of the 21st century. Within this chronology, the course will look at the history of culture, politics, diplomacy, society, education, economics, and more.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (SOC219)

Grade 9; 1 Credit, Skinny (Year)

This course introduces students to the patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students will examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. Topics covered will include geography, population, cultural patterns and processes, political organization of space, agriculture and rural land use, industrialization and economic development, and cities and urban land use. The course aids students in looking at geography in a completely different way. Students will be required to complete nightly reading assignments to gain a basis for the topics of discussion, which is the main source of homework for the class. Also, students need to know that there is a writing component for the tests that require students to formulate their thoughts with well laid-out ideas supported with curriculum information. Upon completion of this course, the student will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.  

REQUIRED COURSES FOR GRADE 10 (choose one of the following)

MODERN GEOGRAPHY (SOC211)

Grade 10; 1/2 Credit, Block (Quarter)

Modern Geography will be a study of Human Geography and Physical Geography. This course will examine where things are on Earth, and why every place on Earth is unique and in other ways related to other locations. Students also will be using modern technology throughout the course (GIS, GPS, etc.) to study Modern Geography. Along with the use of technology there will the study of modern religion, world cultures, the impact humans have on the Earth, as well as local, national and world current events.

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (SOC15)

Grade 10; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Advanced Placement European History is a year-long course designed for college-bound high school students that surveys European political, social, economic, and cultural history from the Renaissance to the present. Students will do extensive essay writing, reading in a college-level text, and analysis of primary documents and other sources materials. Upon completion of this course, students will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR GRADES 11-12 (each required course has an AP option)

(Students need a ½ credit of Government, ½ credit of Economics, and 1 credit of U.S. History)

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (SOC10)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

This course is to prepare students for the role of national citizenship. A democratic people must understand and appreciate the character of their society, its goals, purposes, limitations, methods of operation, and the boundaries or reasonable choice in their nation and world.  Units to be studied include the executive, the legislative and the judicial branches of the U.S. government. Current events are considered to be an important part of each unit

AP U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (SOC16)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

AP American Government and Politics gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The course examines the structures and functions of government institutions, political parties and elections, and basic issues regarding civil rights and civil liberties. Upon completion of this course, students will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.

AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT (SOC17)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

AP Comparative Government gives students a basic understanding of the world’s diverse political structures and practices by examining the governments of six very different countries – China, Russia, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico and Nigeria. The course encompasses the study both of specific countries and of general concepts used to interpret the key political relationships found in virtually all national politics. Upon completion of this course, the student will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.

ECONOMICS  (SOC07)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter) 

Economics is a course designed to give students knowledge about, and appreciation of, the American economy and its position and role in a global economy. Specific issues examined include: economic choices, economic systems, the market economy (microeconomics) which includes income, business organization, market structures, financial institutions, supply and demand, competition, entrepreneurship; the national economy (macroeconomics) which includes measure and analyze overall economic performance, federal budget, federal reserve system, economic growth; and essential skills which include analyzing current events from an economic perspective and exposure to personal finance. The main goal for economics is to prepare students with a foundation in the basics of economics to succeed at a two or four year college.

AP MACROECONOMICS (SOC19)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

AP Macroeconomics examines the principles of economics that apply to the economic system as a whole. Students will analyze the business cycle (why do we have recessions?), indicators of economic performance such as inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, and currency exchange. The course emphasizes analysis of current economic problems and examines different economic schools of thought. Upon completion of this course, students will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.

This course will result in students fully utilizing the learning tools of PowerLearning (formerly Haiku). This class will follow a traditional class schedule except for Friday. On Fridays, students will utilize the tools of PowerLearning instead of being in the traditional classroom setting. The teacher will conduct office hours on Friday and meet with students who are in need of further assistance. This schedule will run for the duration of the course, and the students will find their hybrid days in their course calendar.

AP MICROECONOMICS (SOC20)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

AP Microeconomics gives students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to individuals and businesses within the context of the larger economic system. The course evaluates the efficiency of the market system by examining supply and demand, various market structures such as competitive markets and monopolies, market failures, and the role of government in the market. Upon completion of this course, students will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.

This course will result in students fully utilizing the learning tools of PowerLearning (formerly Haiku). This class will follow a traditional class schedule except for Friday. On Fridays, students will utilize the tools of PowerLearning instead of being in the traditional classroom setting. The teacher will conduct office hours on Friday and meet with students who are in need of further assistance. This schedule will run for the duration of the course, and the students will find their hybrid days in their course calendar.

UNITED STATES HISTORY (SOC24)

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

In this course, students will study the development of the political, social, economic and diplomatic history of the United States. Programs of various presidential administrations and major economic and political ideas that have influenced the development of our American system will be studied. The first half of the course will be a survey of U.S. history to about 1876. This will include such topics as indigenous peoples, exploration, colonial times, the American Revolution and Constitution, the young republic, growth of democracy, territorial expansion, slavery, Civil War, and Reconstruction. The second half of the course will survey U.S. history from about 1877 to the present. The emphasis will be on industrialization, U.S. imperialism, progressivism, the Great War, the Great Depression, the New Deal, WWII, and the Cold War era.

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (SOC14) (SOC142) (SOC143)  REGISTER FOR ALL THREE

Grades 11-12; 1.5 credits, Block (Three Quarters)

Advanced Placement U.S. History is a three quarter blocked course that will explore the development of the political, social, economic and diplomatic history of the United States. Programs of various presidential administrations and major economic and political ideas that have influenced the development of our American system will be studied. Students will participate in extensive essay writing and reading in a college-level text. Students will be expected to provide an analysis of primary documents and other sources of historical materials in developing document-based essays in preparation for the AP Exam. Upon completion of this course, students will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVE COURSES

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (SOC219) (Upper level elective option)

Grades 10-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

This course introduces students to the patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students will examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. Topics covered will include geography, population, cultural patterns and processes, political organization of space, agriculture and rural land use, industrialization and economic development, and cities and urban land use. The course aids students in looking at geography in a completely different way. Students will be required to complete nightly reading assignments to gain a basis for the topics of discussion, which is the main source of homework for the class. Also, students need to know that there is a writing component for the tests that require students to formulate their thoughts with well laid-out ideas supported with curriculum information. Upon completion of this course, the student will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.  

MENTORSHIP (ELE02)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

The Mentorship class is available to junior and senior high school students. The course is designed for students who are interested in a full spectrum of career options. These options may range from what has been traditionally termed the trades (electrical, carpentry, welding, masonry, etc.) to the professional areas (medicine, law, teaching, business, architecture, engineering, etc.). Students will have the opportunity to learn about a trade or profession and to participate in an on-the-job experience with participating people in the Fargo-Moorhead community. This is an advanced-level course requiring classroom work, on-the-job participation, research and independent work. Students will be required to provide their own transportation to and from the mentor’s place of business.  This course may be taken more than once for credit.

PSYCHOLOGY (SOC09)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Psychology is a behavioral science primarily concerned with the actions of humans. The purpose is to achieve an overview of the psychology field. Students will develop an understanding of themselves and others. Areas of study include human development, perception, learning, thinking, intelligence, creativity, emotions, motivations, personality, abnormal behavior and mental health.

AP PSYCHOLOGY (SOC18) (SOC182) (SOC183) REGISTER FOR ALL THREE

Grades 11-12; 1.5 credits, Block (Three Quarters)

The purpose of the AP course in psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The aim is to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses. Upon completion of this course, students will have an opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam by which they can earn college credit.

SOCIOLOGY (SOC08)

Grades 11-12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Sociology is an elective course that will introduce students to the study of human social behavior. Students will develop an understanding of themselves and others from a social standpoint. Students will study culture, change, relationships, socialization, family, and social structure. Social problems such as changing family patterns and sex roles, delinquency and crime, poverty, and health will be important parts of this course.

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Science, Technology, Engineering and Math - STEM / Project Lead the Way (PLTW)

One of the fastest growing segments of the American business community is in areas that demand skills in science, technology, engineering and math and yet, even in Minnesota, businesses cannot find a large enough supply of capable workers to fill all the jobs. In fact, many of the well-paying jobs do not require a college degree and those jobs still go unfilled.  

Coursework in STEM/PLTW  helps students to learn about such jobs as well as jobs that require a college degree or more. However, the course work is fun, challenging and engaging. Student learn by doing. The four areas of STEM are not taught separately but are integrated as students learn how the four areas become tools to craft a single end project.

At the same time students learn about possible careers. The manufacturing sector faces an alarmingly large shortage of employees with the necessary skills — nearly 600,000. The field of cloud computing alone will create 1.7 million jobs between 2011 and 2015, according to recent research. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that by 2018, the bulk of STEM careers will be:

STEM jobs do not all require higher education or even a college degree. Less than half of entry-level STEM jobs require a bachelor's degree or higher. However, a four-year degree is incredibly helpful with salary — the average advertised starting salary for entry-level STEM jobs with a bachelor's requirement was 26 percent higher than jobs in the non-STEM fields, according to the STEM connect report. For every job posting for a bachelor's degree recipient in a non-STEM field, there were 2.5 entry-level job postings for a bachelor's degree recipient in a STEM field.

Learn more in the
report about STEM students, their interests and STEM jobs developed by My College Options and STEMconnector.

Start now to learn about future careers and exciting opportunities. Enroll in STEM courses through the Industrial Technology Department.

21st Century Skills involving STEM:

Critical Thinking
Organization
Self-assessment

Communication
Planning
Constructing

Collaboration
Design        
Problem Solving

Creativity
Prototyping
Troubleshooting

                                                

Jobs involving STEM: See industrial technology

Course Descriptions

STEM - DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (STEM01)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Digital Electronics students will spend time exploring electrical circuitry and how it affects their daily lives. Students will evaluate real-world circuit designs utilized in our everyday electrical devices. Students create and send their electrical designs to a circuit board where they wire and test the circuits — similar to a real-world example of designing electronics and solving problems. This course is an excellent option for students looking to further their organization skills, learn more about electricity and circuitry, test their problem-solving skills, learn the Binary number system, and learn to write programming code to control robots.

STEM - INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING (STEM02)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Introduction to Engineering students will explore many careers categorized as engineering. The focus of this course is real-world problem solving through engineering processes. Regularly, students will be given an example of a real-world problem, devise a strategy to solve the problem, design, build and test their solutions. After testing, they will evaluate whether their solution was adequate or needs modification. Students will brainstorm ideas and evaluate different solutions for solving problems found in society today. This course is a great option for students looking to enhance their organization skills, explore engineering and related careers, and hone their practical real-world problem-solving skills.

STEM - PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (STEM03)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

This survey of engineering exposes students to some of the major concepts they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students have an opportunity to investigate engineering and high tech careers and to develop skills and understanding of course concepts. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to peers and members of the professional community. This course is designed for students who have completed Algebra I.

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Work Experience

The Work Experience Program is a cooperative vocational program. Prospective students may be self-selected or identified by the staff and administration at Moorhead High School. In Work Seminar I, students will develop an understanding of succeeding in the world of work. In Work Seminar II, students will expand their ability to understand the skills necessary for success in the workplace.

Work Experience will allow students to develop and expand the technical and soft skills learned while at Moorhead High School.  Skills gained in work experience will last a lifetime. Students successfully completing work experience are developing a strong reference and will gain skills that serve as a sound foundation for future jobs.    

ACT’s World-of-Workmap shows how occupations relate to each other based on work tasks.

A student may elect to only be involved in the Work Experience Seminar. Students must be in the Work Experience Seminar to be given Work Experience credit/release time. Students who are unable to secure or hold a job may receive partial or no credit for the work experience. A maximum of one block is allowed for work release.

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10

11

12

Work Seminar

Work Seminar

Work Seminar

Work Seminar

Work Experience

Work Experience

Work Experience

Work Based Learning Internship

21st Century Skills in work experience:

Critical Thinking
Decision making
Business decisions
Setting goals
Math problems
Evaluating reading
Reflect and evaluate
Career decisions
Preparing to work

Communication
Reading
Speaking
Writing        
Self-advocacy        
Listen actively        

Collaboration
Teamwork
Accept responsibility
Empathy
Self-control
Conflict resolution

Creativity
Problem solving
Planning
Balance a budget
Living on your own

Jobs involving part-time work experience: Any job involves work

Athletics
Restaurant / Chef
Automotive
Farming
Manufacturing        

Auto Repair
Construction
Communication
Technical
Welding

Education
Health
Child care
Nursing Home
Hospitality

Business
Hardware
Retail
Music

Course Descriptions

WORK BASED LEARNING INTERNSHIP (ELE18)

Grade 12; ½ credit, Block (Quarter)

Prerequisite: Exemplary student attendance, reliable student transportation, adequate academic standing.

This course will provide students with the opportunity to complete a quarter-long unpaid internship at an area business in a career field of their interest. As a part of the internship the student will work closely with a mentor at their place of employment to practice workplace skills particular to that position as well as universally important skills in the workplace such as communication, confidentiality, responsibility, accountability, and decision-making. Grades will be based on evaluations from the workplace mentor and the work-based learning coordinator, student attendance, attitude, and completion of required paperwork.

WORK SEMINAR (ELE19)

Grades 9-11; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

The Work Seminar class will help prepare students in developing critical job skills to provide them with job opportunities in the Moorhead / Fargo area. Students will learn positive job preparation, attitudes, responsibilities, and the rewards of paid entry-level employment. Specific topics to be covered in the classroom will include career exploration, job applications, interview skills, employment skills, interpersonal relationships at work, on-the-job safety, and appropriate job-exit procedures. Students also will have an understanding and become familiar with employment laws and regulations, personal aptitudes, interests and personality characteristics.

WORK EXPERIENCE  (ELE20)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Work Seminar

This course is taken in conjunction with the Work Seminar. Students will be employed and earn wages on a job approved by the work coordinator. Work requirements will include the following: performing assigned job tasks, following prescribed job-related safety procedures and proficient use of any job related equipment. Students are expected to practice sound employer / employee relationships and follow the MHS Student Handbook.  Evaluations and grades will be based upon documentation of consistent employment, the work coordinator’s and employer’s evaluations, attendance, and student attitude.

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World Language

Watch the video to learn more about World Languages

In the past decades there has been a renewal of interest in learning a second or third language. The economic and political forces of a shrinking world, coupled with the changing demographics of America, sharpen the focus on the material and personal benefits from learning another language.  Not only does the study of a foreign language carry intrinsic benefits, but it also advances student learning and test performance on college entrance examinations while broadening a student’s perspective regarding the world and the people in it.

The Moorhead High World Language Department offers three different languages. Each language offers the opportunity to take college placement tests that could advance one’s standing after high school. Knowledge of a second language can greatly enhance travel and magnify fun and enjoyment as one visits new regions of the world. A background in foreign languages easily transfers to the world of work in addition to offering self-enrichment.  

The foreign language national standards can be reviewed on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages website.

Please note that while a course may be taken at any time it is necessary to meet the prerequisites.

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10

11

12

American Sign Language

American Sign Language I

American Sign Language I

American Sign Language I

American Sign Language I

Spanish

Spanish I

Spanish II

Spanish III

Spanish IV

Spanish V

Spanish I

Spanish II

Spanish III

Spanish IV

Spanish V

Spanish I

Spanish II

Spanish III

Spanish IV

Spanish V

Spanish I

Spanish II

Spanish III

Spanish IV

Spanish V

Chinese

Mandarin

       Chinese I

Mandarin

        Chinese II

Mandarin

         Chinese III

Mandarin

       Chinese I

Mandarin

        Chinese II

Mandarin

         Chinese III

Mandarin

       Chinese I

Mandarin

        Chinese II

Mandarin

         Chinese III

Mandarin Chinese IV

Mandarin

       Chinese I

Mandarin

        Chinese II

Mandarin

         Chinese III

Mandarin Chinese IV

21st Century Skills in world language:

Critical Thinking
Perspective
Range of thinking
Curiosity
Global awareness
Cultural awareness

Communication
Flexible communication
Listening
Vocabulary / etymology
Multicultural literacy
Presenting
Oral and written communication

Collaboration
Diversity
Sensitivity
Cooperation
Adaptability

Creativity
Problem solving
Exposure
Self-direction
Perseverance
Imagination
Personal expression

                                        

Jobs involving world language: Many jobs available at the domestic or international level benefit from or require knowledge of a world language. Knowledge of a world language can easily become the reason one person earns a job over a person who does not speak a world language. Every profession benefits from the knowledge of a world language or sign language.

Medical professions
Agriculture
Physical therapy
Education - domestic or foreign

Translator
Peace Corps
Insurance
National security (FBI, CIA, NSA)

Non-profit
Market research
Airline
Manufacturing Research
Industry
Journalism
Human resources
Trade - import / export
Customs
Technical writer

Church/Missionary work
Pharmacist
Automobile
International banking
Linguist
Arts
Travel agent
Investment analyst
Dental

Law
Patents
Public relations
Political aide
Military        
Government
Corrections
Hospitality
Computer/technology        

Course Descriptions

SPANISH I (WLG05) Block

(WLG05S) Skinny

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester) or Skinny (Year)

Sí, everyone is able to learn Spanish! With Spanish being the most widely used second language in the United States, Spanish will be very beneficial to your future. Increased job opportunities, travel and the confidence to communicate in the Spanish-speaking world await you.

 

Students in Spanish I will:

* Discover Hispanic celebrations

* Learn about places in the city, leisure activities, and school

* Study sports, family, and introducing and describing people

* Improve proficiency by speaking, understanding, reading and writing in Spanish

SPANISH II (WLG06) Block

(WLG06S) Skinny

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester) or Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Spanish I or demonstrated proficiency
Students in Spanish II will:

* Describe their daily routine and good health habits

* Describe travel and weather

* Study food, clothing and shopping

* Learn about celebrations of the Spanish-speaking world

Note: Frequently in Spanish II students realize they are developing a useful real-life skill.

SPANISH III (WLG07) Block

(WLG07S) Skinny

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester) or Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Spanish II or demonstrated proficiency 

Four years of Spanish are recommended for minimum proficiency in the use of the language. Spanish III will reinforce and extend previously-learned skills.

Students in Spanish III will:

* Continue to describe past events, express hopes and wishes, and tell someone what to do

* Discuss community and environmental issues

* Discover Central America and its development of ecotourism

* Read authentic short stories and articles in Spanish

* Have opportunities for travel to Spanish-speaking countries (juniors and seniors)
Learning will be through video, CDs, text and workbook, projects, quizzes, tests, and teacher assistance. A Spanish/English dictionary and the book “501 Spanish Verbs” are recommended but not required.

SPANISH IV (WLG08)

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Spanish III or demonstrated proficiency

Four years of Spanish are recommended for minimum proficiency in the use of the language.

Students in Spanish IV will:

* Speak, listen, read and write meaningfully in Spanish

* Learn and use vocabulary for job interviews and the workplace

* Begin studying literature and art in the Hispanic world

* Learn the advanced verb tenses

* Study the novel “Don Quixote”

* Study the politics, music and art of Spain and the New World

* Use computers, skits, music, DVDs and many social activities to practice Spanish

SPANISH V (WLG12) SPRING SEMESTER

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester)

Prerequisite: Spanish IV or demonstrated proficiency

Now that you have a strong understanding of the language, it’s time to have fun by putting those skills into practice.

Students in Spanish V will:

* Use Spanish daily in conversations and activities

* Review grammatical concepts in the Spanish language

* Learn about different Spanish-speaking authors and explore a variety of types of literature in the Spanish language

* Focus on important and influential people in the Spanish-speaking world

* Experience new countries and regions through photos, culture and technology

Levels IV and V will build up your skills before taking college placement tests.


Course work in Mandarin Chinese connects your child with the riches of a 5,000-year-old culture – one that also is a rising economic power and one of the top U.S. trading partners. Learning Chinese makes it possible for students to communicate in the most widely spoken first language that is spoken by 1/5 of the world population.

MANDARIN CHINESE I (WLG16) Block

(WLG16S) Skinny

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester) or Skinny (Year)

Chinese I is for beginning learners with no prior exposure to Chinese. This course builds students’ understanding of Chinese language and culture with themes that are relevant to their daily lives. The curriculum of this course creates a culture-rich, activity-rich learning environment that allows for language acquisition through a wide range of activities, such as Chinese songs, rhymes, games, stories and cultural celebrations. Online lessons that correspond with the curriculum series will make learning more fun and effective while encouraging learning beyond the classroom. Through one year of study, students will build their Chinese language proficiency at novice low to novice high level with an emphasis on interpersonal and interpretive communicational skills. After one year of study, students will be able to greet people in Chinese with culturally appropriate manners and to exchange information regarding name, age, birthday, nationality, school, family, food, fruits and drinks, etc.

MANDARIN CHINESE II (WLG17) Block

(WLG17S) Skinny

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester) or Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I or demonstrated proficiency

This course builds students’ understanding of Chinese language and culture with themes that are relevant to their daily lives. The curriculum of this course creates a culture-rich, activity-rich learning environment that allows for language acquisition through a wide range of activities, such as Chinese songs/chants, games, skits, stories and cultural celebrations. Students will build their Chinese language proficiency at novice high to intermediate low level with an emphasis on interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication skills while becoming acquainted with relevant Chinese cultural studies such as Chinese calligraphy, Chinese ink painting, Chinese music, Chinese folk art, Chinese cooking, and Chinese holiday customs and traditions. After two years of study, students will be able to exchange information regarding topics of color, daily routine, hobbies, courses, animals, ordering in a Chinese restaurant, etc.

MANDARIN CHINESE III (WLG18) Block

(WLG18S) Skinny

Grades 9-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester) or Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese II or demonstrated proficiency

Chinese III is for students with two years of experience in learning Chinese. This course builds students’ understanding of Chinese language and culture with themes that are relevant to their daily lives and target culture. The curriculum of this course creates a culture-rich, activity-rich learning environment that allows for language acquisition through a wide range of activities, such as Chinese songs, chants, stories, skits and culture celebrations. Through this third year of study, students will build their Chinese language proficiency at intermediate mid to intermediate high level, while becoming acquainted with relevant Chinese cultural studies such as Chinese calligraphy, Chinese ink painting, Chinese music, Chinese folk art, Chinese cooking, and Chinese holiday customs and traditions. After three years of study, students will be able to explain an action in progress, past and future actions, discuss the weather, ask/tell directions, make and talk about schedules, make simple invitations, appointments and phone calls in Chinese, describe different positions of objects, and describe a room and its arrangement, etc.

MANDARIN CHINESE IV (WLG19) Block

(WLG19S)  Skinny

Grades 11-12; 1 credit, Block (Semester) or Skinny (Year)

Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese III or demonstrated proficiency

Chinese IV is for students with three years of experience in learning Chinese. This course builds students’ understanding of Chinese language and culture with themes that are relevant to their daily lives and target culture. Through the fourth year of study, students will build their Chinese language proficiency at intermediate high to advance low level (SAT2) while becoming acquainted with relevant Chinese cultural studies. After four years of study, students will be able to use Chinese language to describe Chinese festivals, compare Chinese holiday traditions with American holiday traditions, shop and bargain in stores, plan and celebrate a Chinese person's birthday, see a doctor and explain the physical conditions, express and convey their feelings and preferences, present their school and community, plan for and discuss a vacation and a trip to China, and give presentation to introduce China, etc.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (WLG11)

Grades 9-12; 1/2 credit, Block (Quarter)

Learn how to communicate in one of the most intriguing languages of the world. American Sign Language I will teach students the basis of communicating in the native language of the deaf. It also will introduce students to the cultural aspects of daily living situations. Some colleges and universities are accepting American Sign Language as a world language credit.  It is a fascinating language and a lot of fun to learn. If a student is interested in the field of teaching Deaf / Hard of Hearing students or if one wants to learn the beautiful language of ASL, this class will meet that need. The offering of this class is annually contingent on the hiring of a certified teacher.

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