Piglet

User Guide

Version 1.0C

© 2015 Nicholas Garner, N3WG, Pignology, LLC



Table of Contents

Document Overview

What happened to the wiki?

Copyright Notice

Terms of Use and Liability Waiver

Community Support

Pigtail/Piglet Specs

Pigtail Versions

Piglet

Wi-Fi Module Info

V2 Schematic

Piglet Quick Start

Out of the Box

Pigtail Power Connection

Piglet Power Connection

Wi-Fi

Pre-2012/08/19

Post-2012/08/19

Jumpers

Pigtail v1

Pigtail v2

Piglet

GPIOs

Pigtail/Piglet Reconfiguration

Multiple Configurations

Soft AP Configuration (Pre July 14, 2014)

Soft AP Configuration (Post July 14, 2014)

Adhoc

Original AdHoc

Config Example

AdHoc on a Device Shipped with Version 2.45 or 4.0

Infrastructure Mode

Config Example

Baud Rate Change

Using the Internet while using Piglet

Remove Gateway Setting

Pigtail/Piglet Firmware Update

Firmware Upgrade to Version 4.41

Connect to Home

Upgrade to version 4.xx

Reset Piglet configuration

Pigtail/Piglet Baud Rate Change

Radio Connections

Elecraft K2

Elecraft K3

Elecraft KX3

KXPA100

Yaesu FT-817/857/897

Yaesu FT-450/950/2k/3k/5k

Kenwood TS-480/590/2000

Icom IC-706/7000/7600

Icom Ci-V Address and Baud

Using Pigtail in HamLog on iOS

Using Pigtail in HamLog on Android

Pigtail with Android USB Serial

Configure and Run

Troubleshooting

Basic Connection Sequence

Pre-2012/08/19

Post-2012/08/19

Wi-Fi Co-Channel Interference

Revision History



Document Overview

This document serves to guide Piglet users through the use of the device.  The perspective of this guide is from the point of view of a user who has just unpackaged their Piglet.

Copyright Notice

Piglet, Copyright © 2015 by Pignology, LLC.. All rights reserved.

Terms of Use and Liability Waiver

Terms of Use

This product is offered to you conditioned upon your acceptance without modification of the terms, conditions, and notices contained.

Use Limitation

You may not modify, copy, distribute, reproduce, publish, license, create derivative works from, or sell, any information, software, products or services obtained, from the Pignology, LLC website or its products.

Limitation of Liability

In no event shall Pignology, LLC be liable for any direct, indirect, punitive, incidental, special consequential damages whatsoever arising out of or connected with the use or misuse of it’s products.

General

This disclaimer statement is governed by the laws of the State of California, USA.  You hereby consent to the exclusive jurisdiction and venue of the Courts of competent jurisdiction, USA, in all disputes arising out of or relating to the use of this product.  Use of this product is unauthorized in any jurisdiction that does not give effect to all provisions of these terms and conditions, including without limitation this paragraph.

Modification of Terms and Conditions

Pignology, LLC reserves the right to change the terms, conditions, and notices under which their products are offered.

Community Support

A Yahoo Group has been created for Piglet.  Please consider joining the group to receive information about updates, ask questions or report problems.  If you know the answer to a question posed by another user, please feel free to help out.

Piglet User Group

Pigtail/Piglet Specs

Unless a section specifically calls out the Piglet, the terms Pigtail and Piglet should be used interchangeably in this document.  The Pigtail is the predecessor of the Piglet.  The Pigtail hardware has been discontinued.  The information on Pigtail is retained in this document for historic reasons and because much of the hardware inside the two devices is the same.

Pigtail

pigtail.png

Piglet

piglet.pngs

Pigtail Device

Size (mm)

W: 74 H: 32.5 D: 120

Supply Voltage

Min: 5V Max: 15V

Power consumption

Connected: Idle: 50mA TX: ~180mA

Piglet Device

Size (mm)

W: 50.80 H: 30.32 D: 69.85

Supply Voltage

Min: 7V Max: 15V

Power consumption

Connected: Idle: 50mA TX: ~180mA

Wi-Fi Radio Characteristics

The following characteristics are from the wi-fi module datasheet.

Parameter

Specifications

Frequency

2402 ~ 2480MHz

Modulation

802.11b compatibility : DSSS(CCK-11, CCK-5.5, DQPSK-2, DBPSK- 1) 802.11g : OFDM (default)

Channel intervals

5MHz

Channels

1-14

Transmission rate (over the air)

1 – 11Mbps for 802.11b / 6 – 54Mbps for 802.11g

Receive sensitivity

-83dBm typ.

Output level (Class1)

-2dBm to +12dBm (configurable via software)

Pigtail Versions

There are two versions of Pigtail available, v1 and v2. The differences are small. Version 2 added two more jumpers to enable particular features. Version 2 also pulled some of the GPIO and Sensor pins from the wi-fi module out to the board, for folks that want to venture out of the box with the wi-fi module. The usage of these pins is detailed in the wi-fi module user guide.

Piglet

The Piglet is an evolution of the Pigtail based on user feedback. The battery has been removed and replaced with Anderson PowerPoles also, the device is much smaller. Piglet became available for purchase in January 2013.

Wi-Fi Module Info

The Pigtail uses the Roving Networks Wi-Fi module, part number RN-171.

The detailed user guide for the Wi-Fi Module can be found here:
http://rovingnetworks.com/resources/download/93/WiFly_User_Manual

V2 Schematic

Piglet Quick Start

Please view the Piglet Quick Start guide to get up and running quickly.

http://pignology.net/plqs

Out of the Box

Pigtail Power Connection

Directly out of the box you received the Pigtail in, the 9V connector is attached to the board inside the enclosure. If you opted for an extra power wire, you're free to connect it as you please. The input voltage range for the voltage regulator is 5.5-15 volts.

Observe polarity when connecting power to the board! The board has +/- indicated, +=red, -=black. There is no protection built-in if you connect the power backwards and you will release the smoke.

Piglet Power Connection

The Piglet uses Anderson PowerPoles. There is a reverse voltage protection diode in the device however, always observe proper polarity while attaching the device to power.

Wi-Fi

Pre-2012/08/19

The Wi-Fi module included with your Pigtail is preconfigured for Ad-Hoc mode. The SSID of this adhoc network is Pigtail-XX where XX is the last two characters of the MAC address of the module. You can look at the white label on the module to see these last two characters.

Once you boot it up you can go into wifi on your iDevice and it should be discovered. Just click it to join it. The blinking LEDs on the wi-fi module should change from blinking red/green to just blinking green once you successfully join the adhoc network.

Since we're using an ad-hoc wireless network, we need to wait until the iDevice assigned itself a link-local, also called APIPA, address. These addresses are in the subnet 169.254.0.0/16. It can take about around 30 seconds for this to happen. If you want to speed up the process in the future, you can set a static address on your iDevice. The Pigtail is configured as 169.254.1.1 out of the box.

Set Static IP on iDevice in Ad-Hoc Mode

Once connected to the ad-hoc wifi network, click the small disclosure indictor next to Pigtail-XX. Click the Static button to configure a static IP address. For IP address enter: 169.254.1.2 For Subnet Mask enter: 255.255.0.0

In order to join the Pigtail to an existing wireless network, the Wi-Fi module must be reconfigured. This can be done, carefully, from within HamLog following the configuration examples in Pigtail Reconfiguration.

Post-2012/08/19

As of August 20, 2012, all Pigtails are now shipped configured as a soft-AP. No more ad-hoc is needed. This allows the Pigtail to work with Android devices as well. The Pigtail is also configured to act as a DHCP server. This will dramatically increase the speed of connecting to the Pigtail.

Connecting the Pigtail to your device is the same as before. Open the Settings Application and go to Wi-Fi. Select "Pigtail" as the wireless network you wish to join, there is no authentication needed. Your device will automatically be assigned an IP address from the 10.1.1.0/24 subnet. The pre-configured IP address of the Pigtail is 10.1.1.1.

When you go into the Pigtail tool within HamLog, it will still auto-discover the Pigtail and show the address 10.1.1.1.

If you have a pre-2012/08/19 Pigtail, it's possible to reconfigure the Pigtail to use this new method however you'll have to update the firmware. In order to update the firmware on the Pigtail you'll need to join the Pigtail to a wireless network that has Internet access. See the Pigtail Firmware Update section for instructions on how to do this upgrade.

Jumpers

Pigtail v1

The version 1 Pigtail contained a single jumper labled PIN4PWR. The purpose of the Pin 4 jumper (J2) is two-fold.

1. Simulate the RS-232 Data Terminal Ready (DTR) signal for any external devices that may require it. The RS-232 specification states that signal levels must be between 3 and 15 volts. The output from the voltage regulator is ~3.3 volts and with R1 in the path we come down to around 3.1V, so we're right on the lower edge of the spec. Most computers today provide +5V on pin 4 to signal the attached modem to go off hook.

2. Provide flea power to an external device. If you have a particular custom application that could use some power, you can use the 3V on pin 4 if needed. An example of this, and actually the reason this power connection was added, is if you have a custom Icom CI-V cable that requires power on pin 4 to do the level conversion from RS-232 to TTL, you can use pin 4 to power the PCB inside that cable.

Pigtail v2

The version 2 Pigtail has 3 jumpers. The jumper header is labeled J1 and there are three jumpers installed in a unconnected manner out of the box. Along the edge of J1 are numbers, 1, 2 and 3. The meaning of those jumpers follows.

Jumper 3: Jumper #3 provides the Pin 4 Power as described in the Pigtail v1 section just above this text.

Jumper 2: When the #2 jumper is installed and power it turned on to the device, it will pull pin 9 of the wi-fi module high. Upon sensing this state the wi-fi module will create an ad-hoc network named WiFly-GSX-xx. If you had reconfigured your Pigtail to use infrastructure mode, you can use this jumper to get into adhoc mode quickly without having to reconfigure the Pigtail. Out of the box the Pigtail is configured for Ad-Hoc mode with the SSID Pigtail-XX. You would only need to use this jumper had reconfigured your Pigtail.

Jumper 1: Jumper #1 loops the CTS and RTS pins on the RS-232 connection. This jumper was added because Kenwood radios require RTS pin to be high before it will respond to commands. By looping CTS back to RTS we can fool the radio into thinking it's getting the signal from the Pigtail. The wi-fi module does have CTS and RTS however space was limited to get the traces so this compromise was made and works great.

Piglet

There are no jumpers in the Piglet. They have been replaced with a 3 position DIP switch. On the PCB, around the base of the DIP switch, in white letters, are indications of what each switch does. The three switches are for Pin 4 Power, CTS/RTS Loop, and ADHOC. Please see the jumper text above to understand what these three connections do.

GPIOs

Only v2 and later Pigtail PCBs have the GPIO pins broken out to the board. The Piglet has no GPIOs brought out.  GPIOs are not present on the currently shipping Piglet.

If you decide to play with the GPIO pins, refer to the following mapping of Pigtail Pin to Wi-Fi Module pin. Please refer to the Wi-Fi Module User's Guide for more information on using these pins.

Pigtail Pin

RN-XV Pin

1

GPIO2

2

SEN2

3

GPIO14

4

NC

5

GPIO4

6

GPIO6

7

SEN5

8

GPIO3

Pigtail/Piglet Reconfiguration

DO NOT RECONFIGURE YOUR PIGLET FROM THE WIFI SIDE OF THE DEVICE, ONLY DO IT FROM THE SERIAL SIDE WITH A NULL MODEM ADAPTER AS DESCRIBED BELOW.

Excerpt from the Roving Networks RN-171 User Guide:


There are two modes in the WiFly module, namely data mode and command mode. In data mode, the module is ready to either accept
incoming connections or initiate outgoing connections. To configure the parameters and/or to view the current configuration, the
module must be put into command mode (also called configuration mode). At any given time, the module will either be in command
mode or in data mode.

Upon power up, the device will be in data mode. To enter command mode, exactly the escape sequence (set to three characters, $$$ by default)
must be sent. The device will respond with CMD indicating it is in command mode.

NOTE: There is no carriage return (<cr>) after the $$$ to enter command mode.
For example: To enter command mode from data mode, you need to send:
$$$ - The module will respond with CMD indicating it is in command mode.
$$$<cr> - The module may not enter command mode

NOTE: There is a 250ms buffer before and after the escape sequence. If any characters are sent before or after the escape sequence
within this interval of 250ms, the WiFly module will treat it as data and pass it over the TCP or UDP socket. It will not enter command mode.
While in command mode, the device will accept ASCII bytes as commands. Each command ends with a carriage return <cr>.
To exit command mode, send exit<cr>. The device will respond with EXIT indicating that it has exited command mode and switched into data mode.

Parameters, such as the SSID, channel, IP address, Serial Port settings, and all other settings can be viewed and configured in command mode.

ASCII characters can be sent through a terminal emulator connected to the UART or via Telnet. When using the UART interface, communications
settings should match the stored settings used by the WiFly module. The default is 9600 baudrate, 8 bits, No Parity, 1 stop bit, and
hardware flow control disabled.

Please DO NOT use HyperTerminal. Use TeraTerm as your terminal emulator.

NOTE: The comment regarding not using HyperTerminal is from RovingNetworks, I personally use TeraTerm when in Windows and either MiniCom (via MacPorts) or CoolTerm in Mac.

If manipulating the wifi settings, it's recommended to only do change the settings from the serial side of the device with a USB serial adapter and a null modem cable/adapter. If any mistakes are made in the wifi config, you'll be locked out of the device until you connect to the serial side.

Multiple Configurations

It's possible to save multiple configurations for the Pigtail. The commands to do this are "save configname" and "load configname" from Command mode.

Soft AP Configuration (Pre July 14, 2014)

This is the default configuration on all Pigtails shipped after August 20, 2012 and before July 15, 2014. This configuration requires firmware version >2.45 and <4.41.

#Enable Soft AP Mode
set wlan join 7
#Set WLAN Channel
set wlan chan 3
#Set WLAN SSID
set wlan ssid Pigtail
#Enable DHCP Server
set ip dhcp 4
#Set local IP address
set ip add 10.1.1.1  
#Set local netmask
set ip net 255.255.255.0
#set gateway to self
set ip gateway 10.1.1.1
#Set local TCP listener port
set ip local 7373
#Set UDP broadcast port
set broadcast port 7373
#Set hello string
set comm remote *PT_HELLO*
#Set UART baud rate
set uart baud 4800
save
reboot

Soft AP Configuration (Post July 14, 2014)

This is the default configuration on all Pigtails shipped after July 14, 2014. This configuration requires firmware version >4.41.

#Enable Soft AP Mode
set wlan join 7
#Set WLAN Channel
set wlan chan 3
#Set AP Mode WLAN SSID
set apmode ssid Pigtail
#Enable DHCP Server
set ip dhcp 4
#Set local IP address
set ip add 10.1.1.1  
#Set local netmask
set ip net 255.255.255.0
#set gateway to self
set ip gateway 10.1.1.1
#Set local TCP listener port
set ip local 7373
#Set UDP broadcast port
set broadcast port 7373
#Set hello string
set comm remote *PT_HELLO*
#Set UART baud rate
set uart baud 4800
save
reboot

Adhoc

As of early 2013, Microchip (Roving Networks) has deprecated AdHoc support in version 2.45 of the firmware.  
This is unfortunate and I have voiced my concerns about this decision.  There are two alternatives listed below.

Original AdHoc

This config should only be used on pre-2012/08/19 Pigtails that haven't had the firmware update for Soft-AP mode.  
See the note in the Pigtail User Guide, wifi section, for more information.

Adhoc mode is used when you aren't near a wireless access point. Two devices (e.g. Pigtail and iPad) can both join the same adhoc network and talk to each other.

Enter command mode on the Pigtail by pressing $ (shift-4) three times, as in $$$. Then apply the following commands.

Config Example

set wlan channel 11
set wlan ssid Pigtail
set wlan join 4
set ip address 169.254.1.1
set ip netmask 255.255.0.0
set ip local 7373
set ip dhcp 0
set broadcast port 7373
save
reboot

AdHoc on a Device Shipped with Version 2.45 or 4.0

When I update the firmware prior to shipment, I don't delete the old firmware from the device. It's possible to set the device to boot to the old firmware.

Once in Config mode as described above, enter the command:

ls
(That's Lima-Sierra, not India-Sierra)

You will see output similar to the following.

<2.45> ls

FL# SIZ FLAGS
 2  20   3 WiFly_EZX-2.32  
22  11   3 wps_app  
33   1  10 config  
34  21   3 WiFly_EZX-2.45  

201 Free, Boot=34, Backup=2
<2.45>

In this case the old firmware version is 2.32. You can set the device to boot to this version with this command:

<2.45> boot image 2
Set Boot Image 2, =OK
<2.45>

The "2" corresponds to the FL# in the listing output from "ls". Now reboot and you'll be running the old version and can apply the Ad-Hoc configuration listed above in the Original Adhoc section.

Some of the devices have older firmware, like 2.28, this will work in AdHoc mode as well.

Infrastructure Mode

Infrastructure mode is used when you have an existing wireless network that you would like to connect to, for example your home network.

Enter command mode on the Pigtail by pressing $ (shift-4) three times, as in $$$. Then apply the following commands. If any mistakes are made or

the Pigtail cannot join the network you specify for whatever reason, you'll need a computer with a serial port, a serial cable and a null modem adapter

to troubleshoot it.

Config Example

This configuration examples will join the home WPA network named "MyHomeNet" and turn on DHCP to automatically get an ip address.

set wlan channel 0
set wlan join 1
set wlan ssid MyHomeNet
set wlan phrase MyHomeNetPassword
set ip local 7373
set ip dhcp 1
set broadcast port 7373
save
reboot

Baud Rate Change

See Pigtail/Piglet Baud Rate Change

Using the Internet while using Piglet

Since the Piglet is a Wi-Fi device, when you’re connected to the Piglet’s Wi-Fi network you will lose access to the Internet even if the device has 3G/4G connectivity.  There are a couple workarounds to this problem.

  1. Remove the default gateway setting from the Piglet.  This option appears to work with recent versions of firmware and has been tested by a few folks however when I originally tested it in 2013 it had an issue.  Give this option a shot before trying the next one.
  2. Downgrade the firmware on the device and run it in Ad-Hoc mode.  NOTE: This option only works for iOS.  See the Original AdHoc section.

Remove Gateway Setting

You'll need to enter config mode of the Wi-Fi module to make the change. This can be done within HamLog using the Terminal button from Tools->Pigtail. Once you're connected to the Pigtail/Piglet via the Terminal enter these commands and hit send on each one.

$$$
CMD> set ip gateway 0

CMD> set dns address 0
CMD> save
CMD> reboot

After hitting send on "set ip gateway..." you should get back a response of "AOK". You'll lose connectivity to the Pigtail when you reboot.  You might need to reconnect to the Piglet network after making this change.

Pigtail/Piglet Firmware Update

To update the firmware the Pigtail must be connected to a wi-fi access point with access to the Internet. See PT Config Examples for a configuration example of joining your home wi-fi network.

Once you're on the wi-fi network with internet access, get connected to the Pigtail either through the serial port or by telnetting into the device on port 7373 if you know its IP address.

The command to update the firmware is ftp update. A reboot is required after the new firmware is downloaded. An example of the update starting from the device being turned on is below.

WiFly Ver 2.32, 02-13-2012 on RN-171
MAC Addr=00:06:66:71:cc:eb
Auto-Assoc watchnu22 chan=11 mode=WPA2 SCAN OK
Joining watchnu22 now..
*READY*
Associated!
DHCP: Start
DHCP in 524ms, lease=14400s
IF=UP
DHCP=ON
IP=10.0.1.2:7373
NM=255.255.255.0
GW=10.0.1.1
Listen on 7373
$$$
CMD
<2.32> ftp update
<2.32> FTP connecting to 198.175.253.161
FTP file=54
.........................................................
FTP OK.
UPDATE OK
reboot
*Reboot*WiFly Ver 2.32, 02-13-2012 on RN-171
MAC Addr=00:06:66:71:cc:eb
Auto-Assoc watchnu22 chan=11 mode=WPA2 SCAN OK
Joining watchnu22 now..
*READY*
Associated!
DHCP: Start
DHCP in 538ms, lease=14400s
IF=UP
DHCP=ON
IP=10.0.1.2:7373
NM=255.255.255.0
GW=10.0.1.1
Listen on 7373

Firmware Upgrade to Version 4.41

If you have a Pigtail or Piglet received before March 28, 2013, it's recommended to upgrade the firmware to version 4.0 or higher. This version fixes an issue with the wifi module disconnecting your device if it doesn't send any data for more than about 5 minutes. If you have an older device (2012) it's most likely running version 2.xx.  The steps to do this follow (Connect to Home, Upgrade to 4.x, Reset Configuration). You should only do this upgrade through the CMD mode available on the serial port. Do not attempt this from Terminal in HamLog.

Upgrade video:
N3WG has recorded a video showing the upgrade from 2.45 to 4.0.
The video can be viewed here:
http://youtu.be/i2RBf3y3O3E

Connect to Home

To update the firmware you have to join the Piglet to your home wifi network so it can access the Internet.

Following is an example configuration to configure the Piglet to join your home network.

set wlan join 1
set wlan channel 0
set ip dhcp 1
set wlan ssid my_home_net_ssid
set wlan phrase my_wlan_secret_key
set wlan auth 4
set ftp file wifly7-400.img
set ftp add 198.175.253.161
save
reboot

Upon reboot you should see your device get an IP address via DHCP if it connects to your home WLAN successfully.

Upgrade to version 4.xx

To upgrade to version 4.xx, execute the following commands.

set ftp file wifly-EZX.img
save
ftp update

The module may or may not reboot following this upgrade.  Reboot it if it does not.

Reset Piglet configuration

Per the documentation, you should reset the configuration when upgrading firmware. First reset the config:

factory RESET
reboot

This will reset the baud rate to 9600. Modify your terminal program to set the baud rate of your serial port to 9600 then re-enter CMD mode and apply the default Piglet config.

Apply the default configuration:
Soft AP Configuration (Pre July 14, 2014)
Soft AP Configuration (Post July 14, 2014)


Pigtail/Piglet Baud Rate Change

The Pigtail ships with the baud rate set to 4800. You can modify this. You'll need to enter config mode of the Wi-Fi module to make the change. This can be done within HamLog using the Terminal button from Tools->Pigtail. Once you're connected to the Pigtail/Piglet via the Terminal enter these commands and hit send on each one.

$$$
CMD> set uart baud 38400
CMD> save
CMD> reboot

After hitting send on "set uart..." you should get back a response of "AOK". You'll lose connectivity to the Pigtail when you reboot. You'll need to modify your radio's baud rate so they can talk. NOTE: This will not speed up HamLog getting the freq/mode/options. That happens via Timer that sends to TCP to get to the Wi-Fi module. Once it's in the Wi-Fi module, then the baud rate comes into play.

Radio Connections

The Pigtail has been tested with the following radios. Note that the Pigtail ships with a default baud rate on the UART of 4800.

Elecraft K2

The KIO2 module has a fixed baud rate of 4800. A straight through serial cable is needed for the connection. The KIO2 manual mentions that a special cable is needed because the KIO2 doesn't have standard RS-232 signals on all pins. For example, Pin 4 on the KIO2 is described as "Automatic Level Control from an external amp to the SSB adapter."

THE PIN 4 POWER and RTS/CTS LOOP JUMPERS MUST NOT BE SHORTED IN THE PIGTAIL!!!

Outside of pins 2, 3, 4 and 5 the Pigtail leaves the other pins unconnected so a standard serial cable, not necessarily the one put together when building the KIO2, should work provided the Pin 4 Power jumper is left off.  Seriously, don't have those jumpers in place and connect this to the K2, mine smoked and yours will too.

Elecraft K3

The KIO3 module in the K3 has a user selectable baud rate. The default baud rate is 4800 as is the Pigtail. If, during a firmware update, the baud rate of the KIO3 module is changed to 38400, you'll need to change this back to 4800, or change the baud rate on the Pigtail. A straight through serial cable can be used to connect to the K3. You do not need the Pin4 Power jumper to be in place.

Elecraft KX3

The connection made from the KX3 to the Pigtail will be via the KXSER cable supplied by Elecraft. The KXUSB cable will not work. You may need to change the baud rate of the KX3 serial port to 4800. This can be done in MENU:RS232.

KXPA100

If you have a KXPA100, when this is enabled on the KX3 the RS232 menu item has no effect and the baud rate is hard set to 38400.  You’ll need to modify the baud rate on the Piglet to 38400 if you wish to use the KXPA100 in-line with the Piglet.

Yaesu FT-817/857/897

The default baud rate on the CAT interface of the Yaesu FT-817 is 4800 as is the Pigtail. The Yaesu branded CT-62 cable can be used to connect to the radio. You do not need the Pin4 Power jumper to be in place.

Yaesu FT-450/950/2k/3k/5k

These radios use the new Yaesu CAT command set. The Pigtail's default baud rate is 4800. You'll need to set the CATRATE menu item to 4800 (or modify the Pigtail). The menu item CAT RTS may need to be disabled or, as another option, you can set the CTS/RTS jumper inside the Pigtail.

Kenwood TS-480/590/2000

You do not need the Pin 4 power jumper in place for Kenwood radios. You do need the CTS/RTS Loop jumper in place. This jumper is only present on version 2 and higher Pigtails that became available in June 2012. See the Jumpers section in this manual to determine which jumper needs to be connected. Ensure the baud rate on your Kenwood radio is set to 4800** see the next sentence about this baud rate.

The Kenwood manual states that if you're using a baud rate of 4800 then you must use 2 stop bits.  
The Pigtail is set to 1 stop bit and this is not modifiable.  If you have an issue connecting to a Kenwood radio change
the baud rate of the Pigtail to 9600 or higher and change the radio as well.

If you will be using the CW Sending feature in HamLog you will need to enable VOX on the radio.

Icom IC-706/7000/7600/etc.

Support for Icom radios is only via either the Icom branded CT-17 box or the Pigtail CT-17 adapter board (available at http://shop.pignology.net). The Pin 4 Power jumper needs to be in place to provide power to the CT-17 adapter. The v1/v2 boards need to have R1 (470 ohm) removed if using the CT-17 board from Pignology IF using the device with an IC-7000. There's something different about the CI-V port on that radio that needs just a little more power. Pigtails sold that have a red main board don't have R1 any longer and will work with the CT-17.

Icom Ci-V Address and Baud

The original version of HamLog that supported Icom Ci-V had a fixed address of 58H that had to be configured on the radio.  The latest version of HamLog allows you to specify the Ci-V address to use.  It still defaults to 58H.

The following needs to occur for Icom connectivity using the Pignology CT-17 adapter to HamLog:

  1. Open the Piglet and turn on the Pin 4 Power DIP switch.
  2. Connect the CT-17 adapter to the Piglet.
  3. Connect the mono audio cable from the CT-17 adapter to the Ci-V jack on the Icom radio.
  4. Change the radio to Ci-V address 58H -or- click Settings in Tools->Pigtail and set the Ci-V address to whatever your radio uses.

Using Pigtail in HamLog on iOS

Demo Video

After connecting to the same Wi-Fi network as the Pigtail (or if you're going remote) open HamLog.

1. Click Tools and then select the Pigtail tool.

2. Wait a few seconds for the Pigtail to be discovered.

3. Select the radio type and then click the row in the table that corresponds to the Pigtail you want to connect to.

In most cases, you'll only have one Pigtail show up in this table. If you ever have 2 or more Pigtails on the same network you should see all of them

assuming you have different IP addresses on all of them.

4. Head back to the main contacts list screen and click + to add a contact.

5. You should see the PTA icon show up. If HamLog successfully connects to the Pigtail the icon will be green.

6. If your radio is on and connected, HamLog should start asking the radio for its current frequency, mode and options (pre, agc, att, etc.).

7. Press the Pigtail button in the Toolbar to display the controller screen.

These screens are different for the different radio types. It's based on the capabilities offered by the radio manufacturers.

 

Using Pigtail in HamLog on Android

Demo Video

1. Open the Settings on your device and go to Wi-Fi settings. After a second you should see the network "Pigtail". Select that. After a few seconds you should be assigned an IP address. It will most likely be 10.1.1.10.

2. Open HamLog and go to the Tools menu.

3. Scroll down and select Pigtail.

4. Out of the box the Pigtail's IP address is 10.1.1.1. I'm unable to do the same auto-discovery in Android so you'll have to manually enter the address. Then select your radio manufacturer and model. Then hit save. Unlike iOS, the Pigtail settings are saved and reused. If you are ever logging and need to disable the Pigtail, just click Disable here. If you have the Pigtail configured and the device can't connect it will disable it for this contact.

5. Head back to the main contact list and add a contact.

6. HamLog will attempt to connect to the Pigtail based on the IP address you entered. Note the baud rate information listed above. The Pigtail defaults to 4800 baud. You might need to adjust your radio to match this rate, or change the Pigtail's baud rate. The freq and mode should populate after about 1 second. Up top there is a button labeled "PT". Click this will take you to the control screen.

7. This is the FT-817 control screen. You can change band/mode using the drop down buttons.

8. The Elecraft radios have a CW/Data Terminal button at the bottom.

9. This is the CW/Data Terminal. HamLog will query the radio for decoded CW or Data and it will show in the in the Received Text field. You can type in the Send field and hit send to have the radio transmit what you've typed.

Pigtail with Android USB Serial

Using USB Serial Adapters with HamLog on Android is currently in beta. The functionality in there is the same as when using the Pigtail hardware device described above.

To use this you need some adapters. You'll need a Micro USB Host Adapter and a USB Serial Adapter. I have the Micro USB Host adapter available in my store here: http://shop.pignology.net. I'm grateful for the support if purchased here however if you prefer to purchase from another online retailer, they can be found easily on Amazon.

When everything is connected up, it looks like this:

The USB Serial adapter can be either FTDI or Prolific however I have not tested with Prolific.

Configure and Run

The following screenshots are from HamLog running on a Samsung Galaxy S III.

Ensure you have the latest version of HamLog installed by checking for an update in the Android Play Store.

Plug in your USB to serial adapter using the Micro USB OTG Host Cable. You will see the following question pop up. HamLog is configured to advertise it's ability to use USB Serial Adapters. If you wish to always open HamLog when connecting this adapter, click the "Use by default..." check box and click okay.

HamLog will be opened when you press okay. If you checked the box to use by default, HamLog will be opened whenever you connect the USB Serial adapter.

Click on the Tools tab and select the Pigtail item.

In the Pigtail settings select your radio manufacturer and model, click the Use Serial check box and select the baud rate you want to use. The baud should match the baud rate setting of the radio. Hit save.

You will be presented with a one time information screen. Click okay.

Head back to the main screen and add a contact. HamLog will open the serial port when you add a contact and start querying your radio through the USB serial port.

If you want to verify it's working, if you have another USB serial adapter for your computer and a null modem adapter, you can connect your Android device to your computer and monitor the communication. Ensure you have the same baud rate on both sides. The following screenshot shows the commands being sent for an Elecraft KX3.

Troubleshooting

Basic Connection Sequence

Connect cable to radio.

Turn on Pigtail.

Turn on radio.

Unlock iPad.

Settings->Wifi->Pigtail, wait for checkmark

Go Home

Open HamLog

Select Tools->Pigtail

Select radio type/model

Wait for beacon and select 10.1.1.10 or 169.254.1.1

Go back and add a contact.

Pre-2012/08/19

Please follow these steps to troubleshoot your Pigtail connection.

1. When you turn the Pigtail on (default, as shipped state), it blinks red and green.

2. Opening the settings app on the iPad, do you see the Pigtail listed on the wifi screen?

If not, there may be a configuration issue on the Pigtail. Take a look at the PT Config Examples page.

You might need to reconfigure the Pigtail to create an AdHoc network.

3. If you click on that Pigtail, a check mark should show up next to it. The red LED should stop blinking the the green should be steadily blinking.

4. In the same screen, if you click the little > symbol on the right, while connected to the Pigtail it should dig down into the network settings for the wireless network.

5. Is there an address in there? If not, press the back button and wait about 10 seconds. Re-check for an address. It should assign itself one after about 30 seconds.

6. What is it and what is the subnet mask?

It should start with 169.254 and the subnet mask should be 255.255.0.0. This will be the default.

7. Is the Router field empty? It should be by default.

If there's an address in the router field and you haven't reconfigured it to join a wireless network, rather than create an adhoc one, you should remove it.

You will have problems with doing callsign lookups and the like if a 3G connection is also available.

8. If you want the IP address assignment to be faster in the future, set the IP address to 169.254.1.2 with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0. Leave the Router field empty.

9. Open HamLog. Click Tools->Pigtail. After about 10 seconds you should see an entry in the Pigtail list, most likely it will be 169.254.1.1. If the Pigtail never shows up, something's wrong. I, N3WG, have never seen this happen so we should chat. Get in touch via support@pignology.net.

10. Click your radio manufacturer, click your radio, click on the discovered Pigtail.

The text at the top of the screen should change to: Selected: 169.254.1.1 (Manufacturer)

11. Click the back button a couple times to get back to the main log screen. Click + to add a contact.

12. The Pigtail should connect and a green icon should appear. If it fails to connect there will be an informative message that pops up that says why.

13. If the freq and mode fields are not auto-populated, check the baud rate settings on your radio. It should be 4800.

14. If the freq and mode fields are not auto-populated, reboot your radio. This issue has been observed on certain Elecraft radios that need to be turned on after the Pigtail is connected.

15. If the freq and mode fields are not auto-populated and you're connecting to an Icom radio, is the radio set to Ci-V address 58H?

16. If the freq and mode fields are not auto-populated and it's an Icom radio and you're using the CT-17 adapter from Pignology, is the Pin 4 Power jumper installed?

17. If you get an error message about an issue with QRZ, this is because the device cannot talk to the Internet while connected to the Pigtail.

This would only happen if you have a device that does not have a backup 3G/4G connection. You can stop these errors two ways:

Post-2012/08/19

Please follow these steps to troubleshoot your Pigtail connection. These instructions are for Pigtail's that shipped with updated firmware starting 8/19/2012 using the Soft-AP mode.

1. When you turn the Pigtail on (default, as shipped state), it blinks red and green when no client is associated with the soft Access Point created by the Pigtail. The IP address of the Pigtail is 10.1.1.1/24. NOTE: There were some Pigtails shipped with a version of firmware where only the green LED would blink on boot. These Pigtails should have their firmware updated.

2. Opening the settings app on the iPad, do you see the Pigtail listed on the wifi screen?

If not, there may be a configuration issue on the Pigtail. Take a look at the PT Config Examples page.

You might need to reconfigure the Pigtail to create an AdHoc network.

3. If you click on that "Pigtail", a check mark should show up next to it after a few seconds.

4. In the same screen, if you click the little ">" symbol on the right, while connected to the Pigtail it should dig down into the network settings for the wireless network.

5. Is there an address in there? It will probably be 10.1.1.10. If not, press the back button and wait about 10 seconds. Re-check for an address. It should assign itself one after a few seconds.

6. What is it and what is the subnet mask?

The address of the iPad should be 10.1.1.10 and the subnet mask should be 255.255.255.0. The gateway will be set to 10.1.1.1.

7. Open HamLog. Click Tools->Pigtail. After about 10 seconds you should see an entry in the Pigtail list, most likely it will be 10.1.1.1. If the Pigtail never shows up, something's wrong. I, N3WG, have never seen this happen so we should chat. Get in touch via support@pignology.net.

8. Click your radio manufacturer, click your radio, click on the discovered Pigtail.

The text at the top of the screen should change to: Selected: 10.1.1.1 (Manufacturer)

9. Click the back button a couple times to get back to the main log screen. Click + to add a contact.

10. The Pigtail should connect and a green icon should appear. If it fails to connect there will be an informative message that pops up that says why.

13. If the freq and mode fields are not auto-populated, check the baud rate settings on your radio. It should be 4800.

14. If the freq and mode fields are not auto-populated, reboot your radio. This issue has been observed on certain Elecraft radios that need to be turned on after the Pigtail is connected.

15. If the freq and mode fields are not auto-populated and you're connecting to an Icom radio, is the radio set to Ci-V address 58H?

16. If the freq and mode fields are not auto-populated and it's an Icom radio and you're using the CT-17 adapter from Pignology, is the Pin 4 Power jumper installed?

17. If you get an error message about an issue with QRZ, this is because the device cannot talk to the Internet while connected to the Pigtail.

This would only happen if you have a device that does not have a backup 3G/4G connection. You can stop these errors two ways:

Wi-Fi Co-Channel Interference

In certain environments where there are many Wi-Fi access points around, it's possible to experience disconnects due to co-channel interference. If you experience random disconnects while talking to the Pigtail it's possible you're experiencing this problem. Converting the Pigtail to the old Ad-Hoc configuration should resolve it. Get in touch with support@pignology.net if you suspect you're having this issue and I'll do whatever I can to help fix it. I have filed a bug with the wi-fi vendor and they have acknowledged the issue but haven't come out with a fix yet.

Revision History

Date

Version

Author

Reason for Change

20130704

1.0A

N3WG

Initial Draft

20140723

1.0B

N3WG

Updated for WiFly version 4.41

20150415

1.0C

N3WG

Updated information on using Icom with Piglet