Inspiring Learning, achieving together

 

 

 

 

SEN Information Report 2017

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

 

1.             Who are the best people to talk to about my child’s difficulties with learning, Special

                Educational Needs or disability?                                

2.             How does the school identify children with SEN?

3.             What are the different types of support available in school?

4.             How can I let the school know that I am concerned about my child’s progress in

                  school?

5.             How will school let me know if they have any concerns about my child’s progress in

                school?

6.             How is extra support allocated to children?

7.             How are the teachers helped to work with children with SEN so they make the best

                possible progress?  What training do they have?

8.             How does the school make adaptations to the curriculum and environment for my

                  child?

9.             How does the school measure children’s progress?

10.           How does the school know that support for children with SEN is effective?

11.           How will the school involve me in my child’s learning and progress?

12.           How will the school involve children with SEN in their learning and progress?

13.           What support do you offer to parents of children with SEN?

14.           How will the school support my child when they are joining this school? Leaving this

                school? Moving to another class?

15.           How will the school support my child’s social and emotional development?

16.          What organisations and services does the school work with to improve support for

                children with SEN?

17.           What does Manchester City Council offer to children with SEN or disabilities and

                 their families?

18.           What local and national organisations help children with SEN or disabilities and

                 their families?

 

 

1.   Who are the best people to talk to about my child’s difficulties with learning, Special

                    Educational Needs or disability?

Please arrange to speak to your child’s class teacher first - they know your child best.

You can also ask to speak to Ms Daly who is the Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENDCO)

Please let us know if you would like an interpreter for your meeting.

2.   How does the school identify children with SEN?

We identify children with SEN in different ways:

●   We assess children’s progress each half term and check to see if they are making expected

      progress.  If we are concerned about your child’s progress or development, we will let

      you        know quickly.  Your child’s class teacher will give them targeted teaching in the area

      they are finding difficult.  We may also give them some extra help outside the classroom in a

      group.

     We will let you know how you can help at home.

●   With the extra support in place, your child may make improved progress.  If they do not, we

      will let you know and talk about to you about SEN support and will put this in place to help

      your child make progress.

●   We often ask other professionals for support to identify why your child is experiencing

      difficulty. We will also talk to you about this first.

●   Sometimes children are identified as having SEN before they enter the Nursery.

 It is very important that your child attends their “two year check” with the health visitor when they  are two years old.                    

3.   What are the different types of support available in school?

In your child’s classroom:

●   Support from the class teacher who targets your child’s gaps in their learning.  We will let

      you know your child’s targets.

●   Opportunities for your child to learn in a way that helps them e.g. some children learn better

      when they do things practically or with pictures to support them.

●   We may ask professionals to give us advice about specific strategies that will help your child

      to make better progress.  We may make a “One Page profile” for your child which describes

      their strengths, interests and the best ways to help them. Everyone who works with your

      child  will follow the advice on the One Page Profile.        

We offer group support for children from teaching assistants or teachers.  We run interventions  at different times as we match the  interventions we run to the needs of the children. We offer these interventions:

●   Additional guided reading or group support in maths

●   Reading support from a specialist reading teacher

●   Social, emotional and behavioural support from a drama therapist

●   Motor skills and handwriting

●   Speech and language

●   Spelling

       Interventions for children with autism such as Language for Thinking; Picture  Detectives and Lego Therapy.

 

We also offer some one to one support

●   Reading support with Mrs Mottram

●   One to one reading, spelling, maths or drama therapy

●   Some children with a high level of needs have an Education and Health Care Plan (or a

      Statement of SEN) which means that the have support from a teaching assistant for a

      number  of hours each week.  Your child’s class teacher is responsible for your child’s  

      progress and  learning, even if they have their own teaching assistant.

 

4.  How can I let the school know that I am concerned about my child’s progress or

                    development?

Please arrange to speak to your child’s class teacher first.

You can also make an appointment to speak to Ms Daly or Ms Wray.

Please let us know if you would like an interpreter for your meeting.

Please arrange to speak to your child’s class teacher as soon as you become concerned.  Please don’t wait until parents’ evening.

5. How will school let me know if they have any concerns about my child’s progress in school?

Your child’s class teacher will speak to you when they become concerned.

Ms Wray, Mrs Mottram or Ms Daly may also arrange to discuss your child’s progress with you.

6.  How is extra support allocated to children?

Extra support is not a substitute for high quality classroom teaching.  If a child is experiencing

difficulties, your child’s class teacher will give them targeted teaching in class.  At pupil progress meetings the class teachers talk to the Senior Leadership Team and identify those children who would benefit from some additional help.

●   Most children who receive extra support will do so in a group.

●   If children are experiencing a lot of difficulty we may give them some one to one support

      from a teacher or teaching assistant.

●   A small number of children need a lot of support to make expected progress in school.

      If this is the case for your child, we may talk to you about applying for statutory assessment

      from the Local Authority.  This is how we apply for an Education and Health Care Plan.

7.  How are the teachers helped to work with children with SEN so they make the best possible   progress?  What training do they have?

●   All staff take part in training as part of our programme of continuous professional

      development.  In 2016-17 all staff will receive training in the teaching of reading, writing.

      and maths.  Mrs Mottram is a qualified Reading Recovery teacher.  As well as teaching

      individual children and groups, Mrs Mottram provides regular training for the teachers and

      teaching assistants on strategies to support children in learning to read.

●   Teachers and teaching assistants have also had training on supporting children with social

      and emotional needs from our drama therapist.  In 2016-17 staff will receive training on

      supporting children with autism.

●   We  employed a speech therapist who now works in school on Friday mornings.  She

      provides regular training for staff working with pupils who have SEN language needs.

●   We also regularly use specialist services and local special schools to give us training to

      support individual children.

8. How does the school make adaptations to the curriculum and environment for my child?

We make different adaptations according to children’s needs and always follow specialist advice.  We match learning objectives and targets to their needs.  We also make other adaptations

including:

●   visual timetables

●   picture communication

●   use of visuals to support learning

●   coloured overlays and reading rulers

●   word mats

●   pencil grips

●   physical resources to help children who fidget

●   seating plans adapted to help children to focus

●   individual workstations for children with SEN to learn independently

9.  How does the school measure children’s progress?

In the Foundation Stage we measure progress against the objectives in the Foundation Stage

Profile.  In Years 1 to 6 we measure children’s progress against objectives in the National Curriculum.  We measure whether children are working above, below or at age related expectations.  We track how much progress children make each half term, each year and across their entire time at our school.  A small number of children with SEN make progress very slowly.  If they are working below the objectives of the National Curriculum when they are in Year 1 and above, we measure their progress using a system called the PIVATS.  This helps us measure their progress in very small steps.

10. How does the school know that support for children with SEN is effective?

We monitor the progress of all pupils, including those with SEN at the end of each half term and make changes to the support when necessary.  The Senior Leadership Team observe the teaching and learning of all children, including those with SEN and identify strengths and areas for development.

11. How will the school involve me in my child’s learning and progress?

We will always let you know quickly if we have concerns about your child’s progress.

 

We require parents to:

●  attend all parents’ evenings and meetings about your child’s progress.  Please let us know if

     you would like an interpreter for meetings.

●  to be aware of their child’s targets and their progress towards them.

●  to attend and take part in annual reviews for children with an EHC plan or Statement of SEN.

●  attend parent workshops in English and Maths.

 

You can support your child’s learning and progress by:

●  bringing them to the school library before or after school.

●  reading to them at home and listening to them read.

●  making sure they have a suitable quiet space at home to do their homework.  Turn the

     television off.

●  making sure they get to bed early.  Children need much more sleep than adults.  The NHS

     recommends that 4 to 6 year olds have 11 hours sleep a night; older children need about

     10 hours sleep.  Children learn much more easily when they have had enough sleep.

●  making sure they are in school and on time every day.

12. How will the school involve children with SEN in their learning and progress?

We encourage pupils with special educational needs to understand their rights and to take part in

●  assessing their needs

●  setting targets and reflecting on their learning.

●  the annual review for those pupils with an EHC plan.

13. What support do you offer to parents of children with SEN?

●  We are always happy to talk to you about your child’s progress.

●  We can also put you in touch with local and national organisations that support children

     with SEN and their families.  (See Question 17 & 18).

 

  If your child requires support from a range of agencies, we will set up a multi-agency  

     meeting to bring together a team of professionals who can help.  We will always involve you

     in these meetings.

 

14. How will the school support my child when they are joining this school? Leaving this school?        Moving to another class?

●  Our Foundation Stage staff do home visits before your child starts school.

●  When older children start school, we will assess them as quickly as possible so that we know

     what the next steps are for their learning.  We will also buddy them up with classmates

     so that they are able to make friends quickly.

●  In July teachers have a transition meeting where they discuss your child with the next

     teacher.

·             At the beginning of the school year, the SENDCO will meet with the new class teachers to  discuss the best ways to support your child.

·         When children move to secondary school, we pass on all information about your child’s special educational needs to their new school.  We can also arrange additional transition visits for children who will benefit from these.

15. How does the school help children who need support with their social, emotional

                    development and mental health?

We use a range of strategies:

●  We teach PSHE (Personal, social and health education) to all pupils.

●  Sometimes we set up an individual target and reward system for your child’s behaviour.  We

     will speak to you and your child about this.

●  Arrange for your child to receive targeted support at lunchtime - this may be a lunchtime

     club or activity  with Mrs Jacques, Mr Valentine or Mr Bunbury.

●  Ask the specialist behaviour support team to observe your child in school and advise us.

●  Drama therapy in a group or one to one.

●  A referral to Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMHS).

     We conduct a friendship survey in the autumn term to help us identify children who are feeling isolated.

     Classes have a "worry box" for pupils to voice their worries with their class teacher.

 

16. What organisations and services does the school work with to improve support for children   with SEN?

●  Educational psychologist

●  Speech and language therapy

●  Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS)

●  Specialist teachers from local special schools

●  Occupational therapy service

●  The school nurse and health visitor

17. What does Manchester City Council offer to children with SEN or disabilities and their families?

All local authorities must produce a SEND Local Offer which provides information to parents about organisations that can offer support to Manchester families, including those with children who have SEND.  There are also details of clubs, groups and activities especially for children with SEN and disabilities.  The Manchester Local Offer can be found here: http://manchester.fsd.org.uk/kb5/manchester/fsd/category.page?newcategory=3

18.  What local and national organisations help children with SEN or disabilities and their  families?

Information, Advice and Support (IAS) Manchester offers independent information, advice and support to parents and carers to increase their involvement in the education of their children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities.

parents@manchester.gov.uk

0161 209 8356 (open 10am to 3pm)

AFASIC - voice for life (support children with speech, language and communication needs)

1st Floor, 20 Bowling Green Lane, London, EC1R 0BD.

Phone: 020 7490 9410 Helpline: 08453 555 577 (Monday to Friday, 10:30am to 2:30pm).

British Dyslexia Association

Unit 8 Bracknell Beeches, Old Bracknell Lane, Bracknell, RG12 7BW

Phone: 03334 054555 Helpline: 0333 405 4567 (Monday to Friday, 10am-12:30pm, 1pm-4pm, closed Wednesday afternoons).

Email: helpline@bdadyslexia.org.uk   Website: www.bdadyslexia.org.uk

Children’s Legal Centre

Coram Children’s Legal Centre, Riverside Office Centre, Century House, North Station Road, Colchester, CO1 1RE.  Free advice line: 0808 8020008

Email: info@coramcic.org.uk                    Website: www.childrenslegalcentre.com

Council for Disabled Children

℅ National Children’s Bureau, 8 Wakley Street, London, EC1V 7QE.

Phone: 0207 843 1900

Email: cdc@ncb.org.uk                              Website: www.councilfordisabledchildren.org.uk

Diabetes UK

Macleod House, 10 Parkway, London, NW1 7AA

Phone: 0345 123 2399

Email: info@diabetes.org.uk                     Website: www.diabetes.org.uk

Disability Alliance UK

Universal House, 88-94 Wentworth Street, London E1 7SA

Phone: 020 7247 5776

Email: office@disabilityalliance.org         Website: www.help4me.info

Disability Living Foundation

Ground Floor, Landmark House, Hammersmith Bridge Road, London, W6 9EJ

Phone: 020 7289 6111                     Helpline: 0300 999 0004

Email: info@dlf.org.uk                                         Website: www.dlf.org

Down’s Syndrome Association

Langdon Down Centre, 2a Langdon Park, Teddington, TW11 9PS

Phone: 0333 121 2300 (Monday to Friday, 10am-4pm)

Email: info@downsyndrome.org.uk         Website: www.downs-syndrome.org.uk

Dyspraxia Foundation

8 West Alley, Hitchin, Hertfordshire, SG5 1EG

Phone: 01462 455016 Helpline: 01462 454986

Email: dyspraxia@dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk         Website: www.dyslexiaaction.org.uk

Dyslexia Action

Dyslexia Action House, 10 High Street, Egham, Surrey, TW20 9EA

Phone: 0300 303 8357

Email: info@dyslexiaaction.org.uk            Website: www.dyslexiaaction.org.uk

Epilepsy Action

New Anstey House, Gate Way Drive, Yeadon, Leeds, LS19 7XY

Phone: 0113 210 8800 Helpline: 0808 800 5050

Email: epilepsy@epilepsy.org.uk                Website: www.epilepsy.org.uk

National Asthma UK

18 Mansell Street, London, E1 8AA

Phone: 0207 7864900 Helpline: 0800 121 6244

Website:  www.asthma.org.uk

National Autistic Society

393 City Road, London, EX1V 1NG

Phone: 0207 833 2299 Helpline: 0808 8004104 (Monday to Friday, 10am-4pm)

Website: www.autism.org.uk

Special Needs Jungle

Website: www.specialneedsjungle.com

Young Minds

Suite 11, Baden Place, Crosby Row, London, SE1 1YW

Phone: 020 70895050 Helpline: 0808 802 5544

Email: ymenquiries@youngminds.org.uk         Website: www.youngminds.org.uk

September 2016