Announcements

Our spring chocolate fundraiser is going on now through February 4. Students can use chocolate profits to pay for band fees and our end of the year trip. Band fees are due this Friday, January 31.

Vocabulary

Musical Alphabet; Staff; Clef; Note Names (ABCDEFG); Time Signature; Whole, Half, Quarter, and Eighth Notes; Parts of the mouthpiece; Parts of the instrument, Audiate, Lip Slur, Slur, Multi-Measure or Long Rest, First and Second Endings, Scale, Pick-up or Anacrusis

Breathing Exercises

In for 4/2/1, out for 4/8/12. Keep air fast and steady at all times. Use your mouth. Diaphragm breathing (big belly breathing): Hulk air versus focused Hawkeye air

Mouthpiece Work

We will continue working on sirens and matching pitch on all of our exercises on our mouthpiece this week.

ELPS

Material will be presented to students in a visual, auditory, and kinesthetic manner. English Language Learners will engage through kinesthetic performances and numerous visual cues habitually provided throughout instruction. Our Journal pages will be used to assist supervised and organized note taking.

Curriculum

Monday, January 27

Breathing - In for 2, Out for 4/8

Mouthpiece - 25 Sirens

Lip Slurs - 4 notes, student model

C Major Scale

T of E - P. 16 #56, #58 - New Concept: Pick-up or anacrusis - define on journal page first

Structured Independent Reading

Tuesday, January 28

Counting Chart 7.5 Line 4

Mouthpiece - 25 Sirens

Lip Slurs - 4 notes, student model

C Major Scale, P. 43

T of E - P. 16 #56 - Chorale, #58 - Boil the Cabbage Down

Wednesday, January 29

Breathing - In for 2, Out for 4/8

Mouthpiece - 25 Sirens

Lip Slurs - 4 note slurs

C Major Scale, P. 43

T of E - P. 16 #56, #58, Full Band P. 7 #9

Thursday, January 30

Counting Chart 7.5 Line 5

Mouthpiece - 25 Sirens

Lip Slurs - 4 note slurs

P. 43 - C Major Scale

T of E - P. 16 #56, #58, Full Band P. 7 #9

Friday, January 31

Breathing - In for 2, Out for 4/8

Mouthpiece - 25 Sirens

Lip Slurs - Student model

Playing Assessment - P. 15 #56

T of E - P. 16 #58, Full Band P. 7 #9, P. 8 #15

Order of Performance Process

Before we perform a new piece of music, we must be able to-

             For every step, tap your foot along with a metronome!!!!!!!!

When completed, use academic language to evaluate our performance.

SIM Content Enhancement Routines/Instructional Playbook

New music will be approached using a scaffolded frame routine. Students will all follow our Order of Performance routine and will count, letter name, position, and air band all new music encountered. Anchors of rhythmic and melodic support will be supplied in advance of new rhythmic and melodic concepts. Our Framed journal pages will be used daily for note taking on new concepts.

Weekly Quiz

Friday, January 31 - P. 16 #56, Chorale

Upcoming Events

Friday, January 17 - P. 15 #50

Tuesday, January 21 - World’s Finest Chocolate Fundraiser Begins

Friday, January 24 - Concert F (C Major) one octave scale

Friday, January 31 - P. 16 #56


TEKS addressed- 6th Grade

1  Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sound. The student explores fundamental skills appropriate for a developing young musician. The student is expected to:

(A)  experience and explore exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;

(B)  describe tonal and rhythmic musical elements using standard terminology such as instrumentation, voicing, intervals, solfège, absolute note names, rhythmic values, and counting systems;

(C)  describe musical elements of rhythm, including whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, paired and single eighth notes, sixteenth notes, corresponding rests, and meter, including 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4, using standard terminology;

(D)  identify musical forms presented aurally and through music notation such as binary, ternary, phrasic, rondo, and theme and variations; and

(E)  explore health and wellness concepts related to musical practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practice.

2  Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and writes music notation using an established system for rhythm and melody. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify music symbols and terms referring to notation, including repeat sign; dynamics, including crescendo, decrescendo, piano, and forte; tempi, including accelerando, ritardando, moderato, and allegro; and articulations, including staccato and legato;

(B)  notate meter, rhythm, pitch, and dynamics using standard symbols in a handwritten or computer-generated format;

(C)  create rhythmic phrases using known rhythms and melodic phrases using known pitches at an appropriate level of difficulty within an established system of notation;

(D)  read music notation using appropriate cognitive and kinesthetic responses such as inner hearing, silent fingering, shadow bowing, or Curwen hand signs; and

(E)  sight read unison and homophonic music using the appropriate clef in a minimum of two keys and three meters, including 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4.

3  Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument, alone and in groups, performing a variety of unison, and homophonic repertoire. The student makes music at an appropriate level of difficulty and performs in a variety of genres from notation. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate, alone and in groups, characteristic vocal or instrumental timbre;

(B)  perform music alone and in groups, demonstrating appropriate physical fundamental techniques such as hand position, bowing, embouchure, articulation, and posture;

(C)  perform independently and expressively, with accurate intonation and rhythm, developing fundamental skills and appropriate solo, small ensemble, and large ensemble performance techniques;

(D)  perform independently and expressively a varied repertoire of music representing various styles and cultures;

(E)  sight-read independently and expressively, with accurate intonation and rhythm, demonstrating fundamental skills and appropriate solo and ensemble performance techniques in known keys and rhythms;

(F)  interpret music symbols and terms referring to keys; clefs, tempi, \

(G)  create rhythmic phrases using known rhythms and melodic phrases using known pitches at an appropriate level of difficulty.

4  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform music representative of diverse cultures, including American and Texas heritage;

(B)  describe written and aurally presented music representative of diverse styles, periods, and cultures;

(C)  identify relationships of music concepts to other academic disciplines such as the relationship between music and mathematics, literature, history, and the sciences; and

(D)  describe music-related vocations and avocations.

5  Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in both formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate appropriate concert and stage etiquette as an informed, actively involved listener and performer during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;

(B)  identify criteria for listening to and evaluating musical performances;

(C)  describe processes and select the tools for self-evaluation and personal artistic improvement such as critical listening and individual and group performance recordings;

(D)  evaluate the quality and effectiveness of musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models; and

(E)  demonstrate appropriate cognitive and kinesthetic responses to music and musical performances

TEKS addressed- Spring Semester 6th Grade

1  Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sound. The student explores fundamental skills appropriate for a developing young musician. The student is expected to:

(A)  experience and explore exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;

(B)  describe tonal and rhythmic musical elements using standard terminology such as instrumentation, voicing, intervals, solfège, absolute note names, rhythmic values, and counting systems;

(C)  describe musical elements of rhythm, including whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, paired and single eighth notes, sixteenth notes, corresponding rests, and meter, including 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4, using standard terminology;

(D)  identify musical forms presented aurally and through music notation such as binary, ternary, phrasic, rondo, and theme and variations; and

(E)  explore health and wellness concepts related to musical practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practice.

2  Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and writes music notation using an established system for rhythm and melody. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify music symbols and terms referring to notation, including repeat sign; dynamics, including crescendo, decrescendo, piano, and forte; tempi, including accelerando, ritardando, moderato, and allegro; and articulations, including staccato and legato;

(B)  notate meter, rhythm, pitch, and dynamics using standard symbols in a handwritten or computer-generated format;

(C)  create rhythmic phrases using known rhythms and melodic phrases using known pitches at an appropriate level of difficulty within an established system of notation;

(D)  read music notation using appropriate cognitive and kinesthetic responses such as inner hearing, silent fingering, shadow bowing, or Curwen hand signs; and

(E)  sight read unison and homophonic music using the appropriate clef in a minimum of two keys and three meters, including 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4.

3  Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument, alone and in groups, performing a variety of unison, and homophonic repertoire. The student makes music at an appropriate level of difficulty and performs in a variety of genres from notation. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate, alone and in groups, characteristic vocal or instrumental timbre;

(B)  perform music alone and in groups, demonstrating appropriate physical fundamental techniques such as hand position, bowing, embouchure, articulation, and posture;

(C)  perform independently and expressively, with accurate intonation and rhythm, developing fundamental skills and appropriate solo, small ensemble, and large ensemble performance techniques;

(D)  perform independently and expressively a varied repertoire of music representing various styles and cultures;

(E)  sight-read independently and expressively, with accurate intonation and rhythm, demonstrating fundamental skills and appropriate solo and ensemble performance techniques in known keys and rhythms;

(F)  interpret music symbols and terms referring to keys; clefs, tempi, \

(G)  create rhythmic phrases using known rhythms and melodic phrases using known pitches at an appropriate level of difficulty.

4  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform music representative of diverse cultures, including American and Texas heritage;

(B)  describe written and aurally presented music representative of diverse styles, periods, and cultures;

(C)  identify relationships of music concepts to other academic disciplines such as the relationship between music and mathematics, literature, history, and the sciences; and

(D)  describe music-related vocations and avocations.

5  Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in both formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate appropriate concert and stage etiquette as an informed, actively involved listener and performer during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;

(B)  identify criteria for listening to and evaluating musical performances;

(C)  describe processes and select the tools for self-evaluation and personal artistic improvement such as critical listening and individual and group performance recordings;

(D)  evaluate the quality and effectiveness of musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models; and

(E)  demonstrate appropriate cognitive and kinesthetic responses to music and musical performances.