screenshot-drive.google.com-2017-02-26-13-59-29.png



The Collaborative Inquiry Cycle is a process that builds collaboration, constructs new knowledge about deep learning, and shifts practice to ground our collective work at all levels of the Partnership.
NPDL Exemplar - Playground Design Inquiry Project | NPDL Exemplar - Community Inquiry Project


ASSESS - use the Deep Learning Competency Framework to identify student progress, strengths and needs. Combine with student achievement and interests to establish learning goals. 


1. Project Title:

School:

Administrator:

Division: Junior

Subject Area:

Will you work within school groups or grade partners?

We are working with our school group - (Junior Division).  We will alter some parts based on grade level.

2. Area of student learning need/ interest:

Achievement and Interest / Wondering Data

Consult results from Math pre-assessment (anonymize data).

Grade 4/5:

  • Students had difficulty with multi-step transformations

Grade 6:

  • Noticed about half of the students flipped grid references when naming coordinate points
  • Noticed students have some knowledge of transformations, but need to be identify the specifics about each type of transformation
  • Noticed about half of the students made errors when identifying combined transformations

What are students’ knowledge, skills, interests and needs? How are you capturing this information?

Knowledge, Skills, Interests and Needs

  • Have basic knowledge of transformations terminology
  • Need more exposure to combined transformations
  • Need to describe transformations more specifically
  • Can identify broad real world applications for transformational geometry (careers & problems)

How Captured:

  • shared padlets, class discussions, exit tickets, student documentation  

What questions/ wonderings do students have about learning transformational geometry that we can use to guide our deep learning plan?

  • What is the best way to rotate a figure?
  • Why are we learning about transformations?
  • Can we use a computer to help us learn about transformations?

3. Curriculum expectations to be addressed (overall/ specific):

Grade 1-8 GSS continuum

Grade 4:

  • Identify and describe the general location of an object using a grid system
  • Identify, perform, and describe reflections using a variety of tools

Grade 5:

  • Explain how a coordinate system represents location, and plot points in the first quadrant of a Cartesian coordinate plane
  • Identify, perform, and describe, rotations of 180 and clockwise and counterclockwise rotations of 90with the centre of rotation inside or outside the shape

Grade 6:

  • describe location in the first quadrant of a coordinate system, and rotate two dimensional shapes.
  • explain how a coordinate system represents location, and plot points in the first quadrant of a Cartesian coordinate plane
  • identify, perform, and describe, through investigation using a variety of tools, rotations of 180º and clockwise and counterclockwise rotations of 90/, with the centre of rotation inside or outside the shape
  • create and analyse designs made by reflecting, translating, and/or rotating a shape, or shapes, by 90º or 180º


4. Which
deep learning competencies are you targeting for this learning task?

CRITICAL THINKING

  • Evaluating information and arguments
  • Making connections and identifying patterns
  • Meaningful knowledge
  • Leveraging digital
  • Collaborative knowledge construction
  • Experimenting, reflecting and taking action on their ideas in the real world

COLLABORATION

  • Working interdependently as a team
  • Interpersonal and team-related skills
  • Social, emotional, and intercultural skills
  • Leveraging digital
  • Managing team dynamics and challenges

                        Deep Learning Dimension Leveraging Digital 

Class H - Pre-Assessment

Highlight which C is being assessed:

  • CREATIVITY                                     ❑ CRITICAL THINKING
  • COMMUNICATION                    ❑ CHARACTER
  • CITIZENSHIP                                   ❑ COLLABORATION

SCORING:

1 - Limited evidence

2 - Emerging

3 - Developing

4 - Accelerating

5 - Proficient

Student identifier

Male/Female

Limited Evidence

Emerging 

Developing

Accelerating

Proficient

Student AT

F

x

Student JS

F

x

Student CC

M

x

Student RK

M

x

Student MY

M

x

Student JL

M

x

Class G - Pre-Assessment

Highlight which C is being assessed:

  • CREATIVITY                                     ❑ CRITICAL THINKING
  • COMMUNICATION                    ❑ CHARACTER
  • CITIZENSHIP                                   ❑ COLLABORATION

SCORING:

1 - Limited evidence

2 - Emerging

3 - Developing

4 - Accelerating

5 - Proficient

Student identifier

Male/Female

Limited Evidence

Emerging 

Developing

Accelerating

Proficient

Student JM

F

      X

Student MD

M

X

Student BV

M

X

Student JW

F

       X

Student GE

F

         X

Student SG

M

X

Class S - Pre-Assessment

Highlight which C is being assessed:

  • CREATIVITY                                     ❑ CRITICAL THINKING
  • COMMUNICATION                    ❑ CHARACTER
  • CITIZENSHIP                                   ❑ COLLABORATION

SCORING:

1 - Limited evidence

2 - Emerging

3 - Developing

4 - Accelerating

5 - Proficient

Student identifier

Male/Female

Limited Evidence

Emerging 

Developing

Accelerating

Proficient

Student HM

F

X

Student MM

M

X

Student EF

M

X

Student  DF

F

X

Student LY

M

X

Student KS

F

X

Class W- Pre-Assessment

Highlight which C is being assessed:

  • CREATIVITY                                     ❑ CRITICAL THINKING
  • COMMUNICATION                    ❑ CHARACTER
  • CITIZENSHIP                                   ❑ COLLABORATION

SCORING:

1 - Limited evidence

2 - Emerging

3 - Developing

4 - Accelerating

5 - Proficient

Student identifier

Male/Female

Limited Evidence

Emerging 

Developing

Accelerating

Proficient

Student RA

F

X

Student JN

F

X

Student OL

F

X

Student AR

M

X

Student LS

M

X

Student MD

M

X

Reference Documents: Towards Defining 21st Century Competencies for Ontario | WCDSB 21C Blueprint

5. Teacher self-assessment of the deep learning dimensions.

Complete the teacher self-assessment survey of deep learning dimensions. You will automatically receive a copy of your responses by email for future reference (to be used in the assess & reflect stages of the collaborative inquiry)

Identify which deep learning dimension(s) you will be focusing on during the project. You will use the deep learning dimension charts in the reflection phase to assess where your project falls within the deep learning dimension and to provide evidence to support your choice.

 Junior teachers will be focusing on the deep learning dimension of: Leveraging Digital.

5.  Inquiry question

Which pedagogical practices and methods of leveraging digital tools and resources can be employed to positively impact student achievement, develop critical thinking skills, collaboration, and promote deeper learning in the area of transformational geometry?

Design -­ work with peers, students and community partners to use the Deep Learning Progressions to design deep learning tasks steeped in a real world problem or challenge of relevance to the learners.

6. Deep Learning Task Design

Project outline and description of how activity addresses area of student learning need/ interest.

Link to TLF-M Website (Contains Design and Implementation aspects of the Deep Learning Task)

screenshot-sites.jpg

Click image for a link to our transformational geometry tasks that were used for a junior rotation of classes.

screenshot-sites.google.com-2017-06-13-15-28-17.jpeg

What content areas will provide the problem/challenge context?

Math - Transformational Geometry

What is the guiding question (example 1 | example 2)?

Grade 5 and 6

How can we get students to actively learn more about future careers while understanding the critical role that math (particularly transformational geometry) plays in so many jobs?

Grade 4 and 5

How does the teacher providing deep learning, rich tasks in transformational geometry promote engagement and the ability for students to transfer skills to a variety of real life scenarios?

How will students and the community be engaged in designing the learning task?

Grade 5 and 6

Students will develop the task together by exploring various careers / jobs that use transformational geometry and sharing their findings with others in their class (padlet).  From that, they will use ideas from the class to develop possible real world problems, involving transformational geometry, that people in those professions would need to solve.  They will again share those problem idea with their class (padlet).  In class discussions will be used to fine tune the type of problems that have been proposed.  Students were exposed to various types of software / digital tools that could be used to develop an understanding of the concepts presented in transformational geometry.  Students along with their teachers wanted to share their understanding of transformations as well as the discoveries about various careers in a meaningful way.  We decided to make Google Sites to explain the jobs and to showcase our understanding of how the various careers might use transformational geometry.

Grade 4 and 5

  • Build from prior knowledge ~ Kinesthetic activity on transformational geometry

           ~ students follow transformational instructions (Twister style) using fake remote control and listening to directions being called out by the teacher

  • Students will create their own routine and have others follow it using a life size grid/runway in the gym (made from masking tape). Object of the task is to get students from A-B without “falling off” the runway.
  • After this initial launch activity, explicitly teach/review grids and coordinates
  • Using transparency paper and a school map (with grid and coordinates), students will complete 3 tasks
  1. Locate landmarks on the grid
  2. Give them a couple of scenarios example~ if you were to rotate the map ½ a turn counter clockwise where would your class end up (give the coordinates)
  3. How would you return your classroom to its original location using transformational geometry language
  4. Share as a whole group
  • Use digital tools as introduction: (OERB)
  • Problem: Global warming has caused the Earth’s axis to tilt a few degrees. Using the pattern of the Earth’s rotation and lines of longitude and latitude, predict where Canada may end up, how will this impact our climate, our infrastructure and overall way of life.

 


7. Deep Learning Success Criteria


How will students be engaged in designing/understanding the learning criteria and assessment methods?

Grade 5 and 6

Students were given collaborative time to experiment with digital tools in both a guided and unstructured way and then began to work toward their goal of designing a website and using GeoGebra to help pose and solve a real-world problem related to their chosen career.  Once they were on their way, they were ask to consider what would make their website and GeoGebra problem successful.  They were also asked to consider what they were doing well in the area of collaboration and critical thinking.  They recorded their ideas on 4 different stickies (Website / Career Focus, TG / GeoGebra Problem, Collaboration, & Critical Thinking) which were then sorted into subcategories and used to develop the success criteria for the deep learning task.

Grade 4 and 5

Students were given collaborative time to experiment with digital tools in both a guided and unstructured way and then began to work toward their goal of creating a question challenge based on current facts about global warming and its effect on Earth’s rotation and tilt.

 

8. Learning Design Elements

Example 1 | Example 2

How will you create a learning partnership with students and the community?

Is the learning design steeped in a real world connection of relevance to the learners (i.e cross disciplinary)?

This multimedia mathematics resource features a video that shows examples of transformations (flips, slides, and rotations) found all around West Edmonton Mall. Using an interactive component, students explore and predict transformations by viewing animations of translations, rotations, and reflections.

The author of this site has created some lessons to assist student connection and application of "real world" scenarios to the concepts of geometry. "Geometry and the real world" is designed for sixth and seventh grade mathematics classes (target group of site).

List of careers that use transformational geometry - could reach out to these professions re: a Google Hangout for a virtual visit.

Real-life examples of transformations

Grade 5 and 6

Students will develop a better understanding of how various jobs in their community involve math skills as well as learning much more about how those professions contribute to our community.  Students will also have the opportunity to participate in a “Google Meet” with Jordan Godin, an Engineer EIT working on the reconstruction of the West Block of the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa.  He will share information about what types of things he works on as an engineer as well as how his job is tied to math, particularly how he uses transformations in his work.  He will also share what digital tools he uses to help him do his job and how critical it is that he is precise in his work.  

Students have also been discussing their chosen careers with family members and branching out to network with others in the community to learn more about their careers and how they relate to TG.

Grade 4 and 5  

Students will develop a better understanding of maps and grids, and how the location of the Earth dictates our seasonal changes. In addition they can make predictions of what would happen hypothetically to the planet based on rotations and climate change.

We have invited an engineer from Engineers without Borders and an architect who has designed a kiosk, using transformational geometry to come and show the kids how they use transformational geometry in their jobs on a daily basis.

How will you focus on the development of Deep Learning Competencies?

Grade 4, 5 and 6

Students will be guided to focus on the deep learning competencies of critical thinking and collaboration.  

                   Critical Thinking:

                                         - LD - students will use digital as a tool for thinking together and find new ways to apply the knowledge that they collaboratively created.  They should also be able to articulate how infusing a digital tool has enhanced their thinking and the organization of their thought.

                                         - CKC - Learners think and work together in ways that spark new thinking and original ideas.  They effectively used tools to support shared thinking.

                                         - ERTAIRW - They are able to articulate the importance of transferring and applying their knowledge appropriately to new and authentic situations and settings - and explain how they conduct their own further analyses to identify where else this could be applied.

                    Collaboration:

                                        - WIT - Learners work interdependently matching tasks and expertise to the strengths of individuals in the pair.

                                        - ITRS - Learners demonstrate collective ownership of the work and an active sense of shared responsibility for the outcome.

                                        - LD - Students use digital tools to deepen the nature of collaboration among members

                                        - MTDC - The collaboration is giving students the chance to practice clearly and respectfully expressing their opinions, and listening to and learning from others.  They are also becoming more skilled at identifying what underpins their own and others points of view.

How will you leverage Digital Content | Digital Tools to accelerate and deepen the learning?

Grade 5 and 6

We will use various digital tools to assist the students in deepening their learning.  They will use interactive tools to first assist in making connections with transformational geometry, then they will suggest digital tools to learners in other schools in our board and review suggestions from others.  Students will research and explore various professions that use transformations and create real world problems based on those professions.  They will share those findings with their classmates through two Padlets.

Along with the students, teachers will explore Google Sites as a way to communicate our learning beyond our classroom walls.  We will learn the GeoGebra Tool alongside the students as well and discuss its applications for uses in the real world.  Our classes will use Google Meet to connect with individuals in other professions so they can connect with the students and share how they use transformations in their jobs.

Grade 4 and 5

We will use various digital tools to assist the students in deepening their learning. They will use interactive tools to assist in making connections with transformational geometry. They will research the tilt of the earth and what is happening to it and what the repercussions would be if it tilted more or less. What would happen to seasons? Where would Canada end up (grid coordinates), what would happen to infrastructure etc…?

Rooting our focus in Geometry and Spatial Sense (GSS), more specifically through the curricular big idea of Location and Movement, which houses transformational geometry, is supported in sound research as noted below.

Using Dynamic Geometry Software in Mathematics Teaching

Leveraging Interactive Geometry Software to Prompt Discussion

Transformations and Dynamic Geometry Software

The Effects of Using Dynamic Geometry Software in the Middle School Classroom

Implement the Learning -­ implement the deep learning task, leveraging digital to accelerate and deepen learning.

9. Pedagogical Practises for Creating Deep Learning

Example 1 | Example 2

How will you build meaningful collaboration through learning partnerships?  

Grade 5 and 6:

  • Students will work with partners on various tasks leading up to and including the culminating
  • Students will be encouraged to communicate and use their partner as a resource as well as an experimenter, as they try new methods of communicating their thinking
  • Teachers will circulate to ask questions designed to guide students to deeper thinking
  • People from other professions will be invited to speak to the students about how their careers involve transformational geometry (via Google Meet)

Grade 4 and 5:

  • While some tasks will be done independently, the final activity will be done in small, homogenous groups
  • They will be encouraged to listen to and accept the ideas of others, as well as discuss their differences
  • They will share their work with each other through their gafe accounts
  • Teacher will be there to assist and guide (however, we want this to be a deep learning task...their ideas are sometimes better than ours

How are you optimizing the learning environment for success?

Grade 5 and 6:

The learning task builds on earlier successes in creating interactive learning environments where all students are deeply engaged and motivated. Learners are collaborating with students in their own and another class to develop their understanding.  The learning task includes strategies to engage all students in establishing learning partnerships with and between students and others.

Grade 4 and 5:

Students will be engaged with their own peers and those from another class. There are 4 tasks for students to complete. Each group working at their own level (groups pre-determined by teachers), this will engage all students and all levels.

How will you build rapid cycles of student self/peer formative assessment to accelerate the learning?

Grade 5 and 6:

Students will create success criteria based on four aspects: their website, the math (GeoGebra & transformations), collaboration, and critical thinking.

Students will be asked to consider their level of collaboration and critical thinking at various times during the cycle, related to the co-created success criteria.  They will also be encouraged to regularly revisit the success criteria they created to make sure they are moving in the right direction.

Grade 4 and 5:

Students will follow success criteria and be involved in the creation of success criteria for their culminating task. They will also be asked to peer and self-assess.

Students will be asked to consider their level of collaboration and critical thinking at various times during the cycle, related to the co-created success criteria.  They will also be encouraged to regularly revisit the success criteria they created to make sure they are moving in the right direction.

How will students leverage digital to accelerate and deepen the learning?

Grade 5 and 6:

Students use digital tools (internet research, Google Sites, GeoGebra, etc.) to navigate their learning processes with a focus on working within learning partnerships. The learning task enables application of deep learning competencies.  Digital is used to share new knowledge, processes and innovations within and beyond the learning group using Sites.

Grade 4 and 5:

Students will use the internet to research real world problems as well as use digital tools (scratch, padlet) and present their work on their Gafe accounts

Measure, Reflect & Change – use a range of evidence to measure the outcomes of the learning and effectiveness of the design so that you can reflect on what works and what can be improved.

10. Collecting the evidence

Example 1 | Example 2

screenshot-sites.jpg

Measure the Learning Outcomes

Observation Guide for teachers on May 8th

How will products and performances be assessed?

Grade 4/5, 5/6

  • Students co-created the success criteria for this project and that will be used to assess their learning and understanding of transformational geometry (using digital tools), collaboration, critical thinking, leveraging digital
  • Learning of transformational geometry will also be assessed by comparing the pre- and post-assessment results (based on standardized EQAO questions).
  • Oral discussions and conferences were also used to assess understanding and provide feedback and direction

 

Links to/ or samples of student learning, anecdotal evidence, video and photo evidence, student voices, baseline data, assessment data that you have collected. Consult results from Math post-assessment. (anonymize data).

Grade 4/5, 5/6

Refer to the website for examples of student tasks and products.

Approved video and photo apps to support pedagogical documentation

Deep learning competency post-assessment of marker students (anonymize data).

Class H - Post-Assessment

Highlight which C is being assessed:

  • CREATIVITY                                     ❑ CRITICAL THINKING
  • COMMUNICATION                    ❑ CHARACTER
  • CITIZENSHIP                                   ❑ COLLABORATION

SCORING:

1 - Limited evidence

2 - Emerging

3 - Developing

4 - Accelerating

5 - Proficient

Student identifier

Male/Female

Limited Evidence

Emerging 

Developing

Accelerating

Proficient

Student AT

F

x

X

Student JS

F

x

X

Student CC

M

x

X

Student RK

M

x

X

Student MY

M

x

X

Student JL

M

x

X

Class G - Post-Assessment

Highlight which C is being assessed:

  • CREATIVITY                                     ❑ CRITICAL THINKING
  • COMMUNICATION                    ❑ CHARACTER
  • CITIZENSHIP                                   ❑ COLLABORATION

SCORING:

1 - Limited evidence

2 - Emerging

3 - Developing

4 - Accelerating

5 - Proficient

Student identifier

Male/Female

Limited Evidence

Emerging 

Developing

Accelerating

Proficient

Student JM

F

X

X

Student MD

M

X

X

Student BV

M

X

X

Student JW

F

X

X

Student GE

F

X

X

Student SG

M

X

X

Class S - Post-Assessment

Highlight which C is being assessed:

  • CREATIVITY                                     ❑ CRITICAL THINKING
  • COMMUNICATION                    ❑ CHARACTER
  • CITIZENSHIP                                   ❑ COLLABORATION

SCORING:

1 - Limited evidence

2 - Emerging

3 - Developing

4 - Accelerating

5 - Proficient

Student identifier

Male/Female

Limited Evidence

Emerging 

Developing

Accelerating

Proficient

Student HM

F

X

X

Student MM

M

X

X

Student EF

M

X

X

Student  DF

F

X

X

Student LY

M

X

X

Student KS

F

X

X

Class W- Post-Assessment

Highlight which C is being assessed:

  • CREATIVITY                                     ❑ CRITICAL THINKING
  • COMMUNICATION                    ❑ CHARACTER
  • CITIZENSHIP                                   ❑ COLLABORATION

SCORING:

1 - Limited evidence

2 - Emerging

3 - Developing

4 - Accelerating

5 - Proficient

Student identifier

Male/Female

Limited Evidence

Emerging 

Developing

Accelerating

Proficient

Student RA

F

X

X

Student JN

F

X

X

Student OL

F

X

X

Student AR

M

X

X

Student LS

M

XX

Student MD

M

X

X

Use the deep learning dimension charts to assess where your project falls within the deep learning dimension and to provide evidence to support your choice. Example 1 | Example 2

Grade 5 and 6 Learning Dimension Progression Chart

Grade 4 and 5 Learning Dimension Progression Chart

leveraging digital.png

11. Reflection & Improvement

Example 1 | Example 2


What structures and processes will you use to reflect on the learning task implementation and outcomes – individually and with peers?

            1. How has the collaborative inquiry informed your teaching practice (awareness)?

It challenged us to:

  • Be more creative with finding engaging ways to address curriculum expectations
  • Be more discerning when choosing how to use our resources effectively (e.g., time, access to chromebooks, use of Learning Commons)
  • Incorporate math into deep learning tasks
  • Find ways to relate learning in school to real-life applications
  • Guide student thinking that encourages enriched learning partnerships

    2. How has your teaching practice changed (action)?

Our practice has changed:

  • In deepening our reflection on the importance of extending beyond traditional methods of learning into 21st century pedagogies

Refer to your responses from the teacher self-assessment survey of deep learning dimensions (that your received by email).

           3. What was the impact on
student achievement and development of deep learning competencies?

                  Critical Thinking:

  • Students used digital tools for thinking together and finding new ways to apply the knowledge that they collaboratively created.  They were also able to articulate how infusing a digital tool has enhanced their thinking and the organization of their thought.
  • Learners worked together in ways that sparked new thinking and original ideas.  They effectively used tools to support shared thinking.
  • They were able to articulate the importance of transferring and applying their knowledge appropriately to new and authentic situations and settings - and explain how they conducted their own further analyses to identify where else this could be applied.

                    Collaboration:

  • Learners worked interdependently matching tasks and expertise to the strengths of individuals in the pair.
  • Learners demonstrated collective ownership of the work and an active sense of shared responsibility for the outcome.
  • Students used digital tools to deepen the nature of collaboration among members.
  • The collaboration gave students the chance to practice clearly and respectfully expressing their opinions, and listening to and learning from others.  They were also becoming more skilled at identifying what underpins their own and others points of view.



(refer to the evidence of student learning above). Based on this evidence, how would you answer your inquiry question?

INQUIRY QUESTION: Which pedagogical practices and methods of leveraging digital tools and resources can be employed to positively impact student achievement, develop critical thinking skills, collaboration, and promote deeper learning in the area of transformational geometry?

We discovered that facilitating the learning rather than directly teaching students the concepts, empowered the students to self-direct their learning, discover new strategies and tools, broaden their understanding, learn from each other, and make connections to potential career paths.

Share a learning success or insights gained and a challenge you experienced during the implementation of this project. (In what areas have you made the most progress, and in what areas would you like to grow to better understand how to use these tools?)

5/6 Success:

  • We were impressed with the ability of the students to take risks as they explored topics deeply.
  • Students were eager to forge ahead with their learning even when encountering obstacles (e.g., When two students were struggling with placing lines that were perpendicular, they discovered a tool within GeoGebra to create the lines.  They shared their learning with the class to help make the process more efficient for others).
  • Students also impressed us by continuing their learning beyond what was asked (e.g., Once one of the students had completed their website, they wanted to find ways to use the GeoGebra tool to solve a 3D version of their initial task.  Another student wanted to find a way to change the colour of a lightbulb to show that the electricity had travelled through the transformations that he suggested accurately).
  • We used Google Meet to invite in an engineer to speak with the class.  It helped them to gain a sense of understanding and see real-life projects that use Transformational Geometry (e.g., the glass roof structure on the West Block of the Parliament Buildings.)
  • This project was so engaging that students shared their interest and experiences at home.  This, in turn, prompted one of our parents to visit our school and offer a hands-on presentation for the students, using transformational geometry (as he does in his career), thus extending the learning partnership outside of the school.

5/6 Challenge:

  • To prioritize our schedules to be able to effectively manage this project.
  • To find a collaborative workspace for 50+ students.
  • To guide students as they narrowed their broader ideas to more concise and manageable problems in their chosen careers

4/5 Success:

  • Students worked collaboratively and were engaged throughout the entire process
  • Learned how to use new digital tools
  • Research skills improved
  • Learned more about how transformational geometry and science are linked
  • Deep learning was evident

4/5 Challenge:

  • Students missed the mark and did not necessarily use the knowledge they learned throughout the learning cycle

How will you collaboratively go about changing and improving this learning task?

5/6

  • To continue to act as facilitators in the students’ learning.
  • If time, add in more learning partnerships to help the students explore a variety of career options (e.g., in a career fair).

4/5 

  • Don’t give students such a broad topic
  • Continue to act a facilitators