FAQs about Online Education Standards & Practices (OESP)

Why is OESP replacing the traditional certification courses?

Why is OESP 12 weeks?

What if I already took some of the @ONE courses?

If I have successfully completed an @ONE course, can I waive that unit in OESP?

What aspects of Canvas does OESP cover?

Do I need to have an online course already to take OESP?

Can I use the modules I build in my Sandbox for a real course?

Will I have a fully-developed course at the end of OESP?

How much time does OESP take?

What will we cover in OESP?

Why is OESP replacing the traditional certification courses?

Though we think the @ONE courses are terrific, one limitation of the courses in our original path is their lack of connection to a specific course management system. With the adoption of Canvas, we’ve been able to dovetail the CMS training with the course content, including using assessments in Canvas, building accessible pages, and using Canvas tools to support student success.

Why is OESP 12 weeks?

Many of the participants in the original certification path noted the courses took too long to complete. If faculty needed to be ready to teach online the following semester, or if they were completing the certificate during their sabbatical, the course progression simply took too long. We listened to those concerns, and built the 12-week course to support faculty with a deadline. We’ll continue to offer 4-week courses for faculty who wish to enhance their teaching with short, focused professional development courses.

What if I already took some of the @ONE courses?

Though all @ONE courses are guided by the @ONE Standards for Quality Online Teaching, this is the first course to combine the @ONE Standards with the OEI Online Course Design Rubric and with Canvas training. Even if you have taken several @ONE courses, there is plenty of new material in OESP to keep you thinking, learning, and improving your online course.

If I have successfully completed an @ONE course, can I waive that unit in OESP?

Though OESP pulls from the best of our courses, the material has been revised, updated, and augmented. The units do not align with prior courses—it’s a whole new class. Regardless of prior courses with @ONE, you cannot waive a unit, but we think you’ll find plenty of new ideas!

What aspects of Canvas does OESP cover?

In OESP, you’ll learn the basic elements of building a course in Canvas, including using Modules and Pages to develop units, adding Discussions, Quizzes, and Assignments to modules, and helping students navigate with easy through your course. We’ll also focus on developing fully accessible materials in Canvas.

Do I need to have an online course already to take OESP?

Building an online course requires some playing around. You’ll use a “Sandbox” from Canvas for OESP. This Sandbox is not connected to your institution, giving you lots of freedom to play and to invite others to come in a check out your work, as well.

Can I use the modules I build in my Sandbox for a real course?

Though you can’t teach in your Sandbox, you can easily export the modules you create, then import them into a course from your campus. It’s as easy as 1-2-3. Really!

Will I have a fully-developed course at the end of OESP?

If you have already taught online, and most of your resources already exist and are fully accessible, you may find you can complete your course while you’re in OESP, but that is not the goal of the course. Instead, the goal is to help you build a solid introductory “Orientation” unit to start your course on the right foot, and one content unit.

How much time does OESP take?

Like other @ONE courses, OESP is designed to take about 10 hours a week. There is an option in OESP to have your Sandbox reviewed. If you choose this option, you may find you need to put in extra time to build your Orientation and Content unit to be fully prepared for review.

What will we cover in OESP?

In addition to learning the tools within Canvas, in OESP you’ll create a well-developed Orientation unit that helps get your students started on the right foot, including important course policies, student support materials, and activities to foster a learning community in your class. In addition, you’ll learn how to create accessible content pages, and how to integrate text, images, and multimedia on those pages. Finally, you’ll learn how to use discussion and assessment tools to help you assess your students’ learning.