Grayshaw & Yeo Gardening Company

Risk Assessment

        SECTION 1        INTRODUCTION

        SECTION 2        SITE SAFETY

        Reference                Environmental Conditions

                                Remote Sites / Lone Working

                                Roadside Working

                                Working with people in the garden

                                River, Streams, Waterways

                                Operating in homes of elderly clients

                                                

        

        SECTION 3        GRASS CUTTING OPERATIONS

        Reference                        Pedestrian Mowing

                                        

        

        SECTION 4        GENERAL MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS

        Reference        Pesticide, plant feed and weed kill

        Transport & storage of pesticides, plant feeds and weed killer

                Pruning

                Hand Tool Operations

                Planting

                Leaf Clearance

                Use of Ladders, Steps and Work Platforms

                Hanging Baskets and Planters

                        

        

        

        APPENDICES

        

        (I) Risk Assessment Guidance Notes

                

                

        


INTRODUCTION

This document provides an assessment of the health and safety risks for the gardening carried out by Grayshaw & Yeo Gardening Company in accordance with the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992 (MHSWR) and associated Regulations.

Our primary objectives in carrying out these risk assessments were: -

Definitions

The definition of hazard and risk in this context is shown below

Hazard                =

Anything with the potential to cause harm.

Risk        

The chance or likelihood that someone will be harmed by the hazard.

The method used in carrying out these assessments is explained in the Guidance Notes contained in Appendix (I).

Risk Ranking System

The risk ranking system shown below has been used to help determine priorities for further action. It is based on the likelihood of injury occurring from a hazard and the seriousness of the outcome, taking into account the number of people involved and measures already in place to control hazards and reduce the risk.  

        

Likelihood

Score

Outcome / Severity

Score

Highly Improbable

1

Negligible Injuries

1

Remotely Possible

2

Minor Injuries

2

Occasional

3

Major Injuries

3

Fairly Frequent

4

Fatal Injuries

4

Frequent or Regular

5

Multiple Fatalities

5

Almost and Certainty

6

Catastrophic Fatalities

6

Risk Ranking Number (R.R.N.)   = Likelihood x Outcome score

Interpretation of the Risk Ranking System

RRN 5 or less

=

Insignificant risk, no further action required

RRN between 6 and 12

=

Moderate risk, further control measures may be needed

RRN greater than 12

=

Inadequate controls, urgent remedial action required


RISK ASSESSMENT - DETAIL REVIEW

SITE SAFETY

DESCRIPTION

HAZARD

RISK OF

RISK TO

EXISTING

CONTROLS

RRN

Environmental

Conditions

Ground Conditions

Wet, uneven or slippery surfaces

Muscular injuries

Slips/Falls

Operative

Third Parties

General Site Safety

Safety footwear

Operatives instructed not continue work if ground conditions are considered dangerous.

2/3

Steep banks

Insufficient standing space at top of bank

Muscular injury

Slips/Falls

Loss of control of machinery

Contact with moving machinery

Operative

Public

As above plus

Work only undertaken when sufficient footage at top of bank.

2/4

Heat , sunshine

Cold, wet

Discomfort, illness

sunburn, skin cancer, eye damage.

Discomfort, illness

                 Operative

Comfortable clothing, Regular breaks and drinks available.

Wear sun cream, head covering and work in the shade mid-day if possible.

Appropriate outdoor clothing

Regular breaks

Hot drinks available

2/4

2/3

Operating in Rural Areas /  Remote Sites

Lone working

Remote location

Lone working

Accident or injury whilst working alone.

No immediate assistance  available

Over exertion

More serious injury due to lack of help in an emergency

Operative

Take a First aid kits with you.

Always have your mobile to  contact help.

As above plus

2/3

2/3

Roadside

Working

Moving traffic

Road Traffic Accident

Operatives

Third parties

High visibility clothing

Work scheduled to avoid peak periods

2/4

Working with people in the  garden

Inquisitive children or other people in work area

Various injuries

Operative distracted

Unauthorised use of machinery / equipment

Garden owners and guests

Operatives

Be aware of where people are and ask client to keep children safe.

1/3

Rivers, streams and  Waterways

Serious illness / infection

Panic

Drowning

Operatives

Operative

Third Parties

Work instruction/Safety Code of Practice SSWI01

Trained staff  / local knowledge

Operatives advised of dangers & issued with  Weils Disease cards

Protective clothing (gloves, wellingtons. waterproofs)

No lone working

Rescue equipment available

Swimmers only

Site specific risk assessment undertaken

No under 18s or trainees unless directly supervised by a competent member of staff

2/4

2/4

Operating at  Homes for the Elderly or Special Needs Sites

Elderly / infirm people in work area

Lack of awareness of dangers from machinery or work practices

Various injuries

Contact or entanglement with vehicles or machinery

                          3rd parties

Machinery / equipment never left unattended & put away after use

2/3


RISK ASSESSMENTS - DETAIL REVIEW

GRASS CUTTING OPERATIONS

DESCRIPTION

HAZARD

RISK OF

RISK TO

EXISTING

CONTROLS

RRN

Pedestrian Mowing

(Cylinder/Rotary)

Moving machinery

Contact/entanglement with moving parts

Operator, Third Parties

No loose clothing,

Correct guards fitted

Ask owner of mower for a demonstration.

Care taken when operating in public areas

Machinery immobilised when not in use

Safety boots.

2/3

Flying debris

(Rotary only)

Being struck by flying debris

Operator

As above plus;-

Eye / face protection worn

1/3


RISK ASSESSMENTS - DETAIL REVIEW

GENERAL GROUNDS MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS

DESCRIPTION

HAZARD

RISK OF

RISK TO

EXISTING

CONTROLS

RRN

Pesticide, plant feed and weed kill Operations

Method of substance application

Weather conditions e,g, high winds

Chemical related Illness

Environmental damage

Operatives third parties

Only use shop bought products with the packaging intact and the contents in date and follow instructions carefully

2/3

Transport & storage of pesticides, plant feeds and weed killer.

Accidental chemical spillage or leakage’s

Illness or injury due to exposure to chemicals

Environmental damage

Operatives, third parties

Follow instructions on the packaging.

Up to the Garden owner to store pesticides.

 

2/3

Pruning

Contact with blades,  

Sharp or thorny trimmings

Damage/defective/blunt equipment

Cuts and abrasions

Stabbing injuries

Operator

Work instruction/Safety Code of Practice GMWI05

Protective gloves

Face protection as necessary

Well maintained tools

1/3

Use of Hand tools (spades/forks etc.)

Unsuitable, defective or damaged tools

Incorrect use / misuse of  tools

Stabbing injuries to feet and legs or other injuries

Operative

Tools purchased from reputable supplier and maintained in good condition

Correct tools for job

Defective items removed from use

Safety boots/protective gloves

1/3

Planting

(Bedding)

Repetitive manual work

Handling plants

Fatigue

Muscular disorders

Allergic reactions to plants

Operator

Well maintained tools & equipment

Horticultural knowledge

3

Mulching and using Compost

Handling bags of compost

Muscular injuries,

Back injury

Operator

Bend your knees to lift the compost bags.

Take the compost out of the bag before moving the compost and put the amount you can comfortably lift it into a container.

Planting

(Trees)

Handling, planting trees

Muscular injuries

Cuts, abrasions, bruises or other injuries

Operator

Horticultural knowledge

Don't work alone if need to plant a large shrub or tree.

Leaf Clearance (by hand)

Unseen sharp objects

Used hypodermic needles

Dog excreta

Repetitive manual work

        

Cuts/abrasions,

Stabbing injuries

Illness/infection or other injuries

Contaminated work wear

Muscular injuries

Operator

No leaf clearance by ungloved hands

“Sharps” boxes. and puncture proof gloves available, location of sharps reported

 Tetanus Hepatitis immunisation recommended

Safety boots and protective work wear

Spare overall and washing facilities available

Manual handling instruction

Regular breaks

3

Use of Ladders, Steps & Work Platforms

Unsuitable, damaged or defective equipment

Incorrect use, Unsuitable footwear

Adverse ground conditions

Items falling onto others below

Overhead power cables

Falling from height

Being struck by falling objects

As above

Being struck by falling objects

Electrocution / shock / burns

Operator

Third Parties

Make sure you have insurance to work at heights.

No lone working

Regular inspection of equipment - Ladder Register

Sufficient grip footwear

Work area kept clear, warning signs & barriers as necessary

Tools & materials secured

No metal ladders used near power lines

2/4

Hanging Baskets and Planters (Erection, dismantling and maintaining)

Working at height

Road traffic,

Contact with fertilisers & plants

Lifting, carrying planters and baskets

Falls

Objects falling onto others below

Being struck by moving vehicles (R.T.A)

Allergic reactions

Falls

Muscular injuries

Operator Third Parties

Make sure you have insurance to work at heights.

Tools , materials secured when working at height

Local risk assessments as necessary

Peak periods avoided

High visibility clothing

Warning signs

Suitable, well maintained access equipment

Protective gloves

Manual handling instruction

3/4


APPENDIX (1)

RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE NOTES


APPENDIX (1)

RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE NOTES

A.        Introduction

        The assessment and control of risk underpins the approach to the management of health and safety required by the new EEC Regulations.

        The purpose of these notes is to provide guidance on carrying out the risk assessment process required under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations and to supply additional information on the specific assessments necessary to comply with other applicable legislation.

                

B.      Requirements of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992                 

        The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (MHSWR) which came into force in January 1993 State that every Employer must make a "suitable and sufficient" assessment of the risks within the workplace.  

        In brief, they require the Employer to: -

        -        Carry out a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to both employees and other persons who may also be at risk within the workplace.

        -        Take appropriate measures to prevent or reduce the risks.

        -        Record the findings the assessment where five or more employees are employed

        -        Provide suitable information and training

        -        Establish emergency procedures.

        -        Restrict access to "danger areas" where appropriate

        -        Review the Assessment where there is reason to suspect it is no longer valid or if there has been a significant change in the circumstances to which it relates.


C.        General Risk Assessment Methodology

        Key Stages of the Risk Assessment Process

        (a) Hazard Identification (Initial Review and Index)

        

        This involves looking for hazards that could result in significant harm within the workplace. These may result from environmental conditions, work activities or equipment for example.

        A Schedule is then compiled from which a more in depth analysis of specific hazards can be made.

        (b). Decide Who Maybe Harmed and How (Detail Review)

        Each of the items on the Initial Review Schedule is assigned a reference number (these are subsequently reflected in the Safety Codes of Practice).

        Specific hazards are noted on the Detail Review form and examined in greater depth. Both the likelihood of harm occurring and the severity of the outcome are considered, taking into account measures already in place to reduce the risk of injury.

          A numerical ranking number (RRN) is then calculated from the Risk Ranking System shown in Section 3 to help determine priorities for further action.

        (c). Produce an Action Plan for Risk Reduction

        

        Having assessed the risk, the findings can then be used to produce an Action Plan for Risk Reduction, which clearly defines specific tasks, responsibilities and timescales.

        Sample forms are enclosed at the end of this section.

        (d) Tasks not covered by the general assessment

        Where we are required to carry out one-off tasks not covered by the general assessment, the Supervisor or Manager concerned must make a simple assessment of the hazards and risks involved before starting work.


APPENDIX (2)

MANUAL HANDLING ASSESSMENTS

        Manual Handling can be defined as:

        "The transporting or supporting of a load by hand or by bodily force."

        An assessment of manual handling operations as required under the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, need only be undertaken for a task where a significant hazards are believed to be present.  It need not be used for every manual-handling task.

        Typical manual handling tasks in grounds maintenance include digging for long periods or lifting and carrying heavy equipment / machinery.

        


APPENDIX (1)

RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE NOTES

A.        Introduction

        The assessment and control of risk underpins the approach to the management of health and safety required by the new EEC Regulations.

        The purpose of these notes is to provide guidance on carrying out the risk assessment process required under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations and to supply additional information on the specific assessments necessary to comply with other applicable legislation.

                

B.      Requirements of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992                 

        The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (MHSWR) which came into force in January 1993 State that every Employer must make a "suitable and sufficient" assessment of the risks within the workplace.  

        In brief, they require the Employer to: -

        -        Carry out a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to both employees and other persons who may also be at risk within the workplace.

        -        Take appropriate measures to prevent or reduce the risks.

        -        Record the findings the assessment where five or more employees are employed

        -        Provide suitable information and training

        -        Establish emergency procedures.

        -        Restrict access to "danger areas" where appropriate

        -        Review the Assessment where there is reason to suspect it is no longer valid or if there has been a significant change in the circumstances to which it relates.


C.        General Risk Assessment Methodology

        Key Stages of the Risk Assessment Process

        (a) Hazard Identification (Initial Review and Index)

        

        This involves looking for hazards that could result in significant harm within the workplace. These may result from environmental conditions, work activities or equipment for example.

        A Schedule is then compiled from which a more in depth analysis of specific hazards can be made.

        (b). Decide Who Maybe Harmed and How (Detail Review)

        Each of the items on the Initial Review Schedule is assigned a reference number (these are subsequently reflected in the Safety Codes of Practice).

        Specific hazards are noted on the Detail Review form and examined in greater depth. Both the likelihood of harm occurring and the severity of the outcome are considered, taking into account measures already in place to reduce the risk of injury.

          A numerical ranking number (RRN) is then calculated from the Risk Ranking System shown in Section 3 to help determine priorities for further action.

        (c). Produce an Action Plan for Risk Reduction

        

        Having assessed the risk, the findings can then be used to produce an Action Plan for Risk Reduction, which clearly defines specific tasks, responsibilities and timescales.

        Sample forms are enclosed at the end of this section.

        (d) Tasks not covered by the general assessment

        Where we are required to carry out one-off tasks not covered by the general assessment, the Supervisor or Manager concerned must make a simple assessment of the hazards and risks involved before starting work.


APPENDIX (2)

MANUAL HANDLING ASSESSMENTS

        Manual Handling can be defined as:

        "The transporting or supporting of a load by hand or by bodily force."

        An assessment of manual handling operations as required under the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, need only be undertaken for a task where a significant hazards are believed to be present.  It need not be used for every manual-handling task.

        Typical manual handling tasks in grounds maintenance include digging for long periods or lifting and carrying heavy equipment / machinery.

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