12th Grade DP Year TWO Mrs. MacFarland’s Course Overview

Language A: literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of language.

LANGUAGE A: LITERATURE AIMS

  • Introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles, and genres
  • Develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections
  • Develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication
  • Encourage students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received
  • Encourage, through the study of texts, an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning
  • Encourage students to appreciate the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts
  • Promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature.
  • Develop in students an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism
  • Develop the students’ ability to form independent literary judgments and to support those ideas.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES

There are three assessment objectives for the language A: literature course.

  1. Knowledge and understanding
  1. Analysis, synthesis and evaluation
  1. Selection and use of appropriate presentation and language skills

IB ASSESSMENTS

Year One-11th Grade

  • Individual Oral Presentation (assessed in December) 15%  internal assessment
  • Written Assignment (completed in May) 25% external assessment  (includes a reflective statement)

Year Two-12th Grade

  • Individual Oral Commentary on Poetry and Discussion of Literature from Part II - 20 minutes 15% (late January) internally assessed, but moderated by IB
  • Paper 1: Literary Commentary (2 hrs) in May 20% externally assessed
  • Paper 2: Comparative Analysis Essay (2 hrs) in May 25% externally assessed

The following book summaries are  from http://www.google.com/googlebooks/about/ in italic except for Hamlet, which was a summary by Mrs. MacFarland.

PART TWO: DETAILED STUDY (POETRY, NOVEL, PROSE OTHER THAN FICTION)

Selected poetry by the teacher will include work from Pablo Neruda (Spanish), Langston Hughes (American), and Margaret Atwood (Canadian).

Great Gatbsy by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Novel)

The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922. The story primarily concerns the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and his quixotic passion for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan. Considered to be Fitzgerald's magnum opus, The Great Gatsby explores themes of decadence, idealism, resistance to change, social upheaval, and excess, creating a portrait of the Jazz Age that has been described as a cautionary tale regarding the American Dream.

The Heart of a Woman by Maya Angelou (Memoir)

Maya Angelou's seven volumes of autobiography are a testament to the talents and resilience of this extraordinary writer. Loving the world, she also knows its cruelty. As a black woman she has known discrimination and extreme poverty, but also hope, joy, achievement and celebration. The fourth volume of her enthralling autobiography finds Maya Angelou immersed in the world of black writers and artists in Harlem, working in the civil rights movement with Martin Luther King.

PART THREE: LITERARY GENRE OF DRAMA

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare explores topics of revenge, madness, and loyalty in Hamlet. Young Prince Hamlet is summoned from school in Germany back home to Denmark to learn of his father’s death, and his mother’s quick decision to marry his uncle.  When he learns from his father’s ghost that it was his uncle who murdered his father, he realizes he must avenge his father’s death in his honor. However, many trials and conflicts result in a tragic end with many deaths to follow through with his vengence.

The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

Subtitled “A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,” Wilde’s play is a brilliantly satirical comedy of manners, sending up the absurdity of Victorian social mores and cleverly critiquing the conventions of love and marriage. The tale of two gentlemen who adopt fictitious identities in order to woo the objects of their affections is Wilde’s most beloved work, considered to be one of the wittiest plays ever written in English. The glowing critical reception in London on opening night at the St. James Theater in 1895 marked the high point of Wilde’s career as a writer.

Master Harold and the Boys by Athol Fugard

This play about a young white boy and two African servants is at once a compelling drama of South African apartheid and a universal coming-of-age story.  Originally produced in 1982, it is now an acknowledged classic of the stage, whose themes of injustice, racism, friendship, and reconciliation traverse borders and time.

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

The Glass Menagerie, Tennessee Williams' first great popular success and an autobiographical play about his mother and sister, launched the brilliant and controversial career of this ground-breaking American playwright. Set in St Louis during the depression era of the 1930s, it is the poignant drama of a family's gradual disintegration, under pressure both from outside and within. A frustrated mother persuades her rebellious son to provide a 'gentleman caller' for her shy, crippled daughter, but her romantic dreams are shattered by the intervention of harsh reality. This edition provides the author's preferred text, available for the first time in the United Kingdom, and includes Williams' essay on the impact of sudden fame on a struggling writer, 'The Catastrophe of Success', as well as a short section of Williams' own production notes.

12th GRADE DP LITERATURE YEAR TWO COURSE OVERVIEW

PART TWO: DETAILED STUDY

Multi Genre: Creative nonfiction, poetry, novel

FALL SEMESTER

In part 2, the focus is on detailed analysis of a work, both in terms of content and technique. The detailed study is best achieved through approaches that ensure close reading and in-depth analysis of the significant elements of the works involved. This part of the syllabus will be assessed both orally and in writing. Students are assessed with 1) ORAL COMMENTARY in January (15% of their grade in the course), 2) PAPER ONE Written Commentary in May of 12th grade year. This paper is worth 20% of their grade in the course.

PART THREE: GENRE STUDY

DRAMA

SPRING SEMESTER

In part 3, a group of works selected from the same literary genre is studied in depth. Each genre has recognizable techniques, referred to as literary conventions, and writers use these conventions, along with other literary features, in order to achieve particular artistic ends. The grouping of works by genre is intended to provide a framework for the comparative study of the selected works through an exploration of the literary conventions and features associated with that genre. Mrs. MacFarland has chosen DRAMA as her literary genre with a range of works that span time and geography. Students are assessed externally through PAPER TWO, a Comparative Literature essay of two or more works in this part in May of their 12th grade year. This paper is worth 25% of their grade in the course.

Unit  Title & Length

Weeks

 Pablo Neruda (POETRY)

2 weeks

Langston Hughes  (POETRY) & Great Gatsby (NOVEL)

5 weeks

Maya Angelou (POETRY)  and Heart of a Woman (MEMOIR)

6 weeks

Margaret Atwood (POETRY)

5 weeks

Hamlet

4 weeks

The Importance of Being Earnest

3 weeks

Master Harold and the Boys

3 weeks

Glass Menagerie

3 weeks

Essential Understandings

By analyzing poetry, students will appreciate the effectiveness of a poet's style in developing the meaning of a work.

By encouraging students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received in Great Gatsby, students can appreciate the formal, stylistic, and aesthetic qualities of texts.

By reading Angelou’s memoir, students will gain an understanding of both personal and cultural responses to a time period as well as universal challenges of life during the civil rights movement. They will recognize how particular rhetorical effects are achieved through language use, and analyze elements such as character, theme and setting.

By analyzing a Canadian poet, students will explore a variety of themes and acquire detailed knowledge and understanding of the works studied as well as stylistic and aesthetic qualities of the author in order to produce an oral and written commentary.

By analyzing Hamlet,  students will analyze how an author crafts a drama through characterization, stagecraft, plot development, etc. to develop universal themes.

By closely reading The Importance of Being Earnest and examining the historical context and culture of the Victorian era, students will gain an appreciation for this humorous farce. Students will analyze the dramatic conventions of the play such as form, action, and structure, dialogue, characters, and stagecraft.

By closely reading The Glass Menagerie and examining symbolic diction and purposeful stagecraft, students will gain an appreciation for this reflective, introspective plot. Students will analyze the dramatic conventions of the play such as form, action, and structure, dialogue, characters, and stagecraft.

By closely reading Master Harold and the Boys and examining the symbolic diction and purposeful stagecraft, students will gain an appreciation for this critical perspective of the time period during Apartheid. Students will analyze the dramatic conventions of the play such as form, action, and structure, dialogue, characters, and stagecraft.

Inquiry Questions

Factual: What are specific ways that poets manipulate language? Conceptual: How does a poet craft a poem for a desired effect through structure, word choice, elements of poetry, tone, theme, and sound?

Debatable: What aspects of style do you find more effective than others?

Factual: What evidence do we see of the life of the 20s in The Great Gatsby?

Conceptual: How do authors reflect cultural perceptions through language?

Debatable: To what extent can aesthetic language criticize society’s flaws and how does this medium impact the way it is received?

Factual: What are conventions of a memoir?

Conceptual: How do authors use literary conventions effectively to convey a point?

Debatable: How does the understanding of time and place influence the understanding of a text and our knowledge of the truth?

Factual: What are specific ways that poets can manipulate language?

 Conceptual: How does a poet craft a poem for a desired effect through structure, word choice, elements of poetry, tone, theme, and sound? Debatable: How does language capture a perception of reality?

Factual: What are the conventions of drama?

Conceptual: How do the conventions of drama contribute to meaning?

Debateable: How do characters seek justice for the wrongs against their family?

Factual: What are dramatic conventions?

Conceptual: How do dramatic conventions shape the meaning of a text? How does language influence characterization, plot, and themes?

Debatable: What is the proper function of literature? How can literature be used to expose flaws in society?

Factual: What are dramatic conventions?

Conceptual: How do dramatic conventions shape the meaning of a text? How does language influence characterization, plot, and themes?

Debatable:What knowledge of literature can be gained by focusing attention on its social, cultural or historical context?

Factual: What are dramatic conventions?

 Conceptual: How do dramatic conventions shape the meaning of a text? How does language influence characterization, plot, and themes? Debatable:Can literature express truths that cannot be expressed in other ways? If so, what sort of truths are these?

Teaching & Learning

Students will know:

  • How a literary structure impacts the reading of the plot
  • How word choice impacts the meaning of the text and tone conveyed
  • How elements of prose such as irony, symbolism, figurative language, etc. are used to enhance the characters, conflicts, and themes.
  • How the point of view plays a role in providing perspective into the characters and conflicts
  • How time and place play a role in how a text is read
  • How themes are developed through language

Students will be able to:

  • Acquire detailed knowledge and understanding of the works studied
  • Demonstrate appropriate analytical responses to specific genres
  • Show how particular effects are achieved through language use, and analyse elements such as character, theme, and setting
  • Engage with the details of works in order to develop a considered and informed response.

Students will know:

  • How the plot structure impacts characterization, conflict, and themes
  • How word choice impacts the way characters and conflicts are perceived
  • how dramatic elements are used to enhance the meaning (e.g. foil, dramatic irony, comic relief, tragic hero,symbolism,recurring motif, tragic hero and tragic flaw, protagonist/antagonist, stock characters, stereotypes, motivation, hamartia (fatal flaw), hubris (pride), caricature, etc.)
  • How techniques of dialogue (e.g. monologue, asides, dialogue, soliloquies) reveal motivations and conflicts
  • How tone shifts reveal underlying tensions
  • How setting impacts the plot and themes

Students will be able to:

  • Acquire knowledge and understanding of the works studied
  • Acquire a clear sense of the literary conventions of the selected genre
  • Understand the ways in which content is delivered through the literary conventions of the selected genre
  • Compare the similarities and differences between the chosen works.