ICS Calendar Title: Coming to Our Sense: Art, Faith and Embodiment

ICS Course Code: ICS 151208/251208 S16

Instructor: Dr. Adrienne Dengerink Chaplin

Term and Year: June 20 - July 1, 2016 [On Campus Summer Intensive]

Last Updated: February 25, 2016. Note: This is not the final version.

1. Course Description

2. Reading Schedule

3. Course Learning Goals

4. Course Requirements and Description and Weighting of Elements to be Evaluated

5. Required Readings

6. Some Recommended Readings

1. Course Description

Many centuries of mind-body dualism have conditioned Christians to evaluate art primarily by its capacity to transcend our finite embodied existence in search of ‘the spiritual.’ By contrast, this course will focus on the way art, whether religious or secular, articulates lived human experience as a way to gain more intimate contact with the world, each other and, ultimately, also with God. In order to do so we will discuss the crucial role of the body in our pre-reflective understanding of the world; the importance of the sense of touch for sensing nuanced textures and timbres; and the notion of beauty understood as unfolding in time rather than as a timeless, captured moment. The course will conclude by assessing the implications of this approach for a fresh understanding of art, with particular attention to the recent return of religious references in contemporary art. The aim of the course is to enable participants to develop new Christian criteria by which to approach and evaluate works of art of our time.

2. Reading Schedule

WEEK 1

DAY 1: RETHINKING the SPIRITUAL in ART

Before starting the course students are recommended to read the following material:

Hilary Brand and Adrienne Chaplin, Art and Soul: Signposts for Christians in the Arts (Downers Grove, Ill.: IVP Academic, 2001), Chapter 2 ‘Art and the quest for the spiritual,’ pp. 16-25 and Part 2: ‘Garden, Serpent and Sacrifices: Returning to Primary Sources,’ 37-66. (38 pp.)

DAY 2: ART and the AESTHETIC

Shiner, Larry, The Invention of Art: A Cultural History (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2001), pp. 3-16 ; 19-27. (21 pp.)

Saito, Yuriko, Everyday Aesthetics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), pp. 54-84. (30 pp.)

DAY 3: PERCEPTION and INTERPRETATION

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. The World of Perception, ‘Chapter 3; ‘Exploring the World of Perception: Sensory Objects’ (New York: Routledge, 2008), pp. 45-51 (6 pp.)

Kearney, Richard, and Treanor, Brian (eds.), Carnal Hermeneutics, (New York: Fordham University Press, 2015), pp. 15-26. (11 pp.)

James K.A. Smith, Imagining the Kingdom: How Worship Works (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Academic, 2013), Part 1, Chapter 1, ‘Erotic Comprehension,’ pp. 31-46, 69-73. (19 pp.)

DAY 4: TOUCH and TEXTURES

Mark Johnson, The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007), Chapter 10, ‘Art as an Exemplar of Meaning-Making,’ 207-224. (17 pp.)

Juhani Pallasmaa, The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses (Chichester: John Wiley, 2008), Introduction and ‘Part I,’ pp. 9-46 (37 pp.)

DAY 5: FEELING the BODY in ART

Dissanayake, Ellen, Homo Aestheticus: Where Art Comes From and Why (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1996), ‘Empathy Theory’ Reconsidered,’ pp. 140-157. (17 pp.)

Langer, Susanne K., Mind: An Essay on Human Feeling, Vol. 1, Chapter 4, ‘The Projection of Feeling in Art’ (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1970), pp. 73-107. (34 pp.)

WEEK 2

DAY 1: RETHINKING THEOLOGICAL AESTHETICS

Viladesau, Richard. Theological Aesthetics: God in Imagination, Beauty, and Art. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999), 3-38. (35 pp.)

DAY 2: EMBODIED BEAUTY

Umberto Eco, Art and Beauty in the Middle Ages (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986), Chapter 2, “Transcendental Beauty,’ pp. 17-27 (10 pp.) (Robarts, Knox: BH 131 .E26 1986)

Gordon Fulgie, ‘Beauty Lost, Beauty Found: One Hundred Years of Attitudes’ in Theodore L. Prescott, ed., A Broken Beauty (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2005), pp. 59-76. (17 pp)

Adrienne Dengerink Chaplin, ‘From Vision to Touch: Returning Beauty to Lived Experience,’ The Other Journal (June 1, 2009), http://theotherjournal.com/2009/06/01/from-vision-to-touch-returning-beauty-to-lived-experience/ (16 pp.)

DAY 3: EMBODIED RELIGION in CONTEMPORARY ART

James Elkins, On the Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art (New York: Routledge, 2004), ‘Preface,’ ‘The Words Religion and Art,’ and ‘Conclusion,’ pp. ix-xii; 1-4, 115-116. (10 pp.)

Malz, Isabelle, Curator, The Problem of God, Exhibition Catalogue (Dűsseldorf: Kerber, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfahlen, 2015), pp. 310-311; 324-330. (pp. 7)

Adrienne Dengerink Chaplin, ‘Transcendence Re-mixed: On the Complex Role of Religion in Contemporary Art,’ in Wessel Stoker and W.L. van der Merwe, eds., Culture and Transcendence: A Typology of Transcendence (Leuven: Peeters, 2012), pp. 163-177. (14 pp.)

DAY 4: EXCURSION to exhibition on contemporary art (to be decided nearer the time)

DAY 5: SUMMING UP - Readings to be decided nearer the time in conversation with the class.

3. Course Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

  1. Understand the (secular) roots of the mind-body dualism that has created negative Christian attitudes towards the arts and be able to provide a convincing defence of their importance for human flourishing in a church setting that is normally suspicious of art.
  2. Understand the central role of the body and the senses in the making and receiving of art in order to take a group around a museum and help them look at art in new and fresh ways.
  3. Develop Christian criteria for understanding and evaluating art, especially contemporary art, in order to be able to contribute constructively to a college art crit without using explicit faith language.

4. Course Requirements and Description and Weighting of Elements to be Evaluated

  1. Weekly reading (# of pages): minimum 30 pages/week
  2. In-seminar leadership:
  3. Description of course project: if research paper, 3000-4000 word paper based on 850 pages of research
  4. Description and weighting of elements to be evaluated:

                i. Class participation:   20%

                   ii. In-Seminar Leadership: 30%

                     iii.  Research Project/Paper: 50%

5. Required Readings

Brand, Hilary and Chaplin, Adrienne. Art and Soul: Signposts for Christians in the Arts. (Carlisle: Piquant, 2001 ; Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press, 2001). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BR 115 .A8 B73)

Dengerink Chaplin, Adrienne. ‘From Vision to Touch: Returning Beauty to Lived Experience,’ The Other Journal (June 1, 2009), http://theotherjournal.com/2009/06/01/from-vision-to-touch-returning-beauty-to-lived-experience/

Dengerink Chaplin, Adrienne. ‘Transcendence Remixed: On the Complex Role of Religion in Contemporary Art,’ in Wessel Stoker and W.L. van der Merwe eds., Culture and Transcendence: A Typology of Transcendence (Leuven: Peeters, 2012), 163-177. (Robarts Library: BD 362 .C858 2012X)

Elkins, James. On the Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art (New York: Routledge, 2004). (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/5247530 ; Robarts Library: N 72 .R4 E44 2004X)

Fulgie, Gordon. ‘Beauty Lost, Beauty Found: One Hundred Years of Attitudes’ in Theodore L. Prescott, ed., A Broken Beauty (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2005), 59-76. (Regis Library and Robarts Library: N 7570 .B76 2005)

Johnson, Mark, The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007), Chapter 10, ‘Art as an Exemplar of Meaning-Making,’ 207-224. (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/618758 ; Robarts, St. Michaels, Victoria: B 105 .M4 J65 2007)

Kearney, Richard, and Treanor, Brian, eds., Carnal Hermeneutics (New York: Fordham University Press, 2015). (ICS Library: B 105 .B64 C345 2015 ; Robarts, St. Michaels: B 105 .B64 C345 2015)

Langer, Susanne K. Mind: An Essay on Human Feeling, Vol. 1 (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1970). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BF161 .L28 v.1 ; Robarts, Victoria: BF 161 .L28 v.1)

Malz, Isabelle, Curator, The Problem of God, Exhibition Catalogue (Dusseldorf: Kerber, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfahlen, 2015).  

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. The World of Perception, Chapter 3: ‘Exploring the World of Perception: Sensory Objects’ (New York: Routledge, 2008). (http://timothyquigley.net/cont/mp-wp.pdf)

Pallasmaa, Juhani, The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses (Chichester: John Wiley, 2008). (Robarts Library: NA 2500 .P35 2005 ; http://arts.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Pallasmaa_The-Eyes-of-the-Skin.pdf)

Saito, Yuriko, Everyday Aesthetics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010). (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/7063792 ; Robarts, Victoria: BH 39 .S237)

Shiner, Larry, The Invention of Art: A Cultural History (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2001). (Robarts, St. Michaels: NX 440 .S5 2001)

Smith, James K. A., Imagining the Kingdom: How Worship Works (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Academic, 2013). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BV 15 .S485 2013)

Viladesau, Richard, Theological Aesthetics: God in Imagination, Beauty, and Art (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BR 115 .A8 V55 1999)

6. Some Recommended Readings

Bachelard, Gaston, The Poetics of Space (Boston: Beacon Press, 1994). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: B 2430 .B253 P6313 1969)

Bourriaud, Nicolas, Relational Aesthetics (Dijon: Les presses du reel, 2002). (UofT Mississauga: N 6490 .B6413 2002)

Brown, Frank Burch, Religious Aesthetics: A Theological Study of Making and Meaning (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1989). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BR 115 .A8 B78 1989)

Damasio, Antonio, The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness (San Diego: Harvest, 2000). (Robarts, St. Michaels, Victoria: BF 311 .D33 2000)

Dengerink Chaplin, Adrienne, ‘Sartre and Merleau-Ponty’ in Berys Gaut and Dominic McIver Lopes eds., The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics, 2nd edition (London: Routledge, 2005), 159-171. (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/5496163 ; Robarts, Victoria: BH 21 .R68 [.R49-Victoria])

Dengerink Chaplin, Adrienne, ‘Art and Embodiment: Biological and Phenomenological Contributions to Understanding Beauty and the Aesthetic,’ Contemporary Aesthetics, Volume 3, 2005. Online: http://www.contempaesthetics.org/newvolume/pages/article.php?articleID=291

Dengerink Chaplin, Adrienne, ‘Not All Regious Art is Made by Believers,’ Comment is Free, The Guardian (September 23, 2011): Online: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/sep/23/religious-art-mach

Dewey, John, Art as Experience (New York: Perigee Books, 1980). (OISE Library: 701 DA 19A 1980 ; ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N66 .D4 2005)

Dissanayake, Ellen, Art and Intimacy: How the Arts Began (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2000). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: NX 180 .S6 D58 2000)

Dissanayake, Ellen, Homo Aestheticus: Where Art Comes From and Why (Seattle: University of Washington, 1996). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BH 39 .D56 1995)

Dutton, Denis, The Art Instinct (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2010). (Robarts: N 71 .D88 2009)

Elkins, James, On the Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art (New York: Routledge, 2004. (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/5247530 ; Robarts Library: N 72 .R4 E44 2004X)

Elkins, James and David Morgan, eds., Re-Enchantment (New York: Routledge, 2009). (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8774208 ; Robarts, Victoria: N 72 .R4 R44 2009)

Hall, Edward T., The Hidden Dimension (New York: Anchor Books, 1969). (Robarts, St, Michaels, Victoria: BF 469 .H3)

Jay, Martin, Downcast Eyes: The Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought (Berkeley: University of Chicago Press, 1994). (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8839791 ; Robarts: B 2424 .P45 J39)

Johnson, Mark, The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007). (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/6189758 ; Robarts, St. Michaels, Victoria: B 105 .M4 J65)

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice, Phenomenology of Perception (London: Routledge, 1998). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: B 829.5 .M413)

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice, The World of Perception (New York: Routledge, 2008). (http://timothyquigley.net/cont/mp-wp.pdf)

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice, The Merleau-Ponty Aesthetics Reader: Philosophy and Painting edited by Michael B. Smith (Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 1993). Especially: ‘Cézanne’s Doubt’ (59-75) and ‘Eye and Mind’ (121-149). (ICS Library: B 2430 .M3762)

Montague, Ashley, Touching: The Human Significance of the Skin (New York: Harpers & Row, 1986). (Robarts: BF 698 .M63 ; OISE: 152.182 M758T)

Prescott, Theodore L. ed., A Broken Beauty (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2005). (Regis Library and Robarts Library: N 7570 .B76 2005)

Rosen, Aaron, Art and Religion in the 21st Century (London: Thames and Hudson, 2015). (Robarts: N 72 .R4 R67 2015)

Seerveld, Calvin, Normative Aesthetics (Sioux Center, Ia.: Dordt College Press, 2014). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N 72 .S6 S44 2014)

Seerveld, Calvin, Rainbows for a Fallen World (Toronto: Tuppence Press, 1980), pages tbd. (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BH 39 .S432)

Seerveld, Calvin, Redemptive Art in Society (Sioux Center, Ia.: Dordt College Press, 2014). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: NX 180 .S6 S45 2014)

Shaviro, Steven, Without Criteria: Kant, Whitehead, Deleuze, and Aesthetics (Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press, 2012). (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8848956 ; Robarts: B 1674 .W354 S44 2009X)

Shusterman, Richard, Pragmatist Aesthetics: Living Beauty, Rethinking Art (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2000). (Robarts: BH 39 .S5256 1992)

Thiessen, Gesa Elsbeth, ed., Theological Aesthetics: A Reader (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2004). (ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BR 115 .A8 T427 2005)

Verrips, Jojada, ‘Missing Religion, Overlooking the Body,’ in James Elkins and David Morgan, eds., Re-Enchantment (New York: Routledge, 2009), 287-296. (UofT Libraries e-resource: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/8774208 ; Robarts, Victoria: N 72 .R4 R44 2009)

Students with diverse learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. In particular, if you have a disability/health consideration that may require accommodations, please feel free to approach me and/or Student Services as soon as possible.


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