Oak Grove Curriculum Scope & Sequence

Social Emotional Learning- SEL (First Grade)

Updated 8.7.17

Unit Length

Unit / Skills

  • We are learning to…

Instructional Strategies

Resources

Assessments

  • Formative/Summative (F/S)

Skills for Learning

  • Following Listening Rules helps everyone learn.
  • Your brain gets smarter every time it works hard.
  • Focusing attention involves using your eyes, ears, and brain.
  • The more you practice focusing your attention, the better you get at it.
  • Using self-talk helps focus attention.
  • Listening and following directions are important Skills for Learning.
  • Repeating directions helps you remember them.
  • Following directions involves using your eyes, ears, and brain.
  • Self-talk means talking to yourself out loud in a quiet voice or inside your head.
  • Self-talk helps you focus and maintain attention.
  • Being assertive involves using an assertive posture (face the person, head up and shoulders back) and tone of voice (calm, firm voice; respectful words).
  • Assertive communication is the best way to ask for help.
  • Identifying your own feelings helps you know how others feel.
  • Everyone experiences strong feelings sometimes.
  • Some feelings are comfortable, and some are uncomfortable.
  • Physical clues can help identify others’ feelings.
  • Situational clues can help you identify others’ feelings.
  • Understanding how others feel improves relationships.
  • People can have different feelings about the same situation.
  • It is okay for people to have different feelings about the same thing.
  • People may have different feelings about the same situation at different times.
  • Feelings may change over time.
  • Being inviting and welcoming can change people’s feelings.
  • An accident is when you do something you didn’t mean to do.
  • It is important to accept responsibility for an accident to prevent others from assuming it was intentional.
  • Compassion is empathy in action.
  • People feel better when others show them care and concern
  • You identify your own feelings by physical clues in your body.
  • All feelings are natural.
  • Feelings vary in strength.
  • Strong feelings need to be managed.
  • Saying “Stop” and naming your feeling are ways to begin to calm down.
  • Belly breathing calms down strong feelings.
  • Belly breathing pushes the belly out when you breathe in.
  • Being mean or hurting others when you are angry is not okay.
  • Positive self-talk is an effective strategy for calming down strong emotions.
  • Counting is an effective Way to Calm Down.
  • The Ways to Calm Down can help students manage worry.
  • Talking to a grown-up helps when you are worried.
  • You need to calm down before you solve a problem.
  • The first step in solving a problem is to use words to describe the problem.
  • The second step in solving a problem is to think of lots of solutions.
  • Part of problem solving is thinking about consequences.
  • The final step of problem solving is to pick the best solution.
  • Solving problems is a way to get along better with others.
  • Sharing, trading, and taking turns are fair ways to play.
  • Sharing means playing together with a toy.
  • It is important to notice and have empathy for children who are left out of play.
  • Inviting others to play is the right thing to do.
  • Playing with others is a way to get to know them better.
  • It is not okay to call people names that hurt their feelings.
  • If someone calls you a name, you can ignore the person or speak assertively.
  • If the person doesn’t stop calling you names, you should tell a grown-up.
  • You have all learned a lot of new skills.
  • You can notice how much you have learned.

  • Turn and Talk
  • Class discussion
  • Role playing
  • Modeling
  • DVD video scenario & Discussion

  • Seconds Step Program
  • Puppets
  • DVDs
  • Songs
  • Games & activities
  • Curriculum Cross- over activities
  • Name and demonstrate the Listening Rules
  • Apply attention, memory, and inhibitory control skills in a brain-building game
  • Name and demonstrate the Listening Rules
  • Demonstrate attention skills in the context of a game
  • State typical classroom verbal cues that request student attention
  • Demonstrate listening and following directions within the context of a game
  • Demonstrate self-talk strategies for remembering directions
  • Distinguish an assertive request from a passive or aggressive one
  • Identify assertive posture and tone of voice
  • Demonstrate assertive communication skills in response to scenarios

  • Empathy
  • Identifying your own feelings helps you know how others feel.
  • Everyone experiences strong feelings sometimes.
  • Some feelings are comfortable, and some are uncomfortable.
  • Physical clues can help identify others’ feelings.
  • Situational clues can help you identify others’ feelings.
  • Understanding how others feel improves relationships.
  • People can have different feelings about the same situation.
  • It is okay for people to have different feelings about the same thing.
  • People may have different feelings about the same situation at different times.
  • Feelings may change over time.
  • Being inviting and welcoming can change people’s feelings.
  • An accident is when you do something you didn’t mean to do.
  • It is important to accept responsibility for an accident to prevent others from assuming it was intentional.
  • Compassion is empathy in action.
  • People feel better when others show them care and concern

  • Turn and Talk
  • Class discussion
  • Role playing
  • Modeling
  • DVD video scenario & Discussion

  • Seconds Step Program
  • Puppets
  • DVDs
  • Songs
  • Games & activities
  • Curriculum Cross- over activities
  • Name feelings when presented with physical clues
  • Name feelings when presented with physical clues
  • Name feelings when presented with environmental and situational clues
  • Compare physical and emotional similarities and differences
  • between two children
  • Demonstrate that people can have different feelings about the same situation
  • Demonstrate welcoming and inviting behaviors
  • Know what the word accident means
  • Know what to say when they do something by accident
  • Predict how others might feel as a result of their own or others’ actions
  • Recall that listening, saying kind words, and helping are three ways to show caring
  • Demonstrate caring and helping in response to scenarios

  • Emotional Management
  • You identify your own feelings by physical clues in your body.
  • All feelings are natural.
  • Feelings vary in strength.
  • Strong feelings need to be managed.
  • Saying “Stop” and naming your feeling are ways to begin to calm down.
  • Belly breathing calms down strong feelings.
  • Belly breathing pushes the belly out when you breathe in.
  • Being mean or hurting others when you are angry is not okay.
  • Positive self-talk is an effective strategy for calming down strong emotions.
  • Counting is an effective Way to Calm Down.
  • The Ways to Calm Down can help students manage worry.
  • Talking to a grown-up helps when you are worried.

  • Turn and Talk
  • Class discussion
  • Role playing
  • Modeling
  • DVD video scenario & Discussion

  • Seconds Step Program
  • Puppets
  • DVDs
  • Songs
  • Games & activities
  • Curriculum Cross- over activities
  • Identify physical clues in their bodies that help them identify their feelings
  • Identify grown-ups to talk to about feelings
  • Recognize situations and physical body cues that signal strong feelings
  • Demonstrate two Calming-Down Steps to manage strong feelings
  • Explain physical and situational clues to feeling angry
  • Demonstrate the proper belly breathing technique
  • Use a three-step process to calm down: Say “stop,” name your feeling, and do belly breathing
  • Recognize situations that require the use of calming-down strategies
  • Use positive self-talk to calm down
  • Recognize situations that require the use of calming-down skills
  • Demonstrate the Ways to Calm Down—belly breathing,
  • counting, and using positive self-talk
  • Identify grown-ups to talk to when feeling worried

  • Problem Solving
  • You need to calm down before you solve a problem.
  • The first step in solving a problem is to use words to describe the problem.
  • The second step in solving a problem is to think of lots of solutions.
  • Part of problem solving is thinking about consequences.
  • The final step of problem solving is to pick the best solution.
  • Solving problems is a way to get along better
  • with others.
  • Sharing, trading, and taking turns are fair ways to play.
  • Sharing means playing together with a toy.
  • It is important to notice and have empathy for children who are left out of play.
  • Inviting others to play is the right thing to do.
  • Playing with others is a way to get to know them better.
  • It is not okay to call people names that hurt
  • their feelings.
  • If someone calls you a name, you can ignore the person or speak assertively.
  • If the person doesn’t stop calling you names, you should tell a grown-up.
  • You have all learned a lot of new skills.
  • You can notice how much you have learned.

  • Turn and Talk
  • Class discussion
  • Role playing
  • Modeling
  • DVD video scenario & Discussion

  • Seconds Step Program
  • Puppets
  • DVDs
  • Songs
  • Games & activities
  • Curriculum Cross- over activities
  • Use words to describe problems presented in scenarios
  • Generate multiple solutions to problems presented in scenarios
  • Predict consequences using an if-then model
  • Select a reasonable solution to a problem
  • Define and differentiate sharing, trading, and taking turns
  • Identify and state the problem in a given situation
  • Generate possible solutions to a problem situation
  • Demonstrate the Fair Ways to Play
  • Apply the Problem-Solving Steps
  • Demonstrate how to invite someone to play in response to scenarios
  • Demonstrate assertive responses to name-calling
  • Identify adults to tell if name-calling doesn’t stop
  • Recall skills on all the posters
  • Demonstrate the Listening Rules
  • Demonstrate the Calming-Down Steps
  • Name one concept or skill they learned in their Second Step lessons