DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS STUDENT HANDBOOK
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1: DMA Class Policies & Standards

Item 1.1: Our Mission

Item 1.2: Mutual Expectations

Item 1.3: DMA Core Values

Value #1 – BE PREPARED

Value #2 – BE RESPECTFUL

Value #3 – BE RESPONSIBLE

Value #4 – BE PRODUCTIVE

Item 1.4: Campus-wide Rules of Behavior

Item 1.5: Consequences of Referrals

Item 1.6: Leaving the Classroom

Item 1.7: Excused Early

Item 1.8: Visiting other Classrooms

Item 1.9: Personal Appearance

Item 1.10: Personal Belongings

Part 2: Studio & Computer Lab Procedures

Item 2.1: Borrowing Classroom Items

Item 2.2: Safety, Injury or Medical Emergency

Item 2.3: Studio Use & Scheduling

Item 2.4: “Ask 3-Then-Me” Problem Solving

Item 2.5: Food & Beverages

Item 2.6: Computer Files

Item 2.7: Printing & Use of Materials and Equipment

Item 2.8: Start-of-class Procedures:

Item 2.9: End of Class Procedures:

Item 2.10: Acceptable Cell Phone & Texting Policy

Item 2.11: Acceptable Computer Use Agreement

Part 3: Grading & Attendance Policies

Item 3.1: Grade Components

Item 3.2: Grade Reports

Item 3.3: Marking Period & Progress Report Dates

Item 3.4: Test / Quiz Policy

Item 3.5: Attendance & Calling-In

Item 3.6: Work Skills Employability Profile


Part 4: Instructional Methods

Item 4.1: Inquiry & Project Based Learning

Item 4.2 Content Knowledge & Mastery

Item 4.3 Genius Hour -

Item 4.4 How Genius Hour Works

Item 4.5 Field Trips

Part 5: Student Honors & Recognition

Item 5.1: CERTIFICATIONS:  Adobe® Certified Associate

Item 5.2: Regents CTE Endorsement

Item 5.3: GST BOCES Profiles & Certificates

Item 5.4: National Technical Honor Society

Item 5.5: Work-Based Cooperative Internships

Item 5.6: Wildwood Honor Roll

Item 5.7: NYS CDOS Commencement Credential

Item 5.8 Wildwood Student of the Month / Year

Item 5.9 DMA Graduation Awards

Part 6: Skills USA Student Organization

Item 6.1: What is SkillsUSA?

Item 6.2: SkillsUSA Championships

Item 6.3: SkillsUSA Western NY Regional Area 1

Item 6.4: SkillsUSA New York State

Item 6.5: SkillsUSA Nationals

Item 6.6: SkillsUSA Framework and Programs

Item 6.7: SkillsUSA Local Wildwood Chapter

Item 6.8: SkillsUSA Membership Dues

Part 7: DMA Student Activities Club Constitution

Item 7.1: Name

Item 7.2: Club Purposes

Item 7.3: Club Membership

Item 7.4: The Leadership Team & Officers

Item 7.5: Leadership Appointments

Item 7.6: Leadership Roles

Item 7.7: Club Advisor

Item 7.8: Club Finances


Part 8: Our “Gamified” Classroom

Item 8.1:  Educational Benefits of Gamification

Item 8.2: Game Mechanics

Item 8.3: Points

Item 8.4: Teamwork

Item 8.5: Game Strategy

Item 8.6: Levels Chart

Item 8.7: Incentives & Rewards

Appendix: A - Supply List

Appendix: B - Locker Instructions

Appendix: C - Computer Accounts and Logins

Appendix: D - Class FORM MASTERS

Appendix: E - COURSE CURRICULUM OUTLINES

INTEGRATED ELA CREDIT

TWO YEAR - CTE CORE CURRICULUM

ONE YEAR OPTION

DMA PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE [P]

DMA GRAPHIC DESIGN COURSE [D]

DMA MEDIA PRODUCTION COURSE [M]

DMA 3D DESIGN & ANIMATION COURSE  [A]

DMA FOUNDATION SKILLS COURSE [F]

POST PRODUCTION CORE TECHNICAL SKILLS [S]

Wildwood School Calendar

Wildwood Campus Map



Part 1: DMA Class Policies & Standards


Item 1.1: Our Mission

The mission of this CTE program is to prepare our students with the technical skills, workplace skills and personal skills needed to succeed in twenty-first century digital careers by fostering excellence in creative problem solving, work ethic and social skills. These skills are highly valued by employers in ANY career field, not just those in the career area of Digital Media Arts.  

Item 1.2: Mutual Expectations

As your teacher, I expect you to do your part to maintain a class environment of respect, and civility. This includes being on time, staying seated during direct instruction, refraining from distractions, non-class computer use, or other disruptive behaviors. You have the right to be treated with respect by me and your classmates, and an obligation to respect others even when you disagree with their views. I have a right and responsibility to protect the learning environment of this classroom so that all students have an opportunity to achieve the mission for a quality education in this field.   Always remember that taking DMA is a choice, you choose to be here because of a keen interest or passion for this career field and a desire to develop your skills and abilities in the area of visual communications.

VALUES

In support of our class mission, we have developed the following values or standards every student will be held accountable for, and be expected to develop as part of their own intrinsic values.  

As students learn to adopt these values as their own, and they become a habit,  the chance of success in this course, in college and in a future career are greatly enhanced.  

These values integrate the GST BOCES core values of Service, Collaboration, Integrity and Leadership as well as the SkillsUSA Framework for career readiness.  In the chart below, for each value, there are examples of how the value is consistently applied in our classroom.

Students are held accountable to these values through the daily Workplace Performance grade that is detailed in “Item 4.1: Grade Components”


Item 1.3: DMA Core Values

Listed below are our four core workplace values with examples of how they might be demonstrated in our classroom.

Value #1 – BE PREPARED

Value #2 – BE RESPECTFUL                                                          

Value #3 – BE RESPONSIBLE        

Value #4 – BE PRODUCTIVE


Item 1.4: Campus-wide Rules of Behavior

For the following serious offenses of campus-wide rules, students will be immediately referred to the campus administrator and/or school resource officer.

Item 1.5: Consequences of Referrals

Students should be aware that ANY discipline issues or referrals will have a negative impact on . . .

Item 1.6: Leaving the Classroom

Students leave the classroom for various reasons, including pull out classes, to meet with support staff, to take pictures or interview people elsewhere on campus or to be dismissed early for appointments.

BEFORE LEAVING the class, there are two steps for students; 

(1) always ask the instructor for permission, and

(2) sign out on the log sheet.

Item 1.7: Excused Early

Students that need to be excused early for an appointment or other reasons, must bring a note signed by a parent or guardian.


Item 1.8: Visiting other Classrooms

At times, students from our class need to visit other classes or offices on campus for various reasons such as taking pictures or interviewing staff or students. Students are expected to be respectful and professional.

Item 1.9: Personal Appearance

Our course is preparing students for careers in the professional business field. Training includes an appropriate personal appearance for various career settings such as customer presentations, business meetings, interviews, competitions and field trips. There will be a requirement that students demonstrate appropriate dress and personal grooming for these occasions.


Classroom & Studio Dress Code:

Item 1.10: Personal Belongings

We do provide lockers for your personal belongings. However, if you bring money, jewelry, personal electronics or other valuable items that could be lost or stolen, you do so at your own risk.


You are not allowed to use personal electronic devices including game devices, music players and phones during class since they are a distraction to learning and productivity (see our core values.)

Each locker is wired with a USB charging outlet so that you are able to charge your electronic devices while they are stored in there.  



Part 2: Studio & Computer Lab Procedures


Item 2.1: Borrowing Classroom Items

For class related work certain books, software, materials and equipment including cameras and laptop computers may be borrowed.   Borrowing is a privilege extended ONLY to students who have consistently demonstrated in class that they are responsible, respectful and trustworthy.  Availability of items is determined by the instructor based on classroom needs and prior student requests.  Don’t assume you can check out a laptop computer when you have not used your time productively in class.

Failure to observe the following guidelines will result in loss of future borrowing privileges.

Item 2.2: Safety, Injury or Medical Emergency

No student will use supplies or operate ANY equipment without prior training and instructor’s permission. Safety procedures are to be followed at all times. Students should be familiar with equipment manuals and MSDS documents for any chemical products used.   Follow instructions when using cutting tools such as exacto knives to avoid injury.   The best way to avoid an accidents is follow instructions and no horsing around.

Let your teacher know immediately if you or a fellow student has an accident, is injured or has any other medical need.  We have CPR and first aid supplies, ice packs, and an emergency eye wash station located in our classroom kitchen area.  We also have an AED cardiac defibrillator located just outside our classroom door.    Our campus also has a nurse on duty should further medical attention be required.  


Item 2.3: Studio Use & Scheduling

Our production and recording studios feature the latest in professional equipment and software for photography, video and audio recording projects.  They enable students to explore advanced independent learning projects, and serves to enhance their experience in DMA and to help clarify future career directions.   We encourage students to take time to experiment and try out ideas with their own projects.

However, since these studio resources have a limited availability, this studio use and scheduling policy provides opportunities to as many students as possible.   The following are guidelines for reserving studio time in advance, understanding there may be occasions when schedule changes are needed to meet deadlines and special patron projects.  The teacher will reserve slots on the studio calendar in a way that is as fair as possible to those students requesting time.


At the discretion of the instructor, DMA Alumni may be allowed studio time for personal or paid projects that can be incorporated into the current instructional program and provide authentic experience for our students.   In these situations, the class would appreciate a small donation to the DMA Student Activities fund.


Item 2.4: “Ask 3-Then-Me” Problem Solving

Our computer lab is a cooperative learning environment. While the instructor works with individual students or groups, others are encouraged to help each other answer questions and solve problems. Students can enhance their learning experience by helping each other. Educational research suggests that a student helping tutor another student will actually retain more himself from having to explain a concept or procedure.

Also, students who consistently demonstrate cooperative teamwork and collaboration will be more prepared for the world of work, where it’s expected that you don’t go to the boss to solve every problem but instead use resources and problem solving strategies.

ASK 3-THEN-ME PROBLEM SOLVING MODEL promotes collaboration and cooperation. If when working on a tutorial or project you meet an obstacle or problem, you first should always seek a solution from THREE sources before asking an instructor.   Resources can include;

Item 2.5: Food & Beverages

Crumbs, grease and liquids are not a good mix with computer keyboards and mice.  Therefore out of respect (rule #1) for the other users of your workstation, NO Food, snacks, soda or juice are allowed in the computer lab workstation area. Water bottles with sealed tops may be used in the lab.

Food and beverages are only consumed in areas designated by the instructor (the classroom tables). Scraps, cans and bottles must be disposed of properly and tables cleaned when finished.   Failure to observe these guidelines will result in loss of the privilege for the entire class.   You probably don’t want to be the one that is responsible for that happening!


Item 2.6: Computer Files

When working on the computer develop the following habit...

SAVE YOUR WORK AT LEAST EVERY 15 MINUTES!  Adobe programs do not save automatically.


Item 2.7: Printing & Use of Materials and Equipment

Supplies and equipment are made available by taxpayer provision, and thus are to be used exclusively for educational purposes.


Item 2.8: Start-of-class Procedures:

DAILY “TEAM MEETING”
In many business organizations, the day starts with a staff meeting.

Get READY BEFORE the bell rings…

DURING CLASS “INSTRUCTIONAL TIMES” 
(i.e. group work, discussions, demonstrations, critiques, direct instruction, lessons, etc) …


Item 2.9: End of Class Procedures:

We all share the DMA facilities, and everyone enjoys working in a clean and orderly work area so that important things are not lost or misplaced, and you don’t feel like they are working in a pig pen!  To do this, it takes a community effort!   Don’t fall into the trap of “it’s not my mess,” we are a team, and you’re expected to pitch in to help even if you didn’t make the mess.

10 Minutes prior to the ending bell STOP YOUR WORK on projects and attend to these tasks:

Once cleanup has been completed, you should return to your computer workstation.

AFTER THE BELL:


Item 2.10: Acceptable Cell Phone & Texting Policy

We recognize the growing impact of cell phones and smartphones in today’s professional environment.  It is obvious that portable devices are the platform for content creation and distribution for the Digital Media Artist.  

In a professional business setting, in school, and in a college classroom, there are standards of "etiquette" that limit use of a these devices in public, out of consideration for others.  Standards of conduct in a meeting or conference are not unlike the expectations in a learning classroom.

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT:

Much research demonstrates that student learning is negatively impacted by distractions. Cognitive and behavioral scientists have found that electronic devices can erode ability to focus and concentrate. (see this article: Age of Distraction: Why It's Crucial for Students to Learn to Focus)  Notably, the ability to focus is highly correlated with educational and occupational success. In addition, many students report feeling addicted to their cell phones. Consider this class to be an oasis from your device.

WHEN IT’S OK TO USE YOUR PHONE:

We recognize that in a collaborative, project based program such as ours there are occasions when texting or use of a device is appropriate within the learning objectives of the classroom.  These may include;

WHEN IT’S NOT OK TO USE YOUR PHONE:

CELL PHONE HOTEL:  

We have provided lockers with phone charging cables for you to store your phone when you arrive in class.  Each day when you arrive, please make sure your device is off or on silent and check it into the hotel.  When class is over, you phone will be rested, and energized all ready for your bus ride back home.

UNFORTUNATE CONSEQUENCES

Disregarding this policy demonstrates lack of respect for the learning environment in our class.  You will get one warning, after which the instructor may collect your phone for the remainder of the period. Lack of continued cooperation will result in a discipline referral to campus administration and your phone will need to be picked up by your parent.   There will be an impact on your workplace performance grade as well.

PRIVACY

You should know that taking photos, videos, or audio recordings of fellow students or instructors without their knowledge is a violation of privacy laws and not permitted in our class.  Serious consequences and a disipline referral to administration will be the result.


Item 2.11: Acceptable Computer Use Agreement

Students are expected to learn the self-discipline and the work ethic that is required to be successful in a computer related career such as this. In the world of creative professionals, time pressures and deadlines are a fact of life. For this reason students should learn to STAY ON TASK.

School Appropriate Computer Use

Inappropriate computer usage causes students to develop bad work habits that will seriously affect their productivity on the job, their usefulness to employers, and consequently their earning potential.  While the following computer activities may have recreational value for leisure time, they are generally not considered of instructional value and therefore are to be avoided while in class.

Schoology Code of Conduct

Schoology is a worldwide social network for education where all the members of your class participate as a community. In every community there must be values that will contribute to a well functioning and supportive environment.  

Posting Media Content:

(photos, video, emails, messages, texts, chats etc.)

It is our desire to facilitate Internet publication of exemplary student work and personal student portfolios.  However, there are limits and guidelines for the protection of the student and others. Students may post content directly related to their school projects or personal portfolio. This is a great opportunity for individual students to showcase their abilities and accomplishments in the class for their family and friends to see.   The U.S. Federal Children's Internet Protection Act requires that student’s privacy on the internet is protected.  Also, some parents prohibit photos of their students.  Therefore while you are on school property, we strictly enforce the following policy. 

GST School-Wide Internet Access:

Our campus wide policy also requires that each student using computer equipment must agree to the terms of the Greater Southern Tier BOCES Network User Agreement. Access to BOCES computer network is given to students who agree to act in a responsible manner.  Access is a privilege not a right.

I HAVE READ, UNDERSTAND AND AGREE TO FOLLOW 3.1 Acceptable Cell Phone & Texting Policy and  3.2 Acceptable Computer Use Agreement.

_________________________________________________   DATE:  __________________



Part 3: Grading & Attendance Policies


Item 3.1: Grade Components

Your marking period grade is the un-weighted average of the following components.  

    



Item 3.2: Grade Reports

It is our belief that grades reflect a measurement of your EFFORT and GROWTH in knowledge and skills and are not judgments about you as an individual, or your talent or abilities.  Your grade is not based on your artistic ability.  You will be measured against your own growth in knowledge and development of skills and work ethic related to the course.  It is crucial that you continually show progress and growth in your skills in order to succeed.   Putting forth more effort will always have a positive impact on your grades.

Parents may request a Schoology login code so that they will be able to view their child’s grades, and assignments at any time.

Online Grade Report: Students (and parents) are encouraged to periodically check their progress using the online gradebook feature of our course.  By doing so, students will be able to see if they are missing assignments and tests, and if they need to do some extra work to bring up their grade on an item.  Frequent monitoring of your grade throughout the marking period will avoid the stress of last minute make up of missed assignments.  Please be aware that students and their parents will only be able to see their own grades online, not those of other students.

Yearly Average:         1st Report Card Marking Period x 2        (22.22%)

                                  2nd Report Card Marking Period x 2        (22.22%)

                                  3rd Report Card Marking Period x 2        (22.22%)

                                  4th Report Card Marking Period x 2        (22.22%)

                                  FINAL EXAM GRADE                (11.11%)

                                =====================

                                  Total Above / 9

Final Average:         Average of Year 1 + Year 2

Item 3.3: Marking Period & Progress Report Dates

Item 3.4: Test / Quiz Policy

Tests and quizzes at periodic intervals provide formative feedback to identify areas needing review or further classroom instruction. These will serve as “waypoints” to determine when you have mastered the knowledge and are ready to move on to the next topic.


Item 3.5: Attendance & Calling-In

If you are absent, you miss two and a half hours of instruction, which is a significant amount of material and can be a challenge when it comes time to make up the work.   Attendance is a critical factor in grades, but also is an important criterion for both National Technical Honor Society, and Honor’s Certificate at graduation.  


Appointments:  Medical appointments, ASVAB or placement test appointments, and college admission visits are also allowed as an excused absence.  However, if you are absent because of these exceptions, you must get a signed note at the appointment to verify your attendance.  A note from your parent is not acceptable.   You should still “call-in” as shown above.

See the Wildwood Student Handbook for a full list of excused absences.


Item 3.6: Work Skills Employability Profile

Work Skills Employability Profile: Upon completion of the DMA program, the eligible senior students will receive a certificate of Work Skills Employability Profile. This documents the technical and work related skills that the student has achieved in the field of Digital Media Arts, as well as attendance record, internships and special awards and recognition. The profile may be used in job seeking or college admissions.

Employability Profile Revised3.jpg



Part 4: Instructional Methods


Item 4.1: Inquiry & Project Based Learning

Our curriculum is built upon inquiry and project based learning as modeled by the Buck Institute for Education (www.bie.org).  PBL helps students develop skills for living in a knowledge-based, highly technological society.  

Solving highly complex problems requires that students have both fundamental skills (reading, writing, and math) and 21st century skills (teamwork, problem solving, research gathering, time management, information synthesizing, utilizing high tech tools and professional software.) With this combination of skills, students become directors and managers of their own learning process, guided and mentored by the instructor.  


Types of Projects:


Feedback & Revision:


Project Grading:

Project Redo’s:



Project Deadlines:

Item 4.2 Content Knowledge & Mastery

Although project based learning is a key strategy in our DMA program, there is still a need to know the fundamental principles and techniques to properly complete project assignments.  For example, design principles; color theory, and typography concepts are needed for a creative poster design.  Fundamentals are taught using a combination of the following methods.

cropped-Genius-Hour-Logo11.png

Item 4.3 Genius Hour -

“Where Passions Come Alive”

Our DMA Class has implemented GENIUS HOUR,
a strategy that allows students to explore their own passions and encourages inspiration and creativity in the classroom.  Genius hour is a great way to allow students to drive their own personalized instruction.
It provides students a choice in what they learn during a set period of time during school.

The movement may have originated with the search-engine giant Google  They allow their engineers to spend 20% of their time to work on any pet project that they want.  The idea is very simple.  Allow people to work on something that interests them, and productivity will go up.  Google’s policy has worked so well that it has been said that 50% of Google’s services (i.e. Gmail) have been developed during this creative time period. These projects are creations by passionate developers that blossomed from their their 20-time projects.  Many other tech firms have followed Google’s lead.

The same genius hour principles apply in the classroom as they do in the corporate environment.  The teacher provides a set amount of time for the students to work on their passion projects.  Students are then challenged to explore something to do a project over that they want to learn about.  They spend several weeks researching and doing tutorials before they start creating a product that will be shared with the class/school/world.  Deadlines are limited and creativity is encouraged.  Throughout the process the teacher facilitates the student projects to ensure that they are on task.  

Genius Hour provides students the opportunity to practice learned technical, personal and workplace skills such as problem solving, teamwork, communication, project planning and organizing and leadership.

Item 4.4 How Genius Hour Works

GH GRADING

Genius hour projects are graded on three components including a weekly progress report blog post, a project rubric for the final product, and an ELA presentation rubric on the presentation.   Each of the three components is given equal weight within the grading category for Genius Hour.  

GH TIME FRAME 

Students must complete a minimum of one Genius Hour project every marking period, to coincide with the grading period ending dates.  Depending on student interests and needs, students can do multiple, shorter Genius Hour projects during the grading period, or choose a longer, more complex project to be broken into logical segments for grading.

GH WEEKLY PROGRESS REPORT

Students post a weekly blog entry as an update on their Genius Hour project progress.  These blog entries are graded on three main criteria:

GH PROPOSAL

Similar to a PBL project (see above) Genius Hour starts with a project proposal that is developed between the student and instructor.  Each project must include measurable learning objectives related to visual communication, an instructional component such as research or tutorials, completion of a product which is then presented by the student to a public audience.  

The first blog post is treated as a proposal and has different requirements. For the proposal blog entry, students are required to provide answers to the following questions in narrative form:


PROJECT PRESENTATIONS

Students must present their project and final product to a public audience. This presentation is structured similar to a “TED” talk, where students are required to prepare a formal presentation with visual aids for the class and possibly other audiences. The presentation may also be recorded for posting online. The presentation is graded on having a logical structure (including the required content below), good use of visual aids, eye contact (no talking to the screen), pronunciation, projection, and how effectively they handle a Q&A session at the end.  

GH PRESENTATION GUIDE:


Item 4.5 Field Trips

Field trips are educational experiences that allow students to apply their lessons to the real world. These trips tend to be the most memorable moments of a students career.   New perspective is gained by students especially for more extensive educational trips where students travel further away from home. By coming into contact with a different environment, students can better understand their place in the world, and insight into the careers that are available.   Field trips also cater to more than one learning style, making them excellent an experience for tactile hands-on learners.  Students also have chance to learn to apply appropriate social skills in a real world, professional setting, and to build team bonding with their classmates.

FIELD TRIP TYPES

Our field trips typically fall into one or more of the following four types;

FIELD TRIP PARTICIPATION POLICY

Participation in field trips is not a right, but a privilege that is earned by consistent class performance (i.e. Classcraft), positive attitudes and behavior in class, work ethic, good grades and consistent attendance.  Some field trips may also involve a financial commitment on the part of students which may involve meeting certain fundraising goals and financial support by the DMA Club.   These field trips are optional for students and are not required as part of the course.  

Due to the cost and nature of overnight trips, a limited number of slots will be available for student participation based on van capacity and budget.  If the number of interested students exceeds the slots available, instructor will determine an equitable selection criteria based on student achievement, attendance, work ethic, and class participation and/or NTHS membership.



Part 5: Student Honors & Recognition


Item 5.1: CERTIFICATIONS:  Adobe® Certified Associate

Students in Digital Media Arts have the opportunity to achieve a certification that is recognized worldwide as proof of meeting standards in the field of Digital Media Arts.

An Adobe Certified Associate credential certifies individuals have the entry-level skills to plan, design, build, and maintain effective communications using different forms of digital media.  Professionals use Adobe Certification as a way for getting a raise, finding a job, or promoting themselves to clients.

Every DMA Student must prepare for and take at least one Adobe Certification Exam which is used by GST BOCES as the National Technical Assessment for our DMA Program.  However, motivated students may optionally work to achieve multiple Certifications to enhance their resume for their future career.

VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS:  


WEB COMMUNICATIONS:


RICH MEDIA:


VIDEO COMMUNICATION:

Item 5.2: Regents CTE Endorsement

The Digital Media Arts program has been approved by the New York State Education Department as a Regents level Career and Technical Education (CTE) program.  The CTE Regents Approval process was implemented by the New York State Board of Regents to provide students the flexibility to pursue Career and Technical Education programs and still be able to meet the NYS Regents Diploma graduation requirements.
FakeDiplomaCTEseal300.jpg

Our students may earn a Regents designation with a CTE Technical Endorsement seal on their diploma. This endorsement symbolizes the student’s preparedness for the workplace and/or college level work, having met the challenges of a rigorous training program that is recognized by employers in the field. The gold endorsement seal is affixed to the diploma by the student’s home school district.


Students are eligible to receive a CTE Technical Endorsement seal on their high-school diploma if they:


Item 5.3: GST BOCES Profiles & Certificates

*These students are presented with a red/gold cord at the Annual Award Ceremony and

                           receive a gold Honor seal on their Employability Profile


Item 5.4: National Technical Honor Society

Our campus hosts a local chapter of the National Technical Honor Society.  The National Technical Honor Society (NTHS) is America's highest award for excellence in career and technical education. Membership in NTHS encourages higher scholastic achievement, cultivates a desire for personal excellence, and helps top students find success in today’s highly competitive workplace.  The NTHS induction ceremony is held in March of each year.


NTHS Criteria for GST BOCES:


Item 5.5: Work-Based Cooperative Internships

Students in Digital Media Arts may have the privilege of participating in a work based learning internships. By working on location for an area business organization for one or two weeks during class time, students gain valuable job skills and potential future employment.  Students are selected for this honor based on their demonstrated employability skills, technical skills, interest and motivation.    Community service projects are an alternative to work-based internships. These projects are related to our area of study, and are a project that is developed and created in class for a non-profit organization or business.   Working on our campus yearbook provides all DMA students community service credit.


Item 5.6: Wildwood Honor Roll

Each marking period, students with mastery level grade point averages are recognized in the campus HONOR ROLLS.  

Item 5.7: NYS CDOS Commencement Credential

The New York State CDOS Commencement Credential is awarded in recognition of each individual student’s preparation and skills for post-school employment.   Listed below are the allowable CDOS activities (with examples for DMA students)   The CDOS credential is a required component in the new 4 + 1 Pathways to Graduation which give students who succeed in a CTE course such as DMA, an optional alternate route to graduation without passing the NYS Global Regents.


In the Wildwood Digital Media Arts, students typically earn the NYS required 54 CDOS hours over the two full years of the course, based on participation in the following scheduled CDOS related activities.  

JUNIOR YEAR

SENIOR YEAR

Individual Hours (i.e. community svc)

?

Individual Hours (i.e. community svc))

?

Wildwood Yearbook

10

Wildwood Yearbook

20

Client Projects

10+

Client Projects

10+

Career Exploration Field Trips

2

Career Exploration Field Trips

2

Item 5.8 Wildwood Student of the Month / Year

Simmons and Rockwell of Hornell has partnered with our Wildwood campus to recognize a senior student from each of the CTE classes for Student of the Month, and Student of the Year.  Students are recognized with a lunch, given a certificate and have names displayed at Wegmans and the newspaper, plus the SOM posters around campus.   SOM students can be considered for Student of the Year if they continue to represent their class with pride, and excellence.  Student of the Year winner is given a $500 cash award at the Awards Ceremony.  

The SOM Committee has established these criteria for the honor of Student of the Month eligibility:

 

In our DMA class, we make SOM recommendations each month based on student meeting the above criteria, AND a selection process developed by class consensus.

Item 5.9 DMA Graduation Awards

At our BOCES annual Awards Ceremony, our DMA program provides financial awards to several graduating DMA students.  Students honored with these awards are selected by the teacher based on the following areas.  The amount of these awards may vary depending on available resources in the DMA club account.


Part 6: Skills USA Student Organization


Item 6.1: What is SkillsUSA?                                        

www.skillsusa.org

SkillsUSA's mission is to empower its members to become world-class workers, leaders and responsible American citizens.

SkillsUSA is a nationwide network of more than 360,000 students and instructors in a common bond with industry. The organization was established in 1965 to represent Career and Technical Education and to provide for youth workplace development training.  

The organization is lead by a national headquarters staff in Leesburg VA, with 54 State divisions and over 10,000 local student-run chapters. More than 600 businesses, corporations, trade associations and labor unions are partners at the national level alone, with thousands more supporting at state and local levels.  

In addition to student development training, SkillsUSA programs also help to establish industry standards for job skill training in the classroom.  SkillsUSA is addressing both the skills gap and skilled worker shortages through programs such as the SkillsUSA Championships and industry-driven Skill Connect Assessments.

Item 6.2: SkillsUSA Championships

The SkillsUSA Championships are competitive events showcasing the best career and technical education students in the region, state and nation.

Contests begin locally and continue through the state and national levels.  

Participating in any of these competitions is a wonderful learning experience, a great addition to a student’s resume, to make contacts with college representatives who serve as judges, and may enable them to be eligible for a variety of scholarships.  In addition, it's a lot of fun meeting other students from around our region and state.


The Awards waiting to be distributed at
Area 1 Regional Competition at Alfred NY

The Award Ceremony for the SkillsUSA Area 1 Competition at Alfred State Orvis Center.

Item 6.3: SkillsUSA Western NY Regional Area 1

The SkillsUSA Western New York Area 1 is one of six regional area affiliates in New York State which organizes activities for SkillsUSA members in our region.


The New York State Championships Closing Ceremony at the NYS Fairgrounds

Item 6.4: SkillsUSA New York State                                  

www.nysskillsusa.org


The SkillsUSA New York State affiliate organizes the statewide SkillsUSA activities,  and provides the organizational structure for New York students participating at Nationals.  New York SkillsUSA is divided into six regional areas.

NY State Fall Leadership Conference

NY State Spring Leadership & Skills Competition

One of three exhibit halls where national competitions take place at the
Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville KY.  The competition occupies the space of 16 football fields.


Item 6.5: SkillsUSA Nationals

The National Leadership and Skills Conference is held annually in Louisville, Kentucky during the 3rd week of June.

The opening ceremony at SkillsUSA Nationals in Freedom Hall at the
Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville

Item 6.6: SkillsUSA Framework and Programs

SkillsUSA activities develop positive attitudes, build self-esteem and empower students to excel. They give students a head start in developing valuable professional skills such as communications, interpersonal abilities, time management, teamwork and more.   The SkillsUSA Framework provides a common language for students to articulate what they gain from SkillsUSA participation to employers, school administrators, parents and other students and delivers a skill set demanded by business and industry but lacking in many employees today.

Skills USA Career Readiness Curriculum

The SkillsUSA Framework was the foundation for creating the Career Readiness Curriculum (CRC) which is a practical and flexible standards-based curriculum that seamlessly integrates the framework components into our classroom instruction.  CRC-Logo-FINAL-300x225.jpg


Other SkillsUSA Development Programs

Item 6.7: SkillsUSA Local Wildwood Chapter                   

More info:  gstskills.org

Our campus has a local chapter of the SkillsUSA student leadership organization.  This is a student run organization that provides an opportunity for students to organize fundraising and community service activities, using their occupational and leadership skills to benefit their neighbors, hometowns and the nation.  CTE students gain public respect and understanding as a result. As important, they experience the exhilaration of helping others as they become Champions at Work.

SkillsUSA Class Representatives

Each class on the Wildwood campus selects two Skills member students to represent the class at our local chapter meetings and activities.  

Item 6.8: SkillsUSA Membership Dues


Part 7: DMA Student Activities Club Constitution


As part of our campus student activities program, the Digital Media Arts program maintains a student club for the benefit of our class.  The club activities are supported by student fundraising and contributions from outside organizations.  The following consists of the DMA Club Constitution as required by campus administration and NYS Law.

Item 7.1: Name

The official name of this club is Wildwood Digital Media Arts Student Activities Club.  

Item 7.2: Club Purposes

The club will operate in the best interests of the Wildwood Digital Media Arts Program and its students, and will provide recreational, social, and educational opportunities to club members. It is established for the following purposes:

Item 7.3: Club Membership

A member shall be a currently enrolled student in the AM or PM class of the Digital Media Arts program, at the Wildwood Education Center.  To be eligible to participate in club social and recreational activities, members must behave in an appropriate manner, observing class and campus rules, and the club code of conduct.

Item 7.4: The Leadership Team & Officers

The club operations and activities will be organized by an Leadership Team.  This team will consist of  six club members..  Additional members may be appointed as determined by the advisor based on the program of work and size of class.


Item 7.5: Leadership Appointments

The Senior Leadership Team will be appointed by the end of the junior school year. A Junior Leadership Team may also be selected by the end of the first semester of the junior year.  

Any club member who is interested in serving on the Leadership Committee should complete and submit an application to the advisor.  Selections are made by the advisor, based on the demonstrated responsibility and leadership criteria including;


Leaders are expected to . . .


Item 7.6: Leadership Roles

At the start of the school year, the Leadership Team will select the class officers from among the committee.

PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

SECRETARY  

TREASURER  

SKILLS USA CLASS REPS

Item 7.7: Club Advisor

Item 7.8: Club Finances


Part 8: Our “Gamified” Classroom


Item 8.1:  Educational Benefits of Gamification

CLASSCRAFT.COM is an in-class game designed to encourage teamwork, boost participation, and increase motivation in a learning environment.   Classcraft is a role-playing game featuring mages, warriors, and healers that teachers and students play together.

Classcraft works as a layer over a regular class structure. Students create characters that can acquire special powers and level up, and how they perform in the classroom is directly tied to whether their characters and teammates survive and thrive.

Students aren’t playing a virtual game like Minecraft or World of Warcraft. While Classcraft is inspired by those games and is browser-based, it instead turns the offline  classroom experience into the adventure.

Students learn to help their peers, thereby helping their teammates in the game. They learn to participate and engage with what they’re learning so that they can power up their character. And they’ll learn that what’s disruptive and negative behavior in class is also detrimental to their character’s success in the game.


Item 8.2: Game Mechanics

Time Frame

The game will run for the entire school year which consists of approximately 40 weeks.  To complete the game at level 20, a player should work to level up about every two weeks.

Events

At the beginning of each class, a fun random EVENT occurs.  These events are generated by the game engine software.   Events may be  beneficial, like a “healing” event which gives each player HP, or everyone earns double XP that day.  Others are unfortunate, like the “Feeble” event, where everyone loses twice as many HP during the period.   Some events are just funny or simply chaotic.  

Battles

Battles are great opportunities for teams to do battle against other teams (or the GM / Monster) using course content questions as weapons.   Students do battles with each other in a contest of wits!  As teams prepare for each battle (by doing group study reviews and creating questions for attack) they form strategies for offense, dealing damage to the other teams using challenging questions) and defense by making sure they are prepared with their own correct answers to defend against incoming attacks.


Item 8.3: Points

Similar to online games, in Classcraft, players can earn (or lose) different types of points.


Power Points (PP)  

Power Points (PP) are used within the game to acquire additional powers that players can utilize throughout the game play.  

AP (Action Points)

 

Action Points (AP) are the energy source you need to use your powers.


HP (Health Points)

 

Health points (HP) measure the player's health or life at any point during the game.


HP penalties are assessed each day when the teacher observes (and documents) behaviors that fall short of the following core class values which are detailed in section 1.3:  If you have questions about any HP penalties, you should ask the teacher for clarification.

Sentences

When a player runs out of HP and can not be saved by his teammates, they fall in battle and receive a sentence randomly chosen from a list.  This may mean performing a classroom task chosen by the teacher or completing a review assignment, or loss of GP for example.    The player then re-enters the game with 10 HP.


GP (Gold Points)

 

Gold Points are like money and are used within our classroom token economy to acquire stuff that you want, just like in the real world.  You work you get paid for your work, which in turn you use to provide for the things you need and want.  In DMA when you work, it also results in a pay that you can use to for various purposes.

EARNING GOLD:

Gold Points can be earned inside the Classcraft game:


SPENDING GOLD:


Experience Points XP

Experience Points are earned for content/work oriented behaviors, and are a measure of your progress and ranking in the game. The more XP you gain, the more you’ll level up, gain Gold, and get more privileges and cool new powers!  The ideal pace to complete the game by the end of the school year is 500 XP per week, which results in leveling up every two weeks.

How Can You Earn XP?

bountyheader.gif

EARNING XP:


Item 8.4: Teamwork

Teams Guilds

A guild is a community of students within the game.  Each player belongs to a guild which works together to accomplish objectives and battle class work.  Guilds are from 4 to 6 players, and it is important that guilds are balanced. Teamwork is so important in the game because success results from striving toward a common goal using a variety of problem solving strategies.  Players have great incentive to collaborate, compromise and work together using cooperative powers, such as protecting and healing fellow guild members. This not only helps them progress in the game, but also encourages by peer coaching, success in their course work.

Character Classes

There are three character classes that players choose to role-play for the duration of the game.  Each character class has different powers as shown in the power tree tables below. Before you begin playing Classcraft, you'll have to decide if you want to be a Healer, Mage, or Warrior.  Get to know the differences between them all. You may have a preference going in, but ultimately, you'll want to make a decision that's best for your team. Your team's strategy is very important. Take your time in choosing.  Once your choice is made, there's no turning back.  

Balancing your team

There are many things to consider when putting your team together: Do you want the most balanced formula (e.g., two of each character class), or would you prefer more Healers? There are many possibilities, but the golden rule is to have at least one of each character class on your team so you can access all the different powers. Because each player has already decided which character he/she prefers, make sure your strategy reflects who your teammates want to play as much as possible. If your team can't come up with a formula that follows the golden rule, some team members may have to select another character.

Establishing strategic roles

Being part of a team is one thing; surviving as a team is another. To get the most out of the game, your team needs to establish a strategy right from the start. Without one, the team could face many critical consequences. Once you've chosen your characters, you must determine what role you're going to play on your team. Your role is determined by what powers you can use. It should reflect how you'd like to contribute to rest of your team. Each character has two roles to choose from. If you do well in the game, you can eventually get enough powers to play both roles, but at the beginning of the game, you should only choose one.  So if you have two Healers on your team, give one of them the healer role and have him/her get the "Heal" powers. Then make the other a reviver so that he/she tries to get "Revive" as soon as possible.

Roles

Here are the two suggested roles each character can play:

Mage

Warrior

Healer

Character Class:  MAGE

MAX HP: 40  |  MAX AP: 80  
“Those gifted with a keen intellect and unwavering discipline may walk the path of the Mage.  The arcane magic available to magi is both great and dangerous, and thus is revealed only to the most devoted practitioners. To keep enemies at bay, magi can summon bursts of fire to incinerate distant targets and cause entire areas to erupt, setting groups of foes ablaze.”  


Mages are the game's AP (power) suppliers. Mages are the strongest class in terms of powers because they can acquire the largest amount of AP. They can also use powers to give AP to another team member, which in turn allows them to use their powers more frequently.  Each class can collectively customize five powers that are shown below as blank grey lines.

Power

PP
to Buy
Power

Action Points
to activate

Bonus
5 xp
per AP

DESCRIPTION OF THE POWER

Mana Transfer

1

35

175

All  team members, except Mages, gain 7 AP

Secret Weapon

Invisibility

Mana Shield

2

3X
Damage

none

The mage can prevent the loss of HP to themselves, at the cost of 3 AP per HP prevented.

Cheat Death

2

15

75

A fallen teammate (other than the mage) can reroll the die but must accept the new outcome.

Time Warp

Fountain of Mana

3

40

200

A teammate, who isn’t a Mage, replenishes all of his/her AP

Alchemy

Hidden
Treasure

Character Class:  WARRIOR

MAX HP: 80  |  MAX AP: 40

“For as long as war has raged, heroes from every race have aimed to master the art of battle. Warriors combine strength, leadership, and a vast knowledge of arms and armor to wreak havoc in glorious combat.”   (w.o.w.)

Warriors are the team's HP protectors, absorbing damage.  When a team member is about to lose HP, Warriors can use their powers to absorb the damage for the player while simultaneously neutralizing it so that the team loses fewer HP. These powers can save a team member from falling in battle.   Each class can collectively customize five powers that are shown below as blank grey lines.

Power

PP
to Buy
Power

Action Points
to activate

Bonus
5 xp
per AP

DESCRIPTION OF THE POWER

Protect 1

1

10

50

The warrior can take on up to 10 HP damage instead of a teammate, receiving 80% of the damage.

First Aid

1

10

none

The Warrior adds +1 HP per level, with a minimum of +5 HP.

Secret Weapon

1

Protect 2

2

15

75

The warrior can take on himself up to 20 HP damage instead of a teammate, receiving 65% of the damage.

Invisibility

2

Ambush

2

Protect 3

3

20

100

Warrior can take on himself up to 30 HP damage instead of his teammate receiving 50% of the damage.

Battle
Campaign

3

Hidden
Treasure

3

Character Class:  HEALER

MAX HP: 60  |  MAX AP: 60
Healers are masters of healing and preservation, restoring their wounded allies, shielding them in battle, and even resurrecting them from death.    Healers are devoted to the spiritual, and express their unwavering faith by serving the people.  In the midst of terrible conflict, no hero questions the value of the healer orders.

Healers are the team’s HP (health) suppliers.  As the name suggests, the Healers perform healing functions in the game. When a team member takes damage, they can use different powers to restore HP to that player. They can also use these powers on themselves. This character class likes to help others, and team members will frequently call on them to use the "Heal' and "Revive" powers during the game. The "Revive" power is the Healer's most significant power since it can save other players from falling in battle, thereby preventing damage to the rest of their team.   Each class can collectively customize five powers that are shown below as blank grey lines.

Power

PP
to Buy
Power

Action Points
to activate

Bonus
5 xp
per AP

DESCRIPTION OF THE POWER

Heal 1

1

15

75

Heal a teammate with 10 HP

Secret Weapon

1

Invisibility

1

Heal 2

2

20

100

Heal a teammate with 20 HP

Favor of

the gods

2

Revive

2

25

125

When a teammate falls to 0 HP, he avoids all penalties and comes back to life

Heal 3

3

20

100

A teammate gains 30 HP

Healing Circle

3

30

150

All teammates other than the healer,  gain 15 HP

Hidden
Treasure

3

Item 8.5: Game Strategy

Team Launch

Start creating your team by getting together with your teammates and choosing your team's name, crest, and background using the game engine.

Choosing a Team Captain

When a team member falls in battle or when several teammates lose HP, typically the team gets together to discuss which powers to use to solve the problem. Sometimes, ideas can clash and it can be tough to figure out how to proceed. Team captains can be helpful in these situations as they will have the last word on these decisions, which ultimately lets the whole team take action and move forward quickly. The team captain should be someone who really understands the game rules and mechanics, which makes their decisions most effective during critical situations.    Team captains are also responsible for the following:

Choose your Character and Roles

Talk with your teammates before picking your character so you can make sure you have a balanced team of Healers, Mages, and Warriors.   Be sure to study to Character Power Tree charts above.  Then pick your role within each class.  

Choosing your First Power

Once you've chosen your character class and your role, it's time to choose your first power! It's smart to  choose a collaborative power — one that helps someone else. Survival will be easier that way since someone will always be on hand to save a team member from falling in battle. You also get XP when you use a  collaborative power. Getting more XP will help you unlock more powers faster. Consider these things when choosing your first power and study the power chart paths carefully.

Dealing with Damage (HP Loss)

Taking damage is a normal part of the game. It's important to learn how to work together as a team to manage that damage. Here are some ways you can deal with damage as a team:

Dealing with Death

When a player falls in battle and must roll the cursed dice, only two powers can save him/her: the Healer's "Revive" power and the Warrior's "Protect" power. If a team member uses one of these two powers, the player will avoid the cursed dice. The Healer's "Heal" powers cannot rescue a player from the cursed dice. The "Heal" powers can only be used after a player has rolled the cursed dice or after he/she has been saved by "Revive" or "Protect."  The Mage's "Cheat Death" also won't save a player from the cursed dice, but it enables the player to roll the dice a second time so that he/she might suffer a lesser sentence.


Monitor your HP & AP

If you have only a few HP left, avoid doing anything that might make you lose them. You can also ask a Healer to help so you can avoid falling in battle.  If your AP is at maximum, you should use at least one of your powers, to able to take advantage of the daily increase in AP or game events that might generate AP.

Maximizing Powers


Item 8.6: Levels Chart

SKILL
LEVEL

XP POINTS
Required

Level
Classification

Pace
Week #
Where you should be

LEVEL INCENTIVES

In order to qualify for the incentive,
you must level up on or before the end of the
PACE WEEK for that level.

1

0

Apprentice

1

2

1000

Apprentice

2

BONUS 300 GP

3

2000

Apprentice

4

Guild T-Shirt

4

3000

Apprentice

6

5

4000

Apprentice

8

Guild Mug

6

5000

Journeyman

10

BONUS 600 GP

7

6000

Journeyman

12

8

7000

Journeyman

14

9

8000

Journeyman

16

10

9000

Journeyman

18

11

10000

Craftsman

20

BONUS 900 GP

12

11000

Craftsman

22

13

12000

Craftsman

24

14

13000

Craftsman

26

15

14000

Craftsman

28

16

15000

Master

30

BONUS 1200 GP

17

16000

Master

32

18

17000

Master

34

19

18000

Master

36

20

19000

CHAMPION  

38

At the end of the year, all your XP & GP points are used to bid
on items in our Super Auction!

Item 8.7: Incentives & Rewards

LEVEL-UP Individual Incentives / Privileges

As individual players progress in the game by leveling up, they will earn greater privileges and freedom as a reward for their effort and accomplishments.   These are shown on the Levels Chart above for each level.  Please note that if not gaining XP at an acceptable rate a student’s privileges can be revoked at the teacher's discretion.

GUILD (team) Incentives

To keep teams motivated and focused, there are team incentives when members combine their efforts to work toward a common goal.   A guild should be making a purposeful, strategic plan to minimize team damage and maximize the accumulation of points.  

Classcraft GOLD

Gold can be used as a classroom currency to purchase a variety of items.  Our DMA Club operates a marketplace for goods and services that students want and need.  US Currency is not accepted, only GOLD which is earned in the Classcraft game.  This market is staffed by a “Merchant” who manages the transactions.     HOURS: The market is only open before the beginning bell, and during a 15 minute break which normally happens about 1 hour into the class.

IMG_0992.jpg

Super Auction

At the end of each school year, we hold a super auction for several hundred dollars worth of cool prizes, gift cards and food items that student’s bid on using their total XP earned during the year.  At that time, students may buy additional XP using Gold Points at an exchange of 3XP per 1GP.   During the auction, students bid on items in 100XP increments until their XP is used up.

Customizing your character

You can customize your character in Classcraft by buying equipment. As you level up, you will have access to new sets, giving you epic new looks to choose from. Below you will find the gear chart that explains how these tiers break down.  You can mix and match pieces from different sets to create your own unique look. Go to the equipment section to customize your look.

Unlocking, training, and equipping pets

If you get a complete set of equipment, you will unlock a pet. Each set of equipment has a corresponding pet. Once you have unlocked it, you can go to the pet section and begin training it. Each time you send your pet on mini training missions, you will earn coins. Once your pet is fully trained, you will get a big coin bonus and be able to display your pet alongside your character by equipping it in the equipment section.



Appendix: A - Supply List


Our DMA Class store will provide these required items for sale at a nominal cost if you do not already own them. Or you may purchase them at a store, or use ones you already have.

IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU KEEP THESE ITEMS READILY AVAILABLE FOR CLASS AT ALL TIMES.  WE INSIST THAT YOU KEEP THEM SECURED IN YOUR LOCKER WHEN NOT IN USE.  WE ADVISE YOU DO NOT TAKE THEM HOME. BUT IF YOU TAKE THEM HOME, DON’T FORGET TO BRING THEM BACK!!!

REQUIRED:  HEADPHONES OR EARBUDS

 

There will be many times when you will need to listen to e-Lessons, training videos or other content on your computer using headphones.  Make sure that you always have them available because if you “forget” you will not be able to participate in the learning activity and need to make up the work.      If your headphones or earbuds are lost, stolen or broken, you will need to replace them as soon as possible.  If you wish, you may purchase a set of headphones from the school store for $8.00.

REQUIRED:  USB THUMB DRIVE - 16GB or larger

You will need a USB Flash Memory Thumb Drive to store and transfer your work files.  You may purchase one from any store, or from the school store at a cost of $12.00.

OPTIONAL: SD Camera Card  16GB CLASS 10

You will be assigned a school owned 16GB Class 10 SD Memory card for use in our professional cameras.  This card will be numbered, and you will be responsible for keeping track of it the entire year.  If your card is lost or stolen, you will need to purchase a replacement at your or your parent’s expense.   The cost of a replacement card is $15.00

Optional (nice but certainly not required)

Digital Camera

One of the best ways become a great photographer is practice…  We understand that most students will not have the resources to provide their own digital camera for class photography assignments.  In that case, we have a limited supply of loaner Canon Rebel XTI professional cameras that students may be allowed to borrow, provided they meet certain criteria and parents agree to assume responsibility. (see item 2.0.)  

A less expensive digital point-and-shoot camera if available may also suffice for some of the assignments.

However, if a student is seriously interested in a photography related career, it may be advantageous that they acquire their own digital SLR type camera at some point.  Talk to the instructor for recommendations for a new or used DSLR camera.


Appendix: B - Locker Instructions




Appendix: C - Computer Accounts and Logins

For the sites below, please make a record of the login credentials so that you can reference it later if needed.

FOR THE SAKE OF SIMPLICITY, PLEASE SELECT A UNIVERSAL PASSWORD THAT YOU CAN USE FOR ALL OF THE ACCOUNTS.  Passwords should be at least eight (8) characters and case sensitive.

ACCOUNT

Notes:

LOGIN

1

GST BOCES
Computer

Network Login

In order to use any BOCES computers, you must first log in using your GST network login id and password.  

You may then change your password to something that you can easily remember.    GO TO System Preferences > Users & Groups to change password.

PASSWORDS Must be at least 8 characters, have an uppercase, and a number or symbol

User:  Lastname-Firstname

PW:   Your BOCES Student ID

(9 digit number)

(change to your universal PW)

2

DMAWW.ORG

GOOGLE
APPS
ACCOUNT

A DMAWW.ORG Google Apps for Education Account has been set up for you.     You should make sure that your Chrome Browser is logged in to your DMAWW Google Apps Account so you can automatically access these resources:  GOOGLE DRIVE, GMAIL, DOCS, and CALENDAR.

To sign-in to Chrome Browser:

  • Open Chrome with the URL  chrome://settings/
  • Sign in with your user id shown at right >

User: Lastname-YR@dmaww.org

PW:   #ChangeMeNow

YR =year of graduation  (i.e. 2020 = 20)

(change to your universal PW)

3

SCHOOLOGY

DMA ONLINE CLASSROOM

Your DMA assignments and resources will be accessed from this online website. If you already have a Schoology account, login and join the course below.
To
set up a new account:

  • Go to schoology.com
  • Click the “STUDENT” button
  • Enter Course Access code: 8FHK9-FQ5SP 
  • Enter your full FIRST NAME & LAST NAME
  • Use your DMAWW.ORG EMAIL ADDRESS above
  • Choose a PASSWORD (you can remember!!)
  • Enter your Date of Birth and you are now in the course.
  • To join your class chat click “GROUPS” > “JOIN”
    code
     GF5FV-QKPNR  (for 2020 students)
    code
    CM7NM-K5H7C  (for 2019 students)

User:  Lastname-YR@dmaww.org 

PW:   Use your universal password

________________________________

LINK YOUR GOOGLE DRIVE ACCT TO SCHOOLOGY:

  • Go to RESOURCES
  • Click APPS
  • Click GOOGLE DRIVE

4

CLASSCRAFT

Now you will set up your character in our Classcraft game.  If you already have a Classcraft account, login and enter the student code provided by your teacher.


To
set up a new account:

  • Go to:  game.classcraft.com/signup
  • Click “STUDENT”
  • Click Sign up with “GOOGLE” button
    “Allow” Access to your Google Account  
  • Enter student code provided by your teacher
  • You can then begin to set up your Character

You will authenticate your account using the Google Account from your Chrome Browser sign-in

Additional web services that we will use periodically in class are shown below:

ACCOUNT

Notes:

LOGIN

6

QUIZLET

To set up a new account:

  • Go to quizlet.com
  • Sign-in / Sign-up Link
  • Click the “Continue with Google” Button
  • Allow
  • Enter your birthdate
  • Your username should populate from Google Acct (do not change)
  • Join class DMAWW

You will authenticate your account using the Google Account from your Chrome Browser sign-in

7

CERTIPORT

To set up a new account:

User:  Lastname-YR@dmaww.org 

PW:   Use your universal password



Appendix: D - Class FORM MASTERS

The following pages are samples of classroom forms that are referred

to in the STUDENT HANDBOOK provided here as a reference.

Blank forms are available in the forms rack next to the photo cabinet
or may be printed individually from the STUDENT HANDBOOK Google Document


WORKPLACE PERFORMANCE REVIEW                      

NAME:

2018-2019


Each marking period, students meet with the teacher to review their individual performance in class and discuss strategies and goals for developing and improving their workplace skills.  At this same meeting, the student's portfolio is also reviewed.

100

Always
Demonstrates
(i.e. 100% of time)

75

Frequently
Demonstrates

(i.e. 75% of time)  

50

Inconsistently
Demonstrates
(i.e. 50% or less)

0

Needs Improvement

PERFORMANCE DEMONSTRATED

MP 1

MP 2

MP 3

MP 4

Value #1 – BE PREPARED

  • I take advantage of opportunities to learn extra skills to make me more valuable ($$) in my future career
  • I anticipate what's ahead (near future) and plan for it where possible
  • I arrive on time and am prepared be begin work at my workstation at the start of class
  • I remember to promptly bring needed supplies, materials, equipment, permission slips, etc.
  • I come to class with clothing and grooming appropriate for a professional environment / classroom

Value #2 – BE RESPECTFUL  

  • I am considerate of others’ feelings, rights, and property (the golden rule)
  • I am patient, able to overlook faults and annoyances of others without reacting
  • I am eager (jump-in) to help others who need a hand or some encouragement
  • I support and contribute to the efforts of my team and partner(s)
  • I use good judgment, actions and speech appropriate for a professional workplace
      i.e. - no drama, swearing, rudeness, offensive or sexually suggestive comment

Value #3 – BE RESPONSIBLE

  • I am self-reliant, able to get my work done without needing to interrupt others
  • I am self-directed and motivated to succeed here, so that I will succeed in my future career
  • I take initiative for learning by exploring and experimenting not by needing to be “spoon-fed” knowledge
  • I solve problems independently, using the three-then-me protocol
  • I am determined and persistent and able to overcome obstacles without complaining or giving up

Value #4 – BE PRODUCTIVE  

  • I read or listen to directions and procedures, the follow them carefully
  • I stay focused on the goal and prioritize multiple tasks and projects based on deadlines
  • I avoid distractions that would reduce my effectiveness, my “creative” time, and concentration
       i.e. internet games, time wasted with excessive chattiness, using cell phone & texting for non-work related social conversations
  • I use a planning process to ensure my work is done on schedule, and I meet project deadlines
  • I show craftsmanship and attention to detail by comparing my work to professional standards.

TOTAL (out of 400)

Comments


NAME:

2018-2019

MP 1

MP 2

MP 3

MP 4

What do you feel was the most / least enjoyable part of the past marking period?

What did you achieve or accomplish this marking period?  (goals met)

What goals would you like to achieve in the new marking period?  

How do you feel about the grades you are getting?    What grade would you like next marking period?

Other comments about your experience in DMA????

NOTEBOOK & PORTFOLIO REVIEW                        

NAME:

2018-2019

Holistic Evaluation Criteria:  Portfolio may show growth in accomplishment over time, and the descriptors capture characteristics that merits each score based on the portfolio taken as a whole. This rubric is adapted from the 2011 AP Studio Art Final Portfolio Scoring Guidelines.  

                 SCALE POINTS:   5 WEAK - Attempted but lacking significant evidence     15 AVERAGE - Successful achievement of objectives

                                             10 FAIR - Shows some but inconsistent achievement        20 EXCELLENT - Meets AND exceeds objectives

KEY CRITERIA:

MP 1

MP 2

MP 3

MP 4

CONTENT: OBJECTIVES & SCOPE

Portfolio contains all required projects which meet design specifications. Shows evidence of achievement of all assigned learning goals during the period.

TECHNICAL & STUDIO SKILLS

Portfolio demonstrates increasingly correct and effective use of advanced analog and digital techniques and equipment to produce a variety of media projects.

DESIGN PRINCIPLES & COMPOSITION

Portfolio artifacts demonstrate evidence of growth in ability to plan and apply composition, design elements and principles to creative work.

CRAFTSMANSHIP

Portfolio artifacts demonstrate development of craftsmanship and attention to detail in the execution of creative work.

PRESENTATION

Portfolio shows care in the design and organization of content into a logical and visually appealing structure.

Well written reflection statements where required follow the correct format  (describe learning goals achieved, technical skills used, design principles applied and evidence of craftsmanship.)

CLASS NOTEBOOK  [ EXTRA CREDIT up to 20 Points]

All required pages are completed and organized in their appropriate sections. Handwriting is neat and legible, diagrams and drawings are done with care.

Notes are thorough, summaries are thoughtful showing care and effort with evidence of understanding of content.

SCORE:

GOALS MP 1

GOALS MP 2

GOALS MP 3

GOALS MP 4


DMA Cornell Study Notes

Name

Date

Lesson #

Topic | Title

Page #

CUES & QUESTIONS

RECORD THE LEARNING - FACTS & IDEAS from Lesson

SUMMARY -  Why is this important?  How can I apply this?

DMA Cornell Study Notes

Name

Date

Lesson #

Topic | Title

Page #

CUES & QUESTIONS

RECORD THE LEARNING - FACTS & IDEAS from Lesson

SUMMARY -  Why is this important?  How can I apply this?


ELA WRITING RUBRIC                        

NAME:

Date

       /      /

TITLE

Holistic Evaluation Criteria:  Writing may show growth in accomplishment over time, and the descriptors capture characteristics that merits each score based on the writing taken as a whole.  This rubric is based on the NYS ELA Common Core Regents Grading Rubric  

KEY CRITERIA:

1

2

3

4

Attempted but lacking significant evidence

Shows some but inconsistent achievement

Successful achievement of objectives

Meets AND exceeds objectives

CONTENT & ANALYSIS (Understanding)

the extent to which the writing conveys complex ideas and information clearly and accurately in order to respond to the task and support an analysis of the text

COMMAND OF EVIDENCE:

the extent to which the writing presents detailed evidence from the provided source text to support ideas and analysis.  

ORGANIZATION & STYLE:

the extent to which the writing logically organizes complex ideas, concepts, and information using formal style (introduction, body, conclusion) and precise language

CONVENTIONS

the extent to which the writing demonstrates command of conventions of standard English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.  

Appropriate and correct citation of sources.

GOALS TO WORK ON:

TOTAL POINTS (16 possible)

% SCORE

GENERAL COMMENTS:

Project Rubric.jpg

GENERAL PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT RUBRIC   


Name: ________________  Client/Project Description: ____________________________ Date: _____

Category

Technical Competency | Project Standards

Pts

Self
Eval

Peer
Eval

Instructor
Eval

USE OF TOOLS
& DIGITAL WORKFLOW

  • Technically correct methods were used throughout the creation of this project, including correct and safe use of tools, proper file formats, and procedures.
    (including RAW Image Format)
  • Properly managed digital files using an established workflow process from capture to distribution.
  • Organization: Had materials, equipment, and resources organized, with proper cleanup upon completion.

20

IMAGE QUALITY

L.I.S.A.
(white balance, exposure,focus/depth of field) 

  • White balance set correctly for the lighting conditions.
  • Photo taken at appropriate exposure for setting and mood
  • Avoids  crushed blacks and blown-out highlights
  • Focus and depth of field effectively contribute to a powerful image by drawing viewer attention to the subject.
  • Use of shutter speed to control the appearance of motion (where appropriate)

20

CREATIVE
PRINCIPLES

  • Explored a variety of design approaches and styles using a design planning process.
  • The design shows evidence of creative use of visual design elements and principles.   i.e. Simplicity, rule-of-thirds, leading lines, framing, balance, viewpoint.
  • The design shows strong use of contrast to attract attention
  • Applied previously learned theory and principles to the project

20

QUALITY & ATTENTION TO DETAIL

  • Carefully followed all specifications in project brief or assignment
  • Compared work with model and/or industry standards
  • Reviewed and corrected apparent errors before submitting
  • Solicits peer & instructor review of work and uses suggestions for improvements

20

PRESENTATION

&
CRITIQUE

  • Properly presented finished work according to requirements..
       (i.e. web post & print portfolios, mounted display)
  • Provided a detailed oral or written portfolio narrative to describe the work process, what was learned and how it will be useful in the future.  
  • Narrative should utilize appropriate technical language of design & composition.

20

LATE SUBMISSION PENALTY

-10

-20

NUMBER OF PHOTOS IN SET: __________________                                                            Total Scoring

Peer Evaluator: ___________________


Comments:


VIDEO PRODUCTION DEMO REEL RUBRIC         

NAME:

Date

        /      /

TITLE

PRE-PRODUCTION & PLANNING:

1

STORYBOARD

Storyboard reflects good planning and organization for the visuals in the production

5

2

COPYRIGHT

Content was acquired and used in compliance with copyright law   (-5 pts)

PRODUCTION:

3

CAMERA WORK

The video clips used were well shot
(good lighting, steady/stable shots, good composition-rule of thirds)

5

4

CAMERA TECHNIQUE

Used a variety of cinematic camera techniques
(creative camera angles, distance, movement)

5

5

STILL PHOTOS

Photographs were well shot
(good exposure, composition, and focus)

5

POST-PRODUCTION | EDITING

6

VIDEO TRANSITIONS

Used consistent transitions and effects throughout the video
Transitions were appropriate and did not distract from the story.

10

7

AUDIO TRANSITIONS

Layered musical tracks create smooth musical transitions between songs

10

8

SOUND LEVELS

The audio was normalized for consistent loudness
Music is in balance and does not overpower the primary audio if applicable

10

9

TITLES & GRAPHICS

Titles and graphics were clear

(good contrast, good typography, consistent style throughout the video)

10

10

SPECIAL EFFECTS

Creative special effects (i.e. green screen) used to enhance the production (Bonus Points)

ARTISTIC IMPRESSION:

11

INTRODUCTION

The introduction hooks the viewer, creates interest in what is to follow

5

12

ORGANIZATION

Content is well organized

5

13

MUSIC

The music is expressive (creates an emotional response) and enhances

the story or theme of the video

5

14

PACING

The pacing of the visuals is coordinated to the beat of the music, not too slow or too fast

5

15

ECONOMY

The story is told with the right amount of detail, (not too short nor too long on any one section) to be interesting to the audience

5

16

DURATION

The length of the video was appropriate

5

17

ORIGINALITY

Large amount of original content. Ideas are creative and inventive

5

18

APPROPRIATENESS

The content of the video is appropriate for the audience

5

TOTAL SCORE:


ART & TECH : GENERAL DESIGN PROJECT RUBRIC   

Category

Rating Scale

Self Eval

Peer Eval

Teacher

ARTISTIC &
CREATIVE SKILL

  • Explored a variety of design approaches and styles using a design planning process.
  • The design shows evidence of creative use of visual design elements and principles.
  • Shows effective application of learned color, type, composition and layout principles
  • Project is appealing, engages the target audience and communicates effectively.

50

Excellent -
above average / Exceeded expectations


Professional Standards

40

Good Effort

Met expectations

30

Fair-

minimal effort or inconsistent

20

Attempted but lacks essentials/ redo

TECHNICAL SKILLS

  • Effective use of software, tools & equipment.
  • Technically correct methods and techniques were used throughout the production of this project, including correct and safe use of tools, proper file formats, and procedures.
  • Organization: Had materials, equipment, and resources organized, with proper cleanup upon completion.

50

Excellent -
above average / Exceeded expectations


Professional Standards

40

Good Effort,

minor errors in technique

30

Fair-

 minimal effort or inconsistent

20

Attempted but lacks essentials/ redo

LATE SUBMISSION

 PENALTY

-10

-20

                                                                                   TOTAL

Total pts: _______ x _______ weight factor for project complexity / duration


Comments:


STUDIO WORK HOURS [50 XP/Hour]

NAME:

Week #

Ending

       /      /

Day

[PRINT NEATLY]    ALL HANDS-ON  STUDIO WORK:   What I Accomplished Today . . .

HOURS

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SHEET MUST BE TOTALED HERE: 

Student

Guild Leader

XP

Student hereby attests this is a true and accurate record of hours earned and work shown


TECHNICAL SKILL TUTORIAL LOG  

NAME

ASSIGNMENT #     |     TITLE OF COURSE / TUTORIAL

DUE

Video #

Date

mm/dd

SKILLS LEARNED:  After viewing  this tutorial,

 I can demonstrate how to . . .

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Video #

Date

mm/dd

SKILLS LEARNED:  After viewing  this tutorial,

 I can demonstrate how to . . ..

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

LAB / PRACTICE EXERCISES ATTACHED if applicable  (Extra 10 GP)

                                 TOTAL GP AWARDED (10 GP per line completed):


 GST BOCES Wildwood Education Center
 
Academy of Digital Media ArtsGST BOCES Map LogoGST BOCES Map Logo

                      DMA FULL DAY PERMISSION        

The following student who is enrolled in the Wildwood Digital Media Arts program is requesting permission to attend the DMA CTE class for a full day in order to provide an opportunity meet the instructional objectives shown below.

Student Name

Date of full

day attendance

Instructional
Objectives

APPROVALS 

CTE Instructor’s Signature: 

 ______________________________    ___/___/___

Academic Teachers of classes you will miss:

______________________________    ___/___/___

______________________________    ___/___/___      

______________________________    ___/___/___

High School Administrator and/or Attendance Officer                                              

______________________________    ___/___/___      

______________________________    ___/___/___

RETURN TO:  Instructor Gary Acker 607-281-3146  | FAX 607-324-3842  
at least 24 hours in advance


PERMISSION FORM
GST BOCES Wildwood Education Center
Academy of Digital Media ArtsGST BOCES Map Logo

              MODEL / TALENT PERMISSION FORM        

Permission to Visit Wildwood Campus - Digital Media Arts Class 

Digital Media Arts students grow in their professional knowledge and skills by means of a variety of hands-on projects. These provide our students with authentic industry based practice, and CDOS hours for graduation requirements.  To accomplish this, students may seek models or acting talent from outside our classroom.

❏  MODEL: To support our instruction in commercial photography, Wildwood Digital Media Arts class has a professional photography studio to allow our students to practice posing and lighting techniques.  This studio is available for friends and family members to model for a portrait sitting, and provide very affordable portrait services for those who wish to purchase prints through our DMA Activities Club.  There is no charge for the portrait sitting.  

❏  ACTING TALENT: To support our instruction in videography and filmmaking, Wildwood Digital Media Art class provides professional filmmaking resources available for students to produce a variety of short films and other video productions.  The film’s Producer may seek members from outside of class to be cast as actors during a shoot.  

RELEASE: The undersigned parent or guardian hereby releases all rights to images and/or videos produced by DMA students.  These images/videos may be published in the DMA student’s portfolio, displayed in class or a gallery show, or posted on the internet in DMA class websites.  (talent / model’s name will not be used)

TRANSPORTATION: If applicable, the visiting student may ride the regular school bus to and from the Wildwood campus from a component district.  Students may NOT drive to the campus without prior written permission from campus and home school administrators.  Parents may also provide transportation.

DMA STUDENT:  ____________________  PROJECT DESCRIPTION: ________________________



I hereby grant permission for ______________________________  to visit the Digital Media Arts class at the GST BOCES Wildwood campus in order to participate in the above project.

SHOOTING DATE: ______________      TIME:   ____ AM (9:00 - 11:25)     ____ PM (12:00 - 2:30)


_______________________    __/__/__                _______________________    __/__/__

Gary Acker, Instructor Wildwood DMA                        Parent or Guardian of Talent / Model



_______________________    __/__/__                _______________________    __/__/__
Wildwood Campus Administrator                                Home School Administrator

RETURN TO:  Instructor Gary Acker 607-281-3146  | FAX 607-324-3842  |   acker@dmaww.org

GST BOCES Wildwood Education Center

Academy of Digital Media Arts

PARENT WELCOME LETTER

Dear Parent or Guardian:

It’s exciting to begin a new school year and to have your son or daughter enrolled in the Academy of Digital Media Arts Program.  Our program provides many options for students to explore areas of interest in the field of Visual Communications.   

The mission of this CTE program is to prepare our students with the technical skills, workplace skills and personal skills needed to succeed in twenty-first century careers by fostering excellence in creative problem solving, work ethic and social skills.   These skills are highly valued by employers in ANY career field, not just those in the career area of Digital Media Arts.  

I would extend an open invitation to call or email me should you have any questions or concerns about how your student is doing in the Academy of Digital Media Arts.   We are planning an exciting year with many hands-on projects to enable your student to apply skills and exercise their creativity.

We would also be pleased to meet you during our OPEN HOUSE on Wednesday October 18th from 5 to 7PM where you can tour our amazing state-of-the-art production studio facilities.  

Cordially,SkillsUSA-Framework.jpg

Gary H. Acker, Teacher

EMAIL:  acker@dmaww.org

Direct Classroom Phone: 607-281-3146

Andrew Olin, Teaching Assistant

EMAIL: olin@dmaww.org

Direct Classroom Phone:  607-281-3126


OUR ONLINE CLASSROOM CONNECTIONS


DMAWW.ORG - Online ClassroomScreen Shot 2017-08-26 at 11.40.08 PM.png

This is our main website is designed to be our portal for communicating with our community and prospective students with information about our program, highlights of class events and activities, a portfolio showing off our excellent student work, and recognizing successful students.  The site also has tools and resources for our students to use in the course.



Our FACEBOOK PAGE is an extension of our class website to reach a larger audience with updates about our Digital Media Arts program.  Please visit facebook.com/DMAWW and “LIKE” our Facebook Page to subscribe to our class updates.

Our TWITTER feed also provides news and information about our class activities and student successes.  Follow us at:  @DMAww



 

Google Apps for Education & Gmail - Our class has its own Google Apps for Education domain which is a special bundled version of the Google services like Drive, Docs, and Calendars.   One of the key features of Google Apps is the fact that all of a user’s content is stored “in the cloud” and are accessible from any computer with Internet access. A student’s Google Drive takes the place of flash drives for backing up and transporting work from school to home and back again. And with very capable word-processor, spreadsheet, presentation and graphics tools, the issue of software compatibility between school and home is eliminated.



We use an internet based learning management system called Schoology (pronounced “school-uh-gee”.)   From a student’s point of view, Schoology is the online home for the DMA class work.  Here we post assignments, resources, documents, discussions and even online quizzes and tests.  There is a calendar with assignment due-dates plus a personalized gradebook that allows checking progress grades.   Schoology can be accessed using a web browser on any computer or via a free mobile app for iOS or Android devices.  

We encourage you to create a “parent” Schoology account to be able to follow up on your student’s grades, work and progress.  For a video showing you how to sign-up as a Schoology parent go to:


INSTRUCTIONS:
 SCHOOLOGY PARENT ACCESS  “HOW TO” VIDEO:    www.vimeo.com/46433066
Your student will be able to provide you with a parent “CODE” to access his/her online account with Schoology.


GST BOCES Wildwood Education Center

Academy of Digital Media Arts

PARENT / TEACHER COMMUNICATION

As your son or daughter’s teacher, I encourage you to partner with us as we strive to motivate your student to have a successful year, and prepare for their future employment.  Anytime you have a question or concern, please contact me either by phone, text message or email.

Thank you,

Gary Acker




Here is my cell phone number.

You are welcome to contact me by phone or text message.

607-765-0760






                       

                      You may also contact me at our classroom direct extension

607-281-3146





                                     
                        If you would like to communicate by email just send

your message to this address:

acker@dmaww.org

 


GST BOCES Wildwood Education Center

Academy of Digital Media Arts

PORTFOLIO PUBLISHING PERMISSION

Dear Parent or Guardian of DMA Student:

In the Digital Media Arts program, it is our desire to facility Internet publication of exemplary student work utilizing professional web-based design portfolios.  Students may compose and publish blogs and image gallery websites directly related to their school projects as a professional portfolio that they can use to promote themselves after graduation.  This is a component of the NYS CDOS Standards for the Arts & Humanities cluster.

This is a great opportunity for DMA students for two reasons. First of all, individuals entering any design related field will absolutely need a digital portfolio of their best work to promote and market their business services.  Since this is a Career and Technical Education class, we are preparing students to meet these requirements in our class.

Secondly, the technical skill of web publishing itself is a component of our curriculum.  Students will spend time creating digital projects that can be publicly presented by means of web publishing.

Students composing documents to be published on or linked from BOCES and/or class web sites must follow the standards of the BOCES Network User Agreement, as well as specific standards established by the instructor.

Students under age 18 must have this signed parental consent form for including their photo, full name and class work on their web portfolio site.  Students are NOT allowed to post personal information such as address or phone numbers.  

Please do not hesitate to contact the instructor if you have any questions.

STUDENT:

I understand and agree to follow the guidelines above for student publishing on the web.


Student Signature:  _____________________________________  Date: _____________

PARENT or GUARDIAN:

As a parent or legal guardian of the student signing above, I grant permission for my son or daughter to publish content on the web as outlined above.


Signature: ____________________________________________  Date: _______________


GST BOCES Wildwood Education Center

Academy of Digital Media Arts

CLASS OUTINGS BLANKET PERMISSION

During the course of the year our class may have the privilege of traveling to various off-

campus locations in the area for the purpose of completing instructional projects such as outdoor photography, video filming assignments, and other class related activities. Some of these activities may be weather dependent, so advanced notice may not always be possible.

These class outings would be conducted entirely within the allotted class time and would not require the student to miss other classes at their local high school, and students would arrive and leave the campus on their regular bus run.

Students must have on file a properly completed and signed medical record card in order to

participate in class outings or field trips.

Separate permission forms will be required for each FIELD TRIP that requires the student to miss other classes or necessitates special transportation to and from the campus.

BLANKET PERMISSION:

STUDENT SIGNATURE:   ______________________________        _____/_____/_____

By signing above, participating student hereby acknowledges reading, and agrees to follow the GST BOCES / DMA class field trip policies.

PARENTAL PERMISSION & WAIVER:  The following student has my blanket permission to participate in class outings as described above.  I understand that I hold the GST BOCES, its officers, employees and agents harmless from all liability and claims arising out of or in connection with my student’s participation in this activity. In the event of an accident or sudden illness, the sponsor has my permission to render whatever emergency treatment may be deemed necessary. I understand that participation in this activity is voluntary and not requirement of the course.

 


PARTICIPATING STUDENT’S NAME: _______________________________________  
(please print)

 


Parent/Guardian’s Signature: ______________________________________    _____/_____/_____


Home Phone: ______________________  Cell / Emergency Phone: ________________________

Please advise if student has special needs, medical conditions, or requires prescription medication.

Return this form to your instructor

GST BOCES Wildwood Education Center

Academy of Digital Media Arts

STUDENT HANDBOOK

Dear Parent(s):

We have provided your student with a copy* of our STUDENT HANDBOOK which contains information about how we function as a class, and how students are graded on their performance.  Over the next few days, we will review this in class.  

It is very important that students and parents understand the expectations, policies and procedures that are critical to their success in our program over the next two years.   Please make sure your student understands it is their responsibility to understand and abide by the policies and procedures in this handbook, receipt of which is acknowledged by signing below:    

_______________________________________________

Parent / guardian signature

_______________________________________________

Student Signature

Note, parent/guardians may request a 2nd copy of the student handbook if desired.

PARENT / TEACHER COMMUNICATION

In case we need to contact you or provide periodic progress reports, please provide your email address and/or phone below and have your student return this form to the class.  Your information will be confidential and used only for the purpose described above.

MY STUDENT’S NAME:  ____________________________________________

PARENT NAME(s)

PARENT EMAIL ADDRESS

HOME PHONE / CELL PHONE

(H)

(C)

(H)

(C)

Return this form to your instructor


Appendix: E - COURSE CURRICULUM OUTLINES


INTEGRATED ELA CREDIT

Through integration of academics, two year students may earn one (1) core credit in ELA to meet the Regents graduation requirements according to our status as a New York State Regents Approved CTE Program.

Our program integrates the following technical writing requirements into the curriculum.


F51 FIRST YEAR ACADEMIC SKILLS
 (Integrated ELA)

F52 SECOND YEAR ACADEMIC SKILLS (Integrated ELA)


TWO YEAR - CTE CORE CURRICULUM

Our two year course sequence applies to both Junior (PM) and Senior (AM) classes.  The lessons, projects and activities are the same in both classes each day.  Here's the sequence of course content for both the first and second year students.


ONE YEAR OPTION

It is certainly possible to take DMA for only one year, however most students who are considering a career in the Digital Media Arts or Visual Communications related fields will benefit greatly having a broader range of skills and knowledge by taking both years.   For example, a photographer will need both still photography and video production skills to meet the needs of today's clients and employment market, while a filmmaker or video producer will need to be proficient in the skills of photography lighting and composition.



DMA PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE [P]

FOR SCHOOL YEAR: 2018 - 2019 


PHOTOGRAPHY CORE

P01 CONTEXT

P02 CAMERA & LENS THEORY

P03 ARTISTIC COMPOSITION

P04 EXPOSURE

P05 CREATIVE CAMERA EFFECTS

P06 LIGHT & COLOR

P07 COMMERCIAL STUDIO TECHNIQUES


APPLIED SKILLS​​ (hands-on projects)

P91 OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY

P92 ACTION & EVENT PHOTOGRAPHY

P93 TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

P94 STUDIO LIGHTING TECHNIQUES

P97 SPECIAL EFFECTS PHOTOGRAPHY

P99 PHOTOGRAPHY PORTFOLIO / EXHIBIT



DMA GRAPHIC DESIGN COURSE [D]

FOR SCHOOL YEAR: 2018 - 2019 


 VISUAL DESIGN CORE 

  (Graphic & Advertising Design)

D01 CONTEXT

D02 CREATIVITY & DESIGN PROCESS

D03 ARTISTIC COMPOSITION

D04 COLOR THEORY

D05 TYPOGRAPHY

D06 ADVERTISING, BRANDING & IDENTITY

D07 PAGE LAYOUT & PUBLICATION


D09 GRAPHIC ART PRODUCTION PROCESS

APPLIED SKILLS​​ (hands-on projects)  

D91 BRANDING & IDENTITY DESIGN

D92 PUBLICATIONS DESIGN & LAYOUT

D93 ADVERTISING DESIGN

D94 ENVIRONMENTAL & INFORMATIONAL

D99 DESIGN PORTFOLIO



DMA MEDIA PRODUCTION COURSE [M]

FOR SCHOOL YEAR: 2019 - 2020


MEDIA PRODUCTION CORE

M01 CONTEXT

M02 CAMERA & TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT

M03 PRINCIPLES OF VIDEO & FILM

M04 PRE-PRODUCTION

M05 CINEMATOGRAPHY

P06 LIGHT & COLOR

M07 AUDIO PRODUCTION (Audition, Garageband)


M08 VIDEO EDITING CONCEPTS 

M09 MOTION GRAPHICS & EFFECTS 

M10 BROADCAST MEDIA

APPLIED SKILLS​​ (hands-on projects)

M91 PROMOTIONAL VIDEO

M92 INFORMATIONAL VIDEO

M93 ENTERTAINMENT

M97 POST PRODUCTION ELEMENTS

M98 SPECIAL PROJECTS

M99 MEDIA PRODUCTION PORTFOLIO


DMA 3D DESIGN & ANIMATION COURSE  [A]

FOR SCHOOL YEAR: 2019 - 2020


3D & ANIMATION CORE

A01 3D DESIGN & ANIMATION CONTEXT

A02 ANIMATION PRINCIPLES

A03 ANIMATION FOR CINEMA 

A04 ANIMATION FOR GAME DESIGN

A51 EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES


APPLIED SKILLS​​ (hands-on projects)

A91 PRODUCTION PROJECTS

A99 ANIMATION DEMO REEL



DMA FOUNDATION SKILLS COURSE [F]

Spread Over Two Years


F01 GETTING STARTED

F02 DIGITAL IMAGING FOUNDATION

F03 CAREER DEVELOPMENT

F51 FIRST YR. ACADEMIC SKILLS (Integrated ELA)

F52 SECOND YR. ACADEMIC SKILLS (Integrated ELA)


 SkillsUSA FRAMEWORK SKILLS COURSE:

F11 PERSONAL SKILLS

F12 WORKPLACE SKILLS

F13 RELATED TECHNICAL SKILLS



POST PRODUCTION CORE TECHNICAL SKILLS [S]

Adobe Creative Cloud 2018 self-paced tutorial courses from Adobe Classroom in a Book Courses


FOR SCHOOL YEAR: 2018 - 2019:

S11 ADOBE LIGHTROOM (photography workflow)

S12 ADOBE PHOTOSHOP (image editing)

S22 ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR (vector art/drawing)

S23 ADOBE INDESIGN (page layout)

FOR SCHOOL YEAR: 2019-2020:

S51 ADOBE PREMIERE PRO (video editing)

S53 ADOBE AFTER EFFECTS (animation & effects)

S55 ADOBE AUDITION (sound / music editing)

                  Wildwood School Calendar

Year-At-A-Glance School Planner

SEPTEMBER 2018

OCTOBER 2018

NOVEMBER 2018

DECEMBER 2018

JANUARY 2019

FEBRUARY 2019

MARCH 2019

APRIL 2019

MAY 2019

JUNE 2019

JULY 2019

AUGUST 2019

Wildwood Campus Map