Modern Amendments for Bolt Action

WEAPONS

Assault Rifles: Treat these as normal rifles (ROF 1) as it is assumed all service rifles are semi or fully automatic.

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Assault rifle

24”

1

n/a

-

ex M4 carbine, AK-74

Anti-materiel rifle: Large calibre sniper rifles designed for use against military equipment rather than against other combatants. Treat as anti tank rifle and uses sniper rifle rule with an increased range of 48” (instead of 36” as for a normal sniper rifle.)

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Anti-materiel rifle

36”

1

2+

Team, Fixed, Sniper

ex Barett M82

Light machine guns: All squad belt fed LMG’s get ROF 3 and there is no need for a loader. Magazine fed squad support weapons are treated as Automatic Rifles.

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Belt fed LMG

30”

3

n/a

ex belt fed: M249 SAW, M240, PKM

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Magazine fed LMG

30”

2

n/a

ex magazine fed: L86 light support weapon, RPK-74 

Under slung Grenade Launchers: Fire indirect but need line of sight. May not fire the weapon that the grenade launcher is attached to in the same turn as the grenade launcher.

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Under slung Grenade launcher

6” -24”

1

HE

Indirect, needs LOS, HE (D2)

ex M203, M79 Grenade launcher, GP-25

Automatic Grenade Launchers: Fire indirect but need line of sight, HE (D2) Range 24” ROF:  2. Fixed Team or Vehicle weapon.

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Automatic Grenade launcher

6” -24”

2

HE

Indirect, needs LOS, team, fixed, HE (D2)

 ex Mk 19 grenade launcher

Antitank disposable grenade or rocket launcher:

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Light AT weapon

12”

1

6+

one shot, shape charge

Ex M72 LAW, AT-4, RPG 18, Panzerfaust 3

RPG:

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

RPG

24”

1

5+

shape charge, HE (D2)

 Ex RPG 7, SMAW

Man portable recoilless rifle:

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Recoilless rifle

24”

1

6+

shape charge, Team, HE (D3)

Ex Carl Gustav,

Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM): act as Fixed Team weapons with the stats of heavy or super-heavy Antitank guns depending on the weapon. They are Shaped Charge weapons. Guided Missiles can’t fire at range under 6” but don’t get the -1 to hit at Long Range. Guided missiles need a Rally order to reload a launcher. Vehicles with multiple launchers can reload them all with one Rally order. A Helicopter may not reload its ATGMs.

Guided missile: Vehicles fired upon by at ATGM may attempt to avoid being hit by taking evasive actions (suppressing the ATGM team and/or driving erratically at high speed) by making a moral check. If successful the firing unit gets a -1 to hit.  

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

ATGM

6” -60”

1

6+

shape charge, Guided missile, Team, reload

ex: TOW, MILAN, AT-3 sagger, AT-4 spiggot

Fire and forget ATGM (FF): The latest version of ATGM does not require the firer to keep the target in sight until the missile strikes (hence fire and forget) This means that a target vehicle may not take evasive actions. They are Shaped Charge weapons. Guided Missiles can’t fire at range under 6” but don’t get the -1 to hit at Long Range.

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Fire and forget ATGM

6” -60”

1

7+

shape charge, Team, reload

ex: Javelin, Spike 

Surface to air missiles (SAM)

Surface to air missiles are guided missiles and can be avoided if the aircraft noticed the missile being fired (radar warning systems or optical)  Helicopters fired upon by at SAM may attempt to avoid being hit by taking evasive actions (flying erratically at high speed) by making a moral check. If successful the firing unit gets a -1 to hit.  

MANPADS - man-portable anti-aircraft missile

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Light SAM

24”

1

3+

Team, Guided missile, no ground targets

ex: Stinger, Blowpipe, Strela

Usually mounted on a vehicle

Type

Range

Shots

PEN

Special rules

Heavy SAM

60”

1

+5

D6 hits, no ground targets

ex: SA11,

EQUIPMENT/SPECIAL RULES

Fire-control radar: AA guns equipped with a fire-control radar system get +1 to hit. A unit with fire-control radar does not have to test not fire at friendly aircrafts.

Marksman: Uses a designated marksman rifle equipped with some type of optical sight with a higher magnification level than the standard issue rifle. Unlike a sniper is considered an organic part of a fire team of soldiers. When firing the marksman only needs a natural 6 to score exceptional damage.

Reactive and Chobam Armour: Reduces the Pen value of Shaped Charge weapons by 1D6. Reactive armour only works once per vehicle facing arc.

Body Armour: Increase the Damage value by +1 if wearing body armour.

Vehicle stats: Use the usual ratings to describe your vehicles – i.e. an M1A1 will have a super heavy anti-tank gun and a Damage Value of 11+ (super-heavy tank).

HELICOPTERS

THE UNIT

Helicopters are units consisting of a single model. They are treated as vehicles, with the exceptions noted below.

MOVEMENT

Nap of the earth (NOE): A helicopter may hide from line of sight behind intervening terrain features. It may move over terrain or end its movement on top of a terrain feature.

TYPE

ADVANCE

PIVOT

RUN

PIVOT

Flight

24”

3

36”

2

ORDERS AND SPECIAL ABILITIES

Turn on the spot: Helicopters have the turn on the spot special rule. (see Bren carriers)

RUN

The helicopter moves a minimum of 24” up to 36”  and may make an attack with one weapon att -1 to hit.

Pull out: a helicopter with a run order may move over the table edge. When doing so it leaves the battlefield and go to reserve mode. It loses all pin markers and may try to enter again next turn from any board edge.

ADVANCE

The helicopter moves up to 24”.

Fast rope insertion: Transported units with the fast rope special rule can disembark the helicopter at any point of the helicopters movement. The disembarked unit may not move after fast roping.

DOWN

Land: helicopter landing for taking on or unloading troops. Units mounts or dismounts a helicopter with transport capacity as normal (except that the helicopter must be landed)

FIRE

The helicopter fires its weapons as normal.

Pop-up attack: a helicopter in cover behind a terrain feature can perform a pop-up attack in which it rises briefly above nap of the earth, fires its weapons and then duck back out of sight. A helicopter performing a pop-up attack can only be fired on by a unit if its in ambush mode (unless it has a clear line of sight to the helicopter)

SHOOTING AGAINST HELICOPTERS

FAST TARGETS

As they are moving so fast, only two types of weapons can be fired against moving helicopters:

- any weapon with the Flak special rule (remember this includes all pintle-mounted weapons).

- all small arms with a range higher than 12” carried by infantry units (not by artillery or vehicles, unless of course the weapon also has the flak rule)

Any other weapon is considered too slow to and cumbersome to target a moving helicopter.

A helicopter with a DOWN order (landed) can be fired on by any enemy unit within range and in line of sight.

COUNTERMEASURES

Some helicopters are equipped with different countermeasures against AA-fire such as releasing flare against heat seeking missiles and chaff against radar guided weapons. The countermeasures negate the +1 to hit a fire control system receives.

HELICOPTERS AND SHOOTING

When rolling to damage ground vehicles, helicopters always hit the target’s top armour, regardless of their position (which makes them very good against open topped vehicles!).

Some helecopters have weapons called ‘rockets’, which are followed by a number in brackets. These weapons count as a howitzer that can be fired only a number of times equal to the number in brackets, either simultaneously or in separate turns. For example a rockets (2) weapon can be fired twice during the game, either both at the same target in the very same turn, or once against a target in a turn, and then once against another target in a later turn. Rockets count as heavy howitzers.

CLOSE QUARTERS

Helicopters can never assault and only be assaulted if landed (With a DOWN order)

night fight (not done)

The following rules deal with the limited visibility and uncertainty caused by night operations. They can also be used for battles that occur in other situations of limited visibility, like in heavy fog, snow blizzards, sandstorms and the like. We have found that these rules add a layer of complexity to games of Bolt Action, and slightly slow down game-play, but they create a very different gaming experience, with different tactical challenges and extra tension that, we feel, perfectly captures the fear and confusion of fighting at night. We would like you to try these rules and let us know what you think of them, as we would love to include them in a future edition of the main rulebook.

Different types of game

Whenever you are about to pick a scenario for a game of Bolt Action, you can agree with your opponent that the game you are going to play is going to simply follow the normal game rules, or that it is going to be a Night Fight, in which case the Reduced Visibility rules (below) will apply throughout the game. Alternatively, you can decide that you are playing a Dawn Assault game, a Longest Day game, or a Flare! game.

In a Dawn Assault, the game begins with the Reduced Visibility rules, but you must roll a die at the beginning of each turn after the first, and add the current turn number to the result (e.g. add +2 on turn two, +3 on turn three, etc.). On a modified total of 8 or more, the Reduced Visibility rules immediately cease to apply and visibility returns to normal for the rest of the game.

In a Longest Day, the game begins with normal visibility, but you must roll a die at the beginning of each turn after the first and add the current turn number to the result (as above). On a modified total of 8 or more, the Reduced Visibility rules immediately begin to apply and last for the rest of the game.

In a Flare! game, the action takes place at night, with Reduced Visibility throughout, but you must roll a die at the beginning of each turn after the first. On a roll of 4 or more, a powerful flare goes up (or series of flares are parachuted in, or a heavy fog curtain lifts temporarily…) and visibility is normal for that turn only. Roll again for visibility the next turn, and so on. If you cannot decide on which type of game to play, you may instead roll on the chart opposite at the same time as you roll for the scenario being played:

Reduced Visibility

When you are determining whether a unit is able to see a target (for shooting, assaulting, etc.) at night, first follow the normal rules for line of sight. If the target would be visible according to the normal rules, then start the normal shooting procedure and declare the target. Then, before the ‘target reacts’ step, you must take a spotting roll for the acting unit to see whether they can actually identify the target through the

darkness:

Roll 2D6 and add or subtract any of the modifiers listed below that apply, down to a minimum modified total of 2.

Visibility modifiers

+6” The target has a ‘Fire’, ‘Advance’, ‘Run’ or ‘Rally’ order die on it.

+6” The target has a ‘Muzzle Flashes!’ marker on it (see below)

-6” The target has a ‘Down’ order die on it.

-6” The target is a small unit

+6” The target is a vehicle

If the modified total is equal or higher than the distance between the firing unit and the target, then the target is visible and the firing/assaulting sequence continues as normal – target reacts etc.

If the total is lower than the distance to the target, the attacking unit cannot shoot/assault the target and its action ends immediately (the acting unit’s Order Die is simply left as it is), as the men nervously scan the darkness in search of targets.

D6 Scenario

1 Night Fight

2 Flare!

3 Dawn Assault

4 Longest Day

5 Normal visibility game (or roll again, if both players agree)

6 Players roll-off and the winner chooses

Muzzle Flashes!

The worst thing a unit can do at night is to open fire, as the loud noises and particularly the flashes of their weapons will reveal their position to the enemy. And tracer rounds are infamous for ‘working both ways’. To represent this, when a unit fires any weaponry against an enemy, it must be marked with a ‘Muzzle Flashes’ marker (a coin or other token). This token makes the unit more visible, as shown in the chart above, and will remain with the unit until it receives another order.

Note that it is possible for a unit to receive a Fire! order die, but then to be unable to actually open fire (because of a failed spotting roll, for example). These units do not receive a Muzzle Flashes! marker – you only get one when you actually fire a weapon at the enemy.

Reacting to an assault

If a unit successfully declares an assault at night and the targets reacts by firing at the assaulting models, the target unit must first make a spotting roll to see if they can see the assaulting models (before they are moved). If the target unit fails this spotting roll, it may not react, just as if the assaulting unit was within 6” when they declared the assault – a bloodcurling Surprise Charge out of the darkness!

Indirect Fire

If a weapon with Indirect Fire has ‘zeroed in’ onto a target, there is no need of making another spotting roll to fire at that target, simply roll to hit on a 2+, as normal.

Forward Air and Artillery Observers

When an Artillery observer calls in a Barrage, it does not get a Muzzle Flashes! marker, as he’s  not firing any gun (unless of course someone else in his team does fire a weapon as part of the same order). When calling in a barrage, the observer does not need to make a spotting roll, but can instead place the marker anywhere on the table, as he would be relying on maps and  noise/gun flashes rather than direct observation of targets. However, to simulate the increased  chances of something going wrong, you suffer from a –1 on the Artillery or Smoke

Barrage charts (down to a minimum of 1).

Air Strikes cannot be called at all at night, making Forward Air Observers quite useless.