pok-globaliSyllabus                                                                                 of

Global Inequality (3cr)

http://globali.professorpok.com 

CCNY - Spring 2015

SOC 311.17 (M, W, 2:00 - 3:15, NAC 6/311)

Instructor: Kate B. Pok-Carabalona

Email: professorpok@gmail.com

Office Hours: by appt.

TOC

Course Description

Course Goals & Objectives

Goals

Substantive Knowledge

Related Skills/Abilities

Methods of Instruction

Course Materials

Required Textbook(s)

Instructional Technology

Assignments, Grading, & Scale

(5%) Various

(15%) Class Participation & Contributions

(15%) Weekly Reflection

( 5%) Research Paper - Proposal (1 page)

(10%) Research Paper - Annotated Bibliography

( 5%) Research Paper - Outline (1-3 pages)

(10%) Presentations & Mock Conference

(35%) Research Paper - Final

Note on Formatting Assignments

Scale

Important Course Policies

Attendance

Tardiness

Policies for Late Work

Policy for Extra Credit

Emailing me

Policy on Academic Integrity

ADA Policy

Syllabus Change Policy

Syllabus & Calendar

Student "Job Description"

Courtesy

In-Class Phones/Tablets/Laptops Policy

Readings

Taking Notes

Writing

Keeping Track of Your Own Grades

Instructor "Job Description"

Course Description

The term “global inequality” refers to the systematic differences in the distribution of socially valued attributes such as education, income, information, health, and influence between people living in different areas of the globe. This course examines current states of global inequality at both the local and world scales (within and across countries) and considers the historical contexts in which such unequal access arose as well as how such inequalities continue to be nurtured and/or maintained and exacerbated. At the core of our examination is an analysis of the relationship or link between the dramatic transformations in economic and social structures (often collectively referred to as “globalization”) and its role in the perpetuation/alleviation of enduring social asymmetries in wealth and poverty, population growth, hunger, environmental degradation, and power-- particularly as related to describing differences between those who live in the wealthy nations of the global North (especially the U.S.) and the “poor” nations of the global South.

We begin by trying to clarify and define what we mean by “inequality” and “globalization.” Then we look more closely how such inequalities arose, focusing on intersection between the processes of globalization and “international development and aid.” In the course of the readings, we will wrestle with a series of difficult questions:

We conclude the course with a look at a range of responses and countermovements to the dominant model of globalization, as well as alternative models of development.

Some questions:

Pre-requisites: None

Course Goals & Objectives

Goals

The goal of this course to introduce students to some of the central themes, debates, and literature on the topics of globalization, global poverty, and development. After taking this course, students should have a good foundation for future classes on    


How the course will benefit students (e.g., position them to take other courses or advance toward a particular career; enhanced program-level competencies)

Substantive Knowledge

After taking this class, students should be able to

Related Skills/Abilities

The main assignment for this course is a research paper. It will give students experience and practice

Methods of Instruction

In an ideal world, we would be able to take all the time in the world and discuss the readings under a tree. Unfortunately, this is not possible.

Course Materials

Required Textbook(s)

Instructional Technology 

Instead of using Bb, we will using a website: globali.professorpok.com in combination with a Google Group as our discussion group.

Assignments, Grading, & Scale

  1. (5%) Various
  2. (15%) Class Participation & Contributions
  3. (15%) Weekly Reflection
  4. ( 5%) Research Paper - Proposal (1 page)
  5. (10%) Research Paper - Annotated Bibliography
  6. ( 5%) Research Paper - Outline (1-3 pages)
  7. (10%) Presentations & Mock Conference
  8. (35%) Research Paper - Final

(5%) Various

I’ve learned from experience to include this category. It encompases various assignments that I may assign that are not explicitly noted in the syllabus. For example, if there is a pop quiz, that grade would fall under this category.

(15%) Class Participation & Contributions

This category is really about class participation.

(15%) Weekly Reflection

Your Weekly Reflection on the week’s readings are due by 5pm midnight every Friday. At the end of each Wednesday class, I will give you 3-5 minutes to write

  1.  the main point they’re taking from the week’s lecture/discussion/readings; and
  2. one question you have or issue you don’t quite understand

After writing this 3-5 minute response, you will go home and post your comments to our discussion board (Google Group).

Since we meet for 14 weeks, you will be making roughly 12 7 reflections (a few weeks do NOT require reflections). You may skip making 2 reflections, no questions asked. Any reflection you missed above two will lower your Weekly Reflection grade:

miss 2 reflections = 100%

miss 3 reflections = 90%

miss 4 reflections = 80%

miss 5 reflections = 70%

miss 6 reflections = 60%

miss 7+ reflections = 50%

These reflections are important for you and for me:

( 5%) Research Paper - Proposal (1-2 pages)

see Research Paper - Proposal

(10%) Research Paper - Annotated Bibliography

see Research Paper - Annotated Bibliography

( 5%) Research Paper - Outline (1-3 pages)

See Research Paper Outline

(10%) Presentations & Mock Conference

See Presentations & Conference

(35%) Research Paper - Final

see Research Paper - Final

Note on Formatting Assignments

Hard copies of assignments that you turn in to me should be formatted as follows:

Your First Name Last Name

Course Name-Semester (e.g. Global Inequality-15SP)

Assignment Name

Due Date

Title if Applicable

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Agam doctus an mei, no sit doctus dissentiet, pri homero vocent vituperata id. Tamquam aliquam mandamus ad sit. Adhuc scripta postulant no eam. Prompta facilisis rationibus id sit, at agam quando consul vel. In sea altera pertinacia, nam ad errem vocent feugait. Pro unum suscipit eu, eirmod utroque aliquando id quo. Sed salutatus cotidieque ad, id alii atomorum salutandi per.

Figure 1: Example of Assignment Formatting

If there are multiple pages to an assignments, please staple the work.

Please do NOT use: 

Scale

Letter Grades and Grade Point Equivalents

A+

4.0

93.0–100.0

A

4.0

92.5-97.4

A-

3.7

90.0–92.4

B+

3.3

87.1–89.9

B

3.0

83.0–87.0

B-

2.7

80.0–82.9

C+

2.3

77.1–79.9

C

2.0

73.0–77.0

C-

1.7

70.0–72.9

D+

1.3

67.1–69.9

D

1.0

60.0–67.0

F

0.0

below 60.0

Explanation:

Important Course Policies

Attendance

I am loathe to make attendance mandatory. Instead, you have the opportunity to earn extra credit in the form of attendance. We meet for 28 days; you may miss 4 days, no questions asked. If you attend 24 days, you will earn 1% extra credit that will be added to your final grade. This extra credit is all or nothing:

Tardiness

Please make any and all efforts to come to class on time.

Policies for Late Work

Late work is not accepted.

Policy for Extra Credit

There is no extra credit for this class except as described in the Attendance Policy (see above).

Emailing me

Some guidelines for emailing me:

I will usually respond to your email within 24 hours. If I have not responded by then, feel free to send another email, BUT please do not send me an email every few hours asking why I have not already responded to your first email.  

Policy on Academic Integrity

The CUNY guidelines on Academic Integrity note that

“Academic dishonesty is prohibited the City University of New York. Penalties for academic dishonesty include academic sanctions, such as failing or otherwise reduced grades, and/or disciplinary sanctions, including suspension or expulsion.”

If I suspect you of cheating in anyway (including plagiarism or having someone else do your work for you), I have no choice but to report you to the college. As noted, you risk expulsion from the school in such cases.

ADA Policy

In compliance with the American Disability Act of 1990 (ADA) and with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Hunter College is committed to ensuring educational parity and accommodations for all students with documented disabilities and/or medical conditions. It is recommended that all students with documented disabilities (Emotional, Medical, Physical, and/or Learning) consult the Office of AccessABILITY, located in Room E1214B, to secure necessary academic accommodations. For further information and assistance, please call: (212) 772- 4857 or (212) 650-3230.

Syllabus Change Policy

I reserve the right to revise and change this course schedule as necessary.

Syllabus & Calendar

I have created a Google Calendar for this class. The Google Calendar is the most up-to-date version of our syllabus; any changes I make to our schedule will be reflected on the calendar. The information below is useful as a guide.

Week 1 - Welcome & Introductions

Day 1: Introduction to Course

  1. “register” on the Student Info Form: due 9pm, Thu, 1/29
  2. sign up for our Google Groups; due 9pm, Sun, 2/1

Week 2 - On Inequalities

Reflection #1 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 2/6

Day 2: What is Global Inequality?

Day 3: Measuring Global Inequality


Week 3: Trying to Explain Inequality

Reflection #2 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 2/13

Day 4: Institutions, Geography, and Development

Day 5: Institutions, Geography, and Development cont’d

Suggested Qs:


Week 4: In-Class Group Work

Day 6: Preparing a Proposal


Week 5: Debating Globalization

Reflection #3 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 2/27

Day 7:

Day 8

Suggested Qs:

  1. Are the arguments in this section more persuasive for the position that “ globalization is good” or the position that “ globalization is bad”? Why? Continually revisit this question as you read the other chapters in this book.
  2. How do the various dimensions of globalization affect your life? Consider, for example, job opportunities, stock market fluctuations, diseases ( AIDS, SARS, West Nile virus), music, food, and fashion.
  3. What additional evidence can you provide for Freidman’s “ flat world” thesis, especially in the non- Western world?
  4. The readings in this section focus on the consequences of globalization for societies, institutions within societies ( democracy), and opportunities for individuals ( jobs, wages). Ghemawat disagrees with Friedman’s view of information technology in the global age as profoundly liberating. What do you think of the reasons and evidence he gives to make the argument that the world’s playing field is not leveling?


Week 6: Development & Globalization

No Weekly Reflection due

Day 9 - Library Day!

Day 10: Understanding the Players


Week 7: Development & Globalization cont’d

No Weekly Reflection due

Day 11: Guest Speaker -

Day 12 - Citation workshop (in-class workshop run by me)


Week 8: Economic Globalization - Locally & Globally

Reflection #4 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 3/20

Day 13

Day 14

Suggested Qs:

  1. What is the evidence of the global economy penetrating your community? Who benefits from it? Who does not?
  2. How does Wal-Mart or Amazon affect your community? How does it affect workers everywhere?
  3. Thinking about the technology you commonly use, smartphones, laptop, etc., how often have you thought about the supply chain involved in its manufacture? Now, reflect on how you think your use of your products impacts those are built it.

Week 9: Inequality and the Washington Consensus

Reflection #5 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 3/27

Day 15

        

Day 16


Week 10: Political Globalization

Reflection #6 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 4/3

Day 17:

Day 18


Week 11: The Restructuring of Social Arrangements (Gender & Migration)

Reflection #7 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 4/17

Day 19

Day 20


Week 12: The Aid Debates (tentative)

Reflection #8 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 4/24

Day 21

Day 22


Week 13: Making Trade Work (tentative)

Reflection #9 on this week’s readings due 5pm, Fri, 5/1

Day 23

Day 24: CLASS CANCELLED


Week 14: TBA

Day 25

Day 26: Mock Conference (presentations)


Week 15: Mock Conference

Day 27: Mock Conference (presentations)

Day 28: Mock Conference (presentations)

Final Paper via Email (PDF)


Student "Job Description"

Below are the policies that govern this class. They may also be read as what I view are student responsibilities and my expectations of you as students.

Courtesy

Common courtesy and respect are expected in this class. The most basic idea is not to disrupt your classmates or your instructor during class. Please avoid behavior such as the following: habitually coming to class late, carrying on conversations in class (especially conversations not relevant to our class topic), taking a call (or making a call) during class, disrupting each other, and generally being rude or disrespectful of each other. Please note that the same applies to discussions that take place on class listservs, discussion groups, etc.

In-Class Phones/Tablets/Laptops Policy

No phones or smartphones are allowed in this class. Please turn them off and put them away for the ENTIRETY of the class. During class, you may NOT check your email, send a text, etc. Of course I understand that there may be special circumstances whereby a student must absolutely have access to his/her phone during class; in these situations, please let me know ahead of time so I don’t mistake your behavior in class. If you absolutely must send that text message, please step outside the class The same policy applies for tablets such as iPads, Android tablets, and laptop computers. Again, if you elect to buy a digital version of your textbook that you access on your tablet, please let me know first. The Wi-Fi service at Hunter is a great resource for students, but please do not abuse it. Checking email, sending a text, and browsing the Internet during class is inappropriate behavior. If you prefer to browse the Internet, shop for clothes, watch videos, etc., please do me and your peers the courtesy of leaving the class. If I have to speak to you more than once about using a phone, etc. in class, I will deduct points from your participation grade (after all, you can’t be participating if you’re texting, browsing, etc.).

Readings

You are expected to complete ALL readings PRIOR to coming to class. I've had many students tell me that they prefer to read the assigned readings after our discussions or lectures, but that’s not the way it works in college. It is expected that you struggle with the material and try to understand the material on your own first. Note that some professors give regular quizzes to ensure that you read the material. I find this a little patronizing. I repeat that it is YOUR responsibility to complete the readings. We may or may not have time to go over every reading in minute detail in class, but you are still responsible for the material in the readings.

Taking Notes

In recent years, I've noticed that students increasingly do not take notes. Taking notes is a good practice. No matter how well you think you will remember something, you will not. Research has shown that taking notes helps you to better remember discussion and important notes. Moreover, they may come in handy when I give you a pop quiz where I allow you to use your notes but not your texts.

Writing

Your writing should abide by the standards of good college-level writing. While writing requirements may differ by assignment or across disciplines, there are some basics of college-level writing to which all assignments should abide. Generally, it is not enough to merely summarize readings (unless an assignment specifically demands summaries). At the most basic level, college level-writing usually requires 1) a thesis, 2) supporting documentation that is correctly cited, and 3) logical and analytical reasoning. This type of writing is not easy, it is an acquired skill. Writing is a craft that improves with practice, feedback, and revision. In short, you must work on your writing if you hope to improve it. Finally, it goes without saying that college-level writing also includes a good command of the basics of grammar, spelling, and syntax. The written work you turn in for this class will take all of these factors into consideration. Work that demonstrates little thought or revision will earn you low grades.

Keeping Track of Your Own Grades

In recent years, I have received more and more requests by students for regular updates to their grades. Although, faculty sometimes make use of the gradebook in Bb or send you grade reports, this practice is a courtesy to students, NOT an entitlement. It is not an unusual requirement that you be responsible for keeping track of and calculating your own grades. To be sure, part of my responsibility is to grade your work in a timely manner, but I am not responsible for making sure you know what your grade is at every moment.


Instructor "Job Description"

Below are some of the things you may expect that I will do for you.