Ireland Travel Course

The itinerary and travel dates are customizable.

This initial itinerary is a sample itinerary and does not reflect any academic program. ARAMFO offers its travel courses to all fields of study. Therefore, our initial itineraries serve as a reference for the types of activates and locations available in the region. All customizations for academic programs are made on a case by case basis.

Initial Itinerary

Day

Program

Day 1

Depart for Dublin

Day 2

Welcome to Ireland

 

Arrive in Dublin Airport and meet your driver/guide and depart for Tipperary.


En-route visit the Rock of Dunamese

The Rock of Dunamase in County Laois is a very prominent outcrop. Standing at over 45 metres in height, the outcrop with its castle ruins totally dominates the surrounding countryside. Dunamase started as an early christian dun known as Dun Masc "the Fort of Masc". The earliest historical reference to Dunamase is in the annals of the four masters where it states that Dun Masc was plundered by the Vikings in 843AD and the abbot of Terryglass was killed.


Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your Tipperary or area hotel.

Day 3

Limerick

 

Today explore Limerick.

Enjoy a panoramic city tour of Limerick City

Visit King John’s Castle

Then spend some time in the pretty village of Adare

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your Tipperary or area hotel.

Day 4

Tipperary to County Clare

 

This morning depart Tipperary and journey to County Clare.

En-route enjoy a photo stop at the Rock of Cashel

Possibly the most photographed site in Ireland, the Rock of Cashel towers over the town of Cashel from its perch on a 200-foot high outcrop of limestone. Once the seat of the Kings of Munster. St. Patrick visited the rock in 450 AD, while Brian Boru was crowned the first high King of Ireland here in the tenth century. Granted to the church in the twelfth century, by the O'Brien clan, today the impressive stone walls enclose a round tower, a cathedral, a twelfth century Romanesque chapel and high crosses. The Vicars Choral has been recently restored and its basement houses a small museum of artefacts found on the site. One of the leading visitor attractions in Ireland, in 2011 it was visited by Queen Elizabeth II on her historic first visit to the Republic of Ireland. Conservation work will continue on Cormac’s Chapel and at the site until further notice. Access may be restricted to the chapel and other parts of the site while these works are ongoing.

Then visit Bunratty Castle and Folk Park

Bunratty Castle is one of the most complete and authentic medieval castles in Ireland. Built in 1425 and plundered on many occasions, it was authentically restored in 1954 to its former medieval splendour and now contains mainly 15th and 16th century furnishings and tapestries capturing the mood and the style of the times. The castle hosts evening medieval banquets and takes the participants back to the time that the castle entertained its visitors with fine food, wine and song. Within the grounds of Bunratty Castle is Bunratty Folk Park where 19th century life is vividly recreated. Set on 26 acres, the impressive park features over 30 buildings in a ‘living’ village and rural setting.  Meet and chat with the Bean an Ti (Woman of the House) and various street characters including the Policeman and Schoolteacher. Enjoy the tastes, scents, sights and sounds of this enchanting place as you stroll from house to house or around the charming village complete with school, post office, doctors house, hardware shop, printers and of course the pub!

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your Clare or area hotel.

Day 5

County Clare

 

Today explore the Burren Region

The Burren landscape covers over 150 square kilometres and is one of Ireland’s 6 National Parks. The region is visually similar to a moonscape, yet shelters a mixture of flora and archaeological sites which have attracted visitors for centuries. Man came here over 6000 years ago, cleared the forests and set in motion soil erosion. Centuries of weathering has produced a terrain of fissured limestone pavements, disappearing lakes, terraced mountains, and underground cave systems. For millennia man has left his mark, megalithic tombs and cooking sites litter the pavements, while medieval towerhouses and churches guard the valleys. Today man is absent from most of the upland, leaving behind ancient field systems, routeways and placenames. Today’s visitors to the Burren will find Arctic, Alpine and Mediterranean plants growing together.

Visit the Cliffs of Moher

Situated on the Atlantic Ocean and bordering the Burren region, the Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's most spectacular sights. Standing 230 metres above the ground at their highest point and 8km long, the Cliffs boast one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a clear day, the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay as well as the valleys and hills of Connemara. The cliffs reach their highest point just north of O' Brien's Tower built by Cornelius O’ Brien, a descendant of Brian Boru, to entertain his lady friends. A visit of the tower is also possible. The sweeping view across the Atlantic has recently been ranked the best 'cliff-view' on the planet by Conde Nast Traveler. The respected travel publication has voted the world-famous landmark at the top of a new chart of ' Nine Gorgeous Cliff Views That Rival The Grand Canyon'.

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your Clare or area hotel.

Day 6

County Clare to Castlebar

 

This morning depart County Clare and journey to Castlebar.

En-route journey through Connemara

Today you will explore the Connemara Region. Connemara is a land of lakes and rivers, bogs and mountains. A land of small villages where Gaelic is still the spoken language and where little has changed since the beginning of time. It is without a doubt the wildest and the most romantic part of Ireland. Connemara is a vast peninsula bordered by the arid and rocky coastline of Galway Bay in the south ~ a land characteristic for its stone walls and thatched cottages.  On its northern shore the land is harsher and more secret, with spectacular views of the Ocean and the beautiful fjord of Killary Harbour, as well as the steep mountains overlooking numerous lakes and large bog areas. Connemara is a real paradise for Nature lovers and those in search of strong emotions. In 1951, John Ford's great movie "The Quiet Man" starring John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara and Barry Fitzgerald was made, and filming was centred in the village of Cong on the Mayo-Galway border.

 

Visit Kylemore Abbey

Kylemore Abbey is stunningly located in the Kylemore Pass in Connemara. Mitchell Henry built the House in 1868, after having spent his honeymoon in the area.  The architecture is best described as neo-gothic and the house still displays all the characteristics of that period. One of Kylemore Abbey's most famous features is its miniature cathedral, built in 1870 and known locally as the Gothic church. Today, the abbey is home to the Irish order of Benedictine nuns. They established a private school for young girls, which was the renowned Kylemore Abbey International School. The school eventually closed in 2010. Facilities at Kylemore include a visitor centre, an exhibition housed in the main reception rooms of the house and a video which takes the visitor through the history of the house and its occupants. The Gothic church is available to visit and as a venue for choir groups to sing in. If time allows guests can also visit the Kylemore Abbey Victorian Walled Garden was laid out in 1867 and took three years to complete. A bus service provided from the front door of the Abbey directly to the garden and is the only permitted means of access.

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your Castlebar or area hotel.

Day 7

County Mayo

 

This morning visit the National Museum of Country Life

Home to the national folk life collection, the National Museum of Country Life, in Castlebar, County Mayo, is a branch of the National Museum of Ireland. Visitors to the museum's exhibition galleries are invited to experience the story of Irish country life between 1850 and 1950 through an innovative combination of artefacts and displays, archival video footage and interactive screens. The National Museum of Country Life is located in the spectacular grounds of Turlough Park. Visitors can enjoy a range of public programmes including weekly craft demonstrations and workshops. Admission to these events is free but booking is necessary. There is also a museum café and a gift shop.

Then enjoy a scenic drive on Achill Island

Achill Island occupies an area of some 57sq miles but its actual coastline - including all the inlets and spars - measures over 80 miles. In some places, the roads follow (generally) the shoreline and two particular stretches of road have been designated as Achill's Atlantic Drive. Taken together these two stretches of 'Atlantic Drive' provide a spectacular journey with breathtaking views.

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your Castlebar or area hotel.

Day 8

Castlebar to Dublin

This morning depart Castlebar and journey to Dublin.

En-route visit the Hill of Tara (site only)

Though best known as the seat of the High Kings of Ireland, the Hill of Tara has been an important site since the late Stone Age when a passage-tomb was constructed there. Tara was at the height of its power as a political and religious centre in the early centuries after Christ. Attractions include an audio-visual show and guided tours of the site.

Then visit Bective Abbey

Bective Abbey was founded in 1147 by Murchadh O' Melaghin, King of Meath, for the Cistercians, and was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin. It was an abbey of some importance as the Abbot was a spiritual lord and sat in the Parliament of the Pale. Hugh De Lacy, was buried there in 1195, but was eventually moved to Dublin. The abbey was suppressed in 1536 and the lands were rented to Thomas Asgarde, and eventually bought by Andrew Wyse in 1552. It passed into the hands of the Dillons and then the Boltons, before fallling into ruin. The chief features of the ruins are the combination of both Church and Defence.

Finally enjoy a photo stop at Trim Castle

Trim Castle, the largest Anglo-Norman castle in Ireland, was constructed over a thirty-year period by Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter. Hugh de Lacy was granted the Liberty of Meath by King Henry II in 1172 in an attempt to curb the expansionist policies of Richard de Clare, (Strongbow).  Construction of the massive three storied Keep, the central stronghold of the castle, was begun c. 1176 on the site of an earlier wooden fortress. This massive twenty-sided tower, which is cruciform in shape, was protected by a ditch, curtain wall and moat. The castle and its grounds was used as a location in the Mel Gibson film “ Braveheart”.

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your decentral Dublin or area hotel.

Day 9

Dublin at leisure

 

Transfer to Dublin Airport for your journey home.

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