Oak Grove Curriculum Scope & Sequence

Social Emotional Learning- SEL (3rd Grade Level)

Updated 8.7.17

Unit Length

(32 Wks)

Unit / Skills

  • We are learning to…

Instructional Strategies

Resources

Assessments

  • Formative/Summative (F/S)

4weeks

SKILLS FOR LEARNING

  • We are learning to…
  • Focusing your attention and listening help you be a better learner.
  • Focusing your attention and listening show respect.
  • Self-talk means talking to yourself in a quiet voice or in your head.
  • Self-talk can help you focus, stay on task, and handle distractions.
  • Being assertive means asking for what you want or need in a calm and firm voice.
  • Being assertive is a respectful way to get what you want or need.
  • Making a plan can help you be a better learner.
  • A plan is good if the order makes sense, it’s simple, and you can do it.

  • Turn and Talk
  • Class discussion
  • Role playing
  • Modeling
  • DVD video scenario & Discussion

  • Seconds Step Program
  • Puppets
  • DVDs
  • Songs
  • Games & activities
  • Curriculum Cross- over activities

  • Apply focusing-attention and listening skills in response to scenarios.
  • Identify classroom distractions
  • Demonstrate the use of self-talk in response to scenarios
  • Demonstrate assertive communication skills in response to scenarios
  • Evaluate three-step plans for different scenarios using the
  • Good Plan Checklist criteria
  • Create a simple, three-step plan that meets the Good Plan
  • Checklist criteria

6 weeks

EMPATHY

  • We are learning to...
  • Looking for clues on a person’s face or body and in the situation helps you notice and understand how that person is feeling.
  • People can have different  feelings about the same situation.
  • All feelings are natural.
  • People can have different feelings about the same situation, and their feelings can change.
  • Empathy is feeling or understanding what someone else is feeling.
  • Thinking about others’ perspectives helps you have empathy for them.
  • You can have conflicting feelings about a situation.
  • Having empathy helps you notice when others’ feelings are the same as or different from yours.
  • Having empathy helps you understand and accept how others are the same as or different from you.
  • Accepting and appreciating others’ differences is respectful.
  • Focusing attention on and listening to others can help you have empathy and show compassion.
  • You can say kind words or do helpful things to show your compassion.
  • Focusing attention and listening to others help you make conversation.
  • Making conversation helps you make friends and get along better with others.

  • Turn and Talk
  • Class discussion
  • Role playing
  • Modeling
  • DVD video scenario & Discussion

  • Seconds Step Program
  • Puppets
  • DVDs
  • Songs
  • Games & activities
  • Curriculum Cross- over activities

  • Name a variety of feelings
  • Determine others’ feelings using physical, verbal, and situational clues
  • Label their own feelings as the same as or different from others’ feelings
  • Identify others’ feelings using physical, verbal, and situational clues
  • Determine whether others’ feelings have changed, in response to scenarios
  • Identify two conflicting feelings a person could have in response to scenarios
  • Explain possible reasons for someone’s conflicting feelings in response to scenarios
  • Name similarities and differences between people
  • Predict how others will feel when teased for being different
  • Demonstrate focusing-attention and listening skills in response to scenarios
  • Identify ways to show compassion for others in response to scenarios
  • Express appreciation for another person’s concern in response to scenarios
  • Demonstrate focusing-attention and listening skills in the context of a game
  • Initiate, continue, and end a conversation in a friendly way in the context of a game

6 weeks

EMOTION MANAGEMENT

  • We are learning to...
  • When you feel strong feelings, it’s hard to think clearly.
  • Focusing attention on your body gives you clues about how you’re feeling.
  • Thinking about your feelings helps the thinking part of your brain get back in control.
  • Using a stop signal and naming your feeling are the first two Calming-Down Steps.
  • You can use belly breathing to calm down.
  • Calming down helps you handle accusations calmly and thoughtfully.
  • It’s important to take responsibility when you’ve made a mistake.
  • Negative self-talk can make strong feelings even stronger.
  • You can calm down by using positive self-talk.
  • Setting a new goal and making a plan to achieve it are positive ways to handle disappointment.
  • Everyone feels angry sometimes, but hurting other people’s feelings or bodies is not okay.
  • It’s important to calm down angry feelings so you don’t do something hurtful.
  • Being assertive is a respectful way to get what you want or need.
  • Calming down when your feelings have been hurt can help you avoid jumping to conclusions.
  • Thinking of other explanations and getting more information can help you avoid jumping to conclusions.

  • Turn and Talk
  • Class discussion
  • Role playing
  • Modeling
  • DVD video scenario & Discussion

  • Seconds Step Program
  • Puppets
  • DVDs
  • Songs
  • Games & activities
  • Curriculum Cross- over activities

  • Identify physical clues that can help them label their own feelings
  • Identify the first two Calming-Down Steps
  • Demonstrate using the first two Calming-Down Steps in response to scenarios
  • Demonstrate correct belly-breathing technique
  • Use belly breathing to calm down in response to scenarios
  • Demonstrate steps for handling accusations in response to scenarios
  • Generate positive self-talk they can use to calm down in response to scenarios
  • Make a simple three-step plan to achieve a goal in response to scenarios
  • Use counting to calm down in response to scenarios
  • Use assertive communication skills to get what they want or need in response to scenarios
  • Identify situations that require using strategies for calming down
  • Demonstrate using strategies for calming down
  • Generate alternative explanations in response to scenarios

6 Weeks

  • PROBLEM SOLVING
  • We are learning to…
  • Calming down helps you think so you can solve problems.
  • Following steps can help you solve problems.
  • Saying the problem without blame is respectful.
  • Following steps can help you solve problems.
  • Solutions to problems must be safe and respectful.
  • Solutions can have positive or negative consequences.
  • Calming down helps you think so you can solve problems.
  • Following steps can help you solve problems.
  • Getting along with others helps you be a better learner at school.
  • Following steps can help you solve problems.
  • Being assertive is a safe and respectful solution to problems like being excluded.
  • Excluding others is not nice or respectful.
  • Calming down helps you think so you can solve problems.
  • Following steps can help you solve problems.
  • Being assertive can help you resist negative peer pressure.
  • Using Second Step skills can help you be a better learner and get along with others.

  • Turn and Talk
  • Class discussion
  • Role playing
  • Modeling
  • DVD video scenario & Discussion

  • Seconds Step Program
  • Puppets
  • DVDs
  • Songs
  • Games & activities
  • Curriculum Cross- over activities

Recall the first Problem-Solving Step

Identify and state a problem in response to scenarios

Identify blaming language in response to scenarios

Recall the Problem-Solving Steps

Propose several solutions for a given problem in response to scenarios

Determine if solutions are safe and respectful

Explore positive and negative consequences of solutions

Apply the Calming-Down Steps to an emotional situation in

response to a scenario

Recall the Problem-Solving Steps

Use the Problem-Solving Steps to solve an interpersonal

problem between classmates, in response to a scenario

Apply the Problem-Solving Steps to the problem of being excluded by peers, in response to scenarios

Demonstrate assertive communication skills in response to scenarios

Apply the Problem-Solving Steps to the problem of being negatively pressured by peers, in response to scenarios

Demonstrate assertive communication in response to scenario

Recall Second Step skills learned

Identify Second Step skills in a story

Relate personal examples of skill use