Mount Hutt College/Lauriston School Board of Trustees Charter 2017

Introduction

Governance

Management

Combined Board Composition

Recognising New Zealand’s Cultural Diversity, NAG 1(e)

Commitment to Māori, NAG1(e)

National Education Goals and Priorities

The Schools and their Communities

Lauriston School

Mount Hutt College

Thriving Learning Community

Culture:

Environment:

Learning:

Leadership:

Strategic Goals for 2017 to 2019

1.     Strategic Plan 2017 -2019:  Strategic Goal 1:

2.     Strategic Plan 2017 -2019:  Strategic Goal 2:

3.     Strategic Plan 2017:  2019-Strategic Goal 3:

Strategic Plan 2017 -2019 - Strategic Goal 1:

Strategic Plan 2017 -2019 - Strategic Goal 2:

Strategic Plan 2017 -2019 - Strategic Goal 3:

Strategic Plan 2017 -2019 - Strategic Goal 3: (National Standards)

E-Learning:  Use technologies to enhance learning SG1

ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori SG2

Student Achievement: Improve achievement for all students SG3

a) Achievement of Year 9 Boys and Māori Students

b) NCEA Achievement

c)  National Standards Using the Community of Learning target

Introduction

The Board has the responsibility to develop strategic educational direction from Year 1-13 across two schools; Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School which places it in a unique position.  We acknowledge the Board of Trustees governs two individual schools and that the management reflects each school’s requirements.

The legal responsibility of Boards of Trustees around governance and management is determined by Section 75 and 76 of the Education Act 1989.

 

Governance

The Board emphasises strategic leadership rather than administrative detail, has a clear distinction of Board and staff roles, concentrates on the future rather than the past or present, and is pro-active rather than reactive.

 

Management

The Board delegates all authority and accountability for the day-to-day operational organisation of the respective schools to the Principal, or Acting Principal.

 

Combined Board Composition

Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School combined their boards in March 2004. Initially to ensure both schools thrived, which has happened. It took a lot of consultation with both school communities and required Ministry of Education approval.

  • Mount Hutt College is the lead school.
  • Five elected parent trustees; nominations open across both schools.
  • If either school’s community is not represented by at least one trustee after the election, then the Board will co-opt at least one trustee from that community.
  • One elected student from Mount Hutt College (year 9 and up).
  • One Staff trustee; nominations open across both schools; it is the Principal’s role to make sure the staff are up to date with board matters. We cannot have two staff trustees as it is law that each board can only have one trustee.
  • Co-option is at the discretion of the Board.

 

Recognising New Zealand’s Cultural Diversity, NAG 1(e)                                                                                                    

Both schools, as appropriate to their communities, will develop procedures and practices that reflect New Zealand’s Cultural diversity and the unique position of Maori Culture. In recognition of this we will take reasonable steps to provide instruction in tikanga (Maori culture) and te reo (Maori language).

To achieve this, the schools will:

  • Incorporate elements of tikanga and te reo into units of work across all areas of the curriculum.
  • Offer opportunities for individual student and staff development in te reo as required.
  • Use everyday greetings from the Maori language.
  • Encourage the establishment of signs around the school in both English and Maori.
  • Ensure there are adequate resources to support tikanga and te reo programmes.

 

Commitment to Māori, NAG1(e)                                                                                                                                                    

Both schools recognise that Māori students face barriers to achievement additional to those faced by other students.  The reasons for this are complex, and are both historical and current.

We believe that the additional barriers faced by Māori students can only be addressed effectively in partnership between the school and its Māori community.  That partnership must work to make the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi a reality at both schools and give Māori students the same benefits of participation in education as other students.

The schools also recognise that Māori language and culture has an intrinsic importance to New Zealand society, which is over and above the contribution made by other cultures.  The schools are determined to reflect that importance.

The Board is committed to building, and playing an active part in, the partnership with our Māori community, and to resourcing decisions made in partnership.

 

National Education Goals and Priorities

Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School endorse the National Education Goals and the National Education Priorities and recognise the legislative requirements of the National Standards for achievement

The Schools and their Communities

Lauriston School

Lauriston is a four teacher, rural, co-educational State Primary School that educates pupils from New Entrants to Year 6 with a roll of about 90 students. It contributes to Mount Hutt College, Methven. It was established in 1883 and is situated in the Lauriston Township which is in the Ashburton County, approximately 23km from Ashburton and 18km from Methven.

 

The district is served by the District Bus Scheme. The catchment area for the school includes the Lauriston, Lyndhurst, Barrhill, Rokeby and Winchmore areas.

 

The school is situated in a pleasant rural setting with well-kept grounds and gardens. It has a filtered, heated swimming pool, an artificial turf court area, and extensive playing fields.

 

There is a very supportive parent community who regularly attend school events, school-based occasions and sports days, and participate in fundraising efforts. Parent help is readily forthcoming to support classroom programmes. Parents encourage their children to do well at school and communicate regularly with teaching staff.  There is also a high expectation of good behaviour and discipline by staff and the parent community.

 

The school provides a wide range of learning opportunities for children and view experiences ‘in the wider world’ as important. It has a culture of enterprise and a strong sense of family. The core subjects of literacy and numeracy are given priority in our school, with the inclusion of information and communication tools.

 

Location

Lauriston, Mid-Canterbury            

As at March 2017

Decile Rating

9

Teaching Staff  - Roll generated

 -  Number of teachers

4

4

Gender composition

Girls:  44

Boys: 42

Ethnic composition

New Zealand 79%

New Zealand Maori 13%

Asian 7%

African 1%

Mount Hutt College

Mount Hutt College is a state, rural, co educational Year 7-13 College of about 480 students.  It is set in attractive grounds in Methven, not far from Mt Hutt ski field, and serves a predominantly rural community.

 

A District Bus Scheme provides transport for about half of the school’s population, and due to rapid growth in 2007 an Enrolment Scheme was implemented at the direction of the Ministry of Education. Since then the roll has stabilised at just under 500 students

 

A full range of curricular and extracurricular activities occur in the school, which has a tradition of performing well in all areas of its operation – academic, cultural, sporting and social – strong community links support all school activities.

 

The College continues to look at ways to meet the needs of its students and develop their aspirations. It uses technology in the form of VLN (Virtual Learning Network) to allow distance education. It has a strong GATEWAY and STAR programme and its Vocational Pathways programme. In 2015 an Agricultural Academy was started and we work closely with the Primary ITO to deliver this programme.

 

It is a BYOD (bring your own device) school. These devices are used when appropriate.

 

There is a range of contributing schools from all around Mid-Canterbury.

Location

Methven (updated February 2017)

Decile Rating

9

Teaching Staff  - Roll generated

 -  Number of teachers

34.2

41

Number of foreign fee paying students

 

18

Ethnic composition

Pakeha  72%

Maori  11%

Other European  8%

South East Asian  4%         

Other Asian 3%

Latin American 1%

Other 1%

Thriving Learning Community

Following consultation with students, staff and the broader community during 2014 the joint board of Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School developed a compelling vision of a Thriving Learning Community to express the desired future state of our schools. Our vision statement encompasses four domains that provide context and focus for the development of our strategic goals and define the criteria against which we measure success:

Culture:

Our schools embrace diversity and there is collaboration between our community and our schools. When all students and staff feel valued and respected, when the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi are upheld, and when the wider community is actively involved to provide greater choice and opportunity for richer learning experiences, then we will have achieved success in this domain.

Environment:

Our schools provide a challenging, safe and inclusive environment for all. When the schools are effectively resourced to meet the needs of all learners, and when all students and staff feel both their physical and emotional wellbeing are of paramount importance, then we will have achieved success in this domain.

Learning:

Our students are fully engaged and maximising their potential. When all parents/caregivers/whanau take an active interest in their child’s or children’s education, and when the strengths and talents of all students have been identified and developed so they are achieving in all aspects of the NZ curriculum, then we will have achieved success in this domain.

Leadership:

Quality leadership is demonstrated and developed. When our schools are resourced with great teachers and staff who connect with students, inspire a love of learning and have a commitment to our vision, and when our schools have a responsive approach to implementing best practice for learning, then we will have achieved success in this domain.

 

Note our vision will sometimes be abbreviated to “TLC” and the acronym “CELL” will often be used when referencing our four domains.

The board expects this charter document will become increasingly relevant and integrated into day-to-day operations and decision making at both schools.

This charter presents medium-term (i.e. 3-5 year) strategic goals which have been developed to achieve our aspirational vision of a Thriving Learning Community. We have intentionally rationalised our strategic goals to just two or three goals at each school to provide focus and clarity for our principals and their respective teams. Strategic goals will normally address elements across multiple domains – the view here being that the more domains a goal addresses the more quickly we advance towards our vision. Strategic goals will be reviewed annually by the board (with student, staff and community consultation where necessary) to ensure they remain relevant. Where a shift in focus is required following either self-review or externally imposed changes our strategic goals will be amended accordingly.

Strategic goals are further chunked into annual goals to provide a framework for principal reporting during an academic year. For annual goals, principals will define deliverables, measures, targets and associated review dates, and also assign responsibilities.

Our vision of a Thriving Learning Community is very effectively complimented by the long-standing mottos that have presided over each school for many years: ‘Striving for Excellence’ and ‘Ready for Success’ at Mount Hutt College and Lauriston School respectively. Furthermore, the established school values embodied by the acronyms of PRIDE (at Mount Hutt College) and READY (at Lauriston School) define behaviours and attributes that are absolutely essential to the realisation of our collective vision.  

Lauriston School - Ready for Success

R

Respect

Respectful students are team players that have empathy and tolerance for the rights and responsibilities of themselves, others and the environment. They are polite, considerate and caring children who are locally and globally aware.

E

Enterprise

Enterprising students are reliable, organised team members and creative and analytical thinkers, who use a range of thinking tools. They are problem solvers who set goals and are prepared to take risks in order to successfully achieve their targets.

A

Achievement

Achievers are well-rounded students who have a strong feeling of self-worth. They are diligent and strive to complete tasks to a high standard and produce quality work. They are motivated and resilient and have a sound base in literacy and numeracy, enabling them to be effective communicators.

D

Determination

Determined students strive to do their best, in all situations. They show perseverance and resilience in order to build on their strengths and achieve their learning goals.

Y

You, It’s your choice

Your choice - students who manage themselves are honest, responsible and accountable for their own choices and actions. They are self-disciplined, manage time effectively and understand the benefits of working independently and cooperatively. They seek, recognise and take opportunities to further develop their skills.

Mount Hutt College - PRIDE

PRIDE-teReo-05.png

P

Passion

Be enthusiastic and committed to learning, Be proud of our school

Look after each other and the environment

R

Respect

Respect the rights of all to learn in every class

Be polite and respectful to all

Respect tidiness of all learning environments, Respect yourself

I

Integrity

Be honest, Follow the school systems

Take pride in doing your best. Act responsibly when something is wrong

D

Diversity

Recognise and understand differences; talents, culture and religion

Celebrate successes of others in all areas of school life

E

Excellence

Aim for the very best in all that you do, Be the best you can be

Always exhibit our school values of PRIDE

Strategic / Annual Section - Mount Hutt College

Strategic Goals for 2017 to 2019

1.     Strategic Plan 2017 -2019:  Strategic Goal 1:

E-Learning:  Use technologies to enhance learning.

 

Annual Targets 2017:

a)   Continue to measure progress on the e-Learning Planning Framework (e-LPF) with a focus on the “Beyond the classroom” dimensions. The aim is to be confident that e-learning can become business as usual and not a strategic focus by 2019.

b)   Implement strategies to embed BYOD learning across the full school.

 

2.     Strategic Plan 2017 -2019:  Strategic Goal 2:

ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori

 

Annual Targets 2017:

a)     Develop an implementation strategy for ESMM, based on consultation with our Māori community and recommendations from best practice models.

 

3.     Strategic Plan 2017:  2019-Strategic Goal 3:

Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

 

Annual Targets 2017:

a)       Select a group of Year 9 boys and Maori students who are either below literacy requirements or underperforming then use strategies to improve their literacy with the aim to improve their educational outcomes. Teacher will develop, evaluate and report against more specific targets to accelerate the achievement of identified group.

b)      NCEA Achievement

●      All levels all students achieve at least 14 credits per subject.

●      Level 2: 80% of boys will gain level with 35% of boys achieving an endorsed qualification.

●      All students in Level 3 programmes who identify that they require their university entrance, achieve this target.

●      Improve endorsement levels by 10 percentage points for Level 1 to 3.

        o   Level 1 up to 60% (2016 50%)

        o   Level 2 up to 46% (2016 36%)

        o   Level 3 up to 38% (2016 28%)

c)       National Standards Using the Community of Learning target

        o    Year 8 Reading:  70% of boys at or above the standard

        o    Year 8 Writing:   65% of boys at or above the standard

        o    Year 7 Reading:  target to be set by end of Term 1

        o    Year 7 Writing:  target to be set by end of Term 1

        o    Year 7 Maths:  target to be set by end of Term 1

PRIDE-Both-02.png

A Thriving Learning Community

Striving for Excellence

panel-1.png

Strategic Plan 2017 -2019 - Strategic Goal 1:

E-Learning:  Use technologies to enhance learning

2016 Actions

2017 Annual Targets

2017 Actions

2018 Actions

2019 Actions

●   Use the e-LPF to develop to evaluate progress in e-learning

●   Set up e-learning committee on the same lines as PB4L

●   Continue the implementation of BYOD in Year 8, 9, 10, 12 and 13

●   Faculty areas share ways to use BYOD in their subject areas

●   Continue the Professional development of teachers in the use of technology in the classroom

Develop an enquiry model for all teachers PLD using OneNote for using and storing their appraisal against the teaching criteria.

a)   Continue to measure progress on the e-Learning Planning Framework (e-LPF) with a focus on the “Beyond the classroom” dimensions. The aim is to be confident that e-learning can become business as usual and not a strategic focus by 2019.

b)  Implement strategies to embed BYOD learning across the full school.

●   Use the e-LPE survey to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of e-learning across all dimension in particular “Beyond the Classroom”

●   Have all levels of the College BYOD

●   Use student, parent and student voice to measure effective use in the classroom

●   Teachers to continue to use their appraisal digital portfolio to develop and record their e-learning.

●   Continue the professional development of teachers in the use of technology in the classroom

●   Sharing of ideas by teachers both within faculties and across facilities; best practice and what has not been successful

●   Regular review access to devices for students who are not able to have a device

●   Regularly review and upgrade the infrastructure to support e-learning

Evaluate when e -learning will move to business as usual

No longer a Strategic focus?

Strategic Plan 2017 -2019 - Strategic Goal 2:

ESMM:  Educational success for Māori as Māori

2016 Actions

2017 Annual Targets

2017 Actions

2018 Actions

2019 Actions

Māori learning as Māori. This was not a strategic goal in 2016 however the importance of this was understood.

Some Action that occurred

●   Links with Arwhenua marae

●   More students learn the College Haka

●   Celebrate more stories of Māori student success

●   ERO visit highlighted current progress and clearly set out need for community consultation.

a)    Develop an implementation strategy for ESMM, based on consultation with our Māori community and recommendations from best practice models.

●   Set up a strategic plan for the next 3 years

●   Implement the ERO recommendations

●   Co-opt a person onto the BOT who can give a Māori perspective to the BOT.

Focus on Māori achievement

Developed through 2017

Strategic Plan 2017 -2019 - Strategic Goal 3:

Student Achievement:  Improve achievement for all students

2016 Actions

2017 Annual Targets

2017 Actions

2018 Actions

2019 Actions

2016 NCEA Annual Targets

Level 1 - 85% achieve NCEA L1 (met 92%) with students aiming for at least 14 credits in each of their subjects)

At least 55% certificate endorsement (not met 50%)

Level 2 - 90% achieve NCEA L2 (met 92%) with students aiming for at least 14 credits in each of their subjects

At least 35% certificate endorsement (met 36%)

Level 3 - 85% achieve NCEA L3 (not met 83%) with students aiming for at least 14 credits in each of their subjects and at least 45% certificate endorsement (not met 28%)

2017 NCEA Targets:

a) Select a group of Year 9 boys and Māori students who are either below literacy requirements or underperforming then use strategies to improve their literacy with the aim to improve their educational outcomes. Teacher will develop, evaluate and report against more specific targets to accelerate the achievement of identified group.

b) NCEA Achievement

●  All levels all students achieve at least 14 credits

●  Level 2: 80% of boys will gain level with 35% of boys achieving an endorsed qualification.

●  All students in Level 3 programmes who identify that they require their university entrance, achieve this target.

●  Improve endorsement levels by 10 percentage points for Level 1 to 3.

      i.        Level 1 up to 60% (2016 50%)

    ii.        Level 2 up to 46% (2016 36%)

Level 3 up to 38% (2016 28%)

●   Select target group by end of term one

●   Set up PLG of teachers working with target group

●   Use inquiry model to discuss, try and evaluate strategies with the identified students

●   Continue the focus on 14 credits with a focus on obtaining the best grade possible.

●   Advertise this goal to parents

●   Explore strategies to improve boys’ achievement.

●   Year 13 Teachers made aware of students who are aiming for UE

●   Mentors work with the students

●   Senior students set a goal on credits obtained in each of their classes

●   All senior students set a goal on level of certificate endorsement.

●   Academic goals reviewed during the year

●   Subject teachers do credit predictions and record on KAMAR

●   Careers and goal review interviews with student and parents (in some cases)

●   Improve the learning environment and raise student expectations to raise achievement.

Use 2017 learning and results to develop targets and actions for 2018

 

Use progress on COL Level 2 goal to inform COL goal and next steps for 2018

 

Strategic Plan 2017 -2019 - Strategic Goal 3: (National Standards)

Student Achievement: Improve the confidence of all students in Reading, Writing and Mathematics

2016 Targets National Standards

2017 Targets

2017 Actions

2017

2018

2016 NCEA Annual Targets

Level 1 - 85% achieve NCEA L1 (met 92%) with students aiming for at least 14 credits in each of their subjects)

At least 55% certificate endorsement (not met 50%)

Level 2 - 90% achieve NCEA L2 (met 92%) with students aiming for at least 14 credits in each of their subjects

At least 35% certificate endorsement (met 36%)

Level 3 - 85% achieve NCEA L3 (not met 83%) with students aiming for at least 14 credits in each of their subjects and at least 45% certificate endorsement (not met 28%)

2017 NCEA Targets:

a) Select a group of Year 9 boys and Māori students who are either below literacy requirements or underperforming then use strategies to improve their literacy with the aim to improve their educational outcomes. Teacher will develop, evaluate and report against more specific targets to accelerate the achievement of identified group.

b) NCEA Achievement

●  All levels all students achieve at least 14 credits

●  Level 2: 80% of boys will gain level with 35% of boys achieving an endorsed qualification.

●  All students in Level 3 programmes who identify that they require their university entrance, achieve this target.

●  Improve endorsement levels by 10 percentage points for Level 1 to 3.

      i.        Level 1 up to 60% (2016 50%)

    ii.        Level 2 up to 46% (2016 36%)

Level 3 up to 38% (2016 28%)

●   Select target group by end of term one

●   Set up PLG of teachers working with target group

●   Use inquiry model to discuss, try and evaluate strategies with the identified students

●   Continue the focus on 14 credits with a focus on obtaining the best grade possible.

●   Advertise this goal to parents

●   Explore strategies to improve boys’ achievement.

●   Year 13 Teachers made aware of students who are aiming for UE

●   Mentors work with the students

●   Senior students set a goal on credits obtained in each of their classes

●   All senior students set a goal on level of certificate endorsement.

●   Academic goals reviewed during the year

●   Subject teachers do credit predictions and record on KAMAR

●   Careers and goal review interviews with student and parents (in some cases)

●   Improve the learning environment and raise student expectations to raise achievement.

Use 2017 learning and results to develop targets and actions for 2018

 

Use progress on COL Level 2 goal to inform COL goal and next steps for 2018

 

Background and Progress

E-Learning:  Use technologies to enhance learning SG1

2017 Annual Targets:

a)   Continue to measure progress on the e-Learning Planning Framework (e-LPF) with a focus on the “Beyond the classroom” dimensions. The aim is to be confident that e-learning can become business as usual and not a strategic focus by 2019.

b)  Implement strategies to embed BYOD learning across the full school.

Background -  From e-Learning Planning Framework  Te Toi Tupu Consortium, on behalf of the Ministry of Education.

The e-Learning Planning Framework (English-medium)

The e-Learning Planning Framework is a tool to help schools and teachers measure their e-learning capability. It can support regular self-review and subsequent improvement of e-learning skills and knowledge, in ways that reflect our bi-cultural heritage.

The e-Learning Planning Framework provides [see right]:

●       A ‘road map’ that enables schools/teachers to identify where they are, the practical steps they can take to improve their practice, and connects them to relevant information or services to support them in doing this. The framework provides processes and practices that internationally have been shown to be critical factors in lifting schools’ e-learning capability.

●       Examples and resources to illustrate what the framework might look like in practice (http://elearning.tki.org.nz/)

●       A suggested guide to how to use the framework for self-review (http://elearning.tki.org.nz/Professional-learning/e-Learning-Planning-Framework2).

The diagram  shows the phases of schools and learners’ growing e-learning capability to learn with and through digital technologies, within their own community, cluster and network.

 Schools and learners may progress through some or all of the phases, Emerging through to Empowering. Increasingly, evidence of learning needs, rather than the technology, will drive decisions. These phases are we way we measure the five Dimensions: Beyond the classroom, Learning and Teaching, Professional Development, Leadership and strategic direction, Technologies and infrastructure.

Actions

Responsibility

Time Frame

Use the e-LPE survey to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of e-learning across all dimensions and in particular “Beyond the Classroom”, as this has not been reviewed.

E-learning committee

Start Term 2

Have all levels of the College BYOD by beginning of Term 2

e-learning committee

Mary

 Beginning Term 2

Use student, parent and student voice to measure effective use in the classroom

e-learning committee

Term 2,3,4

Teachers to continue to use their appraisal digital portfolio to develop and record their inquiry and professional learning. (ie teachers e-learning)

Teachers

Term 1,2,3,4

Sharing of ideas by teachers both within faculties and across facilities; best practice and what has not been successful

All teachers

Term 1,2,3,4

Regular review access to devices for students who are not able to have a device

e-learning committee

Mary

Term 1, 2, 3, 4

Regularly review and upgrade the infrastructure to support e-learning.

e-learning committee,

Mary

Term 1, 2, 3, 4.

ESMM: Educational Success for Māori as Māori SG2

Annual Targets 2017

a)     Develop an implementation strategy for ESMM, based on consultation with our Māori community and recommendations from best practice models.

The College has continued to develop its Māori perspective and is very pleased with the progress that has been made. One area it has identified that it has not made the progress that it would like to is in the engagement with the Maori community.

This next step of engaging with the Māori community was also highlighted in the ERO review which occurred at the end of 2016.  As this was also stated in the previous ERO review they have made it a recommendation that a strategic plan for consultation be made.

 

Some of the progress made in 2016

●           Links with Arowhenua marae, at the end of the year

●           More students learn the College Haka

●           Celebrate more stories of Māori student success

Actions

Responsibility

Time Frame

Set up a strategic plan for the next 3 years

Senior Leadership team

End Term 2

Implement the ERO recommendations

SLT and all teachers

Term 1,2,3,4

Co-opt a person onto the BOT who can give a Māori perspective to the BOT

Principal and BOT Chair

End of Term 1

Focus on Māori achievement

All teachers

Term 1,2,3,4

When data is presented present the data from the Māori students when possible.

All who report

Term 1,2,3,4

Student Achievement: Improve achievement for all students SG3

Annual Targets 2017:

a) Achievement of Year 9 Boys and Māori Students  

Select a group of Year 9 boys and Māori students who are either below literacy requirements or underperforming then use strategies to improve their literacy with the aim to improve their educational outcomes. Teacher will develop, evaluate and report against more specific targets to accelerate the achievement of identified group.

●        Boys achievement is lower than girls achieve over most measures

●        Literacy is an area boys have lower outcomes than boys

●        Māori achieve is a MOE priority

●        Use the model of target to improve achievement

Select target group of students

Teachers

End of Term 1

Set up PLG of teachers working with target group

Teachers

 

End of Term 1

Use inquiry model to discuss, try and evaluate strategies with the identified students.

Teachers

Term 1,2,3,4

b) NCEA Achievement

●    All levels all students achieve at least 14 credits

●    Level 2: 80% of boys will gain level with 35% of boys achieving an endorsed qualification.

●    All students in Level 3 programmes who identify that they require their university entrance, achieve this target.

●    Improve endorsement levels by 10 percentage points for Level 1 to 3.

                   i.        Level 1 up to 60% (2016 50%)

                 ii.        Level 2 up to 46% (2016 36%)

                iii.        Level 3 up to 38% (2016 28%)

NCEA Results.png

Note: We have changed to analysing the roll-based data as required by the Ministry of Education. This data includes all students who were on the roll as at 1st July of that year. If they leave after this date or are not working towards NCEA their data is included. We do tend to have students who leave for work from Years 12 and 13 and a few students who are not focused in NCEA. In our small cohorts one student leaving after 1st July will reduce our percentage pass rate.

 

NCEA Achievement

  • Level 1 and Level 2 achievement targets achieved
  • NCEA Level 3 not achieved, down by 2 points
  • Tracking the Achievement of Cohorts:
  • From Level 1 to Level 2 achievement went up by 11 points to 92%, (Nationally up           by 1 point )
  • From Level 2 to Level 3 achievement went up by 3 points, (Nationally down by 5 points.)

 

NCEA: Endorsement

  • Level 2 Target obtained
  • Level 1 and Level 3 not obtained.
  • While our Level 2 endorsement target was obtained, all our endorsement results are below the national decile 8 to 10 results. The College learning programme does have many disruptions NCEA learning, with sport, cultural and individual activities and more needs to be down to analyse the effect of these on short term and long term learning.
  • Tracking the endorsement of cohorts:
  • From Level 1 to Level 2 the drop of endorsement level is usually over 12 point last year the drop was 9 points. Nationally the drop is normally over 10. Last year it was 11 points.
  • From Level 2 to Level 3 last year the drop was 11 point, the national drop was 3 points.
  • The focus on obtaining 14 credits could be the reason the achievement rates are higher in Level 1 and 2 this year. This is a very good outcome as roll based figures tend to under report the success of the group aiming for NCEA.
  • 14 credits target in the senior school, is a business as usual expectation and is reported via faculty analysis of variance reporting to the Principal.
  • Alignment of Level 2 focus, as part of the Opuke COL targets for the next year will be:  80% of boys will gain Level 2 in 2017, with 35% of boys further achieving an endorsed qualification in 2017.
  • We compare ourselves to all Decile 8 to 10 schools. There may be some value in looking at how we compare to other rural schools however these

Actions

Responsibility

Time Frame

Faculties to set Goals based on NCEA Targets

HOF

Early Term 1

Advertise high expectation to families

Principal and teachers

Term 1,2,3,4

All senior students set a Goal of at least 14 credits obtained in each of their classes aiming for endorsement where it is a possibility

Subject teachers, student, parents

Term 1

All senior students set a Goal on level of certificate endorsement.

Form teachers, student, parents

Term 1

Academic Goals reviewed during the year and use their “credit card” to inform this review

Subject and form teacher, Students

Term 1,2,3,4

Explore strategies to improve boys’ achievement

Faculties, subject teacher

Term 1,2,3

Careers and Goal review interviews with student and Parents (in some cases)

SLT, Deans, Form teachers

Term 3

Results analysed and targets made for 2018

HOF, SLT

Term4 , Term 1 2018

Improve the learning environment and raise student expectations to raise achievement

SLT, Deans, Teachers

Term 1,2,3,4

c)  National Standards Using the Community of Learning target

  • Year 8 Reading: 70% of boys at or above the standard
  • Year 8 Writing: 65% of boys at or above the standard
  • Year 7 Reading: target to be set by end of Term 1
  • Year 7 Writing: target to be set by end of Term 1
  • Year 7 Mathematics: target to be set by end of Term 1

Looking at the data girls are achieving better than the boys and are achieving to a level above our targets.

As stated above we identified more students in Year 7 with Literacy needs at the beginning of the year.

The transition to Mount Hutt College could be a factor in the slight slip in results and more students in Year 7, than Year 8 going down one level.

Some actions for 2017

Mathematics: Rearrange the order of topics so that the Year 7 students are starting with a numeracy topic (Add/Sub). This is a topic that they all have had before so that should reduce any loss of confidence as the students transition to “high school”.  In 2016 Year 7 started with the strand topic e.g Measurement/ Geometry.  We feel that some strand topics have not been fully covered at contributing schools. This may be because a focus has been on numeracy strategy rather than strand.  We will now analyse our PAT results to identify the gaps in student’s knowledge so that the strands can be delivered at the correct level.

 

Literacy:  The Year 7/8 English teachers will be introduced to the PACT Reading framework tool and we will work collaboratively to assist the implementation of the framework. We feel the framework is a great tool for gathering data to make our OTJ. The reason we are using the reading framework first is that we feel we have spent a lot of time on writing PD over previous years (e.g. the ALL contract) and staff felt they needed more assistance with identifying the specific reading strategies. We hope to be able to then move on to using the writing framework tool in the future. Through PD we feel teachers have a better understanding of writing criteria which has led to teachers not placing a student above until the maturity of the genres are a whole year level above.

 

BYOD for Year 8 at the start of the year.  Year 7 BYOD at the start of Term 1. Again, this will allow Year 7 students to focus on the new environment in term one. The devices have been used effectively as a tool to assist the reluctant struggling writers.

 

We are working with the Opuke COL to further enhance our Literacy and Numeracy data gathering and analysing. Also the transition of data from contributing school.  Using the COL goals to align to our below targets.

 

Note: Students with learning needs will have support in Reading and Writing from our Learning Support Team.

Look at boys writing collect some base data and look at ways to reduce the gender gap

Actions

Responsibility

Time Frame

CCM teachers use the available data to identify the needs of their Year 8 boys

CCM teachers

Beginning Term 1

Year 7 CCM and Maths teachers develop Year 7 targets.

CCM teachers, Dean Year 7/8

End of Term 1

Share profile of Mount Hutt College students with contributing school

SLT, Dean

Term 1, 2

Teacher use PD and their own expertise to develop and share teaching and learning strategies using inquiry model and data to track progress

CCM teacher

Term 1,2,3,4

Overall teacher judgements made for the mid-year predictions of where the student will be at the end of the year in National standards

SLT, Dean, Form teachers

Beginning Term 3

Use strategies to improve the writing capabilities of the student

Teachers

Term 1,2,3,4

When mid-year judgements done compare profile to beginning of year profile, share data with contributing schools

Year 7/8 Dean, SLT

End Term 3

Collect data from contributing schools and use Overall Teacher judgments to develop the targets for 2018

Teachers, Dean, SLT

End Term 4

Work with teachers from other COL schools

Teachers

Term 2,3,4