Oak Grove Curriculum Scope & Sequence

Social Studies (7th Grade)

Updated 12.2.2016

Unit Length

(32 Wks)

Unit / Skills

We are learning to…

Instructional Strategies

Resources

Assessments

  • Formative/Summative (F/S)

Ongoing

Current Events

We are learning to…

  • Demonstrate the use of an atlas, almanac, dictionary, and internet to reference current news.
  • Show awareness of news from television, internet, conversation, newspaper, and/or radio.
  • Demonstrate the use of prior knowledge, making educated guesses, and analyzing available resources.
  • Integrate visual information with other information in print and digital texts. (RSS. 7)
  • Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic. (RSS.9)
  • Class Discussions

How do current events impact our community, state, country and world?

How do we know what we know?

How does what we know about the world shape the way we view ourselves?

  • Almanac Worksheets
  • Weekly News Handouts
  • Oral Questions
  • News test Instructional Handouts

  • Almanac Quiz
  • News test (S)

Ongoing

Book Conference

We are learning to…

  • Develop and demonstrate an appreciation for oral history.
  • Evaluate the idea of perceptions as it relates to historical themes, personalities, and/or events.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis or primary and secondary sources.(RSS 1)
  • Determine the central ideas or information of a primary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions. (RSS. 2)
  • Read and comprehend social studies texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (RSS.10)

  • Individual Conference
  • Student-Peer Conference

How does literature reveal the values of a given culture or time period?

How does the study of fiction and nonfiction texts help individuals construct

their understanding of reality?

In what ways are all narratives influenced by bias and perspective?

  • Lexile appropriate trade books  (Teacher list / student choice)
  • Book Conference Evaluation Sheet
  • Book Conference (S)

4 weeks

Basic Ideas About Government

We are learning to..

  • Explain the following concepts: natural rights, state of nature, social contract, and the consent of the governed.
  • Explain the characteristics of a republican form of government and the role of civic virtue in that form of government.
  • Characterize the philosophical background explaining the separation of powers and checks and balances.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to social studies. (RSS. 4)
  • Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic. (RSS.9)
  • Write arguments focused on content include claims, counterclaims, and evidence. (WSS.1)
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently. (WSS.6)
  • Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. (WSS. 7)
  • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source;and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. (WSS. 8)

  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Reading Primary Resources and guided reading questions

What makes a government effective?

What would happen if we had no government?

  • Mind Maps for Lessons 1-5
  • Notes for Lessons 1-5
  • Copy of the Mayflower Compact
  • Project-Based learning assignment
  • Study Guide
  • Unit Vocabulary List

  • Homework (F)
  • Quiz 1 (F)
  • Making a Government Web Project - Project-Based Learning (F)
  • Teacher Made Assessment (S)

3-4 weeks

   

American Revolution and Articles of Confederation

We are learning to...

  • Describe the effect of the American Revolution on the formation of a new union.
  • Identify the Declaration of Independence and its statement of purpose.
  • Explain the Articles of Confederation and identify its weaknesses.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to social studies. (RSS. 4)
  • Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose. (RSS. 6)
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently. (WSS.6)
  • Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. (WSS. 7)
  • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source;and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. (WSS. 8)

  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Reading Primary Resources and guided reading questions

How are governments created, structured, maintained and changed?

How did the Declaration of Independence  and Articles of Confederation establish the foundation of American government?                                 

  • Mind Maps for Lessons 6-11
  • Notes for Lessons 6-11
  • Revolutionary War Timeline Project Guides and Rubric
  • Study Guide
  • Unit Vocabulary List
  • Copy of the Declaration of Independence

  • Homework (F)
  • Quiz 1 (F)
  • Revolutionary War Timeline Project (F)
  • Teacher Made Assessment (S)

3-4

weeks

Philadelphia Convention

We are learning to...

  • Identify the framers of our Constitution and their importance in history.
  • Describe the motivation that contributed to the development of the Constitution.
  • Identify the compromises that were necessary in order to form a new government.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis or primary and secondary sources.(RSS. 1)
  • Read and comprehend social studies texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (RSS.10)
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.(WSS. 4)
  • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.(WSS. 5)

  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Non-fiction reading and guided reading questions
  • Watch A More Perfect Union

Is compromise necessary for government to work effectively?

Is compromise always fair?

  • Mind Maps for Lessons 12-16
  • Notes for Lessons 12 -16
  • A More Perfect Union Movie
  • Unit Vocabulary List
  • A Just Right Government Reading

  • Homework (F)
  • Quiz (F)
  • Teacher Made Assessment (S)

5-7

weeks

U.S. Constitution

We are learning to…

  • Identify the three branches of government and responsibilities of each.
  • Identify the amendments to the Constitution and their importance at the time they were added.
  • Name current leaders of the various branches of the government and explain their responsibilities.
  • Determine the central ideas or information of a primary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions. (RSS. 2)
  • Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to social studies. (RSS. 3)
  • Read and comprehend social studies texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (RSS.10)
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.(WSS. 4)

  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Class Activities

How do people support or dismantle Constitutions?

How does the system of checks and balances provide us with an effective and efficient government?

  • Our Federal and State Constitution Bluebook
  • Government Officials Worksheet
  • Leaders in Government Mind Map
  • Senators vs. Representatives Venn Diagram
  • 27 Amendments Project
  • Executive Cabinet Presentation
  •  Electoral College Game
  • Judicial Branch in a Flash

  • Senators vs. Representatives Venn Diagram (F)
  • 27 Amendments Project (F)
  • Executive Cabinet Project (F)
  • Socrative Practice Quiz (F)
  • CPS Clicker Review (F)
  • Legislative Branch Quiz (F)
  • Executive Branch Quiz (F)
  • Judicial Branch Quiz (F)
  • Constitution Test (S)

3-4

weeks

Jacksonian Democracy

We are learning to…

  • Explain how new inventions affected the economic characteristics of the growing regions.
  • Identify the Age of Jackson and its effect on politics.
  • Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose. (RSS. 6)
  • Integrate visual information with other information in print and digital texts. (RSS.7)
  • Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgement in a text. (RSS. 8)
  • Write arguments focused on content include claims, counterclaims, and evidence. (WSS.1)
  • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.(WSS. 5)
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently. (WSS.6)
  • Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. (WSS. 7)
  • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source;and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. (WSS. 8)
  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Reading Primary Resources and guided reading questions

How is power gained, used and justified?

Can the Age of Jackson be considered an Age of Democracy?

When would it be acceptable for  the states to have the right to ignore the laws of the national government?

  • Andrew Jackson : The Good, the Evil and the Presidency
  • Indian Removal Act of 1830 Group Project
  • Political Cartoon Analysis
  • Chapter 10 Notetaking Guides (F)
  • Quiz (F)
  • Indian Removal Group Project (F)
  • Teacher Made Assessment (S)

3-4

weeks

North and South Take Different Paths

We are learning to…

  • Analyze the differences between the North and the South.
  • Explain how new inventions affected the economic characteristics of these growing regions.
  • Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose. (RSS. 6)
  • Integrate visual information with other information in print and digital texts. (RSS.7)
  • Write informative texts, including a topic, precise language and a concluding statement. (WSS.2)
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.(WSS. 4)
  • Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection, and research. (WSS. 9)
  • Write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of purposes, and audiences.(WSS. 10)

  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Reading Primary Resources and guided reading questions

What social, political and economic opportunities and problems arise from changes in technology?

How did the Industrial Revolution move people?

  • Slave Trade Primary Source resources
  • Industrial Revolution Primary Source resources

  • Chapter 11 Notetaking Guides (F)
  • Quiz (F)
  • Teacher Made Assessment (S)

3-4

weeks

Reform Movement

We are learning to…

  • Identify the importance of the Reform Movement.
  • Analyze the importance of religion and transcendentalism  in both social and political reform.
  • Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to social studies. (RSS. 3)
  • Describe how a text presents information (RSS.5)
  • Write informative texts, including a topic, precise language and a concluding statement. (WSS.2)
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.(WSS. 4)
  • Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection, and research. (WSS. 9)
  • Write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of purposes, and audiences.(WSS. 10)

  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Reading Primary Resources and guided reading questions

How have reformers had a significant impact on the problems of American society?

Were abolitionists responsible reformers or irresponsible agitators?

How did ordinary people do extraordinary things to impact society?

  • A Case for Public Schools by Horace Mann
  • Excerpts from the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • The Underground Railroad Movie
  • The Underground Railroad Online Simulation and Question Packet
  • Biographies of people important to Feminism

  • Chapter 12 Notetaking Guides (F)
  • Quiz (F)
  • Teacher Made Assessment (S)

3-4

weeks

Manifest Destiny and Westward Expansion

We are learning to…

  • Analyze Westward Expansion and growth.
  • Explain how conflict with Mexico led allowed the United States to achieve Manifest Destiny.
  • Integrate visual information with other information in print and digital texts. (RSS.7)
  • Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgement in a text. (RSS. 8)
  • Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic. (RSS.9)
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently. (WSS.6)
  • Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. (WSS. 7)
  • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source;and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. (WSS. 8)

  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Reading Primary Resources and guided reading questions

Does the United States have a mission to expand freedom and democracy?

How did “Manifest Destiny” impact America in the 19th century?

  • Manifest Destiny Reading and questions
  • Westward Expansion Teaching  Project Assignment and Rubric

  • Chapter 13 Notetaking Guides (F)
  • Quiz (F)
  • Westward Expansion Teaching Project (F)
  • Teacher Made Assessment (S)

3-4

weeks

The Civil War

We are learning to…

  • Compare different views of the people of the North and South.
  • Identify key events, personalities, and places associated with the war.
  • Explain causes and results of the war
  • Describe how a text presents information (RSS.5)
  • Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgement in a text. (RSS. 8)
  • Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic. (RSS.9)
  • Write informative texts, including a topic, precise language and a concluding statement. (WSS.2)
  • Lecture
  • Notetaking
  • Class Discussions
  • Reading Primary Resources and guided reading questions

Can political freedom exist without an economic foundation?

What issues tended to divide Americans in the period prior to the Civil War?

  • Excerpts from Uncle Tom’s Cabin
  • Two points of view from Fort Sumter
  • Monitor and Merrimac Video
  • Emancipation Proclamation

  • Chapter 14&15 Notetaking Guides (F)
  • Quiz (F)
  • Teacher Made Assessment (S)