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FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Unit of Study Outline
IDEA9103: Design Programming

Semester 1, 2016

6 Credit Points  

Unit Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay

Office: Room 276

Phone: 02 8627 4840

Email: nathaniel.fay@sydney.edu.au

Consultation hours: Via Email Appointment

Lecturer and Tutor: Scott Simon - Scott.Simon@uts.edu.au

Lecture and Tutorial: Wilkinson Lab 261, Friday, 10am–1pm

1. INTRODUCTION

This unit aims to teach students an understanding of the stages involved in the development of software for design; skills in the design and implementation of software for design tasks and in the development of software as design tools. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated through individual and group programming assignments: skills in using software tools to build interactive, visual design applications; knowledge of object-oriented programming concepts; implementation techniques such as editing, using libraries, and compilation and runtime environments; knowledge of programming language concepts including: classes, methods, object creation, instance and local variables, primitive and object types, simple I/O, and control flow; knowledge of software design and development processes including analysis of requirements, design of data-structures, functions and classes, software development lifecycles, and managing software projects. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.

2. AIMS

The aim of this unit of study is to introduce students to computer programming, both as a tool for design computing and as a medium of expression in digital media. This unit of study will focus on the practical application of computer programming as a way to expand the students' abilities to use computers in creative design and research tasks.

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES AND LINKS TO GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. See assessment summary table below for details of which outcomes are assessed where. On completion of this lab, students should be able to:

  1. read and modify substantial, well-written, programs;
  2. use common programming features including variables, functions and objects;
  3. describe and discuss programming and design issues with others;
  4. develop small programs that are correct, robust and well-documented.

Intended Learning Outcome

Relevant Graduate Attribute

Links to Learning and Teaching Methods

Students in this unit are expected to develop and demonstrate the following learning outcomes. Students are expected to:

The Unit of Study Learning Outcomes relate to the following Faculty Contextualized Graduate Attribute:

The main learning activities through which students will practice and develop their knowledge, skills and attributes:

  1. read and modify substantial, well-written, programs

3.1 be independent learners who take responsibility for their own lifelong learning, and engage in continuous reflection, self-evaluation and self-improvement;

Weekly tutorials, weekly lectures, on-line forum discussions

  1. use common programming features including variables, functions and objects

3.1 be independent learners who take responsibility for their own lifelong learning, and engage in continuous reflection, self-evaluation and self-improvement;

Weekly tutorials, weekly lectures, on-line forums, and assignments

  1. describe and discuss programming and design issues with others

3.2 be able to evaluate feedback from other people reflectively and proactively;

5.1 possess a professional standard of oral, written, quantitative, visual and other forms of communication relevant to their fields of study.

Weekly tutorials, on-line forum discussions, and assignments

  1. develop small programs that are correct, robust and well-documented

1.1 exercise critical thinking and conduct empirical and creative research in producing new knowledge and understanding;

1.2 identify and analyse problems, and devise strategies for their solution creatively and imaginatively;

2.1 recognise relevant information needs and be familiar with methods to locate, access and use information effectively;

5.1 possess a professional standard of oral, written, quantitative, visual and other forms of communication relevant to their fields of study.

Weekly tutorials and the assignments

4. READINGS AND ELEARNING SITE

The unit of study uses a custom e-learning environment called Peep to support your learning throughout the semester. You can find Peep at http://www.peepproject.com/. Details about how to log in and use Peep will be given in your first tutorial. Additional materials, e.g., PDF copies of lecture slides, are available through the IDEA9103 Blackboard site accessible from the University of Sydney e-learning portal at http://elearning.sydney.edu.au/. There are no required readings for this unit of study but there are many good books on programming in Processing for those new to computer programming. The following are recommended:

Getting Started with Processing by Casey Reas & Ben Fry (available as an e-book)

Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists by Casey Reas & Ben Fry

5. SCHEDULE

Session

Videos

Tutorials

Lecture Topics

Assessments

01
4th March

Introduction to Peep

Introduction

02
11th March

Introduction to Processing

Elements of Code
Drawing with Code / Color

Systems Thinking in Art and Design

03
18th March

Decisions and Iterations

Conditionals and Loops
Randomness

Repetition, Repetition, Repetition...

AVCC Common Week

04
8th April

Functions and Recursions

Drawing with Functions
Transformations

What should you put in a function?

05
15th April

Transformations and Motion

Simple Animation / Organic Motion
Easing and Tweening

Different Styles of Animation

06
22nd April

Typography

Text and Fonts

Designing with Fonts

Assignment 1
Due: April 25, 23:59

07
29th April

Pixel and Images

Images

Retro Gaming: Sprites

08
6th May

Interaction 1

Interactive Drawing

Finger Painting with a Mouse

09
13th May

Interaction 2

Events / Sketchpad

Push the Button

Assignment 2
Due: May 16, 23:59

10
20th May

Object Oriented Programming

Objects

Objects, Objects, Everywhere

11
27th May

Object Oriented Programming

Classes and Inheritance

Inspiration: Artists and Designers

12
3rd June

SImulation

Processes and Particles

Inspiration: Artists and Designers

Assignment 3
Due: June 13, 23:59

6. ASSESSMENT TASKS

ASSESSMENT SUMMARY

Assessment Item and Name

Work Type

(Individual or Group) 

Weight

Due

Learning Outcomes Assessed

Assessment 1 / Designing with Code

Individual

 20%

April 25 at 11:59pm

2, 3, 4

Assessment 2 / Animating with code

Individual

 20%

May 16 at 11:59pm

2, 3, 4

Assessment 3 / Sketchpad

Individual

 50%

June 13 at 11:59pm

2, 3, 4

Tutorials & Participation

Individual

10%

Continuously assessed

1, 3

ASSESSMENT DESCRIPTION

Assessment 1: Designing with Code 

The goal of the first assignment is for each student to develop a program that can generate variations upon a design each time it is run. You will be assessed on your ability to use the technical material covered so far in class, to produce aesthetically/conceptually engaging imagery based on a repeating pattern. Designs that explore an interesting theme (whether computational or otherwise) will be judged highly. PASS will be given to students who can show that they are able to produce an image that changes with each run while following the design and technical constraints. HIGH DISTINCTION will only be given to students who can demonstrate that they can produce interesting and engaging imagery.

Assessment Criteria:

  1. Background Research and Inspiration
  2. Code Experimentation and Organised code structures, commenting
  3. Presentation and Documentation
  4. Response to Design Brief and Originality
  5. Reflection on Outcomes

Grade Descriptors:

High Distinction

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques at a high level.  The student understands the concepts of Programming techniques completely.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement sophisticated designs.  Uses correct referencing methods.

Distinction

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques at a moderately high level.  The student understands the concepts of Programming techniques in practice.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement sophisticated designs.  Uses correct referencing methods.

Credit

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques at a moderate level.  The student understands some of the concepts of Programming techniques in practice.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement designs, some of which are successful.  Uses correct referencing methods.

Pass

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques at an adequate level.  The student understands some of the concepts of Programming techniques in practice.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement designs of fair quality.  Uses correct referencing methods.

Fail

The student lacks the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques at an adequate level.  The student understands some of the concepts of Programming techniques in practice but fails to implement them successfully.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement designs of fair quality. Does not use correct referencing methods.

Assessment 2: Animating with Code 

The goal of the assignment is for each student to develop a never-ending animation that generates endless variations upon a theme for the banner of a web site. You will be assessed on your ability to use the technical material cover so far in class, to produce aesthetically/conceptually engaging animation. Designs that address the needs of the web site intelligently and/or explore interesting themes will be judged highly. PASS will be given to students who can show that they are able to produce an animation that runs continuously without repeating and satisfies the design requirements. HIGH DISTINCTION will only be given to students who can demonstrate that they can produce appropriate, interesting and engaging animations.

Assessment Criteria:

  1. Background Research and Inspirational Materials
  2. Code Experimentation and Final Quality of Implementation
  3. Presentation and Documentation
  4. Response to Design Brief and Originality
  5. Reflection on Outcomes

Grade Descriptors:

High Distinction

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques and animation at a high level.  The student understands completely the concepts of Programming techniques in relation to the creation of a banner for a web page.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement sophisticated designs.  Uses correct referencing methods.  Satisfies completely criteria listed under “assessment criteria”.  

Distinction

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques and animation at a moderately high level.  The student understands well the concepts of Programming techniques in relation to the creation of a banner for a web page.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement sophisticated designs.  Uses correct referencing methods.  Satisfies criteria listed under “assessment criteria”.

Credit

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques and animation at a moderate level.  The student understands some of the concepts of Programming techniques in relation to the creation of a banner for a web page.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement designs, some of which are aesthetically successful.  Uses correct referencing methods.language and terminology to critique the 2 pieces of visual imagery. Uses correct referencing methods.  Satisfies most of the criteria listed under “assessment criteria”.

Pass

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques and animation at an adequate level.  The student understands some of the concepts of Programming techniques in relation to the creation of a banner for a web page but some areas are lacking.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement designs, some of which are aesthetically viable.  Uses correct referencing methods.  Satisfies the design requirements and creates a piece that runs continuously.

Fail

The student demonstrates a lack of ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques and animation.  The student understands little of the concepts of Programming techniques in relation to the creation of a banner for a web page.  Some serious gaps in terms of i utilization are present.  Programming techniques are utilized haphazardly.  Does not use correct referencing methods.  Does not satisfy the assessment criteria listed.

Assessment 3: Sketchpad

The goal of the assignment is for each student to develop an interactive design tool that combines user action with generative elements. You will be assessed on your ability to use the technical material cover so far in class, to produce an engaging design tool. Design tools that explore an interesting theme (whether computational or otherwise) will be judged highly. Submissions that clearly target a specific need in terms of product design or customer requirements will also be judged highly. PASS will be given to students who can show that they are able to produce an application with multiple drawing tools and satisfies the design requirements. HIGH DISTINCTION will only be given to students who can demonstrate that they can produce an appropriate, interesting and engaging set of design tools.

Assessment Criteria:

  1. Background Research and Inspirational Materials
  2. Code Experimentation and Final Quality of Implementation
  3. Presentation and Documentation
  4. Response to Design Brief and Originality
  5. Reflection on Outcomes

Grade Descriptors:

High Distinction

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques in relation to interactivity at a high level.  The student has done high quality background research and assembled this clearly.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement sophisticated designs.  Uses correct referencing methods.  Satisfies criteria listed under “assessment criteria”.

Distinction

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques in relation to interactivity at a moderately high level.  The student has done good quality background research and assembled this clearly.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement sophisticated designs.  Uses correct referencing methods.  Satisfies criteria listed under “assessment criteria”.

Credit

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques in relation to interactivity at a moderate level.  The student has done moderate quality background research and assembled this clearly.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement working designs.  Uses correct referencing methods.  Satisfies criteria listed under “assessment criteria”.

Pass

The student demonstrates the ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques in relation to interactivity at a functional level.  The student has done some background research and assembled this clearly.  Programming techniques are utilized to implement working designs.  Uses correct referencing methods.  Satisfies most of the criteria listed under “assessment criteria”.

Fail

The student demonstrates little ability to use the design principles in relation to programming techniques in relation to interactivity.  The student has done little or no background research.  Programming techniques are utilized incorrectly or designs are not functional.  Does not use correct referencing methods.  Does not satisfy the criteria listed under “assessment criteria”.

Assessment 4: Tutorials & Participation

Throughout the duration of the unit of study students will be expected to demonstrate their participation in the class by creating portfolio entries about the sketches they produce during the tutorials and engaging with each other in the forums. Note that all students MUST COMPLETE at least 80% of the online tutorials to be allowed to PASS this unit of study.

You will need to export each tutorial you complete as shown in class using the export function, ZIP the file and upload and submit the ZIP file under the corresponding tutorial submission area on the elearning site. We will monitor your progress and email you if we can see that you have not submitted a few weeks of tutorial exercises.

ASSESSMENT RESULTS AND FEEDBACK

Assessment results and feedback will be provided within two weeks of the submission date.

7.        Learning and Teaching Policies

 

Late submission and special consideration policies are included The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Resolutions. They are available at http://sydney.edu.au/architecture/ current_students/formsPolicies.shtml. It is your responsibility to familiarise yourself with these policies.

 

Academic honesty is very important to the University of Sydney. You are responsible for ensuring that all of your University work is academically honest. Visit http://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2012/254 to read the University of Sydney Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism in Coursework Policy. To foster academic honesty, the University uses Turnitin® as similarity detecting software. You should note that all / a random selection of assignments submitted in this unit of study will be submitted to similarity detecting software. You can learn about ways of avoiding plagiarism by visiting the library’s iResearch online module at http://sydney.edu.au/library/skills/elearning/learn/plagiarism/index.php. For information on different referencing systems, visit http://writesite.elearn.usyd.edu.au/m2/m2u5/m2u5s2/m2u5s2_1.htm.

 

8.        Concerns About Teaching and Assessment

 

There is a three-step process to appeal an academic decision.

1.     Informal Appeal: approach the original decision maker to discuss your concerns about your mark. University policy requires you to raise concerns within fifteen days of the mark being released, if possible.

2.     Formal Appeal: if you feel that your appeal has not been adequately addressed at the informal level, you can submit a formal written appeal to the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Student Administration Centre. Your appeal should include a letter outlining the grounds for your appeal and any evidence you have to support your appeal. The Dean or their delegate will assess the appeal and a formal outcome will be sent to you in writing.

3.     University Level Appeal: If you are dissatisfied with the findings of the Faculty, you can submit an appeal the Student Affairs Unit.

For more details on Academic Appeals, see: http://sydney.edu.au/student_affairs/academic_appeals/process.shtml

 

There is a three-step process to complain about a non-academic decision.

1.     Discuss the staff member that oversees the area of concern (e.g. unit of study coordinator, head of the Student Administration Centre, etc.). The staff member will take your complaint seriously and respond to your concerns.

2.     If you feel that the grievance you have raised has not been adequately addressed, you can lodge a written complaint to the Dean of the Faculty. The Dean or delegate will investigate the matter and respond in writing to you with the outcomes of the investigation.

3.     If you are dissatisfied with the outcome of these findings, you can refer your complaint to the Student Affairs Unit of the University.

For more details on the complaint handling procedures, see: 

Complaints Policy: http://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2015/407&RendNum=0 

Complaints Procedure: http://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2015/408&RendNum=0

 

9.        Support Services and Resources

 

The Learning Centre runs many workshops, including Academic Reading and Writing, Oral communications Skills, Studying at University, Workshops for English Language and Learning, etc. Learn more at http://sydney.edu.au/stuserv/learning_centre/.

 

The Write Site provides online support to help you develop academic and professional writing skills and can be accessed at http://writesite.elearn.usyd.edu.au/.

 

For information on staying on top of your study, visit http://sydney.edu.au/arts/current_students/staying_on_top.shtml.

 

Disability Services is located on Level 5 of the Jane Foss Russell Building. For further information, visit http://sydney.edu.au/stuserv/disability/.

 

Counselling and Psychological Services are located on Level 5 of the Jane Foss Russell Building G20.  For further information, visit their website at http://sydney.edu.au/current_students/counselling/.

 

The Koori Centre offers on-going academic support to all Indigenous Australian students enrolled at the University of Sydney. To find out more, visit http://sydney.edu.au/koori/.