Program of Studies

 

 

Principal: Tara Amatrudo

Assistant Principal: JT Foster

2017-2018

9 Riverside Drive

East Hartford, CT 06118

Dear Scholars,

 

You are fortunate to be selecting coursework from a challenging and varied curriculum that is offered by a talented faculty. We are a small high school with very high expectations for each of you. These expectations can be met by careful planning by scholars, families, and staff. As you begin the course selection process, please remember that freedom is really the right to become the best you can be, not to choose the path of least resistance. Good decision making and planning by you is the key to your future in a rapidly changing global society. In selecting your overall program and specific courses that you will take, it is vitally important that you consult parents, teachers, school counselors, and administrators. They can help you make decisions regarding your future plans and will guide you toward the appropriate classes.

 

The required courses at CTRA are designed to prepare all scholars to go on to post-secondary education. There are other courses that you can choose that will support your learning and push you to higher levels of learning. We encourage you to take this opportunity to select courses that will help you grow academically and prepare you for a successful future.

 

Once you have made your decisions, you should regard your course selection as your commitment for the coming year to bring you closer to your goals. Please spend the time necessary to make a commitment to your future success. Good luck and may next year at The Connecticut River Academy be an outstanding one for you.

 

Respectfully,

Tara Amatrudo

Principal

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CT RIVER ACADEMY MISSION        4

CT RIVER ACADEMY VISION        4

MAGNET STANDARDS        4

NON-DISCRIMINATORY STATEMENT        5

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS        5

PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS         6

SUMMER SCHOOL        6

PROGRAM CONSIDERATIONS        7

GRADING POLICY        7

HONOR ROLL        8

CLASS RANK        8

CANCELLATION OF COURSES        8

AUTHORITY OF THE PRINCIPAL        8

DUAL CREDIT/CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT        8

CAREER/COLLEGE READINESS RUBRIC        12

ART        13

CAREER AND LIFE SKILLS        14

ENGLISH        16

HEALTH & WELLNESS        19

MATHEMATICS        21

MUSIC        24

CTRA ENVIRONMENTAL PATHWAYS        26

SCIENCE        28

SOCIAL STUDIES        34

SUPPORT        39

TECHNOLOGY        40

WORLD LANGUAGE        41

 

Connecticut River Academy Vision, Values, and Magnet Standards

Revised for 2016-17

 

Vision

Connecticut River Academy graduates will use their gifts to contribute to a just and sustainable world.

 

Mission

The mission of the Connecticut River Academy is to:

 

Values

AWARENESS  –  DIVERSITY  –  ACTION

 

Magnet Standards

CTRA Scholars will contribute to a just and sustainable world by:

Magnet Standard 1: demonstrating self- and global awareness.

 

Magnet Standard 2: demonstrating a respect for the importance of diversity in the community of life.

 

Magnet Standard 3: demonstrating the impact of individual and social actions and decisions on the community of life.

NON-DISCRIMINATORY STATEMENT

LEARN is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious creed, age, marital status, sexual orientation, national origin, sex, ancestry, present or past history of mental disorder, mental disorder, mental retardation, pregnancy, or physical disability.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CONNECTICUT RIVER ACADEMY

For graduation from the Connecticut River Academy, scholars must earn a minimum of twenty-five credits, including:

 

Subject

Credits

Distributional Credits

English

4

Must take at least 1 credit of English all four years

Social Studies

3

Civics (0.5 credits)

U.S. History (1.0 credit)

Mathematics

3

Algebra 1 and Geometry

Science

3

Biology, Physical Science (Chemistry or Physics), and 1.0 additional Science Lab

World Language

2

-

Physical Education

1

-

Health & Safety

0.5

-

*Career & Life Skills

1

-

Fine Arts

1

Art or Music

**Humanities

1

-

***Capstone Project

1

Senior Demonstration Project and Exhibition

Electives

4.5

-

 

*Career and Life Skills - These skills are embedded throughout our courses including our theme-based electives.

**Humanities – This requirement may be met through English or Social Studies Electives

*** The Capstone Project is a graduation requirement for all CTRA Scholars.

The Capstone Project is a culminating activity that provides a way for scholars to demonstrate the knowledge and skills they acquired throughout their years at CTRA. It engages scholars in a project/experience that focuses on an interest, career path or academic pursuit that synthesizes classroom study and real world perspective. CTRA scholars are asked to demonstrate their ability to apply key knowledge and skills by planning, completing and presenting a culminating project linked to one or more area of personal interest and the individual's Scholar Success Plan.

 

The capstone experience may include an in-depth project, reflective portfolio, community service and/or internship. As part of the experience, the scholar will demonstrate research, communication and technology skills including additional relevant 21st century skills.

PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CONNECTICUT RIVER ACADEMY

At the conclusion of each school year, scholars at the Connecticut River Academy are promoted to the next grade so long as there is still the potential for them to earn enough credits to graduate with their current graduation class. If the scholar cannot possibly graduate with their original class, they will repeat their current grade and move to an anchor/advisory group that corresponds with that grade.

The minimum number of credits needed for promotion to the next grade level are as follows:

Grade 10: 6 credits

Grade 11: 12 credits

Grade 12: 18 credits

Graduation: 25 credits

Scholars lacking credits for promotion will be expected to attend summer school to stay on track with their classmates for graduation.

SUMMER SCHOOL

Scholars lacking credits for promotion may attend summer school to stay on track with their classmates for graduation. Summer School must be completed in the summer semester following the school year that the credit was lost and will be at the expense of the scholar’s family, taken through their home district. If a scholar was truant from school and lost credit as a result, they are not eligible to reclaim this credit through Summer School.

 PROGRAM CONSIDERATIONS

When a course lists a prerequisite, the scholar must have passed the prerequisite to take the course. A scholar may repeat a course to meet a grade requirement for a prerequisite, but may not count the same course twice as credit toward that subject for graduation. Scholars must repeat, in the subsequent summer or the subsequent year, courses required for graduation which they fail. Two grades of English may only be taken concurrently upon the successful completion of English 9 and English 10.

 

All scholar in grades 9-11 must be scheduled for a minimum of six credit bearing classes per semester. Scholars in grade 12 must be enrolled in a minimum of five credit bearing classes per semester. Any course, in any department, may be considered an elective if it is not required for graduation. The elective credit requirement may vary depending on the number of credits the scholar has acquired in the other subject areas.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE

Grade

Percentage

Grade Points

A+

97-100

4.333

A

93-96

4.0

A-

90-92

3.667

B+

87-89

3.333

B

83-86

3.0

B-

80-82

2.667

C+

77-79

2.333

C

73-76

2.0

C-

70-72

1.667

D+

67-69

1.333

D

63-66

1.0

D-

60-62

0.667

F

0-50

0

HONOR ROLL

The honor roll is computed at the end of each quarter based on the grades in all subjects. Scholars must be enrolled in a minimum of three CTRA credit bearing courses to be eligible for honor roll consideration. High honors requires an A- or better in all subjects. Honors requires a B- or better in all subjects.

 

CLASS RANK AT CT RIVER ACADEMY

The Connecticut River Academy does not rank scholars according to their Grade Point Average. The University of Connecticut awards scholarships to the two seniors in the senior class with the highest Grade Point Averages. This is determined using the year end Junior Grade Point Average.

 

CANCELLATION OF COURSES OR PROGRAMS

Courses or programs listed and/or described in this document are subject to change at any time due to budgetary limitations, insufficient enrollments, and for other reasons as determined by the school principal.

 

AUTHORITY OF THE PRINCIPAL

The school principal shall have the final authority on issues regarding course selection and granting of credits. This shall include, but not limited to, determination of credits for transfer scholars, exceptions to prerequisites, level changes, and diploma eligibility.

CTRA/GOODWIN COLLEGE DUAL ENROLLED PROGRAM

In order to ensure that our scholars interested in and qualifying for college level courses will succeed, we require them to take Goodwin College’s foundational writing course, English 099, at the Connecticut River Academy.  Scholars can qualify for this course starting in the second semester of their tenth grade year.  We use our Career and College Readiness rubric (see page 8) to determine placement into this class.  Every year our scholars assess themselves and are assessed by their educators using this rubric. If a scholar receives a 3 or a 4 in all areas of the rubric, he/she qualifies to take English 099.  If there is one area where a scholar receives less than a three, a CTRA English educator can write a recommendation to allow this scholar to enroll in 099. If the scholar earns an 85 or better in the class, he/she may then enroll in Goodwin College courses.  Our scholars taking Goodwin courses for the first time are in a cohort consisting of only CTRA scholars taking the following courses:

Goodwin Year One Scholars:

1st Semester

English 101:  English Composition

Communications 101:  Public Speaking

2nd Semester

English 102:  English Literature

Psychology 112:  Introduction to Psychology

Interim Spring

Environmental Ethics

Goodwin Year Two Scholars:

If a scholar is successful in the Goodwin Year 1 courses,, he/she may enroll in any course at Goodwin College that he/she meets the prerequisite for the following year. Goodwin Year 2 scholars will attend these courses on B days.

In addition, CTRA scholars may access the following college level math courses if they receive an 85 or better in the previous math course and/or with teacher recommendation.

Math 187:  Pre-Calculus

Math 254:  Introduction to Calculus

Math 255:  Calculus II

CTRA/GOODWIN COLLEGE DUAL ENROLLED COURSES

COM 101  Public Speaking

1 semester / 0.5 credit / 3 college credits

This course is designed to develop public speaking and listening skills so that students may become more effective communicators. Students will learn research techniques and how to organize, deliver, and adapt their message to an audience. They prepare and deliver several major speeches. Students also apply interviewing and group discussion techniques.

ENV 107 Environmental Justice

Spring Interim Session  / 0.5 credit / 3 college credits

This course introduces students to environmental issues through the lens of the environmental justice (EJ) movement. Students will explore how the impact that exposure to environmental hazards impact has on an individual's health. Topics include air and water pollution, toxic chemicals, industrial waste, lead, mercury, and the effects of climate change. Access to or lack of affordable healthy food and safe places to engage in physical activity will also be discussed. These topics will be explored using a social, political and economic lens. Using a case study approach, students will examine and explore local, national and global EJ issues with particular emphasis on civil rights, equity, community assets and the active role of citizens in affecting positive changes. Field trips in the local community and action-oriented class projects will also provide students "hands-on" experiences with EJ issues.

ENV 110 Environmental Ethics

Spring Interim Session/ 0.5 credit / 3 college credits

This course examines diverse perspectives regarding values and environmental responsibility as well as the social factors and movements which embody them. Foci may include: Western Civilization and environmental ethics, environmental values in non-western cultures, environmental values in small scale societies, the aesthetics of nature, environmental values in fiction, and ecological ethics and technology.

ENG 101  English Composition at Goodwin College

1 semester / 0.5 credit / 3 college credits

Designed to develop clear and effective college-level writing, course has a strong emphasis on the composing process including topic selection, drafting, editing, and proofreading of final drafts. Focus is on organization of ideas, effective sentence and paragraph structure, grammar and its usage. Scholars will learn the techniques for writing major essays and research papers.

Prerequisite: 85 or better in ENG 099

ENG 102  Composition and Literature at Goodwin College

1 semester / 0.5 credits / 3 college credits

This half-year course provides additional composition skill building. Scholars are required to write extensively on topics related to various genres of serious literature and are expected to explain and support their ideas in writing. Focus is on learning how to read, interpret, and critically analyze literary selections.

Prerequisite: 80 or better in ENG 101

Math 186 Pre-Calculus

1 year / 1 CTRA credit / 4 Goodwin credits

This is a Goodwin College/CTRA dual credit course for scholars who want to expand on their advanced mathematics skills and acquire the foundation for calculus.  Major topics include: linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their applications.

Prerequisite: 80 or better in Algebra 2

 

2        

Math 254 Calculus

1 year / 1 credit/ 4 Goodwin credits

This is a Goodwin College/CTRA dual credit course for scholars who are interested in continuing their study of advanced mathematics. It is especially appropriate for those interested in any of the math-related fields including the sciences, engineering, pharmacy, business, economics, or technology. Topics included are limits, continuity, derivatives, and applications.

Prerequisite: 80 or better in Pre-Calculus

 

Math 255 Calculus II

Not offered in 2015-16

1 year / 1 credit/ 4 Goodwin credits

This is a second course in calculus and intended for scholars who are interested in continuing their study of advanced mathematics. It is especially appropriate for those interested in any of the math-related fields including the sciences, engineering, pharmacy, business, economics, and technology. Topics included are integration, differential equations, applications of integration, integration techniques, improper integrals, sequences and series, conics, parametric equations and polar coordinates.

Prerequisite: 80 or better in Calculus

 PSY 112 Introduction to Psychology at Goodwin College

1 semester / 0.5 credit / 3 college credits

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of psychology, including physiological psychology, neuropsychological principles, sensation and perception, cognition, learning, child and adult development, social psychology, personality, and abnormal psychology. Scholars will focus on understanding human behavior and its application to everyday life.

Prerequisite: English 101

CAREER/COLLEGE READINESS (CCR) RUBRIC

Scholar Name:

Date:

Advisor:

Performance Indicators

4

3

2

1

Grade Level HOMs

Exceeds grade level expectation

Meets grade level expectations

Sometimes meets grade level expectations

Not yet demonstrating grade level expectations

Attendance

No more than three excused absences and zero unexcused absences in a semester

4 to 6 excused absences and no more than one unexcused absence in a semester

7 to 9 excused absences and no more than two unexcused absences in a semester

10 or greater excused absences or more than three unexcused absences in a semester

GPA

3.0 and above

2.5-2.9

2.0-2.4

Below 2.0

Responsible

Behavior

No major infractions

No more than one major infraction

No more than two major infractions

Three or more majors infractions

Lexile

1100 or above

1099 to 900

899 to 700

699 or lower

 

Discussion:

ART

Art Foundations

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course will concentrate on developing artistic ability through the use of the elements of art and principles of design. Scholars will get experience with a wide variety of media such as, drawing, painting and sculpting from observation applied in two-dimensional and three-dimensional projects. Art History and critiques will be a part of each unit. This course is required as a prerequisite for drawing.

 

Digital Photography

1 semester / 0.5 credits

The basic elements of photography such as lighting, composition, and subject matter as well as basic camera functions will be taught. Scholars will also learn how to use Adobe Photoshop to digitally manipulate and enhance their photographs. The history of photography and how it has evolved as an art form will be explored as well as various well-known photographers. This class requires collaboration in the creation of photographs, presentations and critiques.

 

Drawing

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Scholars with an interest in developing strong drawing and rendering skills should take this course. Drawing from observation of three-dimensional forms will be taught as well as drawing from the imagination. Scholars will focus and expand on drawing skills and techniques introduced in Art Foundations. This course will help scholars increase their observational drawing skills, composition and technical manipulation of media.

Prerequisite: Art Foundations

 

Recycle Art

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course focuses on exploration of ideas, materials,and a variety of art concepts that include the elements of art and the principles of design.  Scholars use tools and materials to create innovative art by looking at trash in different and inventive ways.  The Studio Habits of Mind are taught and used as the structure for grading of all projects. Scholars will also research and respond to upcycled art to further their understanding of trash as an art form. The three R’s: reduce, reuse and recycle is emphasized as a purpose and message of creative expression.

COLLEGE/CAREER

Capstone

1 year / 1 credit

In this full year course, scholars will create a body of work that examines an area of interest in depth through studies, reflections, and a culminating exhibition within the CTRA community. A scholar statement that defines the intent and new learning throughout the process will be included as part of the exhibition. Scholars will also write in a variety of modes including literature analysis, personal reflection, and research essays.

Required for grade 12

Career/College Readiness

Not offered in 2017-18

1 year / 0.5 credits

Career/College Readiness supports our Early College theme and assists with scholar’s successful transition into high school. Scholars will enhance their skills in organization and technology. The course introduces scholars to college/career planning and a scholar success plan is developed.

Required for grade 9

Inquiry Methods and Design

1 semester/0.5 credits

This course engages the scholars in interdisciplinary explanation of real world topics and issues of individual interest.  Using an inquiry framework, scholars will investigate using multiple sources and develop solutions to a complex problem or challenge.  This course includes academic reading and writing and delivery of oral and visual presentations.

Open to scholars in grade 9

SAT/ACT Prep

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed to teach the test-taking skills necessary to master college admission tests. Scholars will learn techniques, concepts, and question types that apply to the exam. Time will be spent during each class practicing test questions. This course is recommended for 11th grade scholars that plan to apply to 4 year colleges.

Open to scholars in grade 11

 

Service in the Community

1 semester / 0 credits

Service in the Community is an opportunity for juniors and seniors to give back to the East Hartford Community. During a block of time each week, a scholar who applies and is accepted for this position will be responsible for working with the community on or off campus. The director of the institution in which a scholar volunteers as well as the Internship and Community Service Coordinator will evaluate scholars.  Scholars will receive community service hours.  Applications for community service are posted on ctriveracademy.org and must be completed and returned to the Internship and Community Service Coordinator by the specified deadline.

Open to scholars in grades 10, 11 and 12

 

ENGLISH

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

English 9

English 10

or

English 10/ENG 099

English 11

or

English 11/ENG 099

or

ENG 101/102

English 12

or

English 12 and ENG 101/102

ENG 9 – Freshman English

1 year / 1 credit

During this yearlong course, scholars will read selections from the genres of the short story, non-fiction, poetry, drama, and the novel. They will also study vocabulary, composition, practical grammar, literature, and public speaking. Scholars will be responsible for writing in their online journals, completing projects in class, giving oral presentations, and participating in online and class discussions throughout the year. There will be many opportunities for critical thinking, cooperative learning, and technology-rich lessons.

Required for Grade 9

 

ENG 10 – Sophomore English

1 year / 1 credit

During this yearlong course, scholars will further enhance their skills in oral and written expression. Through discussion, the scholars will respond to literature by analyzing character motivation, making connections, and evaluating the text. The scholars will further develop their critical and independent thinking skills throughout the writing process. Forms of writing will include the literature based essay, analytical writing, and a research paper. Writing and vocabulary are integral parts of the curriculum.

Required for Grade 10

 

ENG 11 – Junior English

1 year / 1 credit

What does it mean to be an American? What are the dreams that unite, and separate us? How are those dreams influenced by the race, religion, sex, sexuality, and ethnic origins of an individual? In this full year course, scholars explore the American Dream as presented in literature from the 1900’s to the present day. Working collaboratively with the History department, this course is a critical examination of the social norms of the day and the impact those norms have on a diverse population. Juniors continue to develop and refine their skills of critical thinking and writing. Writing assignments include a formal research paper in addition to persuasive, comparative, and college application essays.

 

ENG 12 – Senior English 1

1 Semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed to help scholars examine what it means to be human. Reading selections will focus on short stories and novels that represent the perspectives of multiple cultures and the diversity of human experience while helping scholars understand the common aspects of the human experience. Regular written reflections on the reading, periodic analytical essays, and frequent structured discussion opportunities will expand scholars’ ability to think critically about what they read. Some choice will be incorporated in the selection of readings.

ENG 12 – Senior English 2

1 Semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed to help scholars become careful and critical readers of nonfiction. Emphasis will be placed on distinguishing bias, analyzing multiple points of view and perspectives, and composing both written and oral arguments about a variety of controversial issues.

ENGLISH ELECTIVES

Creative Writing                 

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course requires students to demonstrate an ability to write in a creative manner in a variety of literary formats that include the short story, drama, and poetry. Group reading of works in progress is expected and revision based on peer critique is required. Students analyze the writing of established writers to demonstrate their understanding of the creative process and learn to discover their own creative voices. Scholars will create a portfolio of work that demonstrates their growth as writers over the course of the semester.

Introduction to Theatre                   

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This foundational class, designed for scholars with little or no theatre experience, promotes enjoyment and appreciation for all aspects of theatre. Class work focuses on the exploration of theatre literature, performance, historical and cultural connections, and technical requirements. Improvisation, creative dramatics, and beginning scene work are used to introduce scholars to acting and character development. Incorporation of other art forms in theatre also helps scholars gain appreciation for other art forms, such as music, dance, and visual art.

ENGLISH PREP CLASSES FOR GOODWIN COLLEGE

ENG 088 - Foundations for College Reading and Writing at CTRA

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed to enhance students' competence in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in preparation for college-level assignments. Emphasis is on developing the cognitive strategies applicable to reading and writing as interactive processes. Students analyze a variety of readings through class discussions and written responses that focus on reading comprehension as well as on accurate sentence, paragraph and essay structure. The goal of this course is to provide enriched opportunities to improve reading comprehension, vocabulary, and fundamental writing skills for scholars interested in taking English 099 at CTRA followed by English 101 at Goodwin.

Prerequisite: Placement evaluation score, teacher recommendation

Note: Scholars must pass the final exam and earn a grade of 85 or better to take ENG 099.

ENG 099 - Reading/Writing Connection at CTRA

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This semester course for sophomores, juniors, and seniors builds on scholar’s reading, writing, and public speaking practices. Scholars complete a sequence of writing assignments developing the research, writing, and editing process. Scholars develop their public speaking skills with a series of speeches culminating with a final 6 minute presentation. Scholars who earn an 85 or higher can be recommended for Goodwin 101.

Prerequisite: A score of 3s and/or  4s in all categories on the Career and College Readiness Rubric, 85 or better in ENG 088,or  teacher recommendation

Note: Scholars must earn a grade of 85 or better as one of the criteria to take ENG 101.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

 

HEALTH

 

Health and Wellness (Core Course)

1 Semester / 0.5 credits

Health and Wellness is a half-year course that will concentrate on defining wellness and discovering how positive lifestyle choices affect a variety of health-related topics that challenge young adults now and in the future.  This course provides the foundational knowledge that will lead, support, and guide each scholar’s path to living a healthy balanced lifestyle.  Topics include: Wellness, Human Sexuality, HIV/Aids, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Decision Making, Alcohol, Tobacco, Drugs, Mental and Emotional Health, Body Image, Physical Health, Nutrition, and Sleep.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

Lifetime Physical Education Skills

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Combining self-knowledge with the recognition that individual actions and decisions affect physical, social, and cultural environments is required to become advocate for sustainable and just environments.

Physical activity is critical to the development and maintenance of good health.  The goal of physical education is to develop physically educated individuals who have the knowledge, skills, confidence and positive attitudes that are necessary to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity.

 

Individual/Team Sports (Core Course)

1 Semester / 0.5 credits

This is a half-year course that centers on an understanding of health and physical activity concepts and skills that are necessary to lead an active healthy life.  It is important that scholars learn the connection between positive physical activity choices and the result this will have on their health.  The goal of this course is to prepare scholars to lead an active and healthy lifestyle by providing them with physical activity skills, game concepts, and cooperative teamwork opportunities.  Scholars gain an understanding of “wellness” by forming connections between health and physical activity.  This course will help scholars better understand the positive impact physical activity has on the body.  Typical course activities may include: volleyball, team handball, and basketball

 

Lifetime Fitness

1 Semester / 0.5 credits

This class will consist of different styles of fitness and different fitness programs. This class is designed to provide students with a different look into fitness as opposed to our traditional PE classes which focuses on games. The goal is to provide students with options to generate interest in being physically active, that will hopefully stay with them in their lives. Some examples would be Yoga, Pilates, Tai chi, Kickboxing, Crossfit, Zumba, P90X, Insanity, and many more.

Game Tactics

Not offered in 2017-18

1 Semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed for those scholars who have an interest in increasing their skills and knowledge of games, especially non-traditional games.  Scholars will work to improve individual competence, analyze performance in self and others, and peer coach.  Scholars will identify the fundamental skills required in each game, work to create game strategies, and reflect on what and why certain strategies lead to success.

HEALTH & WELLNESS ELECTIVES

 

Personal Training

1 Semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed to give scholars the opportunity to learn fitness concepts and conditioning techniques used for obtaining optimal physical fitness. Scholars will benefit from comprehensive weight training and cardio respiratory endurance activities. Scholars will learn the basic fundamentals of strength training, aerobic training, yoga, anatomy, exercise science, and overall fitness training and conditioning programming. Course includes both class work and activity sessions. Scholars will be empowered to practice goal setting, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.  

 

MATHEMATICS

Algebra 1

1 year / 1 credit

This course emphasizes algebraic language, structure, concepts, and skills. The skills developed in this class will provide the mathematical foundation necessary to be successful in higher–level mathematics courses. Algebra uses variables to generalize and extend the laws of arithmetic. Major topics include: data representation, simplifying algebraic expressions, solving equations and inequalities, linear functions, and real-world applications of algebra.

 

Transition to Algebra

1 year / 2 credits

Transition to Algebra seeks to give scholars the mathematical knowledge, skills, and confidence to succeed in a first year Algebra class.  It is designed to build scholars algebraic habits of mind, key mathematical ways of thinking, aligned with the Common Core standards for mathematical practice.

Geometry

1 year / 1 credit

In this course, scholars will explore relationships between various types of figures and their properties. Throughout the course, inductive and deductive reasoning skills will be developed. Utilizing manipulatives and technology, scholars will explore and develop mathematical concepts to further geometric understanding. Major topics include: basics of geometry, segments and angles, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangle relationships, congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, similarity, polygons and area, surface area and volume, right triangle trigonometry, and circles.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1

 

Geometry Accelerated

1 year / 1 credit

This accelerated course is similar to Geometry with added depth.  The course moves at a faster pace and is intended for students who will likely pursue a mathematics or science-related career.  The Accelerated Geometry course provides a rigorous geometric foundation while incorporating algebra when possible.  This is intended for scholars who intend to take Pre/Calc and Calc.

Prerequisite:  85 or better in Algebra 1

Algebra 2

1 year / 1 credit

This course is designed to help scholars expand on their prior knowledge of Algebra I concepts and apply them to the real world. Scholars will engage in an in-depth exploration of functions and their graphs. Major topics include: systems of equations and inequalities, introduction to function families, and solving and graphing quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry

 

Algebra 2 Accelerated

1 year / 1 credit

This course is designed to help scholars expand on their prior knowledge of Algebra I concepts and apply them to the real world. Scholars in this course will explore algebra concepts in more depth in preparation for higher-level math courses such as pre-calculus and calculus.  Major topics include: systems of equations and inequalities, linear optimization, exploration of function families, quadratic functions, radical functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.

Prerequisite: 85 or better in Algebra 1 and Geometry

 

MATH ELECTIVES

 

Mathematics in Sports

Not Offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

In this course scholars will discover the roles of math in sports and games.  Some of the topics include statistics, data analysis, predictions, scoring/ranking, angles, time strategy, architecture, and infrastructure. Scholars will have many opportunities to present their findings and work with real -life examples as well as virtual representations.

Prerequisite: Algebra I

 

Mathematics of Finance 1

1 semester / 0.5 credits

The goal of this course is to help scholars use mathematics effectively in their daily lives and to become financially responsible members of society.  This course will give scholars the mathematical tools and resources needed to explore current and future financial decisions and evaluate the costs and benefits of decisions.  It will prepare scholars to make wise financial decisions and establish financial well-being.  Scholars will develop financial understanding and mathematical skills in such areas as money management and budgeting and will apply mathematical skills and formulas to solve real-life scenarios.

Open to scholars in grades 11 and 12

 

Mathematics of Finance 2

This course is continuation of Math in Finance 1 with the main goal of helping scholars understand the impact of individual choices on their long-term financial goals and future earnings potential. Scholars will explore the effective use of personal financial resources as a means to financial security.  The course will use scholars’ mathematical skills to explore a wide variety of financial concepts, such as financial institutions, investing options and benefits, the wise use of credit, securing housing, purchasing vehicles, insurance, income taxes and the consequences of mismanaged finances.

Open to scholars in grades 11 and 12

Statistics and Probability

1 year / 1 credit

This course is designed to introduce the basics of statistics and probability. Scholars will study probability rules, normal curves and distributions, standard deviation, linear regressions, correlations, and hypothesis testing. The course will also introduce methods to enable the scholar to interpret statistical data and evaluate their validity to justify conclusions made in everyday life.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 & Geometry

 

Trigonometry

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

In this course scholars will study the six trigonometric functions and their graphs. This course will review the meaning of “function” and approach trigonometry in two ways: through the unit circle and through right triangles. Technology will be used on a regular basis by incorporating the use of graphing calculators.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 & Geometry

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of Algebra 2

 

MUSIC

Chorus

1 year / 1 credit

This is an participation-based vocal group.  This course will cover advanced elements of choral performance as well as dance movement.  Elements of style, posture and breath support, tone quality and production, diction, vocal blend and ear training; will be taught through appropriate director chosen literature and technique/reading materials.  Scholars will perform in at least two annual concerts.

 

Electronic Music Lab

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed to introduce the scholars to the world of digital audio and MIDI computer recording. By using the tools of digital recording, the scholars will be able to create their own musical compositions and arrangements to produce their own audio CD archives to use for listening, websites, video, or any other application where music is used. This course will explore the electronic keyboard, MIDI and audio recording, music theory, notation, arranging, transposition, composition, music production, sound tracks, performance and copyrights.

 

Piano/Keyboard Lab

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

The purpose of this class is to introduce and develop keyboard skills from beginner to intermediate.  Each scholar may progress at their own speed, working individually and in groups. Included in this class will be the use of current electronic keyboards and electronic equipment in CTRA’s new midi lab. This class requires no previous experience.

Introduction to Guitar

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed to provide basic skills for beginning guitar students. Students will learn:

 

World Music Drumming

1 semester / 0.5 credits

World Music Drumming will be a hands-on, performance-based class exploring the traditions and techniques of drumming from cultures around the world.  No previous musical experience is necessary, as most of the material will be taught through the aural tradition, customary in other cultures.  All instruments and materials will be provided.

 

     

 

SCIENCE

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Environmental Science

Biology

Chemistry

 

Physics-Accelerated

or

Science in a Changing World

Environmental Science

Life Science / Lab Science

1 year / 1 credit

This course is designed to help scholars become more aware of the interactions between people and their environment and the resulting environmental challenges of today. The curriculum focuses on science concepts applied to real-life issues. The impact of environmental issues on the future lives of the scholars and local and global communities will be explored. The course will help scholars develop a respect for the necessity and sustainability of natural resources. The scholars will take advantage of local resources, such as the CT River, the school’s Goodwin Navigator research vessel, the Connecticut Science Center, and the CT Department of Environmental Protection.

Required for Grade 9 scholars

 

Introduction to Physical Science

Physical Science / Lab Science

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course is designed to prepare scholars for future success in chemistry and physics. Scholars explore the relationships between matter and energy by investigating force and motion, the structure of atoms, the structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions, and the interactions of energy and matter using scientific practices. Scholars will develop and use models, plan and conduct investigations, analyze and interpret data, use mathematical and computational thinking, and construct explanations and critiques.

Biology

Life Science / Lab Science

1 year /1 credit

This course will explore the study of life with a focus on the conditions and organisms within the CT River Academy and its watershed. It examines all aspects of life, from tiny cells that can only be seen with a microscope up to entire ecosystems with plants and animals. This course will encourage you to connect NGSS topics like cells, genetics, evolution and ecology and apply biological knowledge within your local community as well as globally.

Required for Grade 10 scholars

 

Chemistry

Physical Science/ Lab Science

1 year / 1 credit

This college prep laboratory course is an engaging look at how the elements shape the world around us.  We will study states and types of matter, atoms and elements, ionic and covalent bonding, chemical reactions and equations, and acids and bases.  These concepts will be re-enforced with laboratory investigations.

Open to scholars in grades 11 and 12

 Prerequisite - 75 or better in Algebra 1 or Chemistry teacher recommendation

 

Environmental Chemistry

Physical Science/ Lab Science

1 year / 1 credit

This is a college preparatory lab science course.  The course is a major step toward enhancing science literacy through a curriculum that emphasizes the impact of chemistry on the environment and society.  Units will center on environmental chemistry and the related human and technological issues that confront us.  The interdisciplinary nature and the everyday life contexts of this approach to teaching chemistry enhance science literacy and emphasize the impact of chemistry on society.  The knowledge gained from the course will better prepare scholars to actively and sustainably shape their future society.

 

Physics

Physical Science / Lab Science

1 year /1 credit

Physics is designed to give scholars an understanding and appreciation of the laws of physics and how they pertain to everyday life. The topics covered include motion, momentum and energy, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and light and sound. There will be numerous labs and projects that can relate the physics concepts learned to models and real-life situations.

Prerequisite 85 or better in Algebra 2 or teacher recommendation

 

Advanced Sustainability Research and Action

Physical Science / Lab Science

1 year /1 credit

Advanced Sustainability Research and Action prepares students to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills in the context of scientific investigations that have relevance in our community.  Course material, classroom activities, teaching/learning interactions, and projects focus on questions, authentic problems or challenges that need science knowledge and skills to address.  The course will provide students opportunities to:

SCIENCE ELECTIVES 

 

Agriculture, Aquaculture, and Animals

Life Science

1 semester/ 0.5 credit

This course will engage scholars in using and maintaining animal and plant life (both terrestrial and aquatic), in the CTRA habitat room, green roof, greenhouse and school gardens.  Extensive hands-on activities with a high level of independent responsibilities will be part of this course.  In each unit concepts needed for success in various careers will be taught, including the monitoring of plants and animals, handling and safety of animals and plants, and the use of computer-based monitoring technologies.

Open to scholars in grades 10, 11, 12

Agriculture, Aquaculture, and Animals 2

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester/ 0.5 credit

This course will build upon basic animal, agriculture, and aquaculture concepts to immerse scholars in a student designed leadership experience.  The two core components of this highly individualized course will include serving as a Lab Technician in the AAA 1 course and the design and implementation of an independent study project.  Students will also have the opportunity to complete industry certification programs.  Emphasis will be placed on real- life training and application of industry skills and technologies.

Open to 3 scholars per section in grades 10, 11, 12; prerequisite: B or higher in AAA and teacher recommendation

Climate and Society

Physical Science

1 semester / 0.5 credits

In this course, scholars will explore the concept of climate change, its affect on society, and how society contributes to climate change. Scholars will work with information from national and regional organizations to get the facts on climate change as well as explore current climate issues. As informed citizens, they will spread the news and educate others on how to slow down carbon emissions by taking actions in conserving our resources locally and throughout the world.

Engineering

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course gives scholars an introduction to engineering through a series of assignments, hands-on design projects, and guest presenters.  Scholars will learn about and use the design process to design, build, test, and redesign a variety of products.  Scholars will explore the areas of civil, mechanical, chemical,  biomedical, and computer/electrical engineering. They will also consider how engineering can improve the quality of our lives and of the environment in which we live.

Food Systems 1

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credit

Food systems are one of the hottest social science issues facing the world today.  Scholars will explore genetically modified organisms (GMO’s), sustainable farming and economics of food. In addition, the scholars will examine issues related to food quality and access. Scholars will engage in projects related to industrial food production and compare them to alternative approaches. They will experience hands-on activities that produce nutritious food using technologies such as aquaculture, hydroponics, greenhouses, and green-roof gardens.  This classroom and laboratory course will take an interdisciplinary approach to examine how food is connected to health, justice and the environment.

Introduction to Field Studies of the CT River

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credit

This course will introduce scholars to the basics of field studies. Basic scientific naming and identification of common plant, insect and bird species of the Connecticut River will be explored along with their impacts on the sustainability of the environment. Some fundamental procedures of data collection for use in citizen science based data collection will also be studied. This course requires regular participation in outdoor activities involving sample collection and analysis of various species surrounding the CTRA campus.

Forensics

Life Science / Lab Science

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Environmental forensics is designed to have scholars work in teams to solve crime scenarios using scientific knowledge and reasoning that are based on real events. This course will integrate all areas of science including biology, anatomy, chemistry, physics, and environmental science with an emphasis on complex reasoning and logic. In addition to applying forensic principles and skills to solve crimes against humans, scholars will also examine how these skills can be used to solve crimes against nature, such as poaching and environmental contamination. Scholars will incorporate the use of technology, communication skills, language arts, mathematics, and social studies.

Human Body Systems 1

Life Science

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Scholars will learn basic human anatomy and disorders for selected body systems (nervous system, blood, cardiovascular, respiratory and immune) in the context of potential medical careers.  They will be introduced to basic medical terminology by body system. They will also examine the educational requirements for various healthcare careers.  Scholars will investigate environmental factors and choices that impact personal and family health.  They will also have the opportunity to get CPR certified in an effort to increase trained responders within multiple communities.

Prerequisite- Concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of Biology

Open to scholars in grades 10, 11, 12

 

Human Body Systems 2

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credit

Scholars will learn basic human anatomy and disorders for selected body systems (skeletal, muscular, skin and body membrane, endocrine, and reproductive) in the context of potential medical careers.  They will be introduced to basic medical terminology by body system and educational requirements for various healthcare careers.  Scholars will also investigate environmental factors and choices that impact personal and family health.  They will also have the opportunity to get certified in First Aid in an effort to increase trained responders within multiple communities.

Prerequisite-Concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of Biology

Open to scholars in grades 10, 11 12

Marine Science

Life Science

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course focuses on specific marine ecosystems, including coastlines, estuaries, marshes, coral reefs, and the open ocean, culminating in a study of current events and the human footprint on our oceans. It combines a study of the biological, physical, and chemical aspects of the marine environments as well as the social forces that impact this shared resource.

 

Water Resources Stewardship

Physical Science

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Scholars will explore how humans interact with water on a daily basis, including personal consumption, manufacturing, and especially transportation and recreation. Scholars will learn the basics of boating safety, navigation, and water resources stewardship.

 

Wildlife Ecology

Life Science

1 semester/ 0.5 credit

This course features lessons and laboratory activities that explore the diversity and ecology of wildlife.  Topics include population and community ecology, wildlife biology, wildlife capture and monitoring, track identification, local wildlife identification and taxonomy, human conflicts, sustainable harvest, the effectiveness and purpose of national parks and national forest, invasive species and conservation biology.  Scholars will define problems and create an action plan to make a difference in future wildlife preservation issues.

Open to scholars in grades 10, 11, 12

SOCIAL STUDIES

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Geography and Global

Development

Civics and

Community Development

in the

CT River Region

US History

 

 

Geography and Global Development

1 year / 1 credit

The Geography and Global Development Curriculum has scholars use the Five Themes of Geography as a framework for regional case studies (i.e. CT River Region, Latin America, Europe, Middle East, Africa, and Asia). Scholars examine the history of each region studied as well as contemporary issues associated with the development of more sustainable societies. Throughout the course, scholars improve their spatial awareness, organization, writing, researching, and higher-order thinking skills while developing the habits of mind necessary for successful participation as a global citizen.  

Required for Grade 9 Scholars

 

Civics

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Scholars at the Connecticut River Academy will learn how to proactively participate in the political process in Civics, a state required course. Early units of study will help scholars understand the purpose of government and the functionality of American government. Civics at CTRA will challenge scholars to develop their own political perspectives on a variety of issues. The course will culminate with scholars creating a portfolio that showcases their understanding of civic engagement and responsibility. More specifically, scholars will identify and research an issue of civic importance, think critically about action steps, and participate in the democratic process by completing and evaluating their action plan.

Required for Grade 10 Scholars

 

Community Development in the Connecticut River Region

1 semester/ 0.5 credits

Students at the Connecticut River Academy have the unique opportunity to study history through the lens of the Connecticut River. The Community Development in the CT River Region curriculum is designed to utilize primary and secondary sources so that students will identify connections between local history and the development of our diverse nation through the late 1800s. Lessons in this course will develop critical thinking, listening, persuasive writing skills, and Habits of Mind. Students will apply their interdisciplinary study of the American identity through a variety of college-oriented assessments. The course culminates with an interdisciplinary benchmark assessment with English 10 where the students analyze the connections between The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the Gilded Age, and contemporary society.

Required for Grade 10 Scholars

 

United States History

1 year / 1 credit

This course will use inquiry to study the multicultural American identity from the turn of the 20th Century to present day. Scholars will use their historical thinking and Habits of Mind to evaluate divergent viewpoints of events and people in local and national history.  Scholars will apply college research and communication skills. Scholars will complete a comprehensive thesis paper as a major part of this course.

Required for Grade 11 Scholars

Intro to Psychology

1 semester / 0.5 credit

This course offers scholars at the Connecticut River Academy a unique opportunity to think flexibly about the workings of the mind and the behavior of people. Scholars will investigate brain functions and the evolution of their personalities and apply their findings to coping with the numerous changes in their lives.  Seniors at CTRA will walk away with an action plan of lifelong learning strategies that will help them achieve their diverse goals.   Furthermore, scholars will utilize their knowledge of altered states of consciousness and mental health to increase awareness of important psychological issues.  

Open to grade 12 scholars

Urban Studies

1 semester / 0.5 credit

By 2050, more than two-thirds of all people will live in nearly 400 urban areas. This massive movement of people is pushing our civilization to the limits.  It is also said that by the year 2043 whites will no longer make up the majority of society.  This may be new on the national level, but in many ways this has been true in urban areas for decades. This reality makes people ask, “Does the current urban America represent the “new normal” in our society?”  In this course we will apply Habits of Mind to study urban places, centers of power, oral histories, and social action - all of this while planning for life in the future.  This course will focus heavily on field experience.

Open to grade 12 scholars

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

American Ideals Through Film

1 semester / 0.5 credits

American Ideals through Film is a social studies course where students  will develop the skills necessary to become lifelong learners from what they see on the silver screen. . People from all over the world flock to theaters for entertainment purposes, but this course will help students leave with more than just popcorn kernels on their shirt. How do films show multiple perspectives  in America? Why is empathy, both historical and current, such an important skill to posses and how can watching a movie help develop it? How can we use film as the vehicle for discussing controversial issues? The class will look at movies created throughout American history in order to become experts these important skills..  This course will be much more than just watching movies with our feet up but instead we will begin to understand the power of film.

Deliberation

1 semester / 0.5 credit

The act of deliberating requires individuals to think about and discuss issues and decisions carefully.  Through this Deliberation course scholars will engage in classroom discussions about current issues impacting the United States. Scholars will research primary and secondary sources to gain a deeper understanding of contemporary matters and then apply their gained knowledge in a classroom deliberation on the topic.  Many of these topics will come directly from the list of agenda items being debated in Congress. Scholars will leave this semester course with an understanding of civic values and intellectual skills necessary for citizens in a democracy.   

Food Systems 1

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credit

Food systems are one of the hottest social science issues facing the world today.  Scholars will explore genetically modified organisms (GMO’s), sustainable farming and economics of food. In addition, the scholars will examine issues related to food quality and access. Scholars will engage in projects related to industrial food production and compare them to alternative approaches. They will experience hands-on activities that produce nutritious food using technologies such as aquaculture, hydroponics, greenhouses, and green-roof gardens.  This classroom and laboratory course will take an interdisciplinary approach to examine how food is connected to health, justice and the environment.

Gender Studies

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

We interact with men and women everyday but we typically do not discuss what these labels really mean. This course will delve deeply into how culture influences gender roles. We will study where and why discrimination against women still exists today while tackling stereotypes of today’s men. Topics to be discussed include but are not limited to double standards between men and women, sexist language in the entertainment industry, and the roots of body image issues. We will research the history of individuals, events, and movements that seek to improve gender equality.  

 

Global Perspectives 

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Global Perspectives will inform students of the various perspectives associated with current international issues while fostering empathy and tolerance.  Students will use technology to evaluate a variety of academic, popular, and personal media.  Students will research and organize information that pertains to significant economic, political, social, and environmental issues facing the international community. This course will actively engage students in opportunities that promote democratic dialogue.

Global Rise of Sport

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course will focus on the evolving role of Sports in American and Global Society. Students will examine the history of sports and its relationship with race, gender, economics & politics. Additional topics will include: pressures of sports from adolescence through college, supplement & drug abuse, violence in sports, and exploring sport-related careers. Students will also develop skills in historical research, analysis, and interpretation. Students will be expected to participate in a variety of activities including: weekly discussions about required reading and current events, research projects, and group activities.

 

Identity, Culture, and Community

1 semester / 0.5 credits

The purpose of this course is to promote awareness of local and global differences, to identify shared values, to improve the understanding of one’s own culture, and to encourage scholars to explore and honor differences.  Scholars in this course will develop habits of mind to go beneath surface meaning and first impressions in order gain a deep understanding of each other and the social context that makes up our environment.  Scholars will use the Circle of Courage to inquire about who they are and how they can break barriers, share power, and create a respectful community.  The discussions and projects in this course will help students voice their opinions, develop trust, and listen to each other with empathy.

Required for Grade 9 scholars

 

Leadership for Life

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Participation in Leadership for Life will strengthen scholars’ communication skills and self-confidence. Scholars will have multiple opportunities to reflect on their personal leadership skills and styles and explore how to achieve goals in any setting. Frequent guest speakers will model a variety of leadership styles and opportunities. Scholars will assist in arranging guest “leaders” related to their interests. Scholars will also evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of local, national, and international leaders. This course will help you live up to your leadership potential.

 

Social Justice

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Scholars will identify injustice in society at the local, national, and international level. Through research, course readings, and project completion, scholars will understand, recognize, and describe general characteristics of injustice and how unjust systems, including environmental and social injustices, are self-perpetuating. Participating scholars will develop solutions to injustices in society and discover how to implement those solutions in a productive manner. In addition to research, scholars will volunteer for local organizations whose missions are to level the playing field and/or support community building.

Open to scholars in grades 10, 11, 12

Sociology

Not offered in 2017-18

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course will examine the nature of human behavior as a product of the social world in which we live. Scholars will examine the “social” part of sociology, which gets beyond the individualistic and examines how individuals are interconnected.  Students will use the scientific method to create and test hypotheses in order to describe how society functions as a whole.  Students in this course will examine the values, groups, institutions, inequality and human interaction with the environment to develop their sociological imagination.

Open to scholars in grades 10, 11, 12

SUPPORT

College Study Group

1 semester / 0 credits

This time block offers scholars the opportunity to engage with course content and materials on a deeper level. Scholars will work in a structured environment focused on organizing materials, meeting with professors, and accessing other college-level resources to support their success in Goodwin College courses.

Required for Goodwin Year 1 scholars

 

Learning Center

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Learning Center is designed to help scholars build the necessary skills to be proficient in all academic classes. Scholars will learn study skills and fundamental skills used in all content classes. In addition scholars will have time for structured study and content class support.

 

Learning Lab

1 semester / 0 credits

Scholars will be placed in this class based on advisory teacher recommendation. This time block offers scholars the opportunity to strengthen their study skills and complete assignments with assistance and prepare for academic assessments. Focus will be on organization skills, and planning ahead on assignments and keeping an updated calendar. Scholars will be expected to work on materials that support success in their course work.

 

Math Lab

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Scholars are identified and placed in this course based on standardized test scores and/or performance in previous math courses. The class is intended to prepare scholars for success by reinforcing concepts and skills needed in high school mathematics. Instruction will include pre-assessing, pre-teaching, re-teaching, and reinforcing math skills and concepts. Scholars will also develop and self-regulate personal study and organizational skills imperative for academic success.

 

 Strategic Reading

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Scholars are identified for this course through a review of academic history, standardized test performance, and teacher recommendations. This course uses whole language to develop college readiness in the areas of reading and writing. Emphasis will be placed on increasing vocabulary, developing comprehension skills, utilizing critical reading strategies, improving grammar, and applying outlining and note-taking skills while reading.

TECHNOLOGY

  

Foundations of Technology

1 semester / 0.5 credits

This course provides the foundation for students to understand and apply technological concepts and processes. Group and individual activities engage students in creating ideas, developing innovations, and engineering practical solutions. Technology content, resources, and laboratory activities encourage student applications The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society.

Required for Grade 9 scholars

 

Introduction to Engineering Graphics

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Ever wondered what goes into designing something? How does an idea become reality? In Engineering Graphics scholars explore the world of Computer-Aided Drawing and Design (CADD) to see how a product goes from a concept to a reality. No artistic skill needed to learn industry standard software (AutoCAD Suite and Solidworks) to create 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional designs and models that can be turned into real world products using 3D printers, laser cutters, vinyl cutters and CNC machinery.

 

Introduction to Manufacturing Technology

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Do you like to “make” things? Take a Do It Yourself (DIY) approach to creating everyday products using a variety of materials (wood, metal, plastic, textiles, electronics) to explore the world of manufacturing and what it takes to create products. Scholars explore manufacturing and advanced manufacturing with an emphasis in safety, systems and processes, and career paths.

 

Introduction to Electronics

1 semester / 0.5 credits

Would you like to know more about the “digital world”? This introductory course is designed to teach scholars the basics of electronic devices and methods used in circuit design. Scholars will learn foundational concepts and skills and progress to working with simple controller units like the Arduino and Raspberry Pi platforms to design and create projects.

WORLD LANGUAGE

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Spanish 1

or

Spanish 2

Spanish 2

or

Spanish 3

Spanish 3

or

Spanish 4

Spanish 4

Spanish 1

1 year / 1 credit

This course is designed as an introduction to the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures. Students will practice speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a cultural context. Scholars will identify and utilize new vocabulary words and acquire basic grammatical concepts.

 

Spanish 2

1 year / 1 credit

This course is designed to further develop the language skills acquired in Spanish I.  Scholars will review basic grammatical concepts and be required to demonstrate understanding of new intermediate level concepts. Students will study various aspects of Hispanic cultures around the world.

Prerequisite: 70 or better in Spanish 1

 

Spanish 3

1 year / 1 credit

This course continues to develop language functions learned and emphasizes fluency in speaking, reading, writing and listening at an intermediate high level. Throughout the year, scholars will continue to acquire intermediate concepts.  Vocabulary and grammar appropriate to this level of study is presented in Spanish and developed through the use of authentic listening exercises on a variety of cultural themes.

Prerequisite: 70 or better in Spanish 2

 

Spanish 4

1 year / 1 credit

This course is a continuation of Spanish 3, and is designed for language scholars who are interested in going beyond the mere college requirement. Scholars who have demonstrated excellence in previous Spanish courses should highly consider taking this course. The course aims at developing the ability of the scholar to function effectively and to discuss a variety of topics in Spanish.  Habits of Mind, like persistence and taking responsible risks, are extremely important for this course.

Prerequisite: 80 or better in Spanish 3

 

Spanish 4 for Native Speakers

1 year / 1 credit

This course is designed for scholars who consider themselves bilingual. Because speaking is a strength for bilingual scholars, this course has a heavy focus on reading and writing strategies. Themes of each unit include, but are not limited to, a variety of Spanish-speaking countries, college/career-readiness and environmental studies.

Prerequisite: 80 or better in Spanish 3 and Spanish 4 teacher recommendation