NATIONAL ARCHIVE WO 382/1, 382/2, 382/3    

COURT OF ENQUIRY INTO ATTACK ON CMP INFORMATION POST IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT, 4TH MARCH 1946 IN WHICH TWO CMP (VP) WERE MURDERED

                                 SECRET

                                 Army Form A2

*N B - The Form being                        PROCEEDINGS of a  COURT OF ENQUIRY

Applicable to any Board                        assembled at  MUSTAPHA BARRACKS

Or committee, or court of                        on the 14th March 1946

Inquiry, this blank to be                        by order of   HQ BTE

filled in accordingly.                        For the purpose of enquiring into the circumstances in which            

                                        a C.M.P. outpost was attacked, and the occupants killed          

The proceedings should                         killed or injured during the roots in Alexandria on

Be signed by the President                4 March 1946.

And by each Member of the

Board, etc.

     Attention is particularly                                                                        PRESIDENT

Drawn to the Rules of Courts                                      Col. O.S.G. Sheppard

Of Inquiry contained in Rules                                -------------------------

Of Procedure 124 - 125a and

 especially to Rule 125a(B)                                      MEMBERS

Also paragraph 761, et seq                                     Maj E. M. Phelan, R.T.R.

King’s Regultions, 1940.                                   Capt. P. D. Forsyth-Forrest XII R.L

                                                          IN ATTENDANCE

                                                        _______________

The Court having assembled pursuant to order proceedings

Take Evidence.

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1st Witness.  No. 5335820 L/Cpl. Ayres H, C.M.P. (VP), having been duly sworn states:-

     On the morning of the 4th March, 1946, I was on duty with Cpl. Jump, L/Cpl Thomas, L/cpl maile and Pte Bailey.   At about 12/15 hours I saw that a large mob of natives were coming towards the outpost.   They were about 4,000 strong.   We barred the doors and windows of the outpost.   The mob then closed round the building and began to throw stones, etc at the windows until they were all broken.   I heard the mob beating on the East door of the outpost, they then broke the door down and entered the building from that end.   They set fire to the doors, windows and to our bedding which was in the room which they had broken into.   We had not fired a round up to this time, but in order to try and get them out of the building and to safeguard ourselves we fired a few rounds into the air.   This had no effect whatsoever on the mob and they continued to surge into the building.   We then fired one volley of single rounds to wound some of the attackers but they still persisted.   We then found it necessary to fire directly at the mob and did so.   We his 3 or 4 of the attackers and they retired for a short distance.   The mob then again surged round the building and threw burning material through the windows setting fire to the main entrance also.   We then all retired to the telephone room and took up positions as follows.   L/Cpl Thomas knelt down under the end of the table facing the door of the telephone room so that he could if required, fire through the open door.   L/cpl Maile sat near to the telephone in the corner in order to maintain communication with Kom el Dik.   Pte Bailey sat down with his back to the cell wall, just behind L/cpl Thomas.   Cpl Jump knelt down behind the centre of the table to cover the “information” window.   I stood at the front of the window opening on to the front of the building.   My back was towards the table.   When we had taken up these positions, the mob continued to attack the building by the same methods as before, they were actually inside the West room.   The building was well alight.   This situation lasted for about three quarters of an hour.   The next thing was the appearance of an Egyptian Army troops who arrived from the direction of the Conrinche travelling in lorries.   The mob was then between the outpost and the troops.   The troops did not open fire neither did they make any attempt to reach or approach the outpost.   Soon afterwards an Egyptian Army Officer forced his way through the crown and came near to the outpost.   He was waving a white handkerchief and shouted cease fire.   He stopped outside and Cpl. Jump persuaded him to enter.   When he was inside the building he asked us to stop firing and said he would try and get us out if we did stop firing.   He asked me to give him my Sten gun, I refused.   He then went outside the building and spoke to the crowd.   They then again attacked the outpost.    By this time the situation was rather more serious and we were forced to retire from the telephone room and take up  a position in the cell which is situated behind the telephone room and at the back of the building.   At this time the Egyptian soldiers had reached the outpost and I saw tha they were amongst the crowd.   The outpost was now completely in flames and we found that the cell door had been bolted from the outside.   Our ammunition was also running low.   After we had been inside the cell for about a quarter of an hour I heard the sound of a shot fired very nearby.   It seemed to come from one of the cell windows.   I think is was from the side with the single window.   Cpl Jump then went to one side of the cell and said that he had been hit.   From the sound of the shot I judged it to be from some kind of light weapon, probably a pistol.   It was certainly not from a rifle or machine gun.   Our position at the time when this shot was fired was as follows.   Cpl Jump was standing approx. in the centre of the cell and facing the centre window on the side which has three windows.   L/Cpl Maile was sat down in the corner opposite to the entrance door.   Near the corner of walls at the other end of the cell was L/Cpl Thomas.   He was kneeling down facing the corner and trying to get his Sten gun working.   The weapon had jammed.   In the third corner I was stood facing the wall.   Pte bailey was standing just behind the entrance door of the cell.   We decided to try and break out of the cell as soon as the door had borned down.   We eventually got out and moved into the washroom, between the kitchen and the telephone room.   The Egyptian Police were then in a body amongst the crowd about 10 yards away from the outpost.   They signalled to us to come out.   We all jumped out of the building through the two wash house windows.   The mob rushed for us as we landed outside.   I saw they were going to attack us so I went into the main entrance, through the telephone room and into the cell.   I picked up a magazine of ammunition and returned through the wash house to the window which I had previously jumped out of.   I stood by the window.   The crowd came to attack me, I fired at them and jumped out of the window.   At this time I saw L/Cpl Maile and Pte Bailey, they were on the ground in the direction of the gardens.   The mob was hitting, kicking, beating and stoning them.   I could not see them very well because there were to many people attacking them.  I fired into the mob in the hope that the two men might escape.   I then turned and ran alongside the outside of the bedroom in the direction of the tram station.   I stopped on the corner of the outpost.   I stopped to look what was happening.   I saw about eight or nine Egyptian army soldiers amongst the crowd in the general directions of the gardens.   They fired about 24 shots in my direction.   They could not have been firing at the crowd because there was no crowd close to me.   I ran just round the corner of the outpost in the direction of the burning care.   The crowd surged towards me and i fired on them.   I then ran a little further towards the cafe and saw L/Cpl Thomas between the corner of the outpost and the cafe.   He was on the ground bleeding badly and surrounded by the mob who were attacking him.   At that moment I fired at this mob and L/cpl Thomas got to his feet.   Cpl Jump was not far away and the three of us made a dash to the burning cafe.   No one assisted us until we actually got into the building and then the Egyptian Fire Brigade helped us to get right inside.   We were hidden in this building for half an hour and we then left in an Egyptian Police Truck.   We were then dressed in Egyptian Police unifor.   This we had put on inside the building so that the crowd would not observe us.   After being taken to a Police station we eventually arrived as Mustapha Barracks.   During the incident the only places that I fired from were, 1. The entrance of the bedroom from the telephone room.   This was when the mob set fire to the bedroom.   2. From the two front windows of the telephone room.   3. From the windows of the wash house.     Also at the places I previously described after I left the outpost.   Whilst we were in the telephone room I did not see any of our policemen fire into the woodwork of the main entrance door.   I should have been certain to have seen this had it happened because I was in the telephone room all  the time when any firing was taking place.

The above statement has been read over to me, it is true and correct.

                                                                Signed. H. Ayres

                                                                L/Cpl.  C.M.Police.

        The witness was questioned by the President as follows:
Q.        How many rounds of ammunition had you at the beginning of the attack?

A.        About 40 rounds for my Sten.

Q.        Are you sure that it was Egyptian Army personnel firing at you after you had got out of the Post?

A.        They were only about 15-25 yards away from me, and there was no crowd round me.   They were        firing in my direction but above my head.

Q.        Was there an officer with the Egyptian soldiers who were firing in your direction.

A.        Not so far as I could see.

Q.        What time did the telephone cease to work?

A.        I don’t know, but it was ringing for about 10 or 12 minutes after we had retreated into the cell, and been locked in by the mob.

                                                                Signed. H. Ayres

                                                                L/Cpl. C.M.Police.

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2nd Witness, CPL JUMP, having been duly sworn reads the following statement:-

Statement of CPL. JUMP, No. 13105296 C.M.P. (VP).

Who states:-  Today the 4th March, 1946 I was on duty at the C.M.P. outpost Zidan Saghloyl, with L/Cpl THOMAS, L/Cpl AYRES,  L/Cpl Maile and Pte BAILEY.   Between 11.00 hrs and 11.15 hrs I heard firing between the outpost and the Military Car Park.   A number of shots were fired.   I could see a crown which seemed to be breaking up after the firing.   They were in Blvd Said 1st.   I informed the Ord Sgt Kom el Dik.   The crowd dispersed.   Between 11.30 hrs and 12.00 hrs I saw a large crowd (4,000 to 5,000) approaching the outpost from Blvd Said 1st.   A number of stones were thrown at the doors and windows of the building.   I gathered all my men in the telephone room and locked all the other doors.  I gave my men orders not to open fire unless absolutely necessary.   The bedroom door was then knocked down and natives started advancing into the building.   Meanwhile they set fire to the other door.   All the shutters were being broken.   The crown then threw stones at us, iron bars and other missiles.   I had been in telephonic communication with Kom el Dik all the time this was happening, and had been told that reinforcements were being sent, but they never seemed to arrive.   Up to this time we had not fired a shot.   By now the middle door leading from the bedroom to the telephone room was completely in flames.   I could see out into the road where the natives were making efforts to throw burning materials onto our last door.   Also they were advancing in the main door protecting themselves by means of a big sheet of boarding and throwing burning materials inside the porch of the outpost.   At this time I was struck in the chest by a big stone thrown through the window by a native.   I then gave the order to the NCO’s to fire single rounds as the natives were now inside and all around the outpost.   The building was completely full of smoke.   We could not see very well.   After we had fired about 9 rounds each which had caused them to retreat to the other side of the road, I ordered the men to stop firing.   The natives continued to throw burning materials at and inside the building.   The doors were all now completely burnt down or broken off.   We then saw the natives advance again as the ringleaders shouted and encouraged them from the back.    They then tried to enter the main door by covering themselves with a big piece of wood I have previously mentioned.   I then fired a single round and gave the NCO’s the same order.   The natives again retreated.   Soon after this we noticed the Egyptian army had appearing in lorries from the direction of the Corniche.   I thought this was our relief.   The outpost was now a mass of flames.   The Egyptian soldiers dismounted, the crowd surged towards them.   I saw one soldier’s rifle taken from him.   The crown the again surged on the outpost.   An Egyptian army officer came towards the outpost waving a white flag.   We were not firing at them at this time.   I told all the NCO@s to keep under cover whilst I went out of the front porch to speak to the officer.   However I could not get out because of the burning building.   I asked the officer to enter as I could not speak to him from where he was.   He did not understand me, or could not hear me because of the noise, but I eventually made him understand.   He said “How can I get through?”   I kicked aside some of the burning debris and he entered.   He asked me to ceasefire and said he could get us out.   I told him I would not fire if they could keep the crowds from attacking us.   The officer left the outpost and crossed the road.   The crown immediately surged forward again throwing stones and sticks etc.   I had given my word not to fire, and though that my best means of defence was in the cell where the windows were barred.   I took all the NCO’s in to the cell.   The flames were beginning to eat away the door of the cell.   Natives were now clambering around the windows of the cell and throwing burning materials at us.   I told the NCO’s to keep on the floor to avoid the smoke as much as possible.   Ammunition was running low and I told all to conserve so that we could run for it if possible.   At this time i heard a shot fired from outside and soon after a face appeared at the window and shouted at me in Arabic.  I could not understand what was said.   I took a glance through the cell door and saw some Egyptian soldiers lined up at about 100 yards from the outpost, they seemed to be holding the biggest part of the crowd back.   The heat in the cell was now unbearable and we undid our tunics and kept on the floor to gain air.   I thought that as reinforcements had not arrived our only change was to break out in a body.  I told all NCO’s that my orders were that as soon as the cell door had burnt completely down we should break out.   As I was preparing to do this I saw what appeared to be the muzzle of a Sten gun pushed through the cell window.   A shot was fired and I was hit in the shoulder.   We then tried to break open the door of the cell, and eventually pulled it down.   I could only use my left arm.   L/Cpl  AYRES was first through the door and we all followed together.   As we broke out the crowd surged towards us.  The Civil Police attacked the crowd with batons.   I told the NCO’s to stand fast in the building until the civil police had cleared a way for us.   I gave orders to remain together at all costs.   A great deal of confusion was going on outside but a Civil Police officers signalled us to come out.   We got outside through a window.   As soon as we were outside the crowd surged forward and attacked us.   I could not do much to defend myself.   The Civil Police assisted us away from the scene and eventually took me to a Civil Police outpost.   As I left I saw L/Cpl Thomas in a sitting position outside the outpost, he was bleeding badly.   The incident lasted from approximately 11.00 hrs to 14.00 hrs.   The armament of my party was 3 Sten Guns (2 Mags each) and 2 Revolvers (6 rounds each).   When the crowd attacked us after I had been wounded my Sten Gun was taken from me.   L/Cpl Thomas also had his Sten gun taken    I think by the Civil Police have the Sten gun used by L/Cpl AYRES.   I have no idea how many natives we injured by firing.   We lost contact with Kom el Dik when we entered the cell.

 Statement recorded at 21.00 hrs 4/3/46 by R Hudson C.S.M, S.I.B.

Witness unable to sign due to his injuries.

  1. D. Jump Cpl.

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3rd Witness. L/Cpl Thomas B. C.M.Police, having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

        On 4/3/46 I was on duty at Ramleh, C.M. Police Outpost in company with Cpl. Jump, L/Cpl Ayres, L/Cpl Maile and Pte Bailey.   At about 10.00 hrs natives began to congregate in Ramleh Square, afterwards proceeding down the street towards the W.D. Car Park.   At approximately 11.15 hrs, the Egyptian Police opened fire on the crowds who were apparently still in the vicinity of the W.D. Car Park.   Everything was quiet after this until at about 12.15 hrs when a huge crowd began to gather near the monument opposite the Outpost.   The crown then started to shout Anti-British slogans and at approximately 12.30 hrs they started to stone the Outpost and attempted to break the doors.   They succeeded in breaking down the end door of the Outpost and entered the sleeping quarters.   The natives who had entered the building commenced to set fire to the blankets and everything inflammable.   In the meantime we had all retreated to the other end of the building but other natives had succeeded in breaking down the window shutters and were throwing burning pieces of cloth, stones and other missiles through the windows.   It was now obvious that our lives were now in danger so we fired one or two shots.   This scared the natives away who ran beyond the monument.   After about 5 minutes however the crowd began to come back to the Outpost once again throwing stones, burning pieces of material and other missiles.   Once again we fired and again the crown ran away.   At this time |I saw a lorry draw up outside the Imperial Hotel.   This lorry was loaded with Egyptian soldiers and when they attempted to get down from the lorry the crowd made for them and practically overpowered them.   The Outpost was by this time well in flames.   An Egyptian Police Officer then came towards the Outpost, waving a white handkerchief and calling to us to stop firing.   The Officer stood outside the Outpost shouting but we could not understand what he was saying, and told him to come inside.   When he got inside he told us that if we stopped firing he would try and get us out.   The Officer then left the Outpost, and as soon as he did this, the crowd surged forward once again.   They came up to the Outpost and once again started to throw burning pieces of cloth through the windows.   We all then retreated into the cells of the Outpost closing the door behind us.   The crown then started to push burning pieces of cloth through the bars of the cell windows.   We attempted to put the burning cloth out but it was coming through the bars rapidly and to extinguish it was impossible.   We were gradually being overcome by the smoke fumes and the smoke was getting thicker.   We knew that if reinforcements did not come soon we would be overcome by the smoke and heat, and therefore decided, that as soon as the cell door had burnt through we would break it down and make a dash for it.   Whilst we were waiting for the door to break through I heard a shot fired, but in what direction I do not know.   Eventually the door burnt through and we were able to break out from the cell.   As I left the cell I could see the crowd surging towards the Outpost again.   I then had to get my Sten gun working again which had jammed some time previous.   Whilst I was doing this I heard Cpl Jump say “Oh, my back”, and saw him sink down on his knees.   I went over to him and lifted up his tunic to see where he had been hurt but I could see nothing.   I then returned to the task of trying to get my Sten gun working.   At this time I was feeling a bit dazed and the next thing I clearly remember is seeing my pals going through the windows.   I immediately followed.   As I landed on the ground I was pounced on by about a dozen natives.   I also noticed that the Egyptian police were attempting to hold back these natives.    When the natives got me on the ground they started to kick my head and I saw a knife flash.   The native still kicked me and my face was covered in blood, this running in my eyes and blinding me.   The natives were still kicking me about the body and legs.   The next thing I remember is hearing a volley of shots being fired.   I then wiped the blood from my eyes and saw that crowds were scattering.   At this time two Egyptian Policemen came over and told me to get up and go.   I then got up and ran to an Hotel nearby.   When I got into the Hotel I opened by field dressing and asked L/Cpl Ayres to tie it round my head to stop the flow of blood.   Some Egyptian firemen then took us to a little room and told us to stay there.   Later an Egyptian Army Officer came to us and told us to stay in the room until he could get a truck to take us away.   He later came back and took us to another room where he told three firemen to take off their coats and hats and five them to us to wear.   Whilst I was putting on one of the coats L/Cpl Ayres collapsed and I obtained some water which I threw into his face to revive him.   We then made towards the door where a truck was waiting for us.   It was at this moment I collapsed, and the next thing I remember was finding myself in the back of the truck.   I enquired if we were going to Kom el Dik and was informed that we were not.   Eventually we arrived at a Caracol, the name of which I think is Massallah.   We stayed at the Caracol approximately half an hour and were then taken to the C.R.S. Mustapha.

        I say that this statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                                        Signed. L/Cpl B Thomas.

        The witness was questioned by the President as follows:-

Q. Did you see any Egyptian Army Officer other than the one who came into the post?

  1. No.

                 Signed L/Cpl. B. Thomas

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4th Witness  Mr J. C. Marchant, Base Repair  Office, 46 Shed, Alexandria Docks, having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

        On 4/3/46 I was at Gordon Hotel, Ramleh Square when at about 11.00 hrs I noticed a large crowd of Egyptians congregating in Ramleh Square.   Thuis crown then disappeared in the direction of the Atlantic Hotel.   Shortly afterwards between 11.20 hrs and 12.00 hrs the crown returned and once again congregated in Ramleh Square.   Shorty afterwards they proceeded to throw stones and attack the Military Police hut situated in the square.   A saw a number breaking down the entrance door with what appeared to be a battering ram, a number entered the eastern end of the hut and appeared to be scattering the contents of the hut outside.   The police then made some sort of a sally and succeeded in getting them away from the vicinity of the hut.  Shortly afterwards a number of the crowd returned and tried to set fire to the hut.   At this time I heard several shots coming from the direction of the hut and I saw a faint glow coming from the inside.   After about twenty minutes the hut appeared to be well on fire after wood had been thrown in by the crowd.   I saw a sentry box rolled across the square towards the hut and heard a short burst of fire from the hut.   The crowd then dispersed and after a few minutes returned and proceeded to block the door of the hut with the sentry box.   At about this time the crowd were attacking the rear windows of the hjut and endeavouring  to throw lighted material inside the hut.   In the meantime small batches of Egyptian Army troops commenced to arrive in the vicinity and formed a cordon from the North-East corner of the Trianon, across the tram tracks.   They stood there and their presence did not assist the members of the hut in any way.   About this time I noticed smoke coming from a restaurant nearby.   Just before this the fire engine, (Egyptian) arrived and made two half-hearted attempts to reach the Military Police Post but the crowd barred its progress and it retired.   At this time heavy smoke was coming from within the post.   I then  heard a lot of clapping and cheering coming from the crowd immediately followed by a volley of small arms fire.   I did not see where the firing came from, and the crowd dispersed.   During all the above incidents I took seven photographs from the hotel.   This roll of film I handed to Capt B J Arrowsmith, S.I.B Alex. for developing .

    When the incident first started the Egyptian Police made determined efforts to scatter the crowd but later on they appeared to slacken their efforts and remained more or less as onlookers.  As far as I could see the Army did nothing at all to assist in dispersing the crowd until a cheer came from the crowd and I saw them fire in the air.   I saw a Military Police car approach the hut at one time but after being stoned withdrew.

        I have read over the above statement, it is true and correct and which I sign quite voluntarily.

                                                                (Sgnd)  J. C. Marchant.

        Statement recorded and signature witnessed by me at Alexandria Dockyard about 17.00hrs on 7/3/46.

                                                                (Sgnd) F. J. Arrowsmith Capt.

                                                                             DAPM. S.I.B.

        I say that this statement which I have read and sign is true.

                                                                (Sgnd) J. C Marchant.

The witness was questioned by the President:-

Q.  At what time did the Egyptian troops take up their position  across the tram tracks.

A.  Between 1 and 1.30 pm, I think.

Q. Did they have any Officers with them?

A.  Yes.

Q. Which direction were these troops facing?

A.  Towards the hut occupied by the C.M.P.   They were formed in 3 ranks, and were hemmed in by the crowd.

Q. From which direction were the crowd coming?

A. Generally from the W.

Q. Did you see any other formed bodies of Egyptian troops?

A.  No but I couldn’t see properly to the far end of the square.

Q. Was the hut burning when the troops arrived?

A.  I don’t think so.

Q. Did you see any Egyptian Army personnel trying to make contact with the soldiers in the hut?

A. No.

Q. Was the hut on fire when the British Army police car approached it?

A. Yes.   It had been burning for sometime.

Q. Did you see no attempt at all by the Egyptian Army to protect the hut from the rioters?

A. None at all while the hut was burning, not until about 2.30  pm.

Q. Did the Egyptian Army or Police make any attempt to assist the British police car.

A. No.

Q. Can you remember at what time the Egyptian troops drawn up across the tramlines fired the volley?

A. About 2 pm.

Q. How close to the hut did the British police car get?

A.  About 3 or 4 yards from the N. wall.

Q. About what time did this car approach?

A. About 2.30 pm. I think.

Q. Are you sure that the event of the car approaching the hut happened after the troops had fired the volley?

A. I think so.

Q. Did you see any of the occupants of the hut run out at any time?

A. No.

                                                                        (Sgnd) J. C. Marchant.

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DSCN5304.jpg

The rioters forming up, Information Post to the right of the large  5 storey building

DSCN5306.jpg

The rioters forming up, Information Post to the right of the large building

DSCN5308.jpg

CMP information post beginning to burn

DSCN5309.jpg

The Corniche

DSCN5310.jpg

The CMP Information Post burning, located to the right of the centre building

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5th Witness.  Raoul Kahil, aged 42, Antoniades St, No.1, Alexandria, Egyptian Nationality, having been duly sworn, read the following statement :-

        I am a newspaper man.   I am the Editor of “La Seraine Financiere et Politigue”, Alexandria.

        On 4th March, 1946, at 11.40 hrs, I saw and followed a crowd of young Egyptians, a few of them students, moving in Said 1st Street towards Midan Zaghloul Street.   The crown completely filled the road and extended for about 150 yards.   The side roads were all blocked off with Civil police.   In Said 1st Street there were two or three lorries of Policemen.   The police were armed with rifles and sticks.   The crowd was shouting in Arabic “one Religion and one King”.   When the crowd reached Midan Zlaghloul Street I believe a single shot was fired from a window in a building next to the Cecil Hotel.   The crowd then set fire to the Petrol Station and tried to fire the house from where the shot came.   The crowd then came to the C.M.P. post, throwing stones.   A boy had climbed on the roof of the outpost and cut the wire.   I heard a lot of shooting which appeared to come from the C.M.P. Outpost.   No one was hurt.   The crowds then tried to put fire to the C.M.P. post, using kerosene, then benzine from a car.   The soaked rags in benzine, lit them and threw the through the windows.   They then took a kiosk from the sea front and rolled it end over end to the C.M.P. post.   They set fire to it.   It was by the door of the C.M.P. post.   Shots came from the the outpost and a person in the crowd was hit.   There were some more shots and several more people in the crowd were killed.   Just after the first shot, I went into the Oreco building and on the roof where I watched the proceeding.   The crowd tried to break the shutters down.   There was some intermittent shooting and persons in the crowd were hit.   The police and army were passive and did not interfere up to the time when the C.M.P. post was well alight.   There was a Fire Brigade  standing nearby, but it did nothing.   A Military Police (British) car arrived, paused for a little while, then went away.   It came back again, and then went away.   No one got out of this vehicle, which was a utility.   The fire from the kiosk was put out by the people inside the post, then the people started a fire on the opposite side.   Egyptian troops, with lorries, then arrived and tried to disperse the crowd, without much success.   Three lorries of police arrived a few minutes later.   They came close to the Outpost, and pushed back the crowd for about 30 yards around the post.   A Police Officer then beckoned to the people inside the post and one British soldier with a red cap came out.   The crowd broke through the police and surrounded the soldier.   They beat him.   A lot of shots were fired from the post.   I saw an Egyptian soldier also shooting, but they seemed to be shooting at the post.   The shooting lasted for about two minutes.   There was a big confusion and I did not see what happened to the British soldier.   There were some Arabs dressed in white on the roof of Oreco Building who witnessed the whole affair.   They were servants.   The crown started to go away, and I came away.

        The above statement has been read over to me and it is true.    (Sgnd) Raoul Kahil.

        Statement taken and signature witnessed by me at Alexandria at 16.30 hrs on the 4th March, 1946.

                                                                (Sgnd) L. B. Mountford, Capt.

                                                                             D.A.P.M. - SIB/CMP

        I say that this statement which I have read and now sign is true. (Sgn) Raoul Kahil

        The witness was then questioned by the President:-

Q. At what time did the Egyptian troops arrive?

A. At between 1.15 and 1.30, I think.

Q. What position did they take up?

A.. From the Corner of the Chamber of Commerce to the opposite corner of Nabil Daniel Street.

Q. Did you see any Egyptian Army Officers with them?

A.  Yes.

Q. Are you sure that the soldier who came out of the Post had a red cap on.

A. No.

Q. Do you think soldiers were shooting at the post?

A. Yes.

Q. Where were these soldiers?

A. Between the tram lines and the small garden W. of the Post.

                                                                (Sgnd) Raoul Kahil.

NOTE.   Before he gave evidence the witness asked for my assurance that his evidence would not be communicated to the Egyptian authorities or the press.   I assured him that it would only be seen by the British Military authorities.

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6th Witness.   Major L.G. Smith, R.A., having been duly sworn, read  the following statement.

        During Monday 4 March 1946 I observed the following incidents taking place in midan Saad Zaghloul:-

12.30 hrs  A mob assembled by Seed Zaghloul Statue and made an assault in the direction of the Town Major’s office.   I could not see if it was actually this building because it is just out of sight behind the trianon restaurant.   Shots were fired at the mob who retired but returned and again assaulted in the same direction.   There were no Egyptian Police visible in the area.   There were two lorry loads of Egyptian Army soldiers who took no action other than to take cover behind their vehicles.

12.45 hrs  An attempt was made to set fire to the building.   A sentry or watchman’s shelter was pushed across the road apparently to serve as firewood.   The E.A. still took no action.   Shooting still continued.   Many casualties were suffered amongst the mob.

13.00 hrs  The E.A. made an attempt to cordon off the approach road by Ramleh tram station.   The mob was inside this cordon.   The attack and shooting continued.

13.10 hrs  Two trucks with Egyptian Police arrived but no action by them was observed.   Black smoke was seen rising from behind the Trianon building at a position estimated to be the Town Major’s office.   Still no action by the Egyptian Army.   The Egyptian Police were no longer visible.

13.20 hrs  Considerable smoke coming from the same area and still no official attempt to control the situation was observed.   I reported to G Branch, Alex District by telephone.

13.25 hrs. More Egyptian Army personnel arrived and debussed outside the Cecil Hotel.   They started to move towards the disturbance but the mob interfered and the soldiers returned to their forming up place outside the hotel.

13.33 hrs   M.P. Radio Truck drove round in front of the Town Major’s officer stopped a moment and the drove on.   It was stoned by the mob.

13.35 hrs  Egyptian Police reinforcements arrived in Boulevard Saad Zaghloul, the Egyptian soldiers were mingling with the mob in the area in front of the town Major’s Office.

13.40 hrs  An Egyptian Police staff car arrived, a police officer got out, spoke to some policemen, got back in again and the car drove off.   Immediately after this the police were seen to be firing on the rioters who dispersed slightly.

13.45 hrs  An E. A. cordon was formed West of the T.M’s office.

13.50 hrs  Situation was quieter and apparently in control.

14.00 hrs  Roters broke through again and assaulted the Trianon restaurant and set fire to it.   Further clashes between police and rioters occurred but W.D. property did not appear to be involved.

        I say that this statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                                        (Sgd.) L. G. Smith

                                                                                    Maj. R.A.

        The witness was then questioned by the President:-

Q. From where did you make your observations?

A.  From the balcony of my flat, No.22 Place Saad Zaghloul, nearly opposite the Gordon Hotel.

Q. Did you write down the events and times given in your statement as the occurred?

A. Yes.

Q. Where is the Town Major’s office?

A.  In the CMP Post.

Q. Where were the two lorry loads of Egyptian soldiers to whom you have referred?

A. Opposite the Italian consulate.

Q. What did you report to G branch at 12.30hrs.

A.  A brief summary of what hat happened up till then and that the C.M.P. post appeared to be on fire.

Q. Did you say that no action was being taken by the Egyptian Army and Police?

A. I said that I could see no action.

Q. Could the Egyptian troops have reached the post without undue difficulty if they had made a determined effort.?  

A. Yes.

                                                                        (Sgd.) L G. Smith,

                                                                                    Maj. R.A.

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7th Witness.   Mr A. J. Rich, S.M.S.O., Alexandria, having been duly sworn read the following statement:-

        I live at “Socal House” Ramleh Square.   At about 10.30 hrs. On 4 March 1946 I was standing on my balcony at my pension when I noticed a crowd of Egyptians in m estimate about  1,000 strong who were approaching Ramleth Square from the direction of the Atlantic Hotel.   Before this procession reached the Square, a crowd of young boys commenced stoning the Military Police Hut situated in the Square.   The crowd then all gathered at the Park Area in the centre of the Square.   The students got up on the monument and led the crowd in shouting slogans.   By this time on my estimate the crowd has swelled to about 6,000.   A small number of Egyptian Policemen were endeavouring to coax the crown on to the Corniche but were completely unable to deal with the situation.   I then saw an Egyptian Army man approach near the square on a motorcycle and he stopped and was forced away.   The motorcycle then lay on its side with petrol pouring from it.   Somebody put a match to the petrol.   I next saw and Egyptian (dressed in a Galabieh and a Fez - tall - well built and young - wearing a long dark overcoat).   I then saw somebody dressed in a light green shirt and trouser who apparently objected to the action and the crowd became hostile towards him and he was hustled away by the Egyptian Police.   The Egyptian dressed in the long overcoat then produced a bottle and got the petrol remaining on the tank of the M/C.   He ran towards the CMP hut, which by this time was partially surrounded by the crowd, the Egyptian there handed the bottle to a small boy who proceeded to spread the contents on the walls and shutters.   Shortly afterwards flames appeared from within the hut.   No firing had started at this time by anybody.   I next saw some Egyptians approach the hut with what appeared to be some parts of chairs.   They then threw the pieces of wood through a shutter which had been broken.   I saw several shutters smashed with instruments by the crowd and replaced by the occupants of the hut by pieces of wood only to be destroyed again by the crowd.   I then saw three Egyptians rolling towards the hut what appeared to be a wooden sentry box.   When they got approximately half way across the road, two or three shots were fired by the occupants of the hut.   I saw nobody hurt and it appeared that they were fired in the air to scare the crowd.   The crowd the rapidly ran away towards the Corniche.   After a few minutes the crowd started to approach again and the sentry box was rolled behind the hut.   I don’t know what  happened to the box or for what purpose it was used after that.   I then saw part of the crowd stoning the front entrance of the Cecil Hotel.   I saw about 50 Egyptian soldiers then march up along the Corniche and stand in a line in front of the Cecil.   Whilst this was taking place more shooting was heard coming from the Military Police hut which the crowd was stoning and attacking heavily.   I saw one Egyptian carried away wounded in the face.   I saw an Egyptian officer in charge of several policemen who were trying then to get the crown away from the hut but they were completely out of control.  I saw two Egyptian Officers appear to argue with one another and one of them then went out of my sight in the front of the hut.  He appeared to have a rag of some sort dangling from his hand.   The hut by this time was compelty on fire.   It must be appreciated that from the angle that I was viewing the hut did not permit me to see the entrance door and I therefore could not see whether the officer entered the hut or not.   The firing from the hut then ceased.   I heard no more firing from the hut at all after that time (I have no idea of the exact time).   I heard a terrific cheer from the crowd.   Immediately afterwards the Egyptian soldiers on the left of the hut who had approached about ten minutes previously from the Cecil Hotel fired a of about five shots each in the air.   The crown the rapidly ran away in all directions from the square.

        When firing first started from the hut some Egyptians ran over to the Cecil Hotel, they had picked up some Cartridge cases found in th small garden at the side of the hut which had definitely been fired by the Egyptian soldiers, and they shewed them to an Egyptian Army Officer and pointed to the hut.   This is when the Egyptian Army approached the hut.   I then saw one or two Civilians try to disarm the Egyptian Army men but without success.

        During the time that I was a witness to these incidents it appeared that Egyptian Police were completely out of control.   The Army were in the background watching all the time and only took an active part just a few minutes before the cheer came from the crowd.

                                                                (Sgnd)) A. J. Rich.

        Statement recorded and signatures witnessed by me at Alexandria Dockyard on 6/3/46.

                                                                (Sgnd) F. J. Arrowsmith Capt.

                                                                             DAPM. SIB.

        I say that this statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                                (Sgnd) A. J. Rich

        The witness was questioned by the President:-

Q. Did you see the firing which produced the cartridge cases which were picked up in the small garden?

A. Yes.   They were fired by Egyptian soldiers, firing into the air above the C.M. P. Post.

                                                                (Sgnd) A. J. Rich

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8th Witness.   Mr. P. J. Bawden, B.C.C. Dept., Naval Base, having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

        The second demonstration in Zaghloul Square commenced at 12.30 pm.   The crown approached the square from the direction of the Atlantic Hotel.   They were very excited, and continually shouting at the behest of one or two men who were held on the shoulders of others.

        The first indication of violence as the tearing down of a British military notice in the small park opposite the Egyptian Chamber of Commerce.   One civilian attempted to prevent this but the crown were getting out of hand.

        An attack was the made on the Military Post.   This building was completely closed and the windows were shuttered.   The mob first attempted to pull down a notice board secured over the door and another at the Western end of the building.   This was unsuccessful and they immediately concentrated on breaking open the door and smashing the window shutters.   Through the apertures they made they showered stones on the occupants, and attempted to enter the building through the door and windows.   At this point the British soldiers inside fired a burst of 4 or 5 rounds.   Somebody fell injured and the crowd scattered.   The crowd were prevented from entering several times in this manner, and then decided to burn the occupants out.   The eastern end of the building was fired first and the soldiers were forced to retreat to the western end.   Burning brands were thrown into the windows and this half of the building became a blazing inferno.   At the eastern end of the square and in full view of this violence a large contingent of Egyptian soldiers were standing at ease.      On the South Eastern corner of the square a large force of Egyptian police were standing.   Neither of these forces made any attempt to prevent what had obviously become a determined effort to murder the occupants of the Military post.   To provide more fuel for the flames the crowd tore the shutters from the Restaurant “Giovanidis” and the “Femina”.   These were thrown through the windows of the Military post.   Torches were made on the road from spirit soaked shrubbery and thrown into the building.   I, and others repeatedly phoned the Military authorities at Kom el Dik to send assistance, stressing the fact that the men’s lives were in extreme danger.   Eventually a closed Military Police van came up to the door of the hut.   The occupants of the van opened the back door a few inches, but the crowd commenced stone throwing and the van went away.   I  lone Egyptian military officer entered the hut waving two white handkerchiefs and appeared to be persuading the British sodiers to come out, but the mob entered close behind him and the soldiers were forced to fire again to clear them out.   Eventually at 2 pm when the whole of the building was alight except one small corner, 3 truck loads of Egyptian Police arrived at the Western end, a group of soldiers  were also formed at this position and the crowds were forced back.   Three British soldiers jumped from one  of the windows with their hands raised.   The mob rushed in and attacked them.   Two succeeded in running away but the third was knocked to the ground beneath the window.   Two more came out, but in the general confusion it was not seen what happened to them.   Soldiers on two sides of the square fired continuously for a few minutes and the square was cleared.

                                                                        (Sgnd) P. J Bawden B.C.C.                                                                                     Dept. Naval Base.

                                                                                      W. Lee S.V.S.C.

        I say that this statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                                        (Sgnd) P. J Bawden

        The witness was questioned by the President:-

Q. Can you give an estimate of the number of Egyptian Army and Police who were drawn up on E and S.E sides of the square?

A. At least 150 I should think.

Q. Who did you speak to when you rank up Kom el Dik?

A. A Captain, but I don’t know his name.

Q. What replies did you receive.

A. On the first occasion I was told that they were aware of the situation and that there was nothing to worry about.  

On the second occasion i was told that they were seeking authority to send help.  

On the third occasion I was told that the men were not in the hut, as the Egyptian police had got them out.

On the fourth occasion I was told that two trucks were on the way.

On the fifth occasion I was told that help would be there in a few minutes.

Q. Do you think the Egyptian Army and Police were present in sufficient force to put a cordon round the hut to protect it from the crowd.

A.  Yes.

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9th Witness. 1534110 L/cpl Calvert W. C.M.P. having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

R.B. 486                                                                D.D.B/MAR/60 1946

                                                                        Book No. 5.

To:- The Assistant Provost Marshal,

        HQ Alexandria District.

Sir,

        I have to report that at Alexandria on the 4th March 1946 about 12.40 hrs. I was on duty N.C.O. i/c Wireless Patrol when I was instructed from the Wireless Room to patrol West of Rue Nebi Daniel and report any crowds gathered in the area.

        While proceeding on the Corniche I was stopped by and Egyptian Policeman in the vicinity of Zaghloul Statue who informed me a Naval Rating was seriously injured.   On contacting the Naval Rating I conveyed him to the Fleet Club for attention.

        At about 12.52 hrs. A further message from the wireless Room instructed me to proceed to the C.M.Police outpost, Midan Zaghloul to give assistance.

        On trying to reach the Outpost, I was stopped by an Egyptian Officer who informed me to disperse from that Area immediately.   He stated that personnel inside the Outpost were quite safe.   This I could not believe as I could see from my position that hostile crowds had broken down the door at the East End of the Outpost, and were climbing on the roof, again he insisted on me moving, stating everything was under control.   I then saw a large crown proceeding to attack the vehicle, and had no alternative but to make a hasty retreat.   The Egyptian Officer’s particulars I was unable to obtain,   I then proceeded to Kom El Dik and reported the occurrence to the Ord/Sgt.

Alexandria

4th March, 1946.                                                        Signed. 1434110 W. Calvert. L/Cpl

                                                                        C. M. Police.

I say that the statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                                        (Sgnd) W. Calvert L/Cpl.

        The witness was questioned by the President:-

Q. Could you recognise the Egyptian Army Officer who stopped you?

A. I think so.   He was about 6 ft. tall and had ginger hair.

Q. Where were you stopped?

A. At the corner of the Trianon restaurant, where there was a cordon of troops, with 2 Officers.

                                                                        (Sgnd) W. Calvert L/Cpl/

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10th Witness.  No. 14910204 L/cpl Thomas W. R. M. C.M.P., having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

The Officer Commanding.

202 Provost Coy.

Alexandria District

------------------------------

Sir,        

        I have to report that at Alexandria, on the 4th March 1946, about 13.30 hrs, I was on duty as Wireless Operator on the wireless truck.

        During my tour of duty I was halted at Ramleh Square, when I saw a large crowd of natives attacking the C.M.Police Outpost (Midan Zaghloul) and flame and smoke were coming out of the door and windows.

        I saw a break in the crowd and on instructions from the N.C.O. i/c truck, L/C Elliott C.M.Police, we made an attempt to get to the outpost to evacuate the occupants.

        We managed to reach the outpost and I saw L/C Ayres, C.M.Police (V.P.) in the doorway;  he shouted “We are coming out”.   I tried to open the rear door of the truck, but it was impossible for us to stay there, as we were being heavily stoned and the crowd was closing in on us.

        Approx. 10 minutes later, we again managed to reach the outpost.   This time we halted for approx. three minutes, during which we were being heavily stoned.   I shouted to the occupants to come out, but received no reply.   I was unable to see anyone in the outpost.   Some ten minutes after I contacted C.S.M Murphy, who informed us that the occupants had been evacuated.   I then returned on my normal patrol.

Alexandria                                                Signed 14910204 W. R H Thomas

4th March, 1946                                                                C.M.Police.

        I say that the statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                        (Sgnd) 14910204 W. R. H Thomas L/Cpl

        The witness was Questioned by the President:-

Q. Are you sure that no one was in the Outpost when you made your second visit.

A. I could see there was no one in the lobby, but I could not see any further.   The whole place appeared to be full of smoke and flame.   I could not hear no shouting from inside, but there was a lot of noise from the flames and from the crowd outside.

                                                        (Sgnd) 14910204 W. R H. Thomas L/Cpl

        The witness was recalled and further questioned.

Q. When you had failed to contact the personnel in the outpost for the second time, what report, if any, did you make to Com el Dik?

A. Within 3 or 4 minutes I reported to Kom el Dik, but I can’t  remember exactly what I said.

Q. Did you get any instructions from Kom el Dik after the first approach to the Outpost?

A.  Yes.   We were instructed to try and evacuate the personnel if possible.

Q. What arms did you have?

A.  We each had a revolver and 6 rounds.

                                                        (Sgnd) 14910204 W. R H Thomas L/Cpl

        The witness was recalled and further questioned:-

Q. What report did you make after the failure of the first attempt to relieve the post?

A. I said the men were still alive but were in a bad state.   I had already made several reports about the hut being on fire.   I had been reporting from the time when I first saw smoke coming from the Outpost.

                                                        (Sgnd) 14910204 W. R  H. Thomas L/Cpl

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11th Witness.   No. 7684834 C.S.M. Murphy, C.M.P., having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

To:- The Deputy Provost Marshal,

        Alexandria District.

Sir,

        I have to report that at Alexandria on the 4th March 1946 at about 13.45 hrs.   I was on duty in Kom el Dik barracks when I was detailed by the Regimental Sergeant Major to proceed to Ramleh Square where the C.M.P. outpost was being attacked by hostile Egyptians.   I was instructed to ascertain to the best of my ability that the C.M.P. personnel had been evacuated and to report on the situation in general.

        I proceeded there and arrived at about 13.50 hrs.   I found that a cordon of Egyptian Troops had been thrown round the Outpost on the East side.   On the other side natives were still throwing wood on the Outpost which was alight.   The door on the east side of the Outpost was on fire and smoke was pouring out of the windows.

        The cordon of Egyptian Troops was about 50 yards from the Outpost and as I tried to go through to make sure that the personnel had been evacuated.   I was stopped by an Egyptian officer whose rank was that of Second Lieutenant.   He informed me that the C.M.P. personnel were not in the Outpost.   I repeated by question in slow and deliberate English.   He repeated his answer, also in English:- “There is no one at all in the building, they have been evacuated.   This Officer did not allow me inside the cordon, and ordered me to turn round and leave the vicinity.   In view of this |I returned to Kom el Dik and reported to the D.P.M and R.S.M.   As I was returning to Barracks i saw L/cpl Thomas, C.M.Police who informed me that he had been right up to the door of the Outpost partly entered, and called to the men inside.   He was unable to get an answer.   This further reassured me that the men were safe.   I communicated this information to the D.P.M on my return.

        The Egyptian Officer who informed  me that the men had been evacuated was Auburn haired and had a Moustache of the same colour.   I would have no difficulty whatsoever in recognising him again.

        L/Cpl Kelly, .M.Police was the driver of the wireless Truck in which I was travelling and heard the whole of the conversation with the a/m officer.   He also could recognise him again.

Alexandria.                                                Signed 7684834 Murphy C.S.M.

4th March, 1946                                                        C.M.Police.

        I say that this statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                        (Sgnd) E. A. Murphy C.S.M.        

                                                                     C.M.Police.

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12th Witness.   Lieut/Dr. Cavounides, having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

Statement by Lieut/Dr Cavounides Vassilios.

No.519

-------------------------------------------------------

To

HQ Royal Hellenic Air Force

Alexandria

------------------------------------------------------

Subject:- Two English soldiers killed by natives.

        I have to report that I am residing in Rue Diomides no.6 where I witnessed the killing of two English soldiers during yesterday’s demonstrations.   It happened as follows:-

        At about 14.00 hrs, I observed an English soldier armed being chased by the crowd between Jovanides and Cabaret Feminia, which were in flames.

        I then say him entering Rue Sacour Pacha which was watched by the Egyptian police.   The Egyptian Police did not stop the crowd, but left  the natives to kill the English soldier.

        In front of Garage Lux they got hold of him and started beating him to death with woods, which they took from damaged shops.

        The soldier tried to rise but they hit him again, causing his death.   They then started kicking the dead and tried to pierce his eyes, and they were doing anything to revenge upon a dead body.

        At the same time the same fate had another English soldier in front of Cabaret Femina, which was in flames.

        They pulled the dead body around the street until “Metropole”  Hotel, where they started doing the same, they did to the first one.

        During these un-human actions the Egyptian Police did not interfere to arrest the killers, in co-operation with the Egyptian Fire Brigade they rather helped them.

        I saw a policeman in Service - Dress kick the dead body which was left in front of the Garage Lux.

        I do not know what happened to the other one, because it was taken while I was telephoning.

        I confirm that my statement is true, and I can produce a second witness if necessary.

                                                                (Sgnd) B. Cavounides P/O519

                                                                             R.H.A.F.

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13th Witness. Prof. Fitikides, having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

Statement by Prof. A. Fitikides, 19, Bld. Saad Zoughloul, Alexandria.

Who states:-

        At 13.15 hrs. On 4th March 1946, I left my home at No.10 Rus Lepsius to go to my Academy in Rue Saad Zaghloul through Nebi Daniel and Boulevard Saad Zaghloul.   I heard shots.   I stopped for about two minutes.   I saw about ten or twenty natives coming from Giovannides Restaurant with loot ( Silver and bottles of spirits).   I walked on the left hand side of Blv. Saad Zaghloul.   Many Egyptian soldiers were standing at ease on the right hand side of the road.   I reached a spot outside the Express Cleaning shop and I looked up to the right towards my Academy, and I saw my neighbour on the second floor below my Academy.   His name is Mr. Anthony Michaelides who was with his wife and family standing on the balcony.   I went into see Mr. Michaelides and stayed there until 13.55 hrs.   Just as I was about to leave I saw from the balcony a crowd of Arabs, about twenty in number, in Boulevard Saad Zaghloul.   One Arab, aged about seventeen or eighteen, about 5’5” in height, clean shaven, short black straight hair, dressed in a dirty white gallbieh, naked feet, without a hat and waving a large revolver in a brown leather holster attached to a brown leather belt.   He was shouting in Arabic “We have it, we’ve got it”.   I then decided to go and see the Anglo-American bar as I was afraid that the crowd might have damaged it.   I saw smoke coming from a baker’s shop and I started to run down the street, I turned up a small alley behind the Jewish Club and stopped on the corner opposite the Lux Garage.   The time was the approx. 14.15 hrs.   I saw a soldier running up Chakour Pasha Street.   He appeared very exhausted.   He was an English soldier, blond hair, round face, dressed in a battle dress blouse which was open, battle dress trousers, white gaiters.   He had no hat.   He was being closely pursued by a gang of yelling native.   An Arab aged about 22 yrs,, black straight hair brushed back, brown oval face, clean shaven, no glasses, height about 5’7” - 5’8”, dressed in a dark grey suit  the jacket of which was open, either beige or light brown shirt - with a tie - the colour of which I cannot remember.   The suit was shabby but not ragged.   He was wearing black dirty shoes.   He was well built and wearing no hat.   This man caught the soldier around the neck and bore him to the ground.   The soldier was then surrounded from all directions by other natives.   Other natives then threw themselves upon the soldier on the ground..  I saw the soldier’s legs open.   There was struggle and them some of the natives went away - they were running.   I saw a man with a knife about 8 inches in length (including the handle).   The knife was blood-stained.   This man was dressed in a Galabieh, he was bareheaded.   The galabieh was white with dark stripes.   He was in his twenties.   He was cross-eyed.   He was medium build.   He had a little moustache.   This man then ran away and disappeared from my view.   When the soldier was being assaulted he was shouting for help.   When the crowd started to go away he was still shouting for help but in a tired and weak voice.   An Arab youth then came up to me, aged about 17or 18, about 5’6”, medium build, thin faced, slick black hair in disorder, dressed in a white plain dirty galbieh, naked feet and said to me in Arabic, “The dog is dead, we have butchered him”.   The soldier was lying on his back, with his legs apart, breathing with difficulty and calling for help, blood was gushing from throat.   I then saw an Egyptian Army Full lieutenant standing near Freedom house in the vicinity of the Fleet Club.   he was therefore about (two hundred) 200 yards from the incident.   He had a  plaster on his left elbow.   He declined to help because he said that he was on duty.   There were no soldiers or police in the immediate vicinity of the incident.   I then went to the Fleet Club and informed an Arabic Porter there who told the people inside.   I made a statement to the Naval Authorities.   I am making this statement of my own free will to Capt. Mountford (S.I.B.).   No suggestion has been made by him to me of the identity of the assailant.   This statement has been read over to me in a language which I understand, it is true and correct and which I sign quite voluntarily.

                                                                (Sgnd) A. Fitikides

        Statement recorded and signature witnessed by me at Alexandria  at about 21.30 hrs. On 8/3/1946.

                                                                (Sgnd) B. J. Arrowsmith, Capt.

        I say that this statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                                (Sgnd) A Fitikides

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14th Witness. Mr. X D. Charilaou having been duly sworn, read the following statement:-

Statement by Xenophon D. Charilaou, 21, Blv, Mustpaha Pasha, Sidi Baber.

Who states quite voluntarily:-

        On the 4th March 1946, I was standing on the roof of my sister’s house, Rue Citadelle, no.7, when I saw down below at the corner of Blvd. Saad Zaghloul and Rue Shagour, two (Blue caps) , Military Policemen running from the Ramleh outpost, towards the “Fleet Club”.   Following behind them were a mob of Egyptian natives.   One Egyptian man dressed in a gallabieh came behind one of the blue-caps and struck him over the head with a piece of wood.   The Military Policeman fell to the ground and the rest of the mob arrived, trampling over him and stamping on his face.   The second blue-cap seeing what happened to his friend and opened fire on the mob, dispersing a few of the, he then ran about twenty five metres and was attacked same as his friend.   I did not see how they killed the second blue-cap, as the mob was out of my sight from the building where I was standing.   Whilst all this was happening there were about twenty five Egyptian soldiers and officers in charge.   None of them attempted to helt the Blue-caps in any way, but just stood around and watched what was going on.

        I have read over the above statement, it is true and correct, I sign voluntarily.

                                                                (Sgnd) X.D. Charilaou.

        Statement recorded and signature witnessed by Cpl. Hudson, S.I.B., C.M.Police at 16.15 hrs on the 8th mar 1946. At No.7 base Workshops, R.E.M.E.

                                                                (Sgnd) Hudson Cpl.

                                                                SIB/CMP

        The statement which I have read and now sign is true.                                                                                                        (Sgnd) X. D. Charilaou.

        The witness was questioned by the President:-

Q. Where were the Egyptian soldiers and Officers?

A. Opposite the entrance to the Metropole hotel, about 10 Metres away from where the soldier was killed.

                                                                (Sgnd) X. D Charilaou.

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15th Witness. Capt R.J.F. Avery, RA, attached CMP having been duly sworn read the following statement:-

To:- D.P.M.

        Alexandria District;

Sir,

        At  ALEXANDRIA         on the 4th March, 1946 at approximately 12.36 hrs I was informed that the C.M.P. Outpost at Midan Saad Zaghloul had been attacked and set on fire by a mob of Egyptians.   I immediately went to the Orderly Sergeant’s Office and spoke on the telephone to L/Cpl MAILE who informed me that the mob had set fire to the Outpost and that the men on duty there had assembled in the telephone room.   The mob were attempting to break into this room and had set fire to the telephone room door and the shutters.   He informed me that they had fired some rounds into the air and had been forced to open fire on the mob which had retreated but looked as if they would attack again.   I immediately informed the D.P.M. of the latest situation at the Outpost, he telephoned Alexandria District and asked for assistance.   I then returned to the Orderly Sergeant’s office and was informed that the Outpost was being attacked again.   I again spoke to L/Cpl MAILE who infomred me that they were running short of ammunition;  I advised him to conserve his ammunition.   Whilst I was talking to him I could hear sounds of firing, one being particularly loud.   I asked L/Cpl         MAILE  what was happening and he informed me that he had just fired at a native who was trying to enter the telephone room through the burning door.   He also informed me that Egyptian Army troops who he could see through the window, were firing at the Outpost from the back of the mob.    I told him to hand on and again informed the D.P.M. of the situation and he again rang up Alexandria District and asked for assistance.   At approximately 13.45 hrs I was informed that the Orderly Sergeant was no longer in telephonic communication with the Outpost and that the line was dead.

                                                                (Signed) R.J.F Avery Lt. RA

                                                                                Att. C.M.Police.

        I say that the statement which I have read and now sign is true.                

                                                                 (Signed) R.J.F. Avery.

        The witness was questioned by the President:-

Q.  Were you acting OC 202 Provost Coy?

A. Yes.

Q. Did you have a reserve standing by at KOM EL DIK?

A. yes.   About 45 personnel, with transport, including r wireless jeeps, each with a crew of 4, including driver and wireless operator.

Q. What arms and ammunition did the men in the post have?

A. 3 Sten guns and 2 pistols, 60 rounds of  Sten ammunition and 12 rounds of .39 ammunition.   That is the normal armament for the Post since I have been at KOM EL Dik, i.e. since 21 FEB.

                                                                (Signed) R.J.F. Avery.

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16th Witness.  Lt Col J.S. Drummond, RA Att C.M.P. having been duly sworn, presented a certified time copy of the Situation Report from 08.00 hrs til 18.11 hrs on 4 March 46 (App. A)

        The witness was questioned by the president:-

Q. Your are D.P.M. Alexandria District?

A.  Yes.

Q. From what sources was this report compiled?

A.  Manily from my patrol trucks fitted with wireless.

Q. Did you ask the District Cmdr if you could evacuate the Post with your wireless jee0s?

A.  Yes.   At about 13.30 hrs I think.   The answer was “No”;  the flying column would go in if he didn’t get a satisfactory answer from the Civilian Police.

Q. Had you previously asked District HQ if you could take action?

A. Yes.   But they told me that the Civil Police had informed them that the situation was under control.

Q. When did you yourself think that the situation was really serious?

A. From the reports I was getting from the Post and my Patrols I thought the situation was getting serious and out of control by the Civil Police from 13.00 hrs.   But District HQ were informing me that the Civil Police had assured them that they had things under control.

Q. Did you get any telephone reports from civilians who were watching the disturbance?

A. Yes.   We got a few, not to me personally, and no record was kept of these calls, which were of a rather excitable nature.   In some instances these reports confirmed those I was getting from my own me, and didn’t throw and additional light on the situation.

Q. Why was the Post manned?

A. It is an information post, which is always manned.   It is a most useful information post, and had always proved to in the past.

Q. has it been attacked before?

A. Not seriously during the year I have been in Alexandria.   It was stoned a bit during the Nov. riots, but not at all seriously.

Q. Is there anything laid down in the I.S. Scheme about this Post?

A. No.

Q. When Alexandria is out of bounds do the CMP have any special orders?

A. Our role is to supply information to District HQ, through our wireless trucks and the Information Post.

Q. Did you go down to the post yourself at all?

A. No.

Q. Did you send an officer down to report?

A. No, but I sent CSM Murphy.

Q. You were then presumably satisfied with the reports you were getting from your wireless trucks?

A. Yes.

Q. What action did you take when CSM Murphy reported back?

A.  Although it is not recorded in the Sitrep, I think I passed the report on to District HQ.

                                                                (Signed) J. S. Drummond

                                                                         Lt Col.

                                                                         D.P.M. Alex District.

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17th Witness. Flight/Lt Phillippou G. of the GREEK  AIR FORCE, having been duly sworn read the following statement through an interpreter, LAC Thedossiou, G.

Who states:-

On the 4th March, 1946 at about 12.30 hrs, I was looking from a window above the “LONG BAR” (Rue Chacour ALEXANDRIA) watching the crowds of natives (Egyptians) in the streets below.   Suddenly a British soldier came running through the side street into Bvd. SAAD ZAGHLOUL.   There was a large mob on natives chasing him and shouting.   On the corner of the METROPOLE HOTEL, the soldier was caught by this mob, who beat him to the ground, hitting him with pieces of wood and kicking him.   At this time there were several detachments of Egyptians soldiers and policemen, also members of the Fire Brigade standing near this dreadful scene, but not one of these people did a thing to stop this terrible crime.   Whilst this was in progress I saw another British Soldier carrying a gun dash through the same street, past the mob who were busy murdering the other soldier, and the he ran across Bvd. SAAD ZAGHLOUL into Rue CHACOUR.   By this time, a number of the mob had notices his flight, and about 20 or 30 of them detached themselves from the main party and gave chase shouting “Catch him - catch him, he is ENGLISH”   (his was in Arabic, a language I understand).   On a corner of a little street that cuts through Rue CHACOUR the soldier was caught by the crowd (I noticed that the soldier was limping and could not run fast).   As in the case of the the first soldier, this soldier was beaten to the ground with sticks and stones and trampled on by the mob, who danced on his body, shouting all the time.   At this point I left the window to give aid to my two female friends who had witnessed part of the scene, and were in a state of collapse.   At about half an hour later however I again looked from the window, and I saw the Mob still gathered about the body of the first soldier, and then they lifted his body up and threw it to the ground several yards away, then began again to dance on the body.   The Egyptian police and army were still standing around ignoring it all.

The above statement, which I made quite voluntary has been read over to me in English a language I understand.   It is true and correct.

                                                        (Signed) J. PHILIPPOU

The above statement recorded and signature witnessed by No. 1778331 Sgt. CUDLIP R. SIB ON 11TH mARCH, 1946 in ALEXANDRIA.

                                                        (Signed) R. CUDLIP Sgt.

THe statement which I have read and now sign is true.                (Signed) J. PHILIPPOU.

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18th Witness, Cpl Hurst S. having been duly sworn , read the following statement:-

R E P O R T

Statement by No. 6925313, Cpl. Hurst, S. 202 Provost Coy, C.M.Police.

Who states:-

        On the 4/3/46 I was Orderly Sergeant on duty at HW. 202 Provost Coy, C.M.Police, when I received a telephone  message from L/Cpl MAILE, RAMLETH OUTPOST, to the effect that the outpost had been attacked and set on fire by natives.   He also informed me that Cpl Jump, NCO i/c had been injured.   We then carried on a conversation until 13.45 hrs., when the line went dead.

From L/Cpl MAILE.        

        “An iron bar has just been pushed through the window and it just missed me”.

        “The place is filling with smoke and we require help”.

        “All the windows are on fire”.

        “Some natives have appeared at the windows”.

        “”Is help coming?”.

        “I think the crowd is going away”.

        “The Army has arrived, one of the boys at the window tells me that the Egyptians are taking the rifles    away from the Army and are firing at us,  the Egyptian Army are also firing at us”.

        “An Egyptian Officer has got into the Outpost and has told us to stop firing, this we have done”.

        “We are running short of ammunition, I have only 2 rounds left”.

        During the whole of this conversation a considerable amount of firing was heard through the telephone.   The last words L/Cpl Maile spoke to me were “They are coming in, I have had it”.  The line then went dead.

        I have read over the above statement, and it is true and correct.

                                                                (Signed) 6923318 S. Hurst, Cpl.

        The above statement and signature witnessed by me at approximately 23.00hrs, on 4/3/46.

                                                                (Signed) W.E Crabb, CSM.

                                                                         SIB. C.M.Police

        The statement which I have read and now sign is true.

                                                                (Signed) 6923318 S. Hurst, Cpl.        

                                                                         C.M.Police.

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19th Witness, Ca[tB. W Rhodes, RAMC having been duly sworn hands in copies of his post mortem examination of:-

                                                      1616627 L/CPL MAILE P R, CMP  (815 PRO COY)

                                                       5783652 PTE BAILLIE A J, CMP (815 PRO COY)

                                                                (Signed) B W Rhodes, Capt. RAMC.

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Court adjourns

        The Court adjourned at 12.30 hrs on 18th March to give time for Egyptian Army and Police witnesses to be called.   On the 20th March the President was informed by the convening authority that the Egyptian authorities were reluctant to permit Army and Police to personnel to give evidence and that it had been decided not to press for attendance of the witnesses under the terms of para.13 (a) to the Convention attached to the 1938 Treaty.   The Court reassembled at 09.00 hrs 21 March, and proceeded to take further evidence.

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20th Witness, Maj F le G Whitting, RA GS0II, Alexandria District. Having been duly sworn presented a signed statement of events from 11.30 hrs, on 4 March - attached at App. G.

The witness was then questioned by the president:-

Q. Of what did one column which was ready to relieve the Post consist?

A. One Coy. of Inf, and 6 Armoured Cars provided by the R.I.F.

Q. Where were they standing by?

A. In Mustapha barracks.

Q. Was the Coy. of Inf. in Lorries.

A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure the Baker Pasha said that the CMP personnel had been evacuated when he spoke to you at 13.25 hours?

A. Yes.  Very definitely.

Q. Did you hear the conversation between Baker Pasha and the Cmdr?

A. Yes.   At about 13.15 hrs I heard the Commander demanding police protection and same evacuation of the CMP personnel.

Q. 2 R. Ir. F. were ordered to move off at 13.45 hours but apparently did not move out till 14.08 hrs.   Why was there this long delay?

A. I don’t know.   It is true there was a delay

Q. Did the DPM ask you if he could himself take steps to evacuate his personnel?

A.  On two occasions at least.   I replied that he was to take no action as the Egyptian police had stated that they would get the men out, and that a flying column was standing by at Mustapha.

Q. When you received definite information from other places that the Post was still occupied, did you again get in touch with Baker Pasha?

A. Not personally.   All the communication with the Police was between the Police and the Cmdr. and Baker Pasha, or between the I.O and lt. Montague.

Q. From conversations you had with the DPM and the Manager of the Cecil Hotel, and others, did you  get the impression that the Egyptian authorities were taking active steps to rescue the personnel in the Post?

A. No.

Q. Did you hear the Cmdr. speaking to any Egyptian authorities, other than Baker Pasha?

A. Yes.   At about 14.10 hrs.   I heard him speaking to the Governor, very firmly, saying that he would give the Egyptian authorities 10 minutes to take action.   After which time he would order the British column to intervene.

Q. What time was your watch set to?

A. E.E.T. time, and ordered all my staff to set their watches accordingly,

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21st Witness, Capt H. C. Bowen, R. Welch Fus. GS03 HQ Alexandria District.

Having been duly sworn, signs the statement of events which have been presented to the court by the 20th witness.

22nd Witness, J/Comd B Holford, ATS actg I.O. HQ Alexandria District

Having been duly sworn signs the statement of events which had been presented to the Court by the 20th Witness.

23rd Witness, Brig A. E. Snow, Comdr Alexandria District

Having been duly sworn, handed in a signed report which has been addressed to HQ BTE attached at appx. D.

Q. Who was commanding the flying column?

A. Lt Col CROOKSHANK,        OC 2 R Ir F.   I told him to go down with it personally.

Q. This column was ordered to move at 13.40 hrs, but did not move till 14.08.   Do you know why there was so much delay?

A. No.   I was very surprised to hear there had been so much delay.

Q.How long do yhou think that it would take to get the flying column to (a) the RV and (b) Ramleh Square?

A. (a) 8-10 minutes.   (b) 3-4 minutes.   But, even if they had moved as soon as ordered, they would have been waiting at the RV, and would not have intervened until I told them to.

Q. What instructions had you issued to your staff for dealing with incidents such as occurred on 4 March?

A. I hand to the court a copy of instructions issued at 10.03 hrs 4 Mar to my staff - attached at App. E.

Q. Why was the post manned?

A. It is always manned as part of the normal CMP lay-out.   It was not modified during disturbances.   If I had been asked to remove this Post, I should have declined to do so, as it was a part of a long established policy system in Alexandria, and their appeared to be no reason for abandoning a permanent post.

Q. Why, in view of the reports which you were getting from military sources, did you not order the column to go before 13.40 hrs.

A. From previous experience and from experience on that morning I find that many of these reports are extravagant, and have to be cross checked.   I cross checked them with the Police.   We had already had 2 incidents in Ramleth Square that morning - attack on the ATLANTIC HOTEL and the CECIL HOTEL - both of which had been successfully dealt with by the Egyptian authorities, police and military; and I considered that they would take the same action in the case of the CMP Post, if it was as serious as reported.   I therefore did not want to bring troops out  of barracks until I was quite convinced that I was going to use them.

        It wasn’t until 13.40 hrs, until the lack of information at Alex Police HS’s became apparent from my talks with Baker Pasha, that I decided that we were approaching conditions where we might have to intervene.

        I didn’t harbour the troops nearer the scene of action earlier because I wished to avoid any chance of collision with the Egyptian Crowds which might be about.

Q. During previous disturbances in Alexandria, have the report you received from the Police and Baker Pasha been accurate?

A. Yes.

                                                                (Signed) A. E. Snow

                                                                         Brigadier.

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24th Witness, Lt Col R D Nightingale, A & QMG, Alexandria District, having been duly sworn states:-

At about 14.00 hrs the Cmdr. called me into this office, and instructed me to keep a record of telephone conversations with the Governor of Alexandria and Baker Pasha, Chief of Alexandria Civil Police   I have read the report which the Cmdr. wrote to HQ BTE on the evening of 4th March (red. 677/10/G) and I confirm that the statements made in respect of conversations between 14.06 and 14.58 hrs are in accordance with the notes I took.

                                                        (Signed) R. D. Nightingale

                                                                 Lt Col.

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25th Witness, Capt L. B. Mountford, Middlesex Regt. att. SIB/CMP Alexandria District.

        I examined the hut on 6th March and found bullet holes as follows:-

  1. On the exterior W.  wall, 8 bullet holes, out of which I removed 3 .303 bullets.   These were situated between 5 and 8 ft. from the ground.
  2. One bullet hole in the shutter of the cell window in the W. Wall, and the corresponding hole in the interior wall opposite.   I removed a .38 bullet from this hole.
  3. 6 bullet holes in the end N. door and 1 bullet embedded in the exterior brickwork adjacent to the door hinge.   This bullet was a shot .38 non-British pattern.   Examination of the woodwork of the door, and the absence of any bullet holes (corresponding  to those in the door), in the brickwork against which the door opens, prove that these bullets were fired from outside the hut when the door was shut.   These bullet holes were all in the lower half of the door.
  4.  1 bullet, non-British pattern, the same calibre and type as the one found in the brickwork by the N. door, was found under the table in the telephone room.   This bullet had been subjected to heat, and the lead had melted out, which indicated that it had been fired before or during the time when the hut was burning.
  5. 1 bullet hole on the E. wall, exterior about 5 ft from the ground.   In my opinion was a .303 bullet hole.

                                                        

                                                                        (Signed) L B Mountford

                                                                                 Capt SIB

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1st Witness, L/Cpl Ayres was recalled, and questioned by the President, on his original oath.

Q. Do you remember a “gin Palace” come to the N. Door?

A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember what conversation passed between you and the “gin palace”?

A. I shouted “hang on a minute. We are coming out.”

Q. What happened then?

A. The natives were all around the truck, and closing in on it.   It drove off in the direction of Ramleh Square.

Q. Did you see it come back again later?

A. No.

                                                                        (Signed) H Ayres

                                                                                L/Cpl, CMP.

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26th Witness, Capt G T Montague, I.O. Alexandria District.   Having been duly sworn, handed a signed statement to the court - attached at App. F,

The witness was questioned by the President:-

Q. Did you receive andy instructions from District HQ prior to 13.00 hrs?

A. Between 11.00 and 12.00 hrs I was asked by GSO III to obtain an assurance from Baker Pasha that effective action would be taken to stop the attack on the ATLANTIC HOTEL.

Q. Was no mention made of the CMP Post?

A. No.

Q. When did you first get information that the CMP Post was being attacked?

A. 13.00 hrs. From the Chief of the Special Branch.

Q. How were your getting your information?

A. I was in the Special Branch officer.   The information was coming into them from people on the spot, by telephone or by personal report.   There is also a Recce officer who patrols round in a truck, which is not, however, provided with wireless.

Q. Did you keep a log?

A. No.   It was impossible.

Q.In your statment you say that at 13.45 hr, “the police were still doing nothing”.   How do you know this?

A. During the whole time there were no orders issued from the Special Branch office.

A. Do you think the police officials you were in contact with realised that the lives of the men in the Post were in danger.

A. Yes.

Q. Could they then have not taken action on their own?

A. Yes.   I have been doing liaison officer since january 31 1946.   O previous occasions Special Branch have taken action themselves.

                                                                        (Signed) G T Montague, Capt.

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21st Witness, Capt Bowen was recalled and questioned by the President:-

Q. What were the orders on 4th March regarding the presence of military personnel in Alexandria?

A. All movement of military personnel including essential traffic was forbidden throughout the whole of Alexandria w.e.f  08.00 hrs with the exception of CMP patrols.

                                                                        (Signed) H.C. Bowen, Capt

                                                                                 G.S.

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FINDINGS

I.      The court was required to record any evidence available which establishes what action was taken by the Egyptian Authorities to rescue the men, and it was considered that it would therefore be very desirable, if not essential, to call Egyptian police and Military witnesses.   These were not forthcoming, under the circumstances already mentioned on page 26 above, and the Court has therefore no option but to proceed to their findings on the other evidence available.

  1.     The Court has heard no evidence which established that neither the Egyptian Army or Police took any effective action to control the mob, to stop the CMP Post from being burnt or to rescue the men and to prevent them from being butchered.   MARCHANT (4) stated that at first the Police did make a “determined efforts” to scatter the crowd, but he continues as follows “but later on they appeared to slacken their efforts and remained more or less as onlookers”.   It also appears that Police reinforcements arrived on the spot shortly before the men made their escape from the Post, and that they then did make some attempt to keep the crowd away from it, but certainly without success - vide L/CPL THOMAS (3).   RAOUL MAHIL (5) and BAWDEN(8).   Apart from these evidently half hearted attempts there is a considerable amount of evidence from the soldiers in the post and eye witnesses that neither the Army or Police took action.
  2.  The evidence referred by the three witnesses of the actual killing of the two soldiers - CAVOUNIDES (12), FITIKIIDES (13), and CHARLAOU (14) - also makes it clear that Egyptian Army and Police personnel took no action at all to interfere  with these unfortunate men being butchered.   On the contrary  they were inclined to help the murderers.

       

        (c)     L/Cpl THOMAS (3) gave evidence which points to an Egyptian soldier deliberately firing at him as he ran from the Post.   L/Cpl  AYRES (1) also testified that he saw several soldiers firing in his direction.

        (d)     What is clear from the evidence given by Brig. SNOW (23) and Capt. MONTAGUE (26) that the police authorities were in a state of  inaction.

II.                In the second place the court was instructed to fully examine the action taken by the British Military authorities to deal with the situation, and to record an opinion as to whether or not in the  circumstances the action taken by the military authorities was justified and correct.

  1.    The evidence from the post itself (1), (2), and (3) and from the DPM (16) was that a very serious situation was developing.   This was reinforced by reports from eyewitnesses  telephone to District HQ (28).   The question the immediately arose as to why the District Commander had not taken earlier action to rescue the men at the post and had not permitted the DPM to effect a relief himself (1).

 

  1.  It is quite clear from the District Cmdr’s evidence (23) and from the log of events maintained by his staff (appx C) that the reports that he was receiving from BAKER PASHA and the police authorities conflicted with those coming in from the British Military and from eye witnesses.   The reason which led to Brig. SNOW to hold his hand are set forth in his statement at App. D and in the evidence he gave in answer to questions put by the court (23).   There is no doubt that the conflicting reports put the Cmdr. in a most difficult dilemma and he was seriously misinformed by BAKER PASHA

.

  1. The Court, being aware of the delicate political situation in Egypt and of the policy laid down by the GOC BTE for the employment of British troops in such circumstances as those under review, consider that the action taken by the military authorities was “justified and correct”.

III.             In addition to the two major matters already covered the Court was requested to take evidence on the following points:-

  1. What were the orders of the day regarding the presence of military personnel in Alexandria?

                These are given in evidence by Capt BOWEN (21), page 27.

        (b)   Why was the police post occupied?

                The answer is contained in the replies to questions by the court given by the DPM (18) and Brig.

                SNOW (25).

         (c)    Medical evidence regarding the state of the bodies of the deceased.

                  Post Mortem reports are attached to App. B

         (d)    Whether it appears that fire was opened at the Police Post, if so, by whom.

                  Evidence from Capt MOUNTFORD (25) makes it clear that unknown persons shot at the Post, and  

                 though they may not have been Egyptian Army or Police personnel.   RAOUL KAHIL (5) definitely  

                Though that Egyptian soldiers were shooting at the Post.  

                                                                (Signed)  C.S.G. Sheppard, Col.

                                                                       

                                                                                                                                                  E.M. Phelan, Major.

                                                                         P. C Forsyth-Forrest Capt.

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LIST OF APPENDIXES

  1.  Situation reports from DPM Alexandria District.
  2. Post Mortem reports on L/Cpl Maile and Pte Bailey.
  3. Events in chronological order.
  4. Events
  5. Action taken by HQ Alexandria District in event of attacks on British Services and installations..
  6. Statement of Capt G T Montague.
  7.  Not found
  8. Street plan of environ of the CMP Post
  9. None found
  10. Not found
  11. Line plan of CMP Post
  12. Statement of Lt Col Graham S.A. Rolf.
  13. Statement of Maj A Richardson, East Yorks. Regt.
  14. Statement of  Capt Hodson R. U. U.D.F.
  15. List of Witnesses
  16. Events log HQ Alexandria District.

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The photographs show below were taken by Capt L B Mountford, SIB, Alexandria, at 1605 hrs on the 9th March 1946.

DSCN5321.jpg

West end of CMP outpost, Ramleh Square, Alexandria.   Showing bullet holes ringed in red ink, crosses indicate holes wherein .303 bullets were discovered.

DSCN5323.jpg

South Side of Outpost.

DSCN5325.jpg

East double door of Outpost, bullet holes are ringed.

DSCN5326.jpg

North side of CMP Outpost.

DSCN5327.jpg

East double door, taken from door of kitchen, bullet holes are ringed in red ink, sten bullets found embedded in wall are marked at x

DSCN5331.jpg

Barrack room of Outpost taken from double doors in East Wall.

DSCN5333.jpg

Telephone room of CMP Outpost, non military .38 spent bullet found at X in red ink.

DSCN5329.jpg

Kitchen area of CMP Outpost.

DSCN5335.jpg

Close up north door of Outpost inner side showing bullet exit holes.

DSCN5337.jpg

Close up of North door outer side showing bullet holes.

DSCN5339.jpg

North door of post inner side.

DSCN5320.jpg

Plan of East end of the CMP Outpost.

DSCN5319.jpg

Sketch Plan of the West end of the CMP Outpost.

______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

HONOURS & AWARDS

13105296 CPL. A D JUMP CMP WAS AWARDED THE BRITISH EMPIRE MEDAL FOR HIS ACTIONS IN THE ABOVE INCIDENT.  

5335820 L/CPL H A D AYRES CMP WAS AWARDED THE BRITISH EMPIRE MEDAL FOR HIS ACTIONS IN THE ABOVE INCIDENT.

_________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

OFFICIAL REPORT

HOUSE OF COMMONS

WEDNESDAY, 15th MAY, 1946

Anti British Demonstration,

Alexandria.

142.  Mr. Molson asked the Secretary of State for War whether he will make as full statement regarding the attack on 4th March of an Egyptian mob on a military police post in Alexandria, the failure of both the Egyptian and British authorities to answer the repeated telephone calls for assistance, and the consequent murder of two British military policemen.

          Mr Bellenger:  Yes,, Sir.   At approximately mid-day on 4th March last, an anti-British demonstration occurred in Alexandria, and the assembled crowd took a provocative interest in a British military police post situated in the centre of the city.   The garrison, which consisted of five military policemen, endeavoured to hold off the threatening crowd by firing shots overhead,   These measures failed, and the garrison was forced to open fire on the crowd in its own defence.

           Both the responsible British military authorities and the Egyptian military and police authorities were acquainted with this development at an early stage.   The former took no immediate offensive action, as to do so might have caused a much more serious incident that the one I am now reporting, and also because they had received the strongest representation from the Governor of Alexandria to adopt this somewhat passive attitude, together with an assurance that the Egyptian authorities had the situation in hand.

          For approximately one hour spasmodic British fire continued from the garrison and this ceased on assurances given by an Egyptian Army officer that the crowd would be dispersed and the garrison safely evacuated.    The local British Military Commander, however, had become anxious concerning the adequacy of the protection afforded by the Egyptian authorities to the British soldier in the garrison, and in consequence he issued orders that a military flying column should stand by for action at short notice.

          In the meantime, attacks on the post were resumed and the garrison was forced to take refuge in a cell;  shortly afterwards the whole of the post was observed to be burning.   The non-commissioned officer in charge gave orders to evacuate and run to the Egyptian cordon which was nearby.   In this attempt, three of the soldiers managed to escape to a nearby hotel, where they were given protection by some Egyptians, but I regret to say that the other two soldiers were killed by the crowd.

         The British Military Commander had shortly prior to the murder of the British soldiers, been incorrectly informed by the Governor of Alexandria that the British garrison had been successfully evacuated.   He was placed in a very difficult position in view of the requests and the assurances received from the Governor of Alexandria, and in view of the risk that the use of British troops might be provocative and so lead to even more serious disturbances.

          Nevertheless, the Commander in Chief, Middle East Forces does not exonerate the local Military Commander from blame and has removed him from his appointment.   The officer concerned has appealed to the Army Council against this decision and full consideration will of course be given.

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The National Archive files ref no. WO 382/1, WO 382/2 and WO 382/3 contain more information than  this but the main body of information is shown above.

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WO 203/5723

DAPM REPORT ON RANGOON EVACUATION 18/2/42 TO 7/3/42

   

  THE FOLLOWING IS A REPORT ON THE SITUATION DURING THE PERIOD THAT I WAS DAPM, RANGOON FROM 18/2/42 TO 7/3/42 WHEN THE CITY WAS FINALLY EVACUATED.

     I AM WRITING THIS ENTIRELY FROM MEMORY THREE OR FOUR MONTHS AFTER THE EVENTS TOOK PLACE, AS I DESTROYED BY NOTES FOR SECURITY REASONS, BEFORE MY RETURN TO BURMA.   FOR THIS REASON THERE MIGHT BE SLIGHT DISCREPANCIES IN DATES AND CERTAIN OMISSIONS, BUT I HAVE ENDEAVOURED TO RECAPITULATE EVENTS AS COMPLETELY AS POSSIBLE.

RANGOON 18/2/42  FOLLOWING YOUR DEPARTURE FROM RANGOON, I  ESTABLISHED MYSELF IN THE SSO’S  (STATION STAFF OFFICER) OFFICE AND SET ABOUT THE TASK OF PREPARING A  10 DAYS COURSE FOR THE PROVOST STAFF WHICH HAD BEEN DETAILED BUT WAS DESTINED NOT TO REPORT FOR DUTY.

     THE SITUATION IN RANGOON WHEN I ARRIVED WAS AS FOLLOWS:

      AHQ WERE STILL OPERATING IN THE UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS, BUT REAR ARMY HQ WERE PACKING UP PRIOR TO MOVING UP COUNTRY.

     MOST OF THE GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS HAD MOVED, AND THE REMAINDER WERE PREPARING TO GO.   THE GOVERNOR AND HIS STAFF WERE STILL IN RANGOON.

     WITH THE EXCEPTION OF ROWE & CO AND A FEW SMALLER SHOPS, ALL THE SHOPS WERE CLOSED*

     THE BANKS WITH THE EXCEPTION  OF THE RESERVE BANK WERE PREPARING TO MOVE.

     SHIPS WERE STILL USING THE DOCKS, AND WERE BEING UNLOADED BY THE COOLIE LABOUR WHICH REMAINED.   THIS LABOUR WAS SUBSEQUENTLY TAKEN OVER ENTIRELY BY A DOCK OPERATING COMPANY.

     THE ESSENTIAL SERVICES WERE OPERATING.   THESE INCLUDED THE POLICE, FIRE BRIGADE, DOCK POLICE, ELECTRIC AND WATER SUPPLY AND RAILWAYS.

     THE ARP HAD PRACTICALLY CEASED TO FUNCTION, BUTH THE AIR RAID WARNING SYSTEM WAS STILL OPERATING.

     OF THE PLACES OF AMUSEMENT WHICH WERE STILL OPEN, THERE WAS ONLY ONE, THE SILVER GRILL AND BAR, AND THIS CLOSED DOWN VERY SOON AFTERWARDS.

     LAW AND ORDER WERE BEING MAINTAINED AND THERE WERE FEW IF ANY CASES OF LOOTING AND ARSON.

    MOST OF THE CIVILIANS HAD LEFT THE CITY BUT SEVERAL THOUSANDS REMAINED.

     THE PROVOST STAFF OF 1 NCO AND 5 BOR’S FROM THE 1 GLOUCESTERS WERE WORKING UNDER ORDERS OF THE SSO, BUT WERE PASSED OVER TO ME IMMEDIATELY.   NORMALLY THIS STAFF WOULD HAVE BEEN ENTIRELY INADEQUATE, BUT AT THE TIME THERE WERE FEW PLACES WHERE SOLDIERS COULD MISBEHAVE THEMSELVES.

     ONE OF MY FIRST TASKS WAS TO CONTACT THE C P RANGOON WHO TOLD ME THAT THE CITY WAS QUIET AND THAT HIS POLICE HAD THE SITUATION WELL IN HAND.

INITIAL EVACUATION OF CIVILIANS

     A FEW DAYS LATER THE ORDER FOR THE FINAL EVACUATION OF THE REMAINING CIVILIANS WAS ISSUED AND WITH THE CIVILIANS WENT THE POLICE, (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE COP, BRITISH OFFICERS, EUROPEAN AND EURASIAN SERGEANTS) AND THE BULK OF THE FIRE BRIGADE.

BREAKDOWN CIVIL ADMINISTRATION

      AS THE CIVIL POLICE AND DOCK POLICE HAD CEASED TO FUNCTION, I IMAGINED THAT THE GOVERNOR WOULD IMMEDIATELY SANCTION THE DECLARATION OF MARTIAL LAW, BUT FOR SOME REASON THERE WAS A LAPSE OF TWO DAYS BEFORE A MODIFIED FORM OF MARTIAL LAW AND A CURFEW WERE SANCTIONED.

     LT COL WALTON (1 GLOSTERS, OC TROOPS, RANGOON) WAS APPOINTED MILITARY GOVERNOR.

     IT WAS DURING THESE TWO DAYS THAT MOST OF THE LOOTING AND CASES OF ARSON OCCURRED, WITH NO CIVIL POLICE TO CHECK IT, AND THE MILITARY AUTHORITIES POWERLESS TO TAKE STRONG ACTION.

 NOTE NO. (i)

     TO ADD TO THE DIFFICULTIES THE RAILWAY STATION WAS BESIEGED BY CIVILIANS ENDEAVOURING TO LEAVE THE CITY.

     IN THE TOUR OF THE CITY WHICH I MADE, I FOUND LOOTING BEING CARRIED ON MORE OR LESS UNCHECKED, WHILST SOME OF THE WAREHOUSES ON THE JETTIES WERE BEING RIFLED BY SOLDIERS, SAILORS AND COOLIES.

      DETACHMENTS OF 1 GLOUCESTERS WERE LATER SENT TO THE RAILWAY STATION AND THE DOCKS AND ORDER WAS RESTORED.

     THE SITUATION IN THE CITY WAS NOT SO EASILY DEALT WITH AS THERE WERE NOT THE AVAILABLE TROOPS TO PATROL THE STREETS EFFECTIVELY.

     DETACHMENTS OF THE GARRISON BATTALION BURIFS WERE DETAILED FOR THIS PURPOSE BUT IN SOME INSTANCES DECIDED TO LOOT ON THEIR OWN ACCOUNT AND IN ANY CASE WERE EXTREMELY WEAK IN THEIR HANDLING OF THE LOOTERS WHO WERE MAINLY FELLOW BURMANS.

     THE CASES OF ARSON WERE EVEN MORE DIFFICULT TO DEAL WITH.   ONLY A SKELETON FIRE BRIGADE REMAINED.

     MANY FIRES WERE STARTED BY OUR ALLIES THE CHINESE AND THE AMERICANS, WHO SEEMED TO BE SOMEWHAT PREMATURE IN THEIR ASSUMPTION THAT THE CITY WAS ABOUT TO BE TAKEN BY THE JAPANESE.

(THESE EVENTS OCCURRED AT LEAST TWO WEEKS BEFORE THE CITY WAS EVACUATED).

   IN THE CASE OF THE CHINESE MISSION, THEY FIRED THE BUILDINGS WHICH THEY HAD OCCUPIED.   THIS FIRE SPREAD TO ADJOINING PROPERTY AND THREATENED THE RAILWAY LINE TO LEDPADA, BEFORE IT WAS BROUGHT UNDER CONTROL.

     THE AMERICAN OFFICER IN CHARGE OF THE “LEASE AND LEND” LORRY PARK ORDERED THE FIRING OF HUNDREDS OF LORRIES.   ALTHOUGH THIS FIRE DID NOT SPREAD, THE PARK ITSELF COVERED A CONSIDERABLE AREA.

     APART FROM THESE FIRES THERE WERE MANY OTHERS AT WIDELY DISPERSED AREAS, SOME CAUSED DELIBERATELY BY FIFTH COLUMNISTS AND SOME NO DOUBT CAUSED BY ACCIDENT.

MILITARY GOVERNORSHIP

     AS I  PREVIOUSLY STATED, AFTER A LAPSE OF TWO DAYS, LT COL WALTON WAS APPOINTED MILITARY GOVERNOR, AND HE IMMEDIATELY SET ABOUT THE TASK OF RESTORING ORDER.

     HE INSTRUCTED ME TO TAKE UP QUARTERS IN THE MOGUL GUARD (THE HQ RANGOON POLICE).  I ARRANGED THAT THE 6 MP’S SHOULD ALSO MOVE THERE FROM SALE BARRACKS.

     THE SITUATION AT THE MOGUL GUARD WAS ONE WHICH CALLED FOR DELICATE HANDLING.  THE CP SOMEWHAT RESENTED THE APPOINTMENT OF A MILITARY GOVERNORSHIP AND AT FIRST WAS INCLINED TO TAKE THE ATTITUDE THAT HE HAD BEEN SUPERSEDED.

     DUE TO THE TACT OF LT COL WALTON, HOWEVER HE AGREED TO CO-OPERATE WITH EVERY MEANS WITHIN HIS POWER.

     I MIGHT ADD THAT FOLLOWING COL WALTON’S LEAD I ALWAYS ADVISED THE CP OF WHAT ACTION I WAS TAKING.

     A LARGE NUMBER OF POLICE WERE  RECALLED  IMMEDIATELY, AND A NUMBER OF SUB-STATIONS WERE REOPENED.

    THE FIRE BRIGADE WAS RE-CALLED FROM PROME.

RESTORATION OF ORDER.

     THE MILITARY GOVERNOR AUTHORISED ME TO TAKE OUT ARMED PATROLS OF MP’S TO DEAL SUMMARILY WITH LOOTERS AND FIRE RAISERS.

     FURTHER PATROLS OF POLICE OFFICERS AND CIVILIAN VOLUNTEERS WERE ALSO ORGANISED.   BOTH THE POLICE AND THE VOLUNTEERS WERE AFTERWARDS GRANTED TEMPORARY MILITARY RANKS TO GIVE THEM SOME  MORE AUTHORITY.

     DURING MY PATROLS WHICH I CARRIED OUT IN MY “JEEP” I FOUND THAT LOOTING WAS STILL GOING ON, AND IN SOME CASES I WAS COMPELLED TO ORDER BY PATROL TO OPEN FIRE, AND SOME CASUALTIES RESULTED AMONGST THE LOOTERS.   IN MOST CASES, HOWEVER, I ORDERED THE PATROL TO FIRE TO FRIGHTEN AND NOT TO KILL.

     PATROLS WERE CONTINUED THROUGHOUT THE NIGHT, BUT THE CURFEW AND THE FIRM ACTION TAKEN DURING THE DAY HAD THE DESIRED EFFECT.

     THE SITUATION ON THE FOLLOWING DAY WAS MUCH BETTER, BUT LOOTING WAS GOING ON IN PARTS OF THE CITY.

     PARTLY WITH THE DESIRE TO AVOID FURTHER BLOODSHED AND PARTLY OWING TO THE SHORTAGE OF LABOUR AT THE DOCKS IT WAS DECIDED THAT LOOTERS COULD BE USED TO GOOD PURPOSE UNLOADING SHIPS.

     THEY WERE THEREFORE ROUNDED UP, TAKEN TO THE TOWN LOCK-UP, GIVEN 10 TO 20 STROKES OF A CANE ON THEIR BARE BACKSIDES, AND PUT TO WORK UNDER ESCORT FOR 24 HOURS.

     THIS PROCEDURE WAS CARRIED OUT REGARDLESS OF THE STATUS OF THE LOOTERS, AND IN THE CASE OF CIVILIANS THEY WERE FREED AFTER 24 HOURS, AND THE SOLDIERS HANDED BACK TO THEIR UNITS.

     WITH THE RESTORATION OF ORDER IN THE CITY CASES OF ARSON BECAME MORE AND MORE INFREQUENTLY, AND IN MANY CASES PATROLS WERE ABLE TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE FIRE BRIGADE BEFORE BEFORE THE FIRES GAINED A HOLD, AND ALSO TO DEAL WITH THE FIRE RAISERS.   AT THE SAME TIME REPORTS WERE RECEIVED THAT FINDING THEMSELVES BALKED IN THE CITY, LOOTERS HAD TURNED THEIR ATTENTION TO THE SUBURBS AND WERE RIFLING THE HOUSES EVACUATED BY THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY OF RANGOON AND PATROLS HAD THEREFORE TO EXTEND THE SPHERE OF THEIR ACTIVITIES.

NOTE NO; (ii)

     IT WAS DURING MY PATOL OF THE SUBURBS THAT I FOUND SOME FEMALE LOOTERS.   (HOW DOES ONE DEAL WITH THESE?).

 GUARDS AT VP’S

     OWING TO THE IMPROVEMENT IN CONDITIONS, LT COL WALTON ASKED ME TO TAKE OVER SUPERVISION OF THE GUARDS AT THE VARIOUS VULNERABLE POINTS IN AND AROUND RANGOON.

     THESE GUARDS WERE FURNISHED BY THE 1 GLOUCESTERS AND GARRISON BATTALION, BURIFS, THE BURMA MILITARY POLICE DOING RAILWAY GUARDS AND ROAD PATROLS OUTSIDE THE CITY.

     THE GUARDS WERE DETAILED BY THEIR OWN OFFICERS, BUT IT WAS MY RESPONSIBILITY TO ARRANGE FOR GUARDS TO BE POSED AT FURTHER POINTS OR TO BE WITHDRAWN IF THEY BECAME UNNECESSARY.

     I FOUND THAT IN ALL CASES THE GUARDS WERE CORRECTLY POSTED, BUT THAT SOME OF THE BURIFS HAD LITTLE IDEA OF WHAT THEY WERE GUARDING AND WHY.

     I  PARTICULARLY NOTICED, DURING MY VISITS TO VARIOUS GUARDS AT NIGHT, THAT THE SIGHT OF A MILITARY CAR WITH UNIFORMED DRIVER WAS SUFFICIENT PASSPORT TO THE MAJORITY OF VP’S IN RANGOON, WITHOUT THE SENTRY STOPPING THE CAR.   AFTER MY ORDERS THAT ALL CARS SHOULD BE STOPPED AND THE IDENTITY OF THE OCCUPANTS ESTABLISHED, ANYONE VISITING VP’S AT NIGHT DID SO AT THE RISK OF THEIR LIFE.

     MY UNEXPECTED VISITS TO THE CARDS HAD A MARKED EFFECT, AND THERE WAS A CONSIDERABLE IMPROVEMENT IN THEIR EFFICIENCY.

JAP MOVEMENTS

    ON THE 5TH MARCH INTELLIGENCE WAS RECEIVED THAT PARTIES OF ARMED BURMANS UNDER JAPANESE OFFICERS HAD BEEN SIGHTED ON THE TWANTI CANAL (50 MILES WEST OF RANGOON) AND WERE MOVING TOWARDS RANGOON.

      ALSO THAT A NUMBER OF BARGES HAD BEEN SITED IN THE RANGOON RIVER.

MILITARY PRISONERS NOTE: (iv)

     DURING THE AFTERNOON I RECEIVED A MESSAGE ASKING ME TO PROCEED TO THE DOCKS TO TAKE OVER A JAPANESE NAVAL OFFICER AND 58 TRAITOR BURMANS WHO HAD BEEN TAKEN PRISONER BY A NAVAL PATROL.

   

      I ARRANGED FOR THE GLOSTERS SHOULD PROVIDE A GUARD FOR THE BURMANS AND THAT THEY WOULD BE LODGED IN THE TOWN JAIL.

     I TOOK THE JAPANESE OFFICER TO THE TOWN LOCK-UP FOR INTERROGATION BY AN OFFICER FROM AHQ, AND AFTERWARDS TO THE JAIL.   HE WAS FLOWN TO INDIA THE NEXT DAY.

     THE JAP WAS VERY ARROGANT IN HIS ATTITUDE, BUT THE INTELLIGENCE OFFICER (WHO HAD GOOD COMMAND OF THE JAPANESE TONGUE) BY SKILFUL HANDLING, OBTAINED MUCH USEFUL INFORMATION.

     THE JAP THAWED COMPLETELY AND WAS BOWING AND SMILING BY THE END OF THE INTERROGATION.

     THE 6TH MARCH PASSED QUIETLY ENOUGH, BUT FROM INTELLIGENCE REPORTS WHICH WE RECEIVED, IT WAS OBVIOUSLY THAT THE MILITARY SITUATION WAS DETERIORATING, AND THAT THE MILITARY PERSONNEL IN RANGOON WERE IN DANGER OF BEING CUT OFF.

THE REMAINDER OF THE GLOSTERS (HQ & 2 COMPANIES) MOVED DOWN FROM MINGALADON TO THE OLD RACE-COURSE.   GUARDS WERE WITHDRAWN FROM OUTLYING VP’S, GUARDS WERE DOUBLED ALONG THE WATERFRONT, AND NAVAL CRAFT PATROLLED THE RIVER.

FINAL EVACUATION

     IN THE EARLY HOURS OF THE MORNING OF THE 7TH MARCH I WAS AWAKENED BY THE SSO AND WAS TOLD THAT THE JAPS HAD CVUT THE PROME ROAD AND THAT THE NONESSENTIAL MILITARY PERSONNEL WERE TO BE EVACUATED BY SEA AT 08.00HRS.

     I WAS TO REMAIN BEHIND, TO ACT AS PERSONAL BODYGUARD TO THE MILITARY GOVERNOR, AND TO LEAVE THE CITY WITH HIM.

     ADVANCE AHW HAD ALREADY LEFT BUT, I  AFTERWARDS LEARNED, WERE ON THE WRONG SIDE OF THE ROAD BLOCK (THIS WAS AFTERWARDS FORCED, AND THEY GOT THROUGH INTACT).

   THE GUARDS WERE WITHDRAWN FROM THE VP’S AND THE GARRISON BATTALION BURIFS LEFT THE CITY BY RAIL.   THEY HAD AN EXCITING JOURNEY BUT I BELIEVE THEY ESCAPED WITHOUT CASUALTIES.

     ONE COMPANY OF GLOSTERS REMAINED IN THE CITY TO COVER THE FINAL EVACUATION WHILST THE REST OF THE BATTALION MOVED UP THE ROAD TO ENDEAVOUR TO BREAK THE ROAD BLOCK.

NOTE NO. (v)

      AT 14.00HRS THE ORDER WAS GIVEN BY BRIGADIER LESLIE (COMMANDING RANGOON GARRISON) FOR DEMOLITIONS TO COMMENCE,   THESE WERE COMPLETED BY ABOUT 15.30 HRS, AND AT 17.30 HRS, WITH THE MILITARY GOVERNOR AND STAFF OF RANGOON FORTRESS, POLICE AND THE CIVILIANS WHO WERE OPERATING ESSENTIAL SERVICES, I LEFT THE CITY.

NOTE NO.(vi)

      THE COMPANY OF GLOSTERS LEFT AT THE SAME TIME AND AS FAR AS I COULD SEE THE CITY WAS ENTIRELY DESERTED.

     AT  THE JETTIES HAD BEEN DESTROYED WE BOARDED A RIVER STEAMER AT A POINT ABOUT ? MILES UP THE RANGOON RIVER, PROCEEDED 12 MILES DOWNSTREAM TO WHERE THE CARGO STEAMER “ALIPUR” AWAITED US, AND ON THIS WE SAILED TO CALCUTTA.

     WE LEFT RANGOON AT 18.00HRS, AND 1T 20.00 HRS JAPANESE PATROLS ENTERED THE CITY.

NOTES:-

NO. (i)  RAILWAY STATION

     IT WAS FOUND THAT THE ONLY WAY TO CONTROL THE CROWDS OF PEOPLE ENDEAVOURING TO LEAVE THE CITY WAS TO CLOSE THE STATION AND TO CLEAR THE APPROACHES.

     THIS MEANT THAT THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE WERE CAMPING OUT ON THE MAIDAN JUST OUTSIDE THE STATION, PRESENTING AND EXCELLENT TARGET FOR JAP BOMBERS.

     IN THE CIRCUMSTANCES THERE WAS NO ALTERNATIVE.

     AS TRAINS BECAME AVAILABLE, LIMITED NUMBERS WERE ALLOWED ON THE PLATFORM.

     STRICT CONTROL HAD TO BE EXERCISED OVER THE QUESTION OF BAGGAGE, EACH PERSON BEING ALLOWED

ONE SMALL BUNDLE.. (ii) FEMALE LOOTERS.

     IN THIS CASE I MADE THE WOMEN TAKE THE LOOTED ARTICLES BACK TO THE HOUSE THEY HAD LOOTED.

     I THEN ESCORTED THEM TO THEIR VILLAGE, THEY WALKING IN FRONT OF MY “JEEP”.

NO. (iii) VULNERABLE POINTS GUARDED

  1. PUMPING STATION, 2. OIL PIPELINE ACROSS THE PEGU RIVER,  3, RAILWAY BRIDGE, 4. RAILWAY STATION,

         5. TELEPHONE EXCHANGE.   6. TELEGRAPH OFFICE,  7. BROADCASTING STUDIO,  8. POWER HOUSE,  

9.   RACECOURSE (RIASC DUMP),  10. SUPPLY DEPOT,  11. BOC DEPOT (OIL & PETROL STORAGE),  12. STEEL BROS (OIL & PETROL STORAGE),  13. MONKEY POINT (WIRELESS STATION),  14.  EMERGENCY PUMPING STATION (KOKINE ROAD),  15.  WATSON’S MOTOR WORKS,  16.  RAF OPS (UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS),  17. NAVAL WIRELESS STATION,  18.  DOCKS & WAREHOUSES.

NO. (iv) PRISONERS OF WAR

     THE TRAITOR BURMANS TAKEN WERE RELEASED BEFORE THE TOWN WAS FINALLY EVACUATED.

     IF WE HAD NOT BEEN COMPELLED THROUGH FORCE OF CIRCUMSTANCES TO TAKE THIS COURSE, THE QUESTION OF THEIR STATUS MIGHT HAVE ARISEN.

     THEY WERE DRESSED IN A FORM OF UNIFORM, IE BLUE SHIRTS AND KHAKI SHORTS.   WERE THEY ENTITLED TO BE TREATED AS MILITARY PRISONERS?

NO. (v) DEMOLITIONS

     THE CHARGES HAD BEEN PLACED IN POSITION AND ONLY NEEDED “TOUCHING OFF”.

     THE DEMOLITIONS WERE AS COMPLETE AS THEY COULD BE.   EVERYTHING THAT COULD HAVE BEEN OF THE SLIGHTEST USE TO THE JAPS WAS DESTROYED.

NO (vi) ESSENTIAL SERVICES

     LIGHT, POWER AND WATER SERVICES WERE OPERATED UNTIL THE ORDER TO “BLOW”.

NO (vii) FIELD SECURITY SERVICES

     I MAINTAINED THE CLOSEST COOPERATION WITH THE FSS.   SOMETIMES WE MAY HAVE OVERLAPPED BUT THE CIRCUMSTANCES WERE SUCH THAT THE JOB HAD TO BE DONE BY THE MAN ON THE SPOT.

NO. (viii) PRIVATE ARMS AND AMMUNITION

      IN RANGOON WERE SEVERAL SHOPS LICENSED FOR THE SALE OF ARMS AND AMMUNITION.   ALL THESE STOCKS WERE REMOVED TO SALE BARRACKS AND A GUARD MOUNTED OVER THEM.

NO. (ix) PROVISION AND CHEMIST SHOPS

     GUARDS WERE MOUNTED OVER THESE AND A PERMIT FROM THE POLICE HAD TO BE OBTAINED BEFORE STOCKS COULD BE DRAWN.

NO. (x) LIQUOR

     LARGE STOCKS OF SPIRITS WERE HELD IN THE WAREHOUSES.   THESE WERE REMOVED TO THE VAULTS OF THE RESERVE BANK.

NO. (xi)  HOUNGHIES (BUDDIST PRIESTS)

     MANY OF THESE WERE KNOWN TO HAVE JAPANESE SYMPATHIES, AND SOME IN SOME CASES ACTIVELY HELPED THEM.   THEY WERE RESPONSIBLE FOR SOME OF THE FIRE RAISING

THE ABOVE PAGES ARE ALL STAMPED: MICROGRAM,  D/1559/198, SIMLA

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