TEAL POTTER

Curriculum Vitae

                       

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EDUCATION

Ph.D. Candidate, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Colorado, 2012-present

B.A. in biology, emphasis in ecology, The University of Montana, 2009    

Tropical Conservation Semester, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, spring semester 2009                           

Whitman College, 2005-2006

POSITIONS

        

        Teaching Assistant at the University of Colorado, department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

                Pedagogy for future faculty, graduate course, co-instructor, Spring 2017

                Plants and Society lab TA, Fall 2016

                Microbiology lab TA, Spring 2016

                Plant Ecology lab TA, Fall 2015

                General Biology II lab TA, Spring 2014 & Spring 2013

                General Biology I lab TA, Fall 2013 & Fall 2012

Research Assistant for Niwot Ridge LTER: plant-soil interaction research and LTER outreach

        With Dr. William Bowman and Dr. Katharine Suding, Summers 2013, 2014

Field Research & Lab Manager:  Cascading Effects of Top Predators on Plant communities

With Dr. John Maron Lab, University of Montana, April 2010 – August 2012

        

Plant Ecology Lab Assistant:  Various competition greenhouse experiments                                                                                  With Dr. Ray Calloway Lab, University of Montana, January – April 2010

PUBLICATIONS

        

        Beers AT, Potter TS, Churchill AC, et al (2013) Advocating for Science Writing Cooperatives in Graduate Programs. Ecological Society of America Bulletin 7:245–246. doi: 10.1890/0012-9623-94.3.245

        Maron J, Pearson D, Potter T, Ortega Y (2012) Seed size and provenance mediate the joint effects of disturbance and seed predation on community assembly. J Ecol 100:1492–1500. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2745.2012.02027.x

        Pearson DE, Potter T, Maron JL (2012) Biotic resistance : exclusion of native rodent consumers releases populations of a weak invader. J Ecol 100:1383–1390. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2745.2012.02025.x

         Potter, TS, Owens, M, Bowman, WD, in review, Do plant-microbe interactions and aluminum tolerance influence plant species' responses to nitrogen deposition?

        FUNDED GRANTS

UGGS travel grant for ESA 2017, Spring 2017, received $300

Do plant species' relatedness or traits matter to soil microbes? Maxy Pope EBIO Grant, Spring 2016, received $1800

How does nitrogen pollution influence plant root processes and freezing tolerance? Team UROP Fall 2015, received $2400

Mechanisms of Plant Invasion at Colorado’s 14er Trailheads, Independent UROP Fall 2015, received $3000 (wrote with undergraduate who I mentored on this project)

Isolating the direct effects of environmental change from indirect effects of plants on soil microbial communities, Beverly Sears Fall 2015 received $1000

Interactive responses of Poa species on soil microbes to nitrogen availability, EBIO Grant Spring 2015, received $1780

Direct and indirect plant and microbial responses to nitrogen deposition, Team UROP, co-author: Amber Churchill, Summer 2015, received $3000

How vulnerable is the Colorado Front Range alpine to exotic plant invasion? John Marr Memorial Fellowship, Spring 2015, received $500

How are soil microorganisms and abiotic factors involved in alpine plant community changes?, Team UROP, Fall 2014, received $3000

Patterns of plant influence on soil microorganisms, Beverly Sears Research Grant, The University of Colorado, Spring 2014, $1000

Polar and Alpine Microbiology Conference travel grant, Montana State University, received $1,200

Team UROP grant, The University of Colorado, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, each $2,400

Effects of nitrogen deposition on mycorrhizae-plant relationships in the alpine, EBIO Grant, Spring 2013, $1,600

Effects of nitrogen deposition on mycorrhizae-plant relationships in the alpine, John W. Marr Fund, The University of Colorado, Spring 2013, $1000

Can fungi-root relationships explain alpine plant responses to nitrogen deposition?, Indian Peaks Wilderness Alliance, Spring 2013, $1000

PRESENTATIONS

        

Using phylogenetic relatedness as a predictor for plants’ control on Soil Microbial Communities and Nitrogen Cycling, December 15, 2017, American Geophysical Union annual meeting, San Francisco, CA.

Soil type and temperature inhibit cheatgrass invasion into the Front Range Alpine, September 18, 2016, GREEBS (regional meeting), Gothic, CO.

Guest lecture on Plant ecology field methods, ENVS-4050: Field Methods in Ecosystem Science, Fall 2015 and Fall 2016

Guest Lecture on Mycorrhizae, EBIO 4140: Plant Ecology, Fall 2015 and Fall 2016

Workshop on Introduction to R for graphics and statistics, REU program, summer 2016 & 2015

How are soil microorganisms and abiotic factors involved in alpine plant community changes?, September 20, 2015, GREEBS (regional meeting), Mountain Research Station, CO.

Factors that promote subalpine and alpine plant species invasions, September 1, 2015, LTER All Scientists Meeting (national meeting), Estes Park, CO.

Guest Lecture on Effects of nitrogen deposition on alpine sedges, EBIO 4800/5800: Soil Ecology, Fall 2015

SERVICE AND OUTREACH

Colorado Native Plant Society botany and ecology hike: I volunteered to organize and co-lead a hike to education plant enthusiasts on the botany and ecology of the alpine tundra ecosystem, which took place on the Ute Trail in Rocky Mountain National Park, August, 2, 2015, 8 participants.

REU project mentor (co-mentor with Bill Bowman): I worked with students to help them develop and carryout independent research projects, June 8-August 14, 2015, 2 students.

Science Discovery Program for Boulder high school students: I organized and led a 1-day project on invasive species mapping at the Mountain Research Station, August 8, 2015, 4 students.

Camp Reach summer program for Nederland middle school students: I volunteered to co-teach 6 2.5 hour interactive ecology lessons with two other graduate students. We developed the curriculum for all lessons and led 2 lessons, May 25- Jun 10th, 2015, 18 students.

Mentoring undergraduate volunteers: Trained/mentored volunteers and paid interns (UROP program grants) to work on my projects doing lab and greenhouse work over multiple semesters, Fall 2014-Fall 2015, 7 students.