Updated December Lesson Quick View (12.14.16)

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

5

Session 6 (cont.)

Target: Good readers can ask: “What makes for a good literary essay? How does a writer go from claim and evidence to essay?”

In class: Students will annotate a student example.

At home:

*Finish Scout’s Honor questions

*Choose which story/character you will draft a literary essay about

*Bring back ALL outlines to put in writer’s resource folder

6

Session 6 (cont.)

Target: Good writers can plan and construct a literary essay.

In class: Students will draft their first literary essay. They can choose from any text we have read in class: Everything Will Be Okay, Scout’s Honor, Thank you Ma’am, Gift of Magi, Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, Raymond’s Run

At home:

*Students will continue to draft their essays. This is an initial rough draft. They just need to finish “quick writing” their essay. It will NOT be graded in this stage.

7

Poetry Analysis

Target: Good readers can draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing text evidence to support analysis of what a text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

In class: Students will read the short story, A Bad Robot,  and answer reading comprehension questions that correspond.

At home:

*Finish reading comprehension activity, if necessary.

8

Session 7

Target: Good writers revise their essays to make sure they explain why (and how) the evidence connects with, or supports the claim.

In class: Students will unpack their evidence and explain the connections between their evidence and their claims while anticipating a counterargument.

At home:

No homework

9

Session 7 Day 2

Target: Good writers revise their essays to make sure they explain why (and how) the evidence connects with, or supports the claim.

In class: Students will unpack their evidence and explain the connections between their evidence and their claims while anticipating a counterargument. Students will add transitional phrases to their

At home: Flash draft if not completed  

12

Session 7

Target:  When an essayist makes a claim and includes evidence to support that claim, that alone doesn’t convince readers that the claim is justified. Essayists often revise their essays to explain why and how the evidence connects with or supports the claim.

In class: Students will draft a counterclaim for their essay. We will watch a short video about the parts of a literary essay and the importance of a counterclaim. We will look more at counterclaims when we come back from break.

At home:

13

Make up Day

Target: Good readers can determine the life lessons the author wants them to learn by looking more closely at the troubles a character faces and how they get in the way of what a character wants by asking “What lessons does the character learn from all this?”

In class: Today students worked on Scout’s Honor questions if they were not yet finished. As a reward, those that had completed them on time, were able to help prepare for our hallway competition.

At home: If Scout’s Honor questions (due last Tuesday) are not complete, they are due tomorrow at the start of class. They will not be accepted after that time.

14

Poetry Analysis

Target: Students will analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, stanza, or image contributes to meaning or word choice.

In class: Students will read an excerpt from A Christmas Carol and answer reading comprehension questions that correspond. We will also go to the library.

At home:

*Finish reading comprehension activity, if necessary.

*Work on Poetry Entry (optional)

15

Session 8

Target: Good readers can determine the life lessons the author wants them to learn by looking more closely at the troubles a character faces and how they get in the way of what a character wants by asking “What lessons does the character learn from all this?”

n class: Make motivation/lessons chart for Squeaky as a whole class. Make universal motivation/lessons chart for character from literary essay about characters

At home: Work on Poetry Entry (optional)

16

Session 8

Target: Good readers can determine the life lessons the author wants them to learn by looking more closely at the troubles a character faces and how they get in the way of what a character wants by asking “What lessons does the character learn from all this?”

In class: Students will select compelling evidence to support and help prove their claim. They will make an outline for their essay. Students will plan transitional phrases to move through their argument smoothly.

At home:

*Finish outline if necessary.

*Work on Poetry Entry (optional)

19

STAR test/Session 9

Target: I can set a goal for my learning and chart my progress towards that goal. I can draft a literary essay about theme.

In class: Students will take the STAR assessment. When they finish, they will be able to work on their poetry contest entry or read silently.

At home: Work on Poetry Entry (optional)

20

Poetry Contest

Target: Students will analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, stanza, or image contributes to meaning or word choice.

In class: Students will have class time to work on their poetry entries for the contest. If they chose not to submit a poem for the contest, students will have poetry activities to complete.

At home: Work on Poetry Entry (optional)--due TOMORROW

21 Early Out

Poetry Contest

Target: Students will analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, stanza, or image contributes to meaning or word choice.

In class: Students will have class time to work on their poetry entries for the contest. If they chose not to submit a poem for the contest, students will have poetry activities to complete.

At home: No homework! Enjoy your break!

22 No School

23 No School