Collection Development Policy

The MGH IHP Community Health Collection ● 2013

Introduction

About the Collection

The IHP Community Health Collection was founded in 2012 with materials inherited from a previous Massachusetts Prevention Resource Center. As of 2013, It has over 1300 items including 837 monographs, 246 curricula, 86 kits, 67 DVDs/Videos, and 130 visual aids.

Location

Building 36 4th Floor

MGH Institute of Health Professions

Charlestown Navy Yard

36 First Avenue

Boston, MA 02129

Staff

Jessica Bell

Director of the Library and Instructional Design

Amanda Tarbet

Reference Librarian

Contact

librarian@mghihp.edu

Policy Purpose and Audience

This policy is intended to be used by library staff as a set of guidelines for selection of new materials and evaluation of current materials in the Community Health Collection. It will also inform users, stakeholders, and community members of the selection criteria used to develop the library’s holdings, as well as what resources they may expect to find and why. This policy is supplemental to the IHP Library collection development policy. It will be reviewed annually and revised as needed.

Users

The library’s primary users are the students, faculty and staff of the Institute. Additional users include affiliates from Massachusetts General Hospital, Partners Healthcare, the Charlestown community, and the greater Boston community. The collection is open to the public, with borrowing privileges granted to Massachusetts residents. The majority of users external to the Institute will be community health educators and nurses.

Programs Served

The library supports a number of academic degree and certificate programs within the School of Nursing, the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, and the Center for Interprofessional Studies and Innovation (CIPSI) at the MGH Institute of Health Professions. The academic programs are:

School of Nursing

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Center for Interprofessional Studies and Innovation (CIPSI)

The library resources serve these programs by collecting educational materials and resources that can be used to promote good health practices among clients, patients, families and community-aggregate populations, in fulfillment of assignments, academic endeavors, or professional responsibilities. Resources support health promotion from the program planning to implementation through to the evaluation stage.

Selection Criteria

Current Focus

The current focus of the collection is on Community Health, which combines aspects of public health, human anatomy and physiology, education, ethics, psychology, and more. Priority is placed on items that will help students and health care professionals increase health literacy and provide patient education.  Emphasis is on recently published materials, however some resource types (e.g. anatomical models) are not dependent on publication year for their value. Generally geographic origin is not considered when evaluating materials, with the exception of resources specific to the state of Massachusetts, which may be collected more comprehensively. While a variety of categories and subjects are considered for development (see Appendix I), the library’s current focus is on the following subjects: nutrition, fitness, dementia, fall prevention, hypertension, and diabetes.

Resource Types and Formats

A variety of resource types will be collected by the library including monographs and school curricula of print and electronic formats; audiovisual materials; two dimensional visual resources such as posters; three dimensional realia such as anatomical models and multimodal kits. The library also collects resources in the form of student submissions from the NS 521 class. Materials will be collected at all reading levels including juvenile resources. The library will not collect textbooks.

Languages

Materials will primarily be collected in English, but additional languages will be supported, including (but not limited to): Spanish, French, Chinese, Portuguese and Vietnamese. These are the most commonly spoken languages in Boston other than English according to 2010 census data found in the 2012-2013 Health of Boston report from the Boston Public Health Commission. The terms Spanish, French and Portuguese all include use of associated Creole languages.

Gifts in Kind

Proposed gifts of library materials are subject to acceptance by library staff, who will evaluate the items in terms of institutional value, considering whether materials support the collection development policy for that subject area. When the Library accepts a gift, it becomes the property of the MGH IHP Library, which reserves the right to determine whether the gift will be retained, where it will be located, and how it will be cataloged and circulated. Materials not retained will be offered to other libraries, foreign and domestic, or sold in library book sales or to book dealers. Sale proceeds are used to purchase library materials.

Limitations

Due to our relationship with the Treadwell Library at the Massachusetts General Hospital, the IHP Community Health Library will not collect materials that are available through Treadwell, unless specific materials are considered vital for the use of patrons who do not have access to Treadwell’s resources.

Collection Profile

Depth

All materials are collected at a depth of level 2 as defined by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions Section on Acquisition and Collection Development:

2 Basic Information Level

Collections that serve to introduce and define a subject, to indicate the varieties of information available elsewhere, and to support the needs of general library users through the first two years of college instruction include:

  • A limited collection of monographs and reference works.
  • A limited collection of representative general periodicals.
  • Defined access1 to a limited collection of owned or remotely-accessed electronic bibliographic tools, texts, data sets, journals, etc.

The collection should be frequently and systematically reviewed for currency of information. Superseded editions and titles containing outdated information should be withdrawn. Classic or standard retrospective materials may be retained.

Subjects

The Community Health Collection uses a unique classification system based on topics in community health and disease prevention. Please see Appendix I for the complete list of categories and subjects currently held by the library. Categories that are not currently being collected are denoted as such.

Collection Evaluation Methods

The size of the collection is small enough that the collection can be evaluated on a resource by resource basis. This may change in the future and updates to the policy will reflect that change. The librarians will use a number of quantitative and qualitative indicators to evaluate and, if necessary, weed the collection. 

Those measures include:

Circulation statistics

Age of materials

Overall Inventory

User feedback and suggestions

Condition of materials

Professional judgment

Evaluation will ideally be done once a year with an emphasis on discarding extraneous materials and identifying coverage gaps.

Discards

Any resources removed from the collection may be donated if an appropriate recipient is identified. Other options for discards include a library giveaway/sale, or disposal.

Bibliography

  1. MGH Institute of Health Professions Course Catalog 2012-2013. Available at: http://mghihp.smartcatalogiq.com/2012-2013/catalog
  2. Boston Public Health Commission. Health of Boston 2012-2013. Available at: http://www.bphc.org/about/research/Pages/HOB2012-2013.aspx
  3. International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions: Section on Acquisition and Collection Development. (2001). Guidelines for collection development policy using the conspectus model. Available at: http://www.ifla.org/publications/guidelines-for-a-collection-development-policy-using-the-conspectus-model


Appendix I

Subjects

The categories and subjects of the collection are as follows:

Alcohol and other drugs

Alcohol

Children of alcoholics

Drugs

Dual disorders

Posters

Prevention

Programming

Recovery

Research

Science-based prevention

Science-based treatment

Tobacco

Treatment

Chronic diseases

Allergies

Arthritis

Asthma

Cancer

Cardiovascular disease

Diabetes

Osteoporosis

Chronic pain

Research

Community development/building

Advocacy

Assessment

Case studies

Coalition building

Collaboration

Community building

Community health

Community organizing

Programming

Public health

Social justice

Youth involvement

Comprehensive health

Assessment

Evaluation

Guides

Planning

Programming

Science-based programs

Diversity

Cultural Humility

Multiculturalism

Teaching cultural humility

Elder Issues

Aging

Alcohol and Drugs

Dementia

Terminal care

Death and dying

Wellness

Evaluation/Assessment

Organizational development

Programming

Evaluation Tools

Infectious diseases

Diseases

Infection control

Injury prevention

Media

Alcohol and drugs

Literacy

Mass media

Violence

Mental Health

Video games

Body image

Eating disorders

Self-esteem

Gambling

Learning disabled/disabilities

Mental health

Stress

Suicide and depression

Parenting and Families

Child and infant care

Child and infant rearing

Substance abuse

Education

Physical Health

Fitness

Nutrition

Wellness

Organizations/Workplace

Meetings

Management

Strategic planning

Volunteers

Program Development

Assessment

Fundraising

Grant writing

Group dynamics

Marketing

Meetings

Management

Strategic planning

Volunteers

Safety/Safety education

Consumer education

Environmental issues

Fall prevention

Fires and fire prevention

Injury prevention

Sexuality/Sex education

Abstinence

Birth control/contraception

Gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender health

HIV/AIDS

Puberty

Pregnancy

Sex education

Sexually transmitted diseases

Teaching/Training

Activities

After school programs

Communication

Facilitation

Games

Ice breakers

Presentations

Role playing

Group dynamics

Training

Violence and violence prevention

Anger

Bullying

Child abuse

Conflict resolution

Dating violence

Domestic violence

Hate crimes

Prevention

Science-based prevention

Science-based treatment

Schools

Sexual abuse

Sexual harassment

Trauma

Youth development (no longer being developed)

Character education

Decision making

Job search

Peer leadership

Programming

Interpersonal relations

Social skills