Lesson Plan using Google Maps

*** Optional: Here is a link to travel quotes and photos for a great way to introduce the lesson if you want: http://www.roughguides.com/gallery/50-inspirational-travel-quotes/#/1

Title of the Lesson:

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words, but a Map is More than Muse

Grade Level: 8th grade and adaptable

Length of Lesson: 2 hours, scaffolded over two class days, plus schedule in extra time depending on your assessment of your individual classes.

Overview of lesson: Students will create a Google map using 4 pins of what they did over the summer vacation and anecdote with a short narrative of each pin. Assignment can be adapted to what they wanted to do over the summer and were not able to.

Essential Learning Outcome Questions: Students will be able to annotate a Google Map using technology to write a map story of what they did over the summer.  Students can choose to write a narrative essay if they choose to embellish the detail.

NC Common Core Standards Being Addressed:

8th grade Language Arts

3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and show the relationships among experiences and events.

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences

or events.

Students are expected to apply the narrative plot structure to a real or imagined story. Students’ writing should demonstrate their ability to create a context or setting for the story, naturally develop characters throughout the story, and apply writing techniques to interest their readers.

Work like this might include students developing a personal narrative focused around a significant moment in their life. As students build their story, they may choose to use a variety of brainstorming maps, such as character maps and plot maps, to ensure their writing is well-organized. Instruction may focus on how to reveal character traits, how to create suspense or conflict, and how to weave in reflection that links back to the central meaning or theme.

Materials Needed: Google Maps, computers, digital images, projection screen

How the Lesson Will Flow:

Ask students to create a list of places they went over their summer vacation on a piece of paper. Students can also create a list of where they wish they had gone, but were not able to go.

Have students pick four places they want to pin on a Google Map.  This lesson can be differentiated for students with disabilities by allowing them to choose 1 or 2 instead of 4. For students who need for challenge, those students can create individual maps for each place they went and anecdote their pin through a story sequence. For example, an AIG student may have gone to Disneyworld over the summer vacation and they could create a Google map pinning each particular ride they went on and they can anecdote the particular ride as if narrating a story.

Show students a sample Google Map with photos embedded with each pin and a narration of each pin (see assignment 12 in syllabus for Writing and Technology Integration University Class— Annotated Map for an example).

Take students through the steps visually of creating a Google Map.  Give students hand-outs of directions (see written hand-out and YouTube tutorial.

For differentiated instruction for students with disabilities, allow them to watch the YouTube video multiple times or have a student partner reteach the written directions.

Have student complete various enrichment assignments (see assessment section for further explanation). AIG challenge: — have students write their own set of directions and/or create a video of “student speak” on how to complete a Google Map. Also students can create a “cheat sheet” list as a challenge too.  Another idea — is to have students — have write their own set of directions and/or create a video of “student speak” on how to complete a Google Map. Also students can create a “cheat sheet” list as a challenge too.

Assessment: 

Teacher observation, completed Google Maps with assigned number of pins, reteaching other students, AIG challenge: — have students write their own set of directions and/or create a video of “student speak” on how to complete a Google Map. Also students can create a “cheat sheet” list as a challenge too.  Another idea is to have students who need to beIG challenge: — have students write their own set of directions and/or create a video of “student speak” on how to complete a Google Map.

Sources for the Lesson:

Kevin Oliver’s YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhdj3gFyXyQ&index=15&list=PLEbgXzCwfYcf1I8lLjScRZR-xDOv

Kevin Oliver’s written hand-out on Google Maps (see hand-outs on class Weebly website)

University of Surrey Writing and Technology Integration class, 2014

Google Maps

Travel photos and quotes: http://www.roughguides.com/gallery/50-inspirational-travel-quotes/#/1