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PHS 551
Philosophical Anthropology
Fall 2017

Instructor

Michel Legault, legaultmsa@hotmail.com, (860 632 3082)

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course provides a philosophical investigation of the human person. The course wants to answer the following questions:

What is a human person?

How to explain the phenomenon of questioning?

What is knowledge?

How does man know through his external senses?

What is sensory consciousness?

What is the role of internal senses? Imagination and memory? Coordinating sense and estimative?

How can man express his interior life through language?

How does man exercise his free will?

What are feelings, emotions and passions in the human life?

How do habits build a human personality?

What is life?

Is the human soul immortal?

How can we explain at a philosophical point of view the origin of human life?

The program to be covered is the following:

1. The human phenomenon of questioning

2. The human knowledge: a concise historical approach

3. Sensory consciousness; the role of the external senses

4. The internal senses: coordinating sense, imagination, memory and evaluative sense.

5. Intellection: from sense knowledge to abstract concept

6. Language

7. Will and freedom, with an analysis of the human act

8. Feelings, emotions, passions and the unconscious

9. Habits, formation of personality through the acquisition of intellective and moral virtues

10. The concept of human person

11. The human as a living being: life and soul, death and immortality

12. The origin of human life

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Lecture 1: Introduction to Philosophy of Man or Rational Philosophy

The nature of philosophic inquiry. A metaphysical approach. The possible impact of the study of philosophy of man on students.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 1, p. 1-7

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 1, p. 1-6

Verneaux-Legault, Introduction to Philosophy of Man, document ad hoc, p. 1-4

Thomistic Psychology:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/soul.html

Aristotle:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01713a.htm

Lecture 2: The Human Phenomenon of Questioning

Nature and characteristics of experience. Innate curiosity. How to question? Knowing that I know.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 2, p. 8-22.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 2, p. 1-20 

Lecture 3: Sensory Consciousness (Part 1)

External senses. The diversification of sensory consciousness: material and formal object. Dependence on the material object. The existence of an objective world of things.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 4, p. 58-63.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 4, p. 1-6.

Lecture 4: Sensory Consciousness (Part 2)

The role of sensory image in sensation. The problem of the sense error. Role of the attention in sensation. Our senses are normally healthy.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 4, p. 63-70.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 4, p. 7-15. 

Lecture 5: The Internal Senses (Part 1)

The coordinating sense: differentiation and coordination of various sensory acts. A monitoring of all the special senses. The imagination: its function of storing and combining images in a creative way. Metaphor and fiction. Imagination as source of errors. Dreams.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 5, p. 71-77.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 5, p. 1-10.

Internal senses:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/intsense.html

Common sense or coordinating sense :

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/comsense.html

Imagination:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07672a.htm

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/imaginat.html

Estimative:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/estimatv.html

Memory:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/memoratv.html

Lecture 6: The Internal Senses (Part 2)

The memory: its importance. It is linked with time. Importance of memory for learning. Memory keeps a link with the objective source of our experiences. Its necessity of self-identity, assuring continuity and unity in human life. It is constitutive of personal history. The evaluative sense: instinctive knowledge. Cogitative sense.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 5, p. 77-91.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 5, p. 11-32.

Memory:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10174a.htm

Instinct:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08050b.htm

Lecture 7: From Sensation to Intellection

The unspecialized nature of the human body. Analysis of the case of Archimedes. The unique reality of the human mind and its radical difference from sensory acts. Flexibility and adaptability of the human body. Power of reasoning. Insight. Capacity of reflecting on his own experience. Capacity of abstraction and universalization. New insights are the cause of the progress of civilization.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 6, p. 92-101.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 6, p. 1-16.

Nature of nowledge:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/cognitn.html

Lecture 8: Intellection: Understanding or Simple Apprehension

Moderate realism. The role of the active intellect. Aristotelico-thomistic theory of knowledge contrasted with those of other philosophers.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 7. p. 102-111.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 7, p. 1-18. 

Intellect:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08066a.htm

Knowledge:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08673a.htm


Nominalism, realism, conceptualism:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11090c.htm

Lecture 9: Intellection : Understanding and Judging

Understanding and judging. A reflective act of the first act of understanding. Judging is linked with truth. Existential and essential judgments. The significance of judgment in the human intellective act: affirmation and negation.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 7, p. 111-117.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 7, p. 19-34 

Lecture 10: Intellection: Reasoning: The Mind’s Struggle for Further Understanding

Nature of reasoning. Reasoning in Logic. Reasoning is linked with Metaphysics: return to first principles. Thinking as imperfect reasoning. Understanding and error.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 7, p. 117-128.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 7, p. 34-54.

Reason:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12673b.htm

Lecture 11: Language (Part 1)

Language as a phenomenon. Nature and structure of language. The philosophic significance of language. The inherent and unavoidable ambiguity of language. The phenomenon of the plurality of languages.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 8, p. 129-137.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 8, p. 1-16. 

Zegarac,V. The Philsophy of Language (1998)

http://publish.uwo.ca/~rstainto/documents/PhilosophyofLanguage.pdf

Wikepedia, Philosophy of Language

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy_of_language

Lecture 12:  Language (Part 2)

Written language. Alphabetization and civilization. Return to spoken language through new technologies of communication. Superiority of the language of man. The expression of human mind is linked with the development of his language. Art and technology as language.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 8,  p. 137-148.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 8, p. 17-34 

Assignment

Take-Home on the first part of the semester, i.e., on chapters 1 and 2, 4 to 8.

Reflection paper on one topic taken from lecture 2 to lecture 12. (about 2 pages).

Lecture 13: Willing and Choosing. The Analysis of the Human Free Act (Part 1)

From understanding to willing. The problem of volition or free will. Human freedom: the determinist view. Analysis of the human free act. Voluntas ut natura and voluntas ut libera. Moderate determinism: free choice as self-determination.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 9, p. 149-157.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 9, p. 1-24 

Appetite:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/appetitn.html

Lecture 14: Willing and choosing. Human freedom (Part 2)

The role of deliberation in the free act. Love and the will. The indeterminist view: freedom as an absolute. Motivating factors and freedom.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 9, p. 157-165 and p. 169-170.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 9, p. 24-43. 

Will:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15624a.htm

Free will:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06259a.htm

Freedom of the will:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/freewill.html

Knowledge and love:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/knowlove.html

Lecture 15: Sensory appetites. Emotions and feelings (Part 1)

Appetition. Concupiscible or desiderative appetite. Irascible or aggressive appetite. The three constituents of emotion. The philosophical meaning of emotion.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 9, p. 165-169 and ch. 10, p. 171-176.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 9, p. 44-53 and ch. 10, p. 1-11. 

Appetite:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01656a.htm

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/appetitn.html

Concupiscence:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04208a.htm

Lecture 16: Emotions and feelings (Part 2)

Affectivity. Linkage between concupiscible and irascible appetites. The cultivation of emotions: fine arts. Controlling emotions. The phenomenon of humor.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 10, p. 176-186.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 10, p. 12-31.

Passion:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11534a.htm

Lecture 17: Examination on knowledge (lectures 1 to 12).

First part without books and notes. Second part with books and notes.

Lecture 18: The Unconscious

Nature and existence of the unconscious. The method of investigation of the unconscious: psychoanalysis. Notion of complex. The structure of personality: id, ego and superego. Oedipus complex. Psychosis and neurosis. Psychotherapy. Influence of the unconscious in the formation of human personality during childhood.

Readings:

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 10, appendix, p. 30A-1 -30A-7. 

Unconscious:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/614101/unconscious

Sigmund Freud:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1983319/Sigmund-Freud-on-Psychoanalysis/321026/Pleasure-Pain-Principle#toc321031


Id:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/281641/id

Ego:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/180318/ego

Superego:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/574274/superego

Neurosis:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/481779/neurosis

Psychosis:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/481821/psychosis#ref184692

Psychotherapy:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12549a.htm

Psychoanalysis:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/481586/psychoanalysis

Lecture 19: Habits and Learning (Part 1)

Acquired operational structures. The nature of habits. The value of habits. Speculative habits.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 11, p. 187-195.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 11,  p. 1-21

Habit:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07099b.htm

Lecture 20: Habits and Learning (Part 2)

Practical intellective habit: prudence. Appetitive habits: justice, temperance, fortitude. Habits and education. Habits and freedom. Habits and technology.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 11, p. 195-206.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 11, p. 21-42

Prudence:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12517b.htm

Justice:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08571c.htm

Temperance:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14481a.htm

Lecture 21: The Human Person (Part 1)

The notion of human person. Personhood and personality. The knowledge of others.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 12, p. 207-214.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 12, p. 1- 17. 

Personality:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11727b.htm

Man:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09580c.htm

Lecture 22: The Human Person (Part 2)

A phenomenology of “Yes” and of “No”. The social dimension of the human person. The phenomenon of loneness. The religious dimension of the human person. Metaphysical dimension of the human person.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 12, p. 214-225.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 12, p. 18-31. 

Wallace-Legault, The Elements of Philosophy, no. 34, p. 226-236.

Lecture 23: The Human as a Living Being (Part 1)

Nature of life. The unity of the living beings. The soul as the first principle of life.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 13, p. 226-235.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 13, p. 1-17.

Life:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09238c.htm

Vegetative soul:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/vegsoul.html

Sensitive soul:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/senssoul.html

Soul:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/soul.html

Lecture 24: The Human as a Living Being (Part 2)

The human soul and its relation to body. The uniqueness of human life: self-presence.  

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 13, p. 235-241.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 13, p. 18-27.

Soul:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14153a.htm

Individual, Individuality.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07762a.htm

Lecture 25: The Human as a Living Being (Part 3)

The phenomenon of death. Human death and immortality. Definition of life. Aristotelian vitalism.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 13, p. 241-248.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 13, p. 27-43.

Extracts from Roger Verneaux, Philosophie de l’homme, translated and adapted by Fr. Michel Legault.

Immortality:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07687a.htm 

Assignment

Reflection paper on one topic taken from lecture 13 to lecture 25 (about 2 pages).

Lecture 26: The Beginning of Human Life (Part 1)

The origin of the human soul. The problem of individuation. The beginning of human life. The origin of human kind.  

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 14, p. 249-257.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 14, p. 1-15 

Lecture 27: The Beginning of Human Life (Part 2)

The evolutionary theory. The origin of the human kind.

Readings:

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 14, p. 257-272.

Michel Legault, Commentary on Reichmann’s Philosophy of the Human Person, ch. 14, p. 16-38.

Catholics and Evolution:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05654a.htm

John Paul II, Truth Cannot Contredict Truth (Address to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences

(Oct. 22, 1996).

http://www.newadvent.org/library/docs_jp02tc.htm

Mr. Calvert, The Universe is “Too Fine-Tuned for Chance”, written by Crusade Magazine, Feb. 8, 2009.

http://www.tfp.org/tfp-home/fighting-for-our-culture/the-universe-is-too-fine-tuned-for-chance.html

Julio Loredo, The Sunset of Darwinism (Feb 12,2009)

http://www.tfp.org/tfp-home/news-commentary/the-sunset-of-darwinism.html

Sharon Begley, The sins of the Fathers, Take 2 Newsweek Jan. 17, 2009.

http://www.newsweek.com/begley-was-darwin-wrong-about-evolution-78507?gtl=43002

Assignment

Take-Home on the second part of the semester, i.e., on chapters 9 to 13.

Lecture 28: Final examination (Part 1)

Examination without books and notes.

Lecture 29: Final examination  (Part 2)

Examination with books and notes.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is using and passing off as one’s own the ideas or writings of another. Holy Apostles College and Seminary frowns upon plagiarism and anyone who plagiarizes will suffer the consequences: these may be severe.  The source of any work which is not your own must be acknowledged.

Disability Accomodations

Students in this course seeking accommodations to disabilities must first consult with the Disabilities Resource Center in the Registrar’s Office and follow the instructions of that office for obtaining accommodations.

Textbook :

James B. Reichmann, S.J., Philosophy of the Human Person.  Chicago, Loyola, 1985. 346 p.  ISBN 0-8294-0504-6,   $16.95

Books for Consultation in the Library

Brother Benignus, F.S.C., Nature, Knowledge and God, An introduction to Thomistic Philosophy. Milwaukee, The Bruce Publishing Company, 1947. Pages 145-287.

Jacques Maritain, Distinguish to Unite or The Degrees of Knowledge, translated by Gerald B. Phelan, New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1950, Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 59-12892, 475 p.

J. F. Donceel, S.J., Philosophical Psychology. New York, Sheed and Ward, 1955. 363 p.

Henri Grenier, Thomistic Philosophy, vol. 1, Logic and Philosophy of Nature. Charlottetwon, St. Dunstan’s University, 1948. Pages 375-551.

George P. Klubertanz, S.J., The Philosophy of Human Nature. New York, Appleton-Crofts, Inc., 1953. 444 p.

Henri Renard, S.J., The Philosophy of Man. Milwaukee, The Bruce Publishing Company, 1953. 313 p.

Daniel J. Sullivan, An Introduction to Philosophy. Milwaukee, The Bruce Publishing Company, 1957.  Pages 26-124.

F.-J. Thonnard, A.A., A History of Philosophy, New York, Desclée  Company, 1956. 1074 p.

William A. Wallace, O.P. The Elements of Philosophy, A Compendium for Philosophers and Theologians.  New York, Alba House, 1977. 338 p.

On the WEB:

Thomistic Philosophy page:

http://www.aquinasonline.com/Topics/psychic.html

7. EVALUATION

1) 10% Class attendance and active participation in the course during the semester

2) 10% Personal reflection on one topic taken from lectures 2 to 12. (for October 21)

3) 35% Mid-Term exam on lectures 2 to 12.

4) 10% Personal reflection on one topic taken from lectures 13 to 24: (for Nov. 25)

5) 35% Final examination on lectures 13-27

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubric for the oral exams and personal reflection

CONTENT

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Absence of Understanding

Posting shows no awareness of the concepts addressed in the topic by shifting off-topic

Misunderstanding

Posting demonstrates a misunderstanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic through an inability to re-explain them

Adequate Understanding

Posting demonstrates an adequate understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic by a re-explanation of them

Solid understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic and uses that understanding effectively in the examples it provides

Insightful understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts of the topic through the use of examples and by making connections to other concepts

8. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

9. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required to be in class 3 hours a week and prepare for class discussions 4.5 hours a week. Expect to devote at least 7 quality hours a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

10. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

11. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

D:\Michel Legault\My Pictures 20120403\Michel 20130617\DSCN4782.JPG

Father Michel Legault, priest of the Society of the Missionaries of the Holy Apostles

Life and activities

Born in Montreal in 1935, Fr. Michel Legault studied first to become a teacher in the Province of Quebec, Canada. He taught 13 years as a Brother of Christian Instruction in public primary schools (1954-1958) and private secondary schools (1958-1964) [physics, chemistry, mathematics, Latin, Philosophy and music].

From 1964 to 1967, he taught philosophy at  Normal School (College). In 1967,  he entered the Society of the Holy Apostles and studied theology at St. Paul University in Ottawa. While studying theology, he taught General Ethics and Social Ethics at Ottawa University. He was elected as representative of the students on the Senate of Saint Paul University.

In 1970-1971, he spent one year at the Institut d’Études sociales de  Institut Catholique de Paris. He was ordained a priest on July 10, 1971. Then he taught philosophy, sciences and music while being dean of studies at Holy Apostles Seminary, in Otele, Cameroon (1971-1982).

From 1982 to 1984, he completed his doctoral dissertation (The Philosophy of Education of UNESCO) at Institut Catholique de Paris. In August 1984, he was elected on the general council of this religious family. During his sojourn in Montreal he taught philosophy at Saint John Vianney College and was the director of the Vocational Residence (students discerning for priesthood and religious life). From 1984 to 1988, he was member of the General Council of the Society of the Holy Apostles.

He returned to Cameroon from 1988 to 1997. He was rector of Holy Apostles Seminary in Otele. He founded a Major Seminary of Philosophy for the religious of Central Africa, Institut de Philosophie Saint-Joseph-Mukasa. He organized the propaedeutic year of spiritual formation before the Major Seminary for the Ecclesiastical Province of Yaoundé. He was one of the first teachers of philosophy who opened the Faculty of philosophy at Catholic University of Central Africa (Yaounde, Cameroon), and he initiated the teaching of Philosophy of Education and Pedagogy at the same University.

Since 1998, Fr. Michel teaches philosophy at Holy Apostles College and Seminary, in Cromwell, Connecticut.

Studies

Baccalaureate of Arts (University of Montreal)

Baccalaureate in Education (University of Montreal)

Baccalaureate in Theology (University St. Paul, Ottawa)

Licentiate in Philosophy (University of Ottawa)

Master in Philosophy (Institut Catholique de Paris)

Master in Divinity (Holy Apostles College and Seminary)

Doctorate in Philosophy (Institut Catholique de Paris)

Studies in Sociology (Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. and Institut d’Études sociales, Paris)  

Doctorate Honoris Causa from Holy Apostles College and Seinary.

Publications

  1. La conception démocratique de l'éducation : John Dewey dans Démocratie et éducation]

Yaoundé, Cameroun : Presses de l'Université catholique d'Afrique centrale, [2002]

Pour une philosophie de l’éducation, Cahiers Jacques Maritain, no 14, Déc. 1986, pages 5-58

Une éducation libérale pour la démocratie: Jacques Maritain : pour une philosophie de l'éducation, Presses de l’Université catholique de l’Afrique centrale (Yaoundé, Cameroun), 2002, 62 pages

Communication at the symposium on Jacques Maritain, Montréal, 1988, Métaphysique et éducation http://maritain.nd.edu/ama/Knasas/Knasas14.pdf


CALENDAR

Fall 2017

Lectures

1

Aug. 29

Introduction to Philosophy of Man or Rational Philosophy [ch. 1, p. 1-7][1]

2

Aug. 31

The Human Phenomenon of Questioning [chapter 2, p. 8-22][2]

3

Sept. 5

Sensory Consciousness (Part 1) [ch. 4, p. 58-63]

4

Sept. 7

Sensory Consciousness (Part 2) [ch. 4, p. 63-70]

5

Sept. 12

The Internal Senses (Part 1) [ch. 5, p. 71-77]

6

Sept. 14

The Internal Senses (Part 2) [ch. 5, p. 77-91]

7

Sept. 19

From Sensation to Intellection [chapter 6, p. 92-101]

8

Sept. 21

Intellection: Understanding or Simple Apprehension [ch. 7. p. 102-111]

9

Sept. 26

Intellection: Understanding and Judging [ch. 7, p. 111-117.]

10

Sept. 28

Intellection: Reasoning: Struggle for Further Understanding [ch. 7, p. 117-128.]

11

Oct. 3

Language (Part 1) [ch. 8, p. 129-137]

12

Oct. 5

Language (Part 2) [ch. 8,  p. 137-148]

13

Oct. 10

Willing and Choosing. Analysis of the Human Free Act (Part 1) [ch. 9, p. 149-157]

14

Oct. 12

Willing and Choosing. Human Freedom (Part 2) [ch. 9, p. 157-165 and p. 169-170]

15

Oct. 17

SensoryAppetites. Emotions, Feelings (Part 1) [ch. 9, p. 165-169; ch. 10, p. 171-176]

16

Oct. 19

Emotions and Feelings (Part 2) [ch. 10, p. 176-186’

17

Oct. 24

Examination on Knowledge (lectures 1 to 12).

18

Oct. 26

The Unconscious [ch. 10, appendix, p. 30A-1 -30A-7]

19

Oct.31

Habits and Learning (Part 1) [ch. 11, p. 187-195]

20

Nov. 2

Habits and Learning (Part 2) [ch. 11, p. 195-206]

21

Nov. 7

The Human Person (Part 1) [ch. 12, p. 207-213]

22

Nov. 9

The Human Person (Part 2) [ch. 12, p. 213-225]

23

Nov. 14

The Human as a Living Being (Part 1) [ch. 13, p. 226-235]

24

Nov. 16

The Human as a Living Being (Part 2) [ch. 13, p. 235-241]

25

Nov. 21

The Human as a Living Being (Part 3) [ch. 13, p. 241-248]

26

Nov. 28

The Beginning of Human Life (Part 1) [ch. 14, p. 249-257]

27

Nov. 30

The Beginning of Human Life (Part 2) [ch. 14, p. 257-272]

28

Dec. 5

Final examination (Part 1) [without books and notes]

29

Dec. 7

Final examination  (Part 2) [with books and notes]

7. EVALUATION

1) 10% Class attendance and active participation in the course during the semester

2) 10% Personal reflection on one topic taken from lectures 2 to 12. (for October 24)

3) 35% Mid-Term exam on lectures 2 to 12.

4) 10% Personal reflection on one topic taken from lectures 13 to 24: (for Nov. 30)

5) 35% Final examination on lectures 13-27


[1] The pages refer to the textbook of Fr. James Reichman, Philosophy of the Human Person.

[2] The Problem of Human Knowing: A Historical Overview (chapter 3) will not be studied. This subject was already or is still to be covered in the varied courses of the History of Philosophy. The course of Epistemology will also examine the problem of knowledge.