Friday, October 20, 2017.

Session 1:  8:30am - 9:30am

Whistler A - Mark Reid (Conn-Selmer) and Jeff Weaver (BCMEA)

“Curriculum Transformation Update”

Join us for an outline and overview of the forthcoming final revisions to the Arts Education 10-12 curriculum. The session will also include discussion on curriculum implementation ideas, program design, and course structures. Participants are encouraged to bring their questions and exchange ideas with colleagues.

Whistler B - Dr. Susan Brumfield (Hal Leonard)

First, We Sing! Songs and Games in the Music Class” (Part 1)

Looking for new songs to add to your repertoire, and new ways to teach familiar favorites? First, We Sing! Songbooks 1, 2 & 3 are packed with children’s songs, rhymes and games from around the world, selected, transcribed and annotated by Dr. Susan Brumfield. In this session, we will explore teaching activities, singing games and new ways to incorporate these songs into a Kodály-inspired, literacy-based curriculum. First, We Sing Songbooks come with an enhanced CD featuring Inner Voices, a group of 8 – 12-year old singers from The West Texas Children’s Chorus.

        

Whistler C - Long & McQuade - Diana Clark, Director

“Elementary Choral Reading Session”

Diverse and creative approaches to teaching children’s choirs are the focus of this fast-paced choral reading session. Choral selections include established favourites as well as fresh new titles in unison and 2-part settings. This session includes a complimentary music packet for the first 85 participants.

        

Fraser - Milton Randall (Groove Masters Percussion)

Classroom Drumming with Youtube: A creative approach for educators”

Join Milton Randall in looking at creative approaches to teaching classroom-based drumming to your students.  Milton will be demonstrating how YouTube has become a powerful tool for music education.

Birkenhead/Capilano - Craig Thomson (Yamaha)

Getting the Best Sound Out Of Your Sax Section”

The saxophone is one of those instruments where you can get away with having a weak embouchure for a long time. It’s one of the easiest wind instruments to start playing, and it’s also an easy instrument to sound mediocre on. The rest of your ensemble tends to get a stronger embouchure and a bigger sound just by virtue of the parts they’re made to play year after year. The result is that your saxophone section gets drowned out (especially in the jazz band). Just like every other instrument, there are specific exercises and techniques that students and directors should use every day to make their saxophone sound more powerful and mature as the years go on!
**Any workshop participants who play saxophone (or who have a saxophone) are encouraged to bring their instruments to this session and participate actively!**

Thompson - Don Bennett

“76 Trombones”

Imagine a scenario where your students fight over who gets to play the trombone. Now imagine that they play with a great sound and in tune – even those 5th position D flats and G flats!

Come and get some great recruiting ideas to beef up your low brass section and give your band the foundation it needs to sound good. You’ll discover what the most frequent problems are that are often not addressed with young trombone players, and how to fix them quickly.

Finally, you’ll get suggestions for good repertoire for all levels that your low brass will ask for every year.

        

Lillooet - CMEA

“Executive Meeting of the Full Board of the CMEA”

This is a closed board meeting of the full board of the Canadian Music Educators’ Association.  The BCMEA wishes to thank members of the CMEA full board that are in attendance this week.

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 1 - Dr. Anita Prest (UVic), Dr. Scott Goble (UBC), Hector Vazquez, Beth Tuinstra, & Charmaine Liu

“​Culturally responsive music in action: K–12 music teachers and local culture bearers Indigenizing music education in BC together.”

How are music teachers and Indigenous culture bearers working together to bring Indigenous content, pedagogy and worldview into BC music classrooms? What specific projects and events have they created collaboratively? In this session, we share some of the results of our two-year study funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Learn about the activities that some rural music teachers and culture bearers from Nisga'a, Gitxsan, Nuu-chah-nulth, and Hul'qumi'num territories have undertaken collaboratively to date. Discover their ideas, challenges, problem solving, and the changes they have witnessed as they have done this work. ​This will be an interactive session.

Upper Theatre Lobby 2

Not In Use

Session 2:  10:00am - 11:00am

Whistler A - Jen Hill, Jenn Treble, & Sarah Rhude

“K-12 First Nations Drumming in the Classroom”

In this workshop we will share our on-going story of aiming to respectfully weave First Nations drumming throughout the Greater Victoria School District. This task is in collaboration with Aboriginal Nations Education Division (ANED) the Lekwungen community, on whose traditional territory we live, learn and do our work, and the Greater Victoria Music Educators’ Association (GVMEA). Making drums with staff and students, sharing the teachings of the drums in a culturally safe way, and opening assemblies, ceremonies and celebrations with drumming is our current focus. We have been given permission, through protocol, to share 7 songs that span the three Vancouver Island Nations; Coast Salish, Nuu-chah-nulth, and kwakwaka’wakw. These songs include a celebration, journey, honour, social, gratitude, children’s and a residential school dedication song, to be used appropriately depending on the occasion. In sharing this journey; through sitting in circle, drumming together as we do in the classroom, and demonstrating our best practices, we hope to fan sparks of interest and support you in including Indigenous ways of knowing and being, through drumming, into your schools.

**This session is appropriate for teachers of any subject, K-12 (including band choir, strings, and general music). Participants are invited to bring their own drum or to borrow a drum available at the session.**

        

Whistler B - Dr. Susan Brumfield (Hal Leonard)

“First, We Sing! Songs and Games in the Music Class” (Part 2)

Looking for new songs to add to your repertoire, and new ways to teach familiar favorites? First, We Sing! Songbooks 1, 2 & 3 are packed with children’s songs, rhymes and games from around the world, selected, transcribed and annotated by Dr. Susan Brumfield. In this session, we will explore teaching activities, singing games and new ways to incorporate these songs into a Kodály-inspired, literacy-based curriculum. First, We Sing Songbooks come with an enhanced CD featuring Inner Voices, a group of 8 – 12-year old singers from The West Texas Children’s Chorus.

        

Whistler C - Long & McQuade - Dr. Joel Tranquilla, Director

“High School Choral Reading Session”

Core repertoire by writers from Canada and abroad forms the central focus of this choral reading session for high school and college choirs. Exciting new releases for mixed voices complete the pack for a meaningful  exploration of a variety of styles and genres. This session includes a complimentary music packet for the first 65 participants.

Fraser - Dr. Daniel Tones (KPU/Yamaha)

Demystifying the Closed Roll: Keys to success on the snare drum”

The closed roll is a fundamental technique with which young percussionists often struggle, and this interactive workshop presents essential concepts and exercises for building a successful closed roll on the snare drum. Connections will be drawn between hand position, finger position, instrument height, and body mechanics to demonstrate how a blended, effective roll can be created. Questions from the audience are encouraged, and selected participants will have the opportunity to practice the techniques and exercises presented.

        

Birkenhead/Capilano - Craig Thomson (Yamaha)

Jazz Language: Building Solos with Licks, Rhythm, and Ornamentation”

Learning to improvise can be a daunting task for a student, and it can be just as difficult for the teacher! In this workshop, you’ll learn the difference between the major and minor blues scales, how to construct strong melodies from chord tones, how to develop strong rhythmic motifs through repetition, how to use jazz ornamentation to add excitement to lines, and a few tried-and-true jazz language gems to make a solo really stand out. Getting students to use these techniques can enable and empower even the most reluctant improvisers in your class!  
**Workshop participants are invited to bring instruments and participate actively!**

        

Thompson - Paul Luongo

“A ukulele a day keeps the doctor away”

Learn to love practice and you’ve got it made! In this workshop Paul Luongo will help you to develop a fun, engaging practice routine that you’ll look forward to doing EVERY DAY!

**Please bring your ukulele as we have a small supply of ukuleles to borrow**

Lillooet - CMEA

“Executive Meeting of the Full Board of the CMEA”

This is a closed board meeting of the full board of the Canadian Music Educators’ Association.  The BCMEA wishes to thank members of the CMEA full board that are in attendance this week.

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 1 - CMEBC

Annual General Meeting & Session: "Sharing our Vision for Music Education in BC​"

This AGM and Session is being presented by the board of the CMEBC.  The CMEBC is a non-profit society that lobbies on behalf of music educators across the province working towards stronger overall music education support in BC!

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 2

Not In Use

Keynote Address:  1:00pm - 2:00pm

Dr. Ralph Hultgren AM

Keynote Address - “What do you say when you don’t know what to say”

Here you, standing on the podium with your newly minted Bachelor of Music

Education Degree safely tucked in your satchel. Beaming with anticipation you

have readied yourself for all that may assail you – except for ‘that’ question from

the ninth grade, second flute player.

Sitting in the faculty meeting of the Performing Arts Department, bristling with

the confidence born of your recent graduation from your Master of Music,

majoring in Conducting, and the meeting moves into considerations for funding

for the coming year. You know what is required for music education and you

understand the necessity of being able to articulate your case. “What are the

benefits of music in a child’s life?” questions the Head of Drama, and all you can

do is stumble over how music helps aides a child in mathematics and teamwork.

Your colleague queries your integrity, noting your absence in recent scheduled

events and questioning your commitment and professionalism. You feel the

angst of recent days, with a sick child and deeper troubles at home. That angst

morphs into anger and your pulses races as your struggle to calm yourself,

wondering how to answer the intemperate remarks of your associate.

There may be no definitive answers but there are ways in which we can all

address such concerning situations. Dr Hultgren will consider matters of this

kind, both humorous and heartfelt, in presenting this year’s keynote address.

Session 3:  2:15pm - 3:15pm

Whistler A - Dr. Gerry King (UVic), Erika Sinhuber, Jarrett Schill, Sergei Ryga

Building, Maintaining, and Creating Growth: Learning From Your Peers”

Building, Maintaining, and Creating Growth in British Columbia Middle and Secondary Schools: Learning from Your Peers. This is the final of four annual presentations to assist teachers throughout the Province. Four geographical areas (unique and similar situations for all) 2014 - Vancouver Island; 2015 - Northern BC; 2016 - Lower Mainland; 2017 Central and Eastern BC. Four outstanding educators each will form a panel organized and moderated by Dr. King. This is a rare opportunity to "capture" the essence of success in building, maintaining and creating growth in music programs.

Whistler B - Dr. Susan Brumfield (Hal Leonard)

“PRACTICAL PEDAGOGY: Skill Building and Practice Activities”

You’ve carefully prepared and presented each new element, but what’s next? Practice, and lots of it! Fast-paced and fun, these 5-7 minute practice cards are designed to reinforce new concepts and support literacy skills through sequential, easy to assess activities. Student-tested and approved, these activities fit easily into your rehearsal and lesson plans, with minimum planning and maximum results. Participants will explore creative ways to reinforce musical skill development in singing, playing, reading, writing, composition, improvisation and part-work in both general music and choral settings. We will explore 5-7 minute practice activities designed to save planning time and to provide efficient and fun ways to deliver instruction and assess mastery.

        

Whistler C - Taylor Bone

Recruitment and Community Building in the High School Choral Program”

In this session, we will discuss tried, tested and true ways of building a choral program and musical community within your school.  Topics will include recruitment of singers (especially men!), fostering community growth within classes and the department, and discussions around balance in terms of Choir being a "fun" course while still maintaining musical integrity.  I'll share with you the tips and tricks I've used (and borrowed and stolen from many colleagues) that have worked for me over the past 10 years to build a rich and vibrant choral program.

Fraser - Michael Beauclerc (Yamaha)

“Developing Modern Drumlines” (Part 1)

Indoor marching drumline is one of the fastest growing scholastic and community youth activities in Canada. During this session, see how a drumline can invigorate your music program and raise your school’s profile within the community. This hands-on workshop with author and educator Michael Beauclerc will teach you marching percussion fundamentals, fun exercises, and great pep grooves. All equipment and materials provided.

        

Birkenhead/Capilano - Steve Maddock

Vocal Improvisation With Melodic and Harmonic Coherence”

The aim of this session is to outline some basic methods and strategies in the area of vocal improvisation, and thus establish a “point of departure” for both educators and students. As both a jazz educator and practitioner, my approach to vocal improvisation can be divided into two parts: “what” and “how”. The “what” involves the identification and subsequent practice (via repetition) of fundamental elements of the jazz vocabulary. Upon achieving familiarity with these common jazz devices, I transition to the “how” phase, and explore ways to implement the devices in practical jazz terms, using common chord progressions (ie. jazz standards) as vehicles for exploration. I find that this twofold approach enables me to interact with, and even imply, the harmonic layer, rather than merely “float” above it, as many vocalists are apt to do when improvising.

        

Thompson - Paul Luongo

Ukuleles in the Classroom: A "D-lightful" Experience

This workshop focuses on creating a classroom routine that develops your students' abilities with the instrument while integrating Vocal Technique and singing in harmony. Additionally, resources and teaching techniques will be used to demonstrate how one can grow the skills of their students.  

**Please bring your ukulele as we have a small supply of ukuleles to borrow**

        

Lillooet - CMEA

“Executive Meeting of the Full Board of the CMEA”

This is a closed board meeting of the full board of the Canadian Music Educators’ Association.  The BCMEA wishes to thank members of the CMEA full board that are in attendance this week.

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 1 - Neil Hunter (Breezin’ Thru)

“Exciting New Breezin' Thru Theory Next Gen: Anywhere, Any Device!”

Say goodbye to tech barriers and hello to the most fun, effective, accessible way to breeze thru music theory - even in the palm of your hand. Breezin’ Thru Theory ‘Next Gen’ works anywhere, on any device. Its stunning new interface and fun rewards encourage mastery! Accessed 100% online and auto-assessed, you’ll see real progress with Breezin’ Thru Theory. Save time and track progress with cool dashboards. Use with music students from 4th to 12th grade: at school, at home or even on the bus!

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 2

Not In Use

Saturday, October 21, 2017.

Session 4:  8:30am - 9:30am

Whistler A - Kevin Hamlin (Yamaha)

“Beginning Band: Start Them Right!”

When beginning to learn an instrument, the first few weeks are critical for developing proper technique and habits. This session will provide very practical solutions for the teacher to directly employ in their class; solutions that will look at each instrument and what is necessary to give your students the best start possible. After the session, you’ll leave with a wealth of practical solutions that have been developed and refined over many years. Your bands will improve greatly, as will your enrollment/retention.

        

Whistler B - Helen Van Spronsen

Ta ti Tai, Tititi Tai !”

Kodály told us that children should learn songs that are rooted in their native tongue.  The English language is often strongly ‘compound’ – think of all that iambic pentameter you learned when you studied Shakespeare!  Sometimes though, we get so busy teaching 'ta' and 'titi' that compound time songs and games get left behind.  In this active workshop you will learn some great 6/8 songs and fun games along with activities and suggestions for how to fit them into your K-7 sequencing plans.

Whistler C - Paula Kremer

“Why My Dog’s Name Is TiLa”

Our students, as they learn to play and sing in bands and choirs, discover the language of music. As in most languages, literacy is manifested beyond speaking, in the ability to read and write. The key to truly understanding this language – what we play and sing – is in the connection of sound and theory. How can we help our students gain this understanding and improve their musicianship skills? How can we lead our students on the path towards a ‘seeing ear’ and a ‘hearing eye’? We can build their aural skills through singing... We can use Solfege!

Fraser - Robin Layne

“Latin Percussion: Using clave to build understanding of musical relationships and rhythms”

This workshop will be centred around the clave and using that rhythm as a framework to explore Latin Percussion and rhythmic relationships. Starting with an overview of how these rhythms work in Cuba, participants will get a chance to dig deeper into these rhythmic connections and look at various ways to implement them in the classroom setting.

**This will be a hands on workshop with a chance to play congas, clave and develop these conversations in rhythm that provide a framework for so much music.**

Birkenhead/Capilano - Craig Thomson (Yamaha)

Addressing Common Issues for Saxophone Players”

Every teacher has heard that thin, wavering saxophone tone. Sometimes it’s sharp, sometimes it’s flat. Chirping and squeaking. How can you troubleshoot the problem? In this workshop, we will explore the many and various issues that plague student saxophonists: reeds and basic equipment; ensuring students have the correct embouchure; mouthpiece, ligature, and reed setup; necessary alternate fingerings (and when to use them); saxophone position and seated posture; anchoring using the teeth, thumbs, and neckstrap; air support/speed for tone control; describing the correct mouth shape for playing extreme ranges in tune; important cleaning practices that save you money; optional equipment for the band director or serious student; common preventable damage; when to recommend an equipment upgrade (and what to recommend).

Thompson - Aaron Graham

Proper Playing Area: Instantly improve the sound of your percussion section”

Even seasoned percussionists sometimes produce undesirable sounds on their instruments because a simple lack of focus and concentration leads to playing percussion instruments in an improper playing area. Beginning percussionists and directors alike may be unaware of the sonic improvements this awareness can produce, and these fundamental techniques often go unnoticed. Once a performer or director becomes accustomed to more desirable tones on these instruments, the use of improper playing areas becomes immediately distinguishable to the ear, and can have an immense effect on the quality of an ensemble’s sound. In this session I will present the proper playing areas for the most commonly utilized percussion instruments, as well as demonstrate the sonic differences that occur when moving from an improper to proper playing area. These techniques apply to all realms of percussion playing - from the concert hall, to the marching field, to the throne of a jazz ensemble - and a simple ongoing attention to detail can produce wonderful improvements in your ensemble’s sound.

        

Lillooet - CMEA

“Executive Meeting of the Full Board of the CMEA”

This is a closed board meeting of the full board of the Canadian Music Educators’ Association.  The BCMEA wishes to thank members of the CMEA full board that are in attendance this week.

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 1 - UVic Student Music Educators

Student Presentation: Children's Literature in the Music Room

With presentations by two undergraduate students at the University of Victoria, this session will explore different ways of incorporating children’s literature into the elementary music curriculum. From using story-time to teach musical terminology, to writing Orff ensemble arrangements based on the text, emphasis will be placed on how to create a series of lessons suitable for different grade levels. Come ready to relive your own childhood as you participate in this interactive experience.

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 2

Not In Use

        

Session 5:  9:45am - 10:45am

Whistler A - Mark Reid (Conn-Selmer)

Language of Instruction: Improving Practice Through Relational Pedagogy

Have you noticed that there is an "I" in choir yet there is a "us" in chorus? The language we use can greatly influence the frequency, endurance, and depth of students' engagement in rehearsals. The session will be of interest to those who champion student leadership, inclusive program culture, and a strong sense of community.

        

Whistler B - Dr. Edward Higgins (PSU)

“Intonation: It's a lot more than the needle says!”

The electronic “Strobe Tuner” was introduced in 1936 so why don’t more ensembles play in tune? This session will attempt to answer that question as well as suggest some alternative strategies that are based on the experiences of the 30-year career of Dr. Edward Higgins. The lecture will discuss an alternative to achieving successful intonation, which Dr. Higgins, has termed “Focal Point Intonation.”

Whistler C - Patti Thorpe

“Close Harmony Boot Camp”

Every choir director wants their singers to perform with more confidence and visual engagement. It is often a challenge to find ways for our singers to learn their parts independently. Barbershop singers, in all their sequins and funny matching costumes, have been working on these skills for decades and have mastered vowel matching and vertical tuning of chords to maximize overtones.

“You might think Barbershop is only old guys singing old songs, but you're wrong. Sometimes the songs are new, sometimes the guys are young, but you know what? There's a lot to be learned from your elders, and if a song has lasted a century, it's still around for a good reason.

I'm not saying you have to learn Barbershop to be a great a cappella singer... but I am promising you if you do sing Barbershop, you'll be better than if you don't.” Deke Sharon : Barbershop: A Cappella's Martial Art, www.casa.org 22 March 2013.

 

This hands-on session will introduce participants to close harmony in the barbershop style, including online resources and short harmonic examples. Come ready to sing, with or without your boater hat!

Fraser - Robin Layne

Exploring the use of 6/8 Rhythms of West Africa in a Jazz Setting”

Based on my experiences studying West African drumming in Guinea and Mali, this workshop aims to give you a fresh approach to 6/8 rhythms and some new rhythm studies you can use with your students that will help their jazz comping and overall feeling of pulse.

Come prepared to have fun, play some drums, use your hands and feet, and try thinking of rhythm and time as a circle not in the linear way that we are used to.

Birkenhead/Capilano - Dr. Daniel Tones (KPU/Yamaha/Sabian)

Cymbal Artistry: Foundational Concepts and Playing Techniques”

Cymbals are core elements of the percussion section that provide distinct opportunities for artistic expression. This interactive workshop presents an overview of foundational concepts and vital playing techniques for hand crash and suspended cymbals. Participants will be introduced to cymbal selection, instrument set-up, and producing crashes or rolls at various dynamics. Some participants will also have the opportunity to practice these techniques and receive feedback.

        

Thompson - Laine Longton

Successful Strings: Fundamentals essential in String classes

String playing is complex and requires patience and a well-established technical base.  This clinic will cover proper setup and care of instruments, posture, left-hand adjustments, and bow technique.  Teachers will develop an understanding of how each facet of basic technique and setup contribute to intonation, sound quality, and ease of playing.  Clinic will address issues which frequently arise in string classes and which prevent students from reaching their full potential.

        

Lillooet - CMEA

“Executive Meeting of the Full Board of the CMEA”

This is a closed board meeting of the full board of the Canadian Music Educators’ Association.  The BCMEA wishes to thank members of the CMEA full board that are in attendance this week.

Upper Theatre Lobby 1 - Jake Autio

“My Journey With The BC Arts Curriculum”

When we journey through change we are all led through transformation. Our curriculum is simple in its design and forces us to critically reflect and grow as educators. Have we done our own reflection on core competencies? How have we experienced the creative process outlined in the curricular competencies? What content is necessary for students to understand and appreciate our musical experiences? How do we and our students reflect on our musical experiences?  

This session will be a time for participants to experience the mindsets, routines, and activities I have developed over the past three years to maximize student voice and ownership over their learning.  I will exemplify starting points from my practice for group discussion on year planning, inquiry, and assessment and how they relate to the core competencies and the creative process. As our curriculum shifts from prescribed to philosophical learning outcomes (for both teacher and student) we must continually transform what we do and contemplate why we are doing what we are doing.

“If a method is written, you just take it…If it is a philosophy, you have to change yourself first before you do it in the schools. It is a path, not a large highway” (Klara Kokas).

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 2

Not In Use

Session 6:  1:45pm - 2:45pm

Whistler A - Melissa McKnight and Tina Horwood

“Tools for creating a strings program for the non-strings educator”

So, you’ve been asked to start an orchestral strings program by your administrator or district but you are not a strings educator, what now?  Join Melissa and Tina in this interactive session that will give you the tools to work with beginning strings musicians and create a successful strings program at your school.  

**Bring your violin, viola, or cello as our demonstration instruments are in small supply**

        

Whistler B - Jennica Alpaugh

“Teaching the Elements of Movement”

Using Orff instruments and small props, we will explore the elements of movement and how they compliment music education. Participants will leave with an understanding of the elements of dance and practical strategies to teach them in the classroom setting.

Whistler C - Willi Zwozdesky (BCCF)

“Music Educator Services of the BC Choral Federation”

BCCF services are yours to discover! Since 1978, the BC Choral Federation (BCCF) has assisted music educators across BC. Specific services include the annual Choral Directorship Course, the Virtual Library, on-site workshops on pro-D days, Children’s Chorfest gatherings, and the BC Youth Choir, an auditioned honour choir ages 16-25, which is a stepping stone to the National Youth Choir of Canada.

Fraser - Michael Perkins

“Practical Steps To Make Your Jazz Band Perform Better”

In order to develop the next generation of Jazz artists and inspire students to embrace this amazing American art form, one needs to perfect the obvious. This workshop will focus on ensuring you don't make the same mistakes as others before you. From set-up to tuning (yes, Tuning!); mastering the four "A's" - Attitude, Appearance, Approach and Attack; selecting challenging yet appropriate repertoire; to demonstrating a disciplined Work Ethic, come and learn what to do to help your jazz band perform better. By following these easy steps, you will also improve your Jazz groups' self-esteem, teach them about leadership, inspire teamwork, promote problem-solving skills, generate good citizenship, and get your students excited about participating in one of the best art forms this planet has to offer. Only for those who want to learn.

Birkenhead/Capilano - Michael Beauclerc

“Developing Modern Drumlines” (Part 2)

Indoor marching drumline is one of the fastest growing scholastic and community youth activities in Canada. During this session, see how a drumline can invigorate your music program and raise your school’s profile within the community. This hands-on workshop with author and educator Michael Beauclerc will teach you marching percussion fundamentals, fun exercises, and great pep grooves. All equipment and materials provided.

        

Thompson - Kevin Hamlin (Yamaha)

“Boosting Retention Up Into The 90% Year Over Year”

Preparing your concert band for Festival competition is hard work! Here's an inside look from a National level adjudicator of what we're looking for from your band. Cover these elements in your rehearsal as you prepare, and you're sure to improve your standing at the Festival!

        

Lillooet - CMEA

“Executive Meeting of the Full Board of the CMEA”

This is a closed board meeting of the full board of the Canadian Music Educators’ Association.  The BCMEA wishes to thank members of the CMEA full board that are in attendance this week.

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 1 - Zoltan Virag and Amanda Randt

Digital Tools for Assessment and Organization

Digital platforms for collecting and grading assignments are becoming increasingly common, often adopted and supported by local school districts. Amanda Randt and Zoltan Virag work in the West Vancouver school districts, where both Fresh Grade and Google Classroom are widely used. In this session they will introduce how music teachers can set up and use these digital environments. The focus will be on creating and evaluating assignments, applicable at both the elementary and secondary levels. Time permitting we’ll also touch on iDoceo for iPad, an all-in-one teacher’s mark book, seating plan, schedule, calendar, and much more.

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 2

Not In Use

Session 7:  3:00pm - 4:00pm

Whistler A - Mark Reid (Conn-Selmer) and MusiCounts

“Music Education and the Real World: Connecting to Issues and Industry”

Music Education must be part of the dialogue around emerging trends in education. Students learning in our classrooms benefit from connecting music to trending topics such as coding, sustainable development, and musically-enhanced careers. This session will outline strategies for capacity-building that includes applying for grants. Staff from MusiCounts will also discuss the BandAid grant program during this session.

Whistler B - Jennica Alpaugh

“Integrating Literature and Movement in the Classroom”

Using specially selected children’s literature, we will explore integrating elements of movement with science and humanities.  Participants will leave with ideas for an Earth Day or Spring project.

Whistler C - Dr. Adam Con (UVic)

“Getting Different Tones From Your Choir For Varying Styles Of Choral Music”

Different types of choral music require different approaches to tone. Shape of vowels, space in the mouth, and placement of sound all play a part in changing choral tone. Knowing what is appropriate for styles such as Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic, and Spirituals for example, requires listening to different choirs, reviewing performance practice literature, and learning how to manipulate the vocal mechanism using gestures.

Fraser - Michael Perkins

“Concepts to Consider Before Your Jazz Ensemble Takes The Stage”

How to your students see you? Embrace a culture of creativity for your Jazz Band by "Being" a player yourself. Walk the talk. This workshop covers everything from repertoire selection to the 5 skills jazz musician (any musician) needs: listening, keyboarding, sight reading, ear-training, and performance skills. Learn how to ensure your students know about keys, form, changes, chords/scales, phrasing, dynamics, and performance expectations. Let's not forget the business of jazz - before they ever take the stage you and your students need to be responsible to each other, dress professionally, understand collaboration and commitment, and exercise self-discipline. Learn the importance of bringing clinicians in, taking your students to workshops, festivals, and, of course, live performances. Have your students get excited about improvisation and composition. Better yet, get them ready to perform anywhere, any time. Ensure your students develop their own "jazz" voice, create new sounds, cultivate and original voice, and present something new to the world.

Birkenhead/Capilano - Larry Dureski

“Instrumental Care and Repair”

Students in a Band program can only play as strong as the condition of their instruments and the condition of your repair budget.  This practical workshop addresses common situations that arise in Band class (or three minutes before the concert), and how to deal with them.  Diagnostic techniques and repairs that can be done at school will be demonstrated.  Participants will also learn the difference between a problem that can be solved with items in a desk drawer and a situation that requires a call to a technician.  Please bring your repair questions to this session!

        

Thompson - Don Bennett

“Music - The Most Important Endeavour”

For several decades now we have been inundated with articles and books about the essential value of music learning, with more published every year. Music involvement is by far the number one choice for neuroscientists and neurologists doing brain research. Why? - because it engages the brain more thoroughly than anything else we know.

This Powerpoint presentation on the importance of learning music is designed to advocate for music in our schools in a way that is irrefutable. It has been adapted for parent groups, administrators’ meetings, and adult learner’s societies, and it will be made available for delegates of the Diamond anniversary BCMEA conference. You can adapt it for any group, from your students to a School Board Trustee meeting, to help advocate for what many of us already know – that EVERY child needs music throughout their learning years (and frankly, every adult as well)!

Lillooet - CMEA

“Executive Meeting of the Full Board of the CMEA”

This is a closed board meeting of the full board of the Canadian Music Educators’ Association.  The BCMEA wishes to thank members of the CMEA full board that are in attendance this week.

        

Upper Theatre Lobby 1 - Felipe Sequeira

A blended model for Music Education”

More and more music classes are beginning to move to ePortfolios and new forms of assessment. There are also more and more blended learning environments popping up every year. Where can and does Music Education fit into this. This seminar will take a look at a blended model of learning that incorporates cross-curricular integration and assessment to make music learning exciting and relevant to the learner(s). It can be adapted to individuals or groups from elementary to graduation. We will also explore related privacy concerns regarding the music classroom and recording/publishing student work.

Upper Theatre Lobby 2

Not In Use