Ionia High School English Summer Reading for 2017 – 2018

11th grade Honors English

Excellence Every Day

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/XyPX8SO_7jzolIUauo3H1G7jH4_6NGMXBHMowvr5I-0FsyE4LmXYhg7tVTb11c4HIx3N_pivu636CmD5Lol0E0zB5REhjTLIHL7xuNlB-z4aN5_CIdSkB4qQ9zuSxiBchIWF_VoZ

The literacy goal for 11th grade Honors English students at Ionia High School is to increase their reading stamina for the upcoming SAT and to be college-ready for complex text, to become lifelong learners and readers, and to promote a broader literary perspective for college, career, and community.  

To support this literacy goal, there will be specific reading lessons (especially as it relates to the SAT) next fall, dedicated time for in-class reading, and required summer reading (which accounts for 5% of the first semester grade).

REQUIREMENTS FOR SUMMER READING UNIT

  1. Read one book of your choice.  The book must be school appropriate and parent approved.  The book must have a Lexile between 880 and 1310L.  See  https://lexile.com/fab/ to determine your book’s Lexile or to find one within the Lexile range of 880 – 1310L.  It can be of any genre.
  1. Task One:  Read
  1. Complete log sheets.
  2. List the Lexile level on log sheet.
  1. Task Two:  Complete a media project for book of choice.
  1. The Due Date for 100% grade is August 23rd. Each day it is late, you lose 10%.
  2. Read and Think and Share using a mini-poster, Prezi, PowerPoint or story in a box/ bottle / etc.  Then identify the following and share on your media.
  1. Significance of the Title
  2.  Author’s craftsmanship with literary elements, themes, and setting.  

What is Author’s Craft?

Author’s craft consists of the skills and techniques that an author uses to tell a story or create a piece of writing.

 

Below is a list of skills and techniques that authors often use and are all considered part of author’s craft.

Narrative Elements:

 

·       Characterization: The development of a character within a story—when the author is clearly developing a character by describing at length the character’s thoughts, dialogue, or interactions with other characters.

·       Sequencing:  When the author uses a unique sequence of events to tell the story. For example, when the author jumps between alternating timelines to tell the story or has lapses in the story that become clear later in the story.  

·       Theme: The true meaning or message of the story; what is the author trying to communicate to his or her readers? How are more than one theme woven together.

·       Point of View:  The perspective from which the story is being told. This is an example of author’s craft when the author uses an unique point of view to tell the story OR changes the point of view in the story.

 

·       Flashback: A jump back in time during the story, often done to provide the reader with important background information about a character or past event.

·       Foreshadowing: A warning or indication of a future event in the story.

·       Story Within a Story: When a character in the narrative retells a previous experience that happened to them or someone else within the time frame of the narrative (not a flashback).

·       Cliffhanger: When the author abruptly ends part of the story to make you want to continue reading.

·       Humor/Sarcasm: When the author uses sarcasm or humor to emphasis a point in the story.

·       Chapter Set-Up: When the author uses a quote, famous saying, dates, or some unique characteristic at the beginning of a chapter.

Literary Devices:

 

·       Repetition: Repeating of words or phrases throughout the text. The repetition needs to happen many times to emphasize an important message.

·       Tone or Mood: The tone and feeling that the writer creates for the reader (funny, serious, dramatic, suspenseful). Authors will often establish the mood based upon the actions and feelings of the characters in the story.  

 

·       Simile: Comparisons between two unlike things using the words “like” or “as”.  For example, “She is as sly as a fox.”

·       Metaphor: A comparison between two unlike things.  For example, “He’s a tiger.”

·       Symbolism: An object or action that means something more than its literal meaning. For example—a rainy day often means a bad day or hard times.

·       Alliteration: An author uses the same letter or sound to begin each word in a string of words. For example, Abbie’s alligator ate apples and asparagus.

·       Imagery: The use of descriptive language to create powerful images in the reader’s mind. Often the author describes one of the five senses to help create the image.

·       Onomatopoeia: When a word sounds like what it means. Examples—crash, buzz, thump, bang

·       Allusion: A figure of speech that makes reference to a well-known person, event, or place—I was surprised his nose wasn’t growing like Pinocchio’s.

· Irony     

 Hyperbole: An exaggerated comment or line—I’ve told you that a million times.

·     Oxymoron and Paradox

-  Personification: This occurs when an author gives animals, objects, ideas or actions, the qualities of humans. For example, the calm sea kissed the southern chore.

  1. Include the function of the setting (geography, time period, occupations, cultural environment, social relationships, religion, and moral standards).  How does this impact the plot, theme, reader?
  2. Characterization
  1. Identify and summarize the seven most important plot moments, those that highlight conflict, aid in character development, and move the text toward resolution. Explain and provide supporting detail.
  1. You could do this with a time line on your media project.
  1. One quote from the book that is meaningful to you.  Explain.
  2. A short paragraph persuading others to read your book of choice. Think about what drew you to it.   (no more than 250 words)

  1. Read a second novel, The Great Gatsby.  
  1. This novel is considered by many to be the great American novel as it critiques the American Dream; this work traces one man’s friendship with a mysterious neighbor as he learns about the romantic dream of the title character.  It questions socio-economic and political issues of its setting.
  2. A media project is not required for The Great Gatsby, but rather, you will write an essay upon your return to school in the fall.
  1. You need to read the novel, and I encourage you to take notes to help you remember what you’ve read and discovered on your first week back to school.
  1. Reading questions are attached to help you stay on task and better understand what is implied, inferred, and intended.
  1. These questions will be graded and placed in “Summer Reading” category of the gradebook.
  2. This is a once chance opportunity.  
  1. What do you need to be attentive to as you read the novel?
  1. EVERYTHING LISTED FOR YOUR MEDIA PROJECT in your free choice novel … but you don’t have to do another media project; however, you will be writing a 50 minute essay related to the plot, author’s craft, characterization, the historical impact upon the setting and characters, how the author choices impact the meaning of the text and influences the reader.
  2. Do you know what was historically taking place during the timeframe of novel?
  3. What was the author’s objective in writing this novel?  Think about themes!

REFER TO THE ATTACHED RUBRICS FOR YOUR MEDIA PROJECT, READING, and ESSAY.

Ionia High School English Summer Reading Log for 2017 – 2018

11th grade Honors English / Student’s Choice

Excellence Every Day

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/XyPX8SO_7jzolIUauo3H1G7jH4_6NGMXBHMowvr5I-0FsyE4LmXYhg7tVTb11c4HIx3N_pivu636CmD5Lol0E0zB5REhjTLIHL7xuNlB-z4aN5_CIdSkB4qQ9zuSxiBchIWF_VoZ

Student Name:  _________________________________    

Title of Student’s Free Choice Novel:  ___________________________________________

Author:  ___________________________    Date Published:  ________________________

Number of pages in this novel:  _________________     Lexile Level:  __________________

Date

Starting Page

Last Page Read

What just happened during this reading session?

Date

Starting Page

Last Page Read

What just happened during this reading session?

        

Summary of the book:

Would you suggest this book to others?  Explain.

What was the author’s objective in writing this book?  Consider theme, lessons, and genre.

Ionia High School English Summer Reading Log for 2017 – 2018

11th grade Honors English / The Great Gatsby

Excellence Every Day

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/XyPX8SO_7jzolIUauo3H1G7jH4_6NGMXBHMowvr5I-0FsyE4LmXYhg7tVTb11c4HIx3N_pivu636CmD5Lol0E0zB5REhjTLIHL7xuNlB-z4aN5_CIdSkB4qQ9zuSxiBchIWF_VoZ

Student Name:  _________________________________    

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Date Published:  ___________      Setting / Time frame:  _____________

Number of pages in this novel:  _________________     Lexile Level:  __________________

Date

Starting Page

Last Page Read

What just happened during this reading session?

Date

Starting Page

Last Page Read

What just happened during this reading session?