Charity Research

1.           What are the needs in our community/country/world?

 

Browse newspaper/magazine articles to find evidence of a need, or search keywords.

Find evidence that the need exists and causes suffering.

 

Community:

* Lake Oswego Review

* Oregonian 

* Gale Powersearch -- include the word Oregon or Lake Oswego in your search, then switch from Books to Newspapers or Magazines on left side.

Country:

Opposing Viewpoints – browse to your topic using the categories; focus on “Featured Viewpoints” and “Statistics”

Gale Powersearch

World:

Global Issues in Context – browse to your topic, focus on “Global Viewpoints” and “Statistics”. For Step 2 (below), also note “GET INVOLVED” box, lower right.

Opposing Viewpoints – browse to your topic using the categories; focus on “Featured Viewpoints” and “Statistics”

 

2.           What charities would best help those causes?

 

Research charities mentioned in articles from #1, or in the “GET INVOLVED” box in Global Issues in Context.

 

You may also want to use Charity Navigator/other resources below to find a charity to research.

 

 Ask yourself: what percentage of donations do they spend on their cause? Can they prove that they are effective? Who do they serve – do they specifically target your issue/group?

 

Charity Navigator – Browse by category or type in keywords. Next, limit to Oregon (for local charities) or other criteria.

Also try Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance and/or American Institute of Philanthropy

 

3. Find out more about your charity

Gale Powersearch – Search name of charity, then switch to Newspapers or Magazines on right. Have they been in the news? Why?

Also search for your charity using Google, etc. -- find information on the charity’s own web site, but realize that they may not tell you any negative facts about their organization.