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CUVC Recruiting newsletter

Episode 1 –

 

Welcome to the CUVC Recruiting newsletter. Throughout the season we will be sending out some helpful tips and tricks to this crazy recruiting process. It can be a confusing and frustrating time in a players (and parents) life. We are here to make that process as painless as possible. If you missed our recruiting seminar in December please take a min and review our presentation.

So you want to play in College? Deciding to make that commitment is the first step! I am not going to lie and say that it’s easy for everyone, but hopefully this can get you off on the right foot. Here is my top tips to getting started -

 

Tip #1 - Register/Update key websites

There are a couple of key websites that you want to register with and keep updated. First would be the NCAA Eligibility Center. This is going to be necessary in order to be recruited by any NCAA university. Student athletes must register to validate their status as an amature athlete. Overall the process isn’t too bad. It does cost some money (but it is a small one time fee) and a social security number. Also, ensure updated profile on University Athlete. This website is used by the majority of college programs in the country to evaluate and track players. If your son/daughter has played in a bigger tournament outside of the region then their name is most likely already in the database. (Tournament directors turn over the rosters and schedule to UA so they can have an updated database for the tournaments) You want to ensure that you have the correct graduation year, height, position, and contact information for coaches.

Tip #2 - Filter your search

Have the discussion with your parents/guardians about your desire to play at the next level. Begin by discussing some very important issues in the process. Start with these topics to ensure that everyone is on the same page:

Tip #3 - Create a video

Recruiting video can be one of the most useful ways an athlete can attract the attention of coaches. Unfortunately, it is also where some athletes lose a coach because of something silly. There are a couple different video types that coaches receive: skills video, highlight video, and game video. There are benefits to all, but if you are only able to produce one, game film is ultimately what coaches will want to see. A good skills or highlight video is a good way to get a coach to see some of the great things you can do and get them “hooked.” Game video should be taken from the back line of the court behind the athlete’s team.

Quick tip: Keep skills/highlight videos short and skip the pop music soundtrack and colorful graphics! Coaches hate them!

Tip #4 - Research the schools

Research about the school through the school’s website. Take an online campus tour (if available). Look on the athletic website for some history on the team (how was their last season? any awards to the team or players?) Check out the school’s website to find out the best coach (recruiting coordinator) to contact. Check out the roster and see if they could be looking for a player in your position (do they have any upperclassmen that will be graduating soon). Lastly, talk to anyone in the club that might have been in contact with or played with that school/coach.

Tip #5 - Make contact

Do not be scared of reaching out to coaches. They are just people like you and me. Now is the time to place yourself on a college’s radar in an aggressive - but friendly - way. Introduce yourself to the coach explaining who you are any why you are contacting them (new game film, new schedule for upcoming tournament, etc). If you are more comfortable making contact by phone, that works too (as long as it is the athlete, not mom and dad). If you are a freshmen or sophomore and get a voicemail, leave a message and continue to call back a different times and different days since they can’t call you back yet.

Welcome to the start of your journey. This should give you a good start. Lastly, be sure to let us know that you are interested in playing and the steps you are making so we can help you!

Keep Improving,

Nathan