My Artificial (or Conventional) bidding systems

Most of my bidding is “natural”, based on the card-distribution and points in my hand and my partner’s. However, some hands and situations cannot be described easily without “artificial” or conventional bidding. These pages describe some of the conventions - based mostly on the Standard American system - that I strive to remember.

Opening bids

Responses to Weak 2

Raise Only Non-Forcing (RONF)

2NT to ask for feature

2NT Ogust (*)

Response to Strong 2C

Show controls (*)

2D Waiting

After a No-Trump opening bid

Stayman

Jacoby Transfer

Minor Suit Stayman

Super Accepts of Jacoby Transfer

After 1-bid

Minor suit opening

NT responses

Support

Forcing Raise

Limit Raise

Inverted Minors

Bidding a major

Forcing 2NT after 1m-1M-2M (alertable)

Major suit opening

NT responses

With strong support for opener’s suit

Jump Raise

Forcing Raise

Limit Raise

Bergen Raises (*) (alertable)

Splinter bid (alertable)

Jacoby 2NT (alertable)

Interference after a Jacoby 2NT

Drury (alertable)

Slam-searching conventions

Ace-Asking…

Gerber - After an NT bid...

Ace-Asking… after a suit has been decided…

Blackwood

Roman Key-Card Blackwood (RKCB) 1430 (*)

After Interference of ace-asking bid (DEPO)

Control Bidding (or cue-bidding towards a Slam)

Grand Slam Force

Some General/Additional Notes:

Total points for Contracts

Counting Points for bidding

Length Points

Short Suit Points

How and when to use Length and Shortness points

Counting tricks (specially for pre-emptive bidding)

The “Rule of 2, 3 or 4 shy”

Law of Total tricks (LOTT)

After Stayman!

Garbage Stayman

Crawling Stayman

Opening bids

1C :        12-21 hcp (except 1NT opening hand), 5+ Cs or no 5-card major, 2+ in Cs

1D :        12-21 hcp (except 1NT opening hand), 5+ Ds or no 5-card major, 4+ in Ds

1H :        12-21 hcp, 5+ Hs.

1S :        12-21 hcp, 5+ Ss.

        [Open the longer major. Bid higher major of equal-length (5-5 / 6-6) suits.]

1NT :        15-17, balanced - no singleton, at most one doubleton

2NT :        20-21, balanced

2C :        22+ hcp (or 8-½ tricks); non-passable (the only really artificial opening bid in this system.)

3NT :        25-27, balanced

2 bids:        (except C or NT) 5-11 hcp, minimum 6-cards (2 of 3, or 3 of 5, top cards)
[Also,
Rule of 2, 3, or 4 shy, based on vulnerability, can be used.]

3 bids: 6-10 hcp, minimum 7-cards


Responses to Weak 2

Raise Only Non-Forcing (RONF)

This is a standard response to an opening weak-2 bid.

Single Raise:        Sign-off (“Raise Only, is Non-Forcing”)

Jump raise:        Opening hand, invitational

New Suit:        5+ Cards in new suit. Forcing for one round.

2NT:                15+ points with interest in game. It usually shows support. Forcing.


There are two types of response to 2NT after weak-2 and a partnership must decide which of these they play:

2NT to ask for feature

Responses are:

Suit rebid with minimum hand

With AKQ or AKJ in bid suit, bid 3NT

Show the cheapest side suit with an Ace or King (feature) with a good hand

2NT Ogust (*)

2NT response to a weak 2-bid shows 15+ points with interest in game. It usually shows support.

Responses are:

3C :        Bad hand (5-7 hcp) with only 1 of 3 honors in preempt suit

3D :        Bad hand (5-7 hcp) with 2 of top 3 honors

3H :        Good hand (8+ hcp) with 1 of top 3 honors

3S :        Good hand (8+ hcp) with 2 of top 3 honors

3NT :        Good hand (8+ hcp) with all of the top 3 honors

(Memory mnemonic: Minors, minimum, 1-2-1-2-3)


Response to Strong 2C

A partnership must decide which of these they play:

Show controls (*)

Counting controls in the hand with A=2 controls, K=1 control, KK=2 controls,

Responder shows the controls in his hand thus:

2D:        0 or 1 control

2H:        2 controls (A or KK)

2S:        3 controls with Ace (AK)

2NT:        3 controls with Kings (KKK)

3C:        4 controls

2D Waiting

After a strong 2C opening, responses can be:

2D :         “waiting” bid - either 0-7, or no good bid (eg 4441 distribution disallowing NT bid)

2H :         8+ hcp; 5+ cards in H

2S :         8+ hcp; 5+ cards in S

2NT :         8+ hcp; balanced hand

3C :         8+ hcp; 5+ cards in C

3D :         8+ hcp; 5+ cards in D

After a 2D Waiting bid, opener’s responses are:

2H :         5+ cards in H

2S :         5+ cards in S

2NT :         22-24 hcp, balanced hand

3C :         5+ cards in C

3D :         5+ cards in D

3NT :         25-27 hcp, balanced hand

4NT :         28-30 hcp, balanced hand (!)

5NT :        31-32 hcp, balanced hand (!!)


After a No-Trump opening bid

1NT opening bid shows 15-17 points, balanced distribution.

2NT opening bid shows 20-21 points, balanced distribution.

3NT opening bid shows 25-27 points, balanced distribution.

In modern times, a no-trump “balanced” hand can have one 5-carder suit, but can have no singleton or void, and has at most one doubleton.

The bid may be passed by partner.

Stayman

2C response to 1NT. (Or 3C after 2NT.) It shows a game-invitational hand with one or both majors.

Asks balanced-hand partner to show 4-card major(s).

NT-bidder bids 4-card major, and 2D if no majors:

With both majors, a partnership must decide what they bid:

(See “After Stayman” in Annex)


Jacoby Transfer

Opener bids 1NT. Responder bids 2D, 2H asking opener to bid 2H, 2S. This is so that the stronger hand becomes the declarer. Promises 5 cards in the requested suit.

Opener can “super accept” - bid 3 of the requested suit with a maximum (17 hcp) hand and 4 cards in the suit.

Other “super accept” bids are detailed below...

After a 2-level response, transfer requester can

With a weak hand: Pass

With an otherwise balanced (no singletons or voids):
Bid 2NT. Partner can pass, or signoff with 3-level supporting bid, or bid 3 NT.
Bid 3NT with game-strength hand. Asks opener to pass or bid 4 of the agreed major.

With 5-5 in both majors, asking partner to contract with the better suit in his hand: bid other major. Typically, with 0-6 points, first bid 2D (transferring to 2H) and then bid 2S. WIth a good hand, first bid 2H (transferring to 2S) and then bid 3H.
(Note that, with 4-5 in majors, Stayman would be preferable.)

With a 6-card major:
Invite partner (if he has support) to game with a 3-level rebid
With game-strength hand, signoff by bidding game.
(He would have made a Texas transfer instead of Jacoby transfer, if that is part of the partnership agreement.)

With a game-strength hand and a 5-5 or 5-4 distribution: bid a new suit

Some partnerships use 1NT-2S to simply transfer to 3C and 1NT-3C to transfer to 3D (*).

Others play Minor Suit Stayman…

A partnership must decide which of those they play.

Minor Suit Stayman

Jacoby transfer (2D/2H) and Stayman (2NT) neglect minor suit asks. So, some partnerships use the 2S bid to advantage and agree to play MSS. This shows interest in game or slam, usually finding a good 3NT contract.

Requester should have 8+ hcp, 5-4 distribution in minors or, with a strong hand and interest in slam, 4-4 in minors. It denies 4-card major.

Opener should rebid:

2NT :         Denies a 4-card minor and stoppers in both majors

3C :         4 Clubs. Could be 4-4 in minors

3D :         4 Diamonds. Denies 4 Clubs

3H :         Shows a H stopper. Invites partner to bid 3NT with S stopper. Opener may have 4-card minor but is looking for a 3NT contract

3S :         Shows a S stopper. Invites partner to bid 3NT with H stopper. Opener may have 4-card minor but is looking for a 3NT contract

3NT :        Denies 4-card minor. Shows maximum hand with stoppers in both majors

4C :         Shows 4 C, maximum hand

4D :         Shows 4 D, maximum hand

The responder bids naturally after this. However, a bid of a major shows singleton or void in that suit, with an interest in slam.

Super Accepts of Jacoby Transfer

After responder transfers (to a major suit), NT opener can super-accept if

He has 3 or 4 (or 5!) cards in support of partner’s suit and is at the top of his NT range (17). With 3 cards, he must have 5 HCP in the transferred suit.

Transferer can repeat the transfer bid with a minimum hand so that strong hand is declarer. Or, with no room, can bid his suit himself.

So what are the super-accepts by NT bidder?

After 1-bid

Normally, after a 1-level opening bid of a suit, most responses are natural. A raise to the 2 level shows 6 to 9 points. And a jump shift to a different suit is a strong bid, showing 5+ cards and is an invitation to slam.

Minor suit opening

NT responses

If the opening bid is in a minor suit (recall that 1D implies 4-cards in D). So with a balanced hand:

1NT shows 6-10 points and is non-forcing

2NT is 11-12 HCP and is game-forcing

3NT is 13-17 HCP

Support

The minor suit bid by opener can be raised by responder with 6+ points. But recall that a 1C opening could be as short as 2 cards, so a raise requires at least a good 5-carder while a 1D opening bid (4+ cards) can be raised with 4+ cards in support.

If partner opens 1 of a suit, a jump raise can mean two things and a partnership must decide which of these they play:

Forcing Raise

This is a natural “I have a strong hand, should we look for a slam?” bid, made with an opening hand or better.

However, modern experts suggest that a more frequent and useful use of the jump raise is the..

Limit Raise

A jump raise shows 10-12 points (limit) and 4+-card support for D opening (opener has shown 4+ cards in D) and 5+ support for C (2+ cards with opener).

Opener can pass a Limit Raise with a minimum opening hand or bid on.

However, modern experts suggest that after a minor opening, and holding a hand with length in that minor, you play...

Inverted Minors

Normally, a jump raise is strong and a single raise is weak. Playing Inverted Minors, the bids are reversed.

With a weak hand - and suspecting that opponents might have a major fit - the jump raise is weak (6-9 points) and is preemptive, forcing opponents to enter the auction at the 3-level. An inverted single raise in the minor shows 10+ points and is forcing to at least 2NT or 3 of the minor suit. With a game-hand, responder can bid up to game in either NT or the minor suit.

Bidding a major

After opener opens a minor, responder can bid his major with 4 or 5 cards in the suit. WIth 5-4 in majors, he should bid the 5-carder first. With two 4-card majors he should bid up the line.

Minor opener can support the major-suit bid by partner with 3 cards in the suit.

Forcing 2NT after 1m-1M-2M (alertable)

If partner has a game-going hand, and he wants partner to show shape and size, he bids 2NT which is forcing and asks partner to bid

3C :        3-card support, 12-14 hcp

3D :        3-card support, 15-16 hcp

3H :        4-card support, 12-14 hcp

3S :        4-card support, 15-16 hcp

3NT :        3-card support, re-evaluated to 17+ points

4suit :        4-card support, 17+ points with no shortness - singleton or void

Other 4-bid :         4-card support, 15+ points and shortness in bid suit.
                If shortness is in S, then correction will be to 5H, so 4S bidder should have 17+ points.

A partnership should decide what they do in the following situations:

Major suit opening

NT responses

If the opening bid is in a major suit:

1NT shows 6-9 points and is non-forcing.

2NT is Jacoby 2NT (below)

3NT 15-17 HCP, balanced hand with 2-card support.

A single raise shows 6-10 points, and 3-cards in support.

However, there are some special artificial bids that are important …


With strong support for opener’s suit

Jump Raise

If partner opens 1 of a suit, a jump raise can mean two things and a partnership must decide which of these they play:

Forcing Raise

This is a natural “I have a strong hand, should we look for a slam?” bid, made with an opening hand or better.

However, modern experts suggest that a more frequent and useful use of the jump raise is the..

Limit Raise

A jump raise shows 10-12 points (limit) and 4-card support for D/H/S opening (opener has shown 5+ cards in major and 4+ cards in D) and 5+ support for C (2+ cards with opener).

Opener can pass a Limit Raise with a minimum opening hand or bid on.

Bergen Raises (*) (alertable)

An alternative to a Limit Raise (which can only be made with strong support (4 cards) and 10-12 points), Bergen Raises are bids from a responder who sees 4 cards in his partner’s 5-card bid suit in his hand. Bergen Raises are graduated options.

Responses following a 1H/S opening will be:

2H/2S -        3-card support, weak 7-10 hcp

3C -        4-card support, weak 7-10 hcp

3D -        4-card support, strong 11-12 hcp

3H/3S -        preemptive 4-card support, <7 hcp

4H/4S -        preemptive 5-card support, <7 hcp

[Again, Bergen Raises disallow the Limit Raise bid. Now, the double jump in partner’s suit is preemptive.]


Splinter bid (alertable)

This is a slam-inviting bid, with a strong (10-12 hcp) hand and at least 4 cards in partner’s suit and a void or singleton (not A or K “control”) in a side suit. Since, with an opening supporting hand, slam could be biddable by normal methods, a splinter bid after a major opening is more usually used with 10-12 hcp hands.

Splinters can also be bid by opener (or later bid by responder) to show slam interest and shortness. Splinters are not applicable if opponents are bidding.

A Splinter is an unusual jump into the short suit - usually a double jump after a major opening bid.

Examples:

1 - (P) - 4

1 - (P) - 3

1 - (P) - 1 - (P) - 3 [4+ Heart support, shortness in Spades, looking for slam]

1 - (P) - 1 - (P) - 4 [4+ Spade support, shortness in Clubs, 18+ points]

However, after some bidding has happened, an unusual jump can take the form of a single jump bid (at the 4-level) after a suit has been agreed, or a 2-over-1 bid has shown game-going values. Also, if partner has shown a 6-card suit, a splinter bid can be made with 3-card support.

1S - 2D - 2S - 4C        : Splinter bidder has 3+ Ss and shortness in C.


Jacoby 2NT (alertable)

Opener bids a major at 1-level. Partner bids 2NT. This shows an opening hand, with support of at least 4 cards. Being artificial, Jacoby 2NT is alertable.

Opener’s rebids are:

Put another way, opener’s rebids are:

Interference after a Jacoby 2NT

When partner has bid J2NT and RHO overcalls a new suit at the 3-level, use the following agreements:

So, opener’s rebids are:

Put another way, opener’s rebids are:


Drury (alertable)

(I don’t usually play Drury. It is listed here to understand when opponents bid this. And, waiting for a situation to prove its value :-) It is also described under “Other Conventions”

You pass. Partner opens a major (3rd or 4th hand possibly opening weak).

You, the Drury bidder, bid 2C showing 10-12 hcp, 3+ support.

Partner bids:


Slam-searching conventions

Ace-Asking…

Gerber - After an NT bid...

4C is ace-asking after NT contract is decided.

Responses are:

4D : 0 or 4 Aces        4H : 1 Aces                4S : 2 Aces                4NT : 3 Aces


Ace-Asking… after a suit has been decided…

A partnership must decide which of these they play:

Blackwood

4NT is ace-asking.

Responses are:

5C : 0 or 4 Aces        5D : 1 Aces                5H : 2 Aces                5S : 3 Aces

5NT following 4NT is king-asking:

Responses are:

6C : 0 or 4 Kings        6D : 1 King                6H : 2 Kings                6S : 3 Kings

Roman Key-Card Blackwood (RKCB) 1430 (*)

(RKCB 0314 reverses the first two responses)

4NT bid is ace-asking after a trump suit has been agreed.

A Key-Card is any Ace, and the King of trumps.

Responses are:

5C :         1 or 4 key-cards

5D :         3 or 0 key-cards

5H :         2 or 5 key-cards without the trump Q

5S :         2 or 5 key-cards with the trump Q

Optional: If responder has a void… (I do not play this convention myself.)

5NT :        Even number of key-cards and a void somewhere

6C :        Odd number of key-cards and void in C. If C is trumps, then void somewhere

6D :        Odd number of key-cards and void in D if H/S is trumps. If D is trumps, then void in H/S

6H :        Odd number of key-cards and void in H if S is trumps. If H is trumps, then void in S

Note that this could take the bidding into really high levels and so this sequence is only possible in some circumstances. For example, with S as trump;

4NT (RKCB 1430)        -        5C (1 key-card)

5D (asking for Q-S)        -        5S (denial)

6S (possible Q-S loser, so shut it down)


After Interference of ace-asking bid (DEPO)

If 4C (Gerber) or 4NT (BW/RKCB) is interfered by opponents, DEPO responses are

Double = Even, Pass = Odd

DEPO after Gerber/BW is         Double = 0, 2, or 4 Aces, Pass = 1, or 3 Aces

DEPO after RKCB is        Double = 0, 2, or 4 key-cards, Pass = 1, 3 ,or 5 key-cards


Control Bidding (or cue-bidding towards a Slam)

This is a methodical way to make your way to a slam and figure out where your partnership’s strengths are; or rather, understand where your weaknesses may be, if any.

Some refer to a “cue-bid” as bidding an opponent’s suit only, so we will refer to this kind of bidding as Control Bidding here. Control-bidding is sometimes preferable to Blackwood for slam searching because it doesn’t merely show Aces and Kings, it shows Controls - counting Aces and voids as first-round controls and Kings and singletons as second-round controls. When attempting a slam in a trump suit, shortness can be as important as honors, and slams can be made with smaller combined HCP holdings.

A Control Bid is made when a trump suit has been agreed, or if it is obviously implied. If you and your partner have about 33 points (counting for distribution), you can either go the Blackwood route to try for a slam, or you can make a bid in an unbid or enemy suit at a level above 3NT to show first-round control (Ace or void) in that suit (except: 3S is a CB if the agreed trump suit is H). All non-trump suit bids from that point are Control Bids. Control bids are made straight up the line, at the cheapest level. Skipping a suit means you lack the control to make the bid. Bidding a suit you have skipped or a suit where control has been identified implies second-round control - except in the case of bidding partner’s bid non-trump suit - there, the control could be first- or second-round.

Return to the trump suit shows reluctance by the player to continue to slam, but partner could override and, knowing better, continue bidding.

Examples (assuming opponents are not bidding):

1 - 3 - 4 : Ace or Void in  and implies lack of first-round control of

1 - 3 - 4 - 4 - 4 : Shows second-round control in  otherwise he would have bid 3 over 3

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 4 - 5 :  is agreed trump suit. South has both A and K of  and no first or second--round control in


Grand Slam Force

This is a 5NT bid where the bid cannot be mistaken for something else, eg it would not apply after Blackwood has been initiated, or if it is a natural NT raise. It asks partner to bid a Small Slam with less than two of the top three trump-suit honors and a Grand Slam with two of the top three trump-suit honors (A/K/Q).

Unless a trump suit has been agreed by previous bidding, the GSF designates the last-bid suit as the trump.

It is bid by a player who has one of the top three honors and is sure that the other suits are stopped. If partner has the two remaining, a Grand Slam is a definite possibility and, without that, a Small Slam is worth a try.

Examples: (assuming opponents are not bidding)

1 - 5NT : H is the agreed trump suit.

1 - 2NT - 4 - 4 - 5 - 5 - 5NT:

Here, the Jacoby 2NT establishes  as trumps. A jump shift to 4 shows a two-suited hand with a good 5 carded  suit as well. 4 is a cue-bid showing A. As is 5. 5 shows first- or second-round control in  (since it is partner’s suit and he should know), at which point opener makes his 5NT bid because all the suits are covered and all he needs to know is if the partnership has all of the A,K,Q in the  suit.


Some General/Additional Notes:

Total points for Contracts

Game: 25 HCP

Small slam: 33 HCP

Grand slam: 37 HCP

25-27: Game in major suit or NT

28-30: Game in minor suit

31-33: Slam in a suit

34-36: Slam in NT or Grand-slam in suit

37-40:        Grand slam


Counting Points for bidding

Besides counting your High Card Points (A=4, K=3, Q=2, J=1) when you start bidding, you should count your distribution points as bidding progresses, based on your combined holdings. There are two methods (which should not be used together):

Length Points

You count 1 point for each card more than 4 in any suit. So, 5-carder=1, 6-carder=2 points etc

Short Suit Points

Once a suit has been agreed, or a possible fit identified, shortness can provide clues for a partnership’s potential for game or slam. Do not count Short Suit Points if you are heading for an NT contract.

Void = 3; Singleton = 2, Doubleton = 1

Singleton and doubleton honors should not be counted both as HCP and Shortness.

How and when to use Length and Shortness points

When there is no agreed upon trump suit (and for opening bidding), add HCP and Length points.

When a suit has been agreed, add HCP and Shortness points.

When bidding NT, count HCP only.


Counting tricks (specially for pre-emptive bidding)

For this hand, count 7 tricks:

6KJT9542QJ427

The “Rule of 2, 3 or 4 shy”

With Unfavorable Vulnerability (Us vul, They non-vul), pre-empt 2 more than the number of tricks in your hand

At Equal Vulnerability (both vul, or both non-vul), pre-empt 3 more than the number of tricks in your hand

At Favorable Vulnerability (They vul, Us non-vul), pre-empt 4 more than the number of tricks in your hand

So, with the hand above, you can bid 4H if non-vulnerable and 3H if vulnerable.


Law of Total tricks (LOTT)

The actual and full Law of Total Tricks states that the total number of cards in each partnership’s longest suit is the number of tricks that contributes to the number of total tricks that are available on that board. For example, if NS holds 8 ♠s and EW holds 9 ♥s, then the total number of tricks available in that deal is 17. However, if EW can actually make 11 tricks in ♥s because of the distribution of cards and high card points, then the most that NS can make in ♠s is 6.

Of course, this is not an assured outcome; counter-examples are easy to find. But it is an useful device that indicates how high a partnership can go in competitive bidding.

The most useful application of the Law is a useful guideline that a partnership should be willing to compete to the level warranted by the partnerships’ holdings in the trump suit.

So, with 8 cards in ♠, a partnership should bid up to 2S; with 9 cards in , bid up to 3H.

Even if the partnership cannot make their contract that they bid based on LOTT, it would be a useful sacrifice against if they allowed their opponents to have the contract.

There are many cautions and codicils to this application of the Law. But the most important are:


After Stayman!

Partner bids 1NT (15-17 balanced), you Stayman with 2C. Now what?

After 2D response: (no majors)

2H:        5 Hs and 4 Ss. Invitational

3H:        5 Hs and 4 Ss. Game-forcing

4H:        6 Hs and 4 Ss. Sign-off

2S:        5 Ss and 4 Hs. Invitational

3S:        5 Ss and 4 Hs. Game-forcing

4S:        6 Ss and 4 Hs. Sign-off

3C:        5 Cs (usually 6), does not guarantee a 4-card major. Game-forcing.

3D:        5 Ds (usually 6), does not guarantee a 4-card major. Game-forcing.

2NT: Invitational

3NT: Signoff

4NT: Invites 6NT

After 2H response:

3H:        Four Hs, Invitational

4H:        Signoff

2S:        5 Ss, 4 Hs. Invitational

3S:        5 Ss, 4 Hs. Game-forcing

3C:        5 Cs (usually 6), does not guarantee a 4-card major. Game-forcing.

3D:        5 Ds (usually 6), does not guarantee a 4-card major. Game-forcing.

2NT:        4 Ss, <4 Hs. Invitational. Expects opener can pass, signoff with 3 S with 4 Ss, or signoff with 3NT

4NT:        Combined hands have slam potential. Invites 6NT

After 2S response:

3S:        Four Ss, Invitational

4S:        Signoff

3H:        5 Hs, 4 Ss. Invitational

3C:        5 Cs (usually 6), does not guarantee a 4-card major. Game-forcing.

3D:        5 Ds (usually 6), does not guarantee a 4-card major. Game-forcing.

2NT:        Invitational

3NT:        Signoff

4NT:        Combined hands have slam potential. Invites 6NT

Garbage Stayman

With a responder holding of 4-4-4-1 or 4-5-4-0 (with singleton or void in C) and few points, Stayman may be used, with the intention of passing any bid by 1NT opener.

So, with “Garbage” holdings like these, 1NT-opener’s partner will attempt to shut out opponents by bidding Stayman and will pass opener’s response in any suit, hoping to, at best, play in a 4-4- major fit or, at worst, find a 4-4 fit in Diamonds.

Suitable hands for Garbage Stayman are:

T987 A974 98743 -

Q987 QT43 9875 T

J986 JT8 97532 9

Crawling Stayman

With a shortage of Diamonds and 4-4 (or better) in majors, responder inquires with Stayman. Major responses are passed. If the response is 2D (no majors), Stayman bidder escapes to 2H. If NT opener has 3 cards in Hs, he passes, otherwise corrects to 3S with 3 cards. Otherwise, with 2-2 in the majors, he bids 2NT, asking partner to correct to 3C.

Suitable hands are:

T987 A984 - Q9753

Q653 Q432 3 J765


NOTES: