Bloomfield High School

 

“Home of the Cardinals”

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

HANDBOOK

 

 TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

PURPOSE STATEMENT                                                                                                  1

MISSION STATEMENT                                                                                                   1

NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT                                                                        1

COMMENCEMENT REQUIREMENTS                                                                          1

DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS                                                                                       3

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY DEPARTMENT                                                             

                            Agriculture                                                                                             7

                            Business                                                                                                  10                

                            Engineering/Technology                                                                        13

                       Family & Consumer Science                                                                 14

                            Health Sciences                                                                                      18

                            Trade & Industry                                                                                    20

                            Work-Based Learning                                                                                22

                            English                                                                                                    23

                            Fine Arts                                                                                                 28

                            Health Education & Physical Education                                                32

                            Mathematics                                                                                           34

                            Multidisciplinary Studies                                                                       38

                            Science                                                                                                   40

                            Social Studies                                                                                         43

                            World Languages                                                                                   46

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 PURPOSE

 

The purpose of this handbook is to provide students and their parents with the general information needed when planning a high school course of study, yearly course of study, requirements for graduation and recommendations for a course of study if a student decides to pursue some type of post high school training.

 

                We have attempted to make this handbook as comprehensive as possible.  However, we realize that each student's needs are unique and separate.  We, therefore, encourage each student to work closely with his/her parents and the counselors when making decisions concerning his/her choices of a course of study at Bloomfield High School.

 

 

MISSION STATEMENT

 

The administration, faculty, and staff of Bloomfield Jr./Sr. High School share with families and the community responsibility and commitment for providing a safe, conducive learning environment.  All students are provided opportunities to develop skills for academic, social, physical, and intellectual growth and are encouraged to become lifelong learners.

 

NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT

 

                Bloomfield High School does not discriminate against any student in course offering and admission criteria regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, or handicap.

 

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

                

To be graduated from Bloomfield High School, a student shall have successfully completed a minimum of forty-two (42) credits in several areas of study in grades 9-12.

                

The forty-two (42) credits necessary for graduation shall consist of twenty-two (22) credits earned in academic areas and twenty (20) credits earned as electives from these and other areas of study.

 

COMMENCEMENT REQUIREMENTS

 

In order to participate in commencement exercises, a student must meet or surpass the minimum requirements for graduation set forth by the State of Indiana and Bloomfield Jr./Sr. High School.

 

A student failing one (1) or more subjects necessary for the completion of graduation requirements WILL NOT GRADUATE nor be eligible for participation in the graduation ceremonies.

 

A student who has completed all Bloomfield and state requirements, but has not passed the ECAs or ISTEP+ 10 for Math and ELA, may be eligible for a waiver according to state standards.  If not eligible for a waiver, the student will receive a certificate of completion and participate in commencement ceremonies.

 

In order to graduate and TAKE PART in the commencement exercises, all requirements must be met.  There is no unsigned diploma.

 

Students may petition to be an EARLY GRADUATE.  Students (pursuant to state guidelines) may not graduate early unless they have passed the required ECAs or ISTEP+ 10 for Math and ELA and have earned a minimum of a Core 40 Diploma.  Students must also submit a completed petition by the required deadlines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Core 40 Diploma:

Effective beginning with students who enter high school in 2012-2013 school year (class of 2016).

Course and Credit Requirements

English/Language Arts

8 credits

Including a balance of literature, composition and speech.

Mathematics

6 credits earned in grades 9-12

  • 2 credits: Algebra I*
  • 2 credits: Geometry
  • 2 credits: Algebra II

Or complete Integrated Math I, II, and III for 6 credits.

Students must take a math or quantitative reasoning course each year in high school.  *If a student took Algebra I in 8th grade, then a student must take three (3) years of Math in grades 9-12.

Science

6 credits

  • 2 credits: Biology I
  • 2 credits: Chemistry I or Physics I or Integrated Chemistry-Physics
  • 2 credits: any Core 40 science course

Social Studies

6 credits

  • 2 credits: U.S. History
  • 1 credit: U.S. Government
  • 1 credit: Economics
  • 2 credits: World History/Civilization or Geography/History of the World

Directed Electives

5 credits

  • World Languages
  • Fine Arts
  • Career and Technical Education

Physical Education

2 credits

Health & Wellness

1 credit

Electives+

8 credits**

(College and Career Pathway courses recommended)

42 Total Credits Required

**Schools may have additional local graduation requirements that apply to all students.  At Bloomfield Jr/Sr High School, students are required to complete the following additional courses for graduation:

Preparing for Colleges and Careers                                                         1 Credit and

Digital Citizenship (Class of 2019 and higher)                                1 Credit   or

Personal Financial Responsibility (Class of 2019 and lower)            1 Credit                

 

+ Specifies the number of electives required by the state. High school schedules provide time for many

more electives during the high school years. All students are strongly encouraged to complete a College and Career Pathway (selecting electives in a deliberate manner) to take full advantage of career and college exploration and preparation opportunities.

Core 40 with Academic Honors (minimum 47 credits)

For the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma, students must:

·        Complete all requirements for Core 40 Diploma.

·        Earn 2 additional Core 40 math credits (6 credits must be earned in grades 9-12).

·        Earn 6-8 Core 40 world language credits.

(6 credits in one language or 4 credits each in two languages).

·        Earn 2 Core 40 fine arts credits.

·        Earn a grade of a “C” or better in courses that will count toward the diploma.

·        Have a grade point average of a “B” or better.

·        Complete one of the following:

1.      Earn 4 credits in 2 or more AP courses and take corresponding AP exams

2.      Earn 6 verifiable transcripted college credits in dual credit courses from the approved priority dual credit list.

3.      Earn two of the following:

1.      A minimum of 3 verifiable transcripted college credits from the approved priority dual credit list, or

2.      2 credits in AP courses and corresponding AP exams

4.      Earn a combined score of 1750 or higher on the old SAT critical reading, mathematics and writing sections and a minimum score of 530 on each section or earn a ____ on the new SAT.

5.      Earn an ACT composite score of 26 or higher and complete written section

Core 40 with Technical Honors (minimum 47 credits)

For the Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma, students must:

·        Complete all requirements for Core 40.

·        Earn 6 credits in the college and career preparation courses in a state-approved College & Career Pathway and one of the following:

1.      State approved, industry recognized certification or credential (See IDOE Website under CTE), or

2.      Pathway dual credits from the approved dual credit list resulting in 6 transcripted college credits

·        Earn a grade of “C” or better in courses that will count toward the diploma.

·        Have a grade point average of a “B” or better.

·        Complete one of the following,

1.      Any one of the options (A – F) of the Core 40 with Academic Honors

2.      Earn the following scores or higher on WorkKeys; Reading for Information – Level 6, Applied Mathematics – Level 6, and Locating Information-Level 5.

3.      Earn the following minimum score(s) on Accuplacer: Writing 80, Reading 90, Math 75.

4.      Earn the following minimum score(s) on Compass; Algebra 66, Writing 70, Reading 80.

CTE:  AGRICULTURE

 

Agricultural Education is an active part of the curriculum for many high schools in Indiana. This program area combines the home, the school and the community as the means of education in agriculture and natural resources. The courses provide students with a solid foundation of academic knowledge and hands‐on opportunities to apply this knowledge through classroom activities, laboratory experiments and project applications, supervised agricultural experiences (SAE) and FFA.

The vision and mission of Agricultural Education is that all people value and understand the vital role of

agriculture, food, fiber and natural resource systems to advance personal and global well‐being, prepare students for successful careers and to make a lifetime of informed choices in agriculture.  The goals for Agricultural Science and Business students focus on providing learning experiences that will allow them to:

• Demonstrate desirable work ethics and work habits.

• Apply the basic agricultural competencies and background knowledge in agriculture and related occupations.

• Analyze entrepreneurial, business and management skills needed to enter agriculture and related occupations.

• Expand leadership and participatory skills necessary for the development of productive and contributing citizenship in our democratic society.

• Gain effective social and interpersonal communication skills.

• Be aware of career opportunities in agriculture and set career objectives.

• Acquire job‐seeking, employability and job‐retention skills.

• Advance in a career through a program of continuing education and life‐long learning.

• Apply reading, writing, mathematics, communication and study skills.

• Recognize the interaction of agriculture with governments and economic systems at the local, state, national and global levels.

• Recognize the ways new technologies impact agriculture and how agriculture impacts the environment.

It is important to understand and reaffirm that career‐technical experiences do not preclude students from going on to higher education, in fact, participation actually enhances the opportunity. A growing number of students are combining both college preparation and workplace experiences in their high school preparation. Agricultural Science and Business and FFA programs have a long history of successfully preparing students for entry‐level careers and furthering education and training in the science, business and technology of agriculture. The programs combine classroom instruction and hands‐on career focused learning to develop students’ potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success.

 

FFA

The FFA is the leadership student organization that is an integral part of the instruction and operation of a total agricultural education program. As an intra‐curricular organization and essential component of the total program, the local agricultural education teacher(s) serve as the FFA chapter advisors. The many activities of the FFA parallel the methodology of the instructional program and are directly related to the occupational goals and objectives. As an integral part of the instructional program, district and state level FFA activities provide students opportunities to demonstrate their proficiency in the knowledge, skills and aptitudes they have acquired through the agricultural science and agricultural business program(s). Agricultural education students demonstrating a high degree of competence in state level FFA activities are highly encouraged to represent their local communities, districts and state by participating in national FFA activities.  Instructional activities of the FFA require participation by the agricultural science and agriculture business education students as an integral part of an agricultural education course of instruction and, therefore, may be considered an appropriate use and amount of the allotted instructional time.

 

ADVANCED LIFE SCIENCE:  ANIMALS (5074) *Not Offered Every Year

Pre: Biology, Intro to Agriculture, and Animal Science

Advanced Life Science: Animals provides students with opportunities to participate in a variety of activities including laboratory work. Students investigate concepts that enable them to understand animal life and animal science as it pertains to agriculture. Through instruction, including laboratory, fieldwork, leadership development, supervised agricultural experience and the exploration of career opportunities, they will recognize concepts associated with animal taxonomy, life at the cellular level, organ systems, genetics, evolution, ecology, historical and current issues in animal agriculture in the area of advanced life science in animals. This course meets the Science requirements for all diplomas.

 

AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT (5002)

Pre:  Intro to Agriculture

Agribusiness Management provides foundational concepts in agribusiness. This course introduces students to the principles of business organization and management from a local and global perspective while incorporating technology. Concepts covered in the course include food and fiber, forms of business, finance, marketing, management, sales, leadership development, supervised agricultural experience career opportunities in the area of agribusiness management.  This Course meets the requirements for an Elective or Directed Elective for all diplomas.  This course qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

                Dual Credit:  AGRI 102 Agribusiness & Farm Management, 3 Credits

 

AGRICULTURAL POWER, STRUCTURE AND TECHNOLOGY (5088)

Pre: Intro to Agriculture

Agricultural Power, Structure and Technology is a lab intensive course in which students develop an understanding of basic principles of selection, operation, maintenance and management of agricultural equipment in concert while incorporating technology. Topics covered include: safety, electricity, plumbing, concrete, carpentry, metal technology, engines, emerging technologies, leadership development, supervised agricultural experience and career opportunities in the area of agriculture power, structure and technology. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

                Dual Credit:  AGRI 106 Agriculture Mechanization, 3 Credits

 

ANIMAL SCIENCE (5008) * Not Offered Every Year

Pre: Intro to Agriculture

Animal Science provides students with an overview of the field of animal science. Students participate in a large variety of activities and laboratory work including real and simulated animal science experiences and projects. All areas that the students study can be applied to both large and small animals. Topics to be addressed include: anatomy and physiology, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, common diseases and parasites, social and political issues related to the industry and management practices for the care and maintenance of animals while incorporating leadership development, supervised agricultural experience and learning about career opportunities in the area of animal science. Fulfills a Life Science or Physical Science requirement for the General Diploma only or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

                Dual Credit:  AGRI 103 Animal Science, 3 Credits

 

HORTICULTURE SCIENCE (5132) *Not Offered Every Year

Pre:  Intro to Agriculture

Horticulture Science is designed to give students a background in the field of horticulture and its many career opportunities. It addresses the biology and technology involved in the production, processing and marketing of plants and its products. Topics covered include: reproduction and propagation of plants, plant growth, growth media, management practices for field and greenhouse production, marketing concepts, production of plants of local interest and pest management. Students participate in a variety of activities to include extensive laboratory work usually in a school greenhouse, leadership development, supervised agricultural experience and learning about career opportunities in the area of horticulture science.   This course counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Life Science or Physical Science requirement for the General Diploma.

 

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE (5056)

Pre:  None

Introduction to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources is highly recommended as a prerequisite to and a foundation for all other agricultural classes. The nature of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of agricultural science and business. Topics to be covered include: animal science, plant and soil science, food science, horticultural science, agricultural business management, landscape management, natural resources, agriculture power, structure and technology, leadership development, supervised agricultural experience and career opportunities in the area of agriculture, food and natural resources.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

NATURAL RESOURCES (5180)

Pre:  Intro to Agriculture

Natural Resources provides students with a foundation in natural resources. Hands-on learning activities in addition to leadership development, supervised agricultural experience and career exploration encourage students to investigate areas of environmental concern. Students are introduced to the following areas of natural resources: soils, the water cycle, air quality, outdoor recreation, forestry, rangelands, wetlands, animal wildlife and safety.  This course counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:  AGRI 115 Natural Resources Management, 3 Credits

 

SUPERVISED AGRICULTURAL EXPERIENCE (5228)

Pre: NONE

Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) is designed to provide students with opportunities to gain experience in the agriculture field(s) in which they are interested. Students should experience and apply what is learned in the classroom, laboratory and training site to real‐life situations. Students work closely with their agricultural science and business teacher(s), parents and/or employers to get the most out of their SAE program. This course can be offered each year as well as during the summer session. SAE may be offered as a Cooperative Education Program. Curriculum content and competencies should be varied so that school year and summer session experiences are not duplicated. Curriculum content and standards should not be duplicated when this course is taken for multiple semesters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CTE:  BUSINESS, MARKETING, AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

 

Introduction

 

Business and industry surveys indicate that economic survival in the 21st century will demand that students know and understand both fundamental and technical concepts of business as well as possess the ability to execute these concepts in nearly any setting. All persons regardless of age, gender, and career aspirations, can benefit from participating in Business, Marketing, and Information Technology education. These programs provide a foundation for success for all students.

 

DECA (An Association of Marketing Students) DECA is a co-curricular, international youth organization with emphasis on developing civic consciousness, leadership skills, social intelligence, and vocational understanding within the student members. DECA offers a comprehensive program of competitive events that contribute to the development of skills necessary for careers in marketing, merchandising, management, and entrepreneurship. The DECA Competency-Based Competitive Events Program facilitates effective integration of DECA as an integral component of the total marketing education instructional program. Events are designed to enable students to engage in activities that will extend their interests and skills for careers in marketing and to measure, via performance indicators, the degree to which skills have already been acquired.

NOTE:  Business Courses are offered on a rotation, and all courses listed are not available each year due to student demand.

ADVANCED BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (5268)

Pre: Principles of Business Management or Principles of Marketing

Advanced Business Management prepares students to plan, organize, direct, and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization and to perform business-related functions. Students are provided opportunities to develop attitudes and apply skills and knowledge in the areas of business administration, management, and finance. Individual experiences will be based upon the student’s career and educational goals.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.  

 

BUSINESS LAW AND ETHICS (4560)

Pre: None

Business Law and Ethics provides an overview of the legal system in the business setting. Topics covered include: basics of the judicial system, contract, personal, employment and property law. Application of legal principles and ethical decision-making techniques are presented through problem-solving methods and situation analyses. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

BUSINESS MATH (4512)

Pre: Algebra I

Business Math is a business course designed to prepare students for roles as entrepreneurs, producers, and business leaders by developing abilities and skills that are part of any business environment. A solid understanding of math including algebra, basic geometry, statistics and probability provides the necessary foundation for students interested in careers in business and skilled trade areas. The content includes mathematical operations related to accounting, banking and finance, marketing, and management. Instructional strategies should include simulations, guest speakers, tours, Internet research, and business experiences.  Fulfills a Mathematics requirement for the General Diploma only or counts as an Elective or Directed Elective for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.  Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE I (4801)

Pre:  Demonstration of knowledge of basic concepts.  See Mrs. Mattox for information.

Computer Science I introduces the structured techniques necessary for efficient solution of business-related computer programming logic problems and coding solutions into a high-level language. The fundamental concepts of programming are provided through explanations and effects of commands and hands-on utilization of lab equipment to produce accurate outputs. Topics include program flow-charting, pseudo coding, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving problems. The course covers creating file layouts, print charts, program narratives, user documentation, and system flowcharts for business problems; algorithm development and review, flowcharting, input/output techniques, looping, modules, selection structures, file handling, control breaks, and offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE II: SPECIAL TOPICS (5252)

Pre:  Computer Science I

Computer Science II: Special Topics is an extended experience designed to address the advancement and specialization of computer science careers allowing schools to provide a specialized course for a specific computer science workforce need in the school’s region. It prepares students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes essential for working in the field of computer science. Course standards and curriculum must be tailored to the specific computer science specialization. This course must prepare students for advancement in this career field and should provide students with opportunities for certification.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

COMPUTER TECH SUPPORT (5230)

Pre:  By application only to IT Department

Computer Tech Support allows students to explore how computers work. Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues. Through hands on activities and labs, students learn how to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

DIGITAL APPLICATIONS AND RESPONSIBILITY (4528)
Pre:  None
Digital Applications and Responsibility prepares students to use technology in an effective and appropriate manner in school, in a job, or everyday life. Students develop skills related to word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and communications software. Students learn what it means to be a good digital citizen and how to use technology, including social media, responsibly. Students expand their knowledge of how to use digital devices and software to build decision-making and problem-solving skills. Students should be provided with the opportunity to seek industry-recognized digital literacy certifications.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING (formerly Accounting) (4524)

Pre:  None

(INTO ACC) Introduction to Accounting introduces the language of business using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting. Emphasis is placed on accounting principles as they relate to both manual and automated financial systems. This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision-making.   Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

        Dual Credit:        ACCT 100 Basic Accounting, 3 Credits VU

 

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (4518)

Pre:  None

Introduction to Business introduces students to the world of business, including the concepts, functions, and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in the twenty-first century on a local, national, and/or international scale. The course covers business management, entrepreneurship, marketing fundamentals, and business ethics and law. The course further develops business vocabulary and provides an overview of business and the role that business plays in economic, social, and political environments.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP 5967

Pre:  None

Introduction to Entrepreneurship provides an overview of what it means to be an Entrepreneur. Student will learn about starting and operating a business, marketing products and services, and how to find resources to help. This course is ideal for students interested in starting their own art gallery, salon, restaurant, etc.   Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

PERSONAL FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (4540)

Pre:  None-Required for Graduation Class of 2020 and Beyond

Personal Financial Responsibility addresses the identification and management of personal financial resources to meet the financial needs and wants of individuals and families, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, and maintenance factors. This course helps students build skills in financial responsibility and decision making; analyze personal standards, needs, wants, and goals; identify sources of income, saving and investing; understand banking, budgeting, record-keeping and managing risk, insurance and credit card debt. A project based approach and applications through authentic settings such as work based observations and service learning experiences are appropriate. Direct, concrete applications of mathematics proficiencies in projects are encouraged.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

PREPARING FOR COLLEGE AND CAREERS (5394)

Pre:  None-Required for Graduation

Preparing for College and Careers addresses the knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to be prepared for success in college, career, and life. The focus of the course is the impact of today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities. Topics to be addressed include twenty-first century life and career skills; higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, values, and goals; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members; planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work; and managing personal resources. This course includes reviewing the 16 national career clusters and Indiana's College and Career Pathways, in depth investigation of one or more pathways, reviewing graduation plans, developing career plans, and developing personal and career portfolios. A project based approach, including computer and technology applications, cooperative ventures between school and community, simulations, and real life experiences, is recommended.   Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (4562)

Pre:  Introduction to Business

Principles of Business Management focuses on the roles and responsibilities of managers as well as opportunities and challenges of ethically managing a business in the free enterprise system. Students will attain an understanding of management, team building, leadership, problem solving steps and processes that contribute to the achievement of organizational goals. The management of human and financial resources is emphasized.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.   This course is aligned with postsecondary courses for Dual Credit.

 

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (5914)

Pre:  None

Principles of Marketing provides a basic introduction to the scope and importance of marketing in the global economy. Emphasis is placed on oral and written communications, mathematical applications, problem solving, and critical thinking skills as they relate to advertising/promotion/selling, distribution, financing, marketing information management, pricing, and product/service management.   Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING (5984)

Pre: Principles of Marketing

Sports and Entertainment Marketing is a specialized marketing course that develops student understanding of the sport/event industries, their economic impact, and products; distribution systems and strategies; pricing considerations; product/service management, and promotion. Students acquire an understanding and appreciation for planning. Throughout the course, students are presented problem-solving situations for which they must apply academic and critical-thinking skills. Participation in cooperative education is an optional instructional method, giving students the opportunity to apply newly acquired marketing skills in the workplace.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

 

CTE: ENGINEERING/TECHNOLOGY

 

COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING PLTW (CIM) (4810)

Pre:  PLTW IED; PLTW POE

Computer Integrated Manufacturing is a course that applies principles of rapid prototyping, robotics, and automation. This course builds upon the computer solid modeling skills developed in Introduction of Engineering Design. Students will use computer controlled rapid prototyping and CNC equipment to solve problems by constructing actual models of their three-dimensional designs. Students will also be introduced to the fundamentals of robotics and how this equipment is used in an automated manufacturing environment. Students will evaluate their design solutions using various techniques of analysis and make appropriate modifications before producing their prototypes. NOTE: Use of the PLTW Course number is limited to schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network and follow all training and data collection requirements. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Qualifies as 1 of 3 courses for a CTE Pathway for a THD at BHS. Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

 

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN PLTW (IED) (4812)

Pre:  None

Introduction to Engineering Design is a fundamental pre-engineering course where students become familiar with the engineering design process. Students work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using industry standard sketches and current 3D design and modeling software to represent and communicate solutions. Students apply their knowledge through hands-on projects and document their work with the use of an engineering notebook. Students advance from completing structured activities to solving open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills. Ethical issues related to professional practice and product development are also presented. NOTE: Use of the PLTW Course number is limited to schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network and follow all training and data collection requirements. Counts as 1 of 3 courses for a CTE Pathway for a THD at BHS.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING PLTW (POE) (4814)

Pre:  PLTW IED

Principles of Engineering is a course that focuses on the process of applying engineering, technological, scientific and mathematical principles in the design, production, and operation of products, structures, and systems. This is a hands-on course designed to provide students interested in engineering careers to explore experiences related to specialized fields such as civil, mechanical, and materials engineering. Students will engage in research, development, planning, design, production, and project management to simulate a career in engineering. The topics of ethics and the impacts of engineering decisions are also addressed. Classroom activities are organized to allow students to work in teams and use modern technological processes, computers, CAD software, and production systems in developing and presenting solutions to engineering problems. NOTE: Use of the PLTW Course number is limited to schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network and follow all training and data collection requirements.   Counts as 1 of 3 courses for a CTE Pathway for a THD at BHS.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CTE:  FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Family and Consumer Sciences has roots in both academic and career/technical (vocational) education and easily reaches beyond the education system into the community as it focuses on the needs of individuals and families. Essential preparation for success of all students includes acquisition of problem-solving, decision-making, higher order thinking, communication, literacy, and numerical skills in applied contexts. As the future members and leaders of tomorrow's families, workplaces, and communities, students need to be able to act responsibly and productively, to synthesize knowledge from multiple sources, to work cooperatively, and to apply the highest standards in all aspects of their lives.

 

High school Family and Consumer Sciences is organized into a variety of semester-long and year-long courses. State-approved high school High school Family and Consumer Sciences courses and the curriculum framework for each course provide guidelines for local High school Family and Consumer Sciences programs that focus on building strong and resilient individuals and families and helping students manage personal and family issues. The High school Family and Consumer Sciences course frameworks reflect the current vision and mission statements for Family and Consumer Sciences and the 2008 High school Family and Consumer Sciences National Standards and provide consistency among High school Family and Consumer Sciences programs across the state.

 

FCCLA

 

Family, Career & Community Leaders of America is the official student organization for Family and Consumer Sciences Education in Indiana and across the country. The FCCLA organization helps students develop leadership and citizenship skills while synthesizing and applying Family and Consumer Sciences content and skills in family, workplace, and community settings. As a teaching/learning approach, FCCLA offers teacher-developed and student-tested strategies and materials that center the responsibility for achieving FACS standards on students through in-class and co-curricular chapter programs and projects.

 

ADULT ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES (5330)

Pre:  None

Adult Roles and Responsibilities is recommended for all students as life foundations and academic enrichment, and as a career sequence course for students with interest in family and community services, personal and family finance, and similar areas. This course builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors that students will need as they complete high school and prepare to take the next steps toward adulthood in today’s society. The course includes the study of interpersonal standards, lifespan roles and responsibilities, individual and family resource management, and financial responsibility and resources. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of adult roles and responsibilities. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and postsecondary education in all career areas related to individual and family life.  Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Heath & Wellness graduation requirement, in place of either Human Development and Wellness or Interpersonal Relationships. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c)(6).  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

ADV NUTRITION AND WELLNESS 5340)

Pre:  Nutrition and Wellness

Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is a course which provides an extensive study of nutrition. This course is recommended for all students wanting to improve their nutrition and learn how nutrition affects the body across the lifespan. Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is an especially appropriate course for students interested in careers in the medical field, athletic training and dietetics. This course builds on the foundation established in Nutrition and Wellness, which is a required prerequisite. This is a project-based course; utilizing higher-order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes. Topics include extensive study of major nutrients, nutritional standards across the lifespan, and influences on nutrition/food choices, technological and scientific influences, and career exploration in this field. Laboratory experiences will be utilized to develop food handling and preparation skills; attention will be given to nutrition, food safety and sanitation. This course is the second in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT (5362)

Pre:  None

Child Development is an introductory course for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers that draw on knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from conception/prenatal through age 3. It includes the study of prenatal development and birth; growth and development of children; child care giving and nurturing; and support systems for parents and caregivers. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Authentic applications such as introductory laboratory/field experiences with young children and/or service learning that build knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.  Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Health & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c) (6). Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

HUMAN AND SOCIAL SERVICES I (5336)

Pre:  Nutrition and Wellness, Interpersonal Relationships, Child Development or Human Development and Wellness

Human and Social Services I is an introductory/exploratory course for students interested in careers in human and community services and other helping professions. Areas of exploration include family and social services, youth development, and adult and elder care, and other for-profit and non-profit services. This project-based course will help students integrate higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes to conduct investigations in human and social services at the local, state, national, or global/world level. Research and development, interdisciplinary projects, and/or collaboration with postsecondary faculty, community agencies or organizations, or student organizations are appropriate approaches. Students will be introduced to human and social services professions through presentations from a variety of guest speakers, job shadowing, field trips and introductory and exploratory field experiences. Case studies, role play, and application of professional codes of ethics will be utilized reflecting the challenges of working in diverse communities. Service learning experiences are highly recommended. Achievement of applicable FACS, academic, and employability competencies will be documented through a student portfolio.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

HUMAN AND SOCIAL SERVICES II (5462)

Pre: Human and Social Services I

Human and Social Services II is a core component of the Family and Community Services pathway. The course prepares students for occupations and higher education programs related to assisting individuals and families in meeting their potentials. Through work-based experiences, students apply the knowledge and skills developed in the Human Services Foundations course. Concentration areas include family and social services, youth development, and adult and elder care. Ethical, legal, and safety issues, as well as helping processes and collaborative ways of working with others, will be addressed. Learning experiences will involve analysis of the influence of culture and socioeconomic factors on individual choices and opportunities, service delivery models, and theoretical perspectives. Intensive laboratory/field experiences in one or more human social service agencies are a required component of this course. Student laboratory/field experiences may be either school based, if available, or “on the job” in community-based agencies, or a combination of the two. A standards based plan guides the students’ laboratory/field experiences. Students are monitored in their laboratory/field experiences by the Human and Social Services II teacher. Achievement of applicable standards will be documented through a student portfolio. Articulation with postsecondary programs is encouraged. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND WELLNESS (5366)

Pre:  None

Human Development and Wellness is valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers impacted by individuals’ physical, social, emotional, and moral development and wellness across the lifespan. Major topics include principles of human development and wellness; impacts of family on human development and wellness; factors that affect human development and wellness; practices that promote human development and wellness; managing resources and services related to human development and wellness; and career exploration in human development and wellness. Life events and contemporary issues addressed in this course include (but are not limited to) change; stress; abuse; personal safety; and relationships among lifestyle choices, health and wellness conditions, and diseases. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate the study of these topics. Authentic applications through service learning are encouraged.  Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Heath & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c) (6). Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS (5364)

Pre:  None

Interpersonal Relationships is an introductory course that is especially relevant for students interested in careers that involve interacting with people. It is also valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. This course addresses knowledge and skills needed for positive and productive relationships in career, community, and family settings. Major course topics include communication skills; leadership, teamwork, and collaboration; conflict prevention, resolution, and management; building and maintaining relationships; and individual needs and characteristics and their impacts on relationships. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of interpersonal relationships. Direct, concrete language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education for all career areas that involve interacting with people both inside and outside of a business/organization, including team members, clients, patients, customers, and the general public. Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Heath & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c) (6).  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

NUTRITION AND WELLNESS (5342)

Pre:  None

Nutrition and Wellness is an introductory course valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers related to nutrition, food, and wellness. This is a nutrition class that introduces students to only the basics of food preparation so they can become self- sufficient in accessing healthy and nutritious foods. Major course topics include nutrition principles and applications; influences on nutrition and wellness; food preparation, safety, and sanitation; and science, technology, and careers in nutrition and wellness. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of nutrition, food, and wellness. Food preparation experiences are a required component. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. This course is the first in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness. Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Heath & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC 6-7.1-4(c) (6).

 

 

 

 

CTE:  HEALTH SCIENCE

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Health Science is a secondary career and technical education program for students interested in pursuing careers in all aspects of the health science/healthcare industry. The Health Science Career Cluster integrates academics, specific health science technology courses, and a variety of problem-based and work-based learning opportunities. Work-based learning may include job shadowing, internships, and other clinical experiences that allow students to observe and learn from healthcare professionals.

 

Every Health Science program provides students with opportunities to explore a variety of health careers and make realistic and satisfying career choices. Students also develop their leadership potential through involvement in HOSA, a student leadership organization for health science students. Students in the Health Science Career Cluster leave high school better prepared for further education and/or immediate employment in the healthcare field.

 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (5276)  *Not on core transfer list-course driven by student demand

Pre:  Biology and placement scores for dual credit

Anatomy & Physiology is a course in which students investigate concepts related to Health Science, with emphasis on interdependence of systems and contributions of each system to the maintenance of a healthy body. It introduces students to the cell, which is the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms, and covers tissues, integument, skeleton, muscular and nervous systems as an integrated unit. Through instruction, including laboratory activities, students apply concepts associated with Human Anatomy & Physiology. Students will understand the structure, organization and function of the various components of the healthy body in order to apply this knowledge in all health related fields.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas. Fulfills a Core 40 Science course requirement for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:  APHY 101 Anatomy & Physiology I, 3 credits

 

HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION I (5282)  Twin Rivers

Pre:  Twin Rivers Application and Acceptance-January of prior year

Health Science Education I is a course designed to provide a foundation of skills development to specific health careers including; patient care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, and public health. Students will also receive an introduction to healthcare systems, anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. Laboratory experiences with industry applications are organized and planned around the activities associated with the student's career objectives. Job seeking and job maintenance skills, personal management skills, self-analysis to aid in career selection and completion of the application process for admission into a postsecondary program of their choice are also included in this course. Participation in HOSA encourages the development of leadership, communication and career related skills, and opportunities for community service.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:  HLHS 100 Intro to Health Careers, 3 Credits

 

HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION II: NURSING (5284) Twin Rivers

Pre:  Health Science I and Twin Rivers Application and Acceptance-January of prior year

Health Science Education II: Nursing is an extended laboratory experience designed to provide students with the opportunity to assume the role of nurse assistant. Student have the opportunity to practice technical skills previously learned in the classroom; all while working at the student’s choice of clinical site and under the direction of licensed nurses. These sites may include extended care facilities, hospitals and home health agencies. Throughout the course, students will focus on learning about the healthcare system and employment opportunities at a variety of entry levels; an overview of the healthcare delivery systems, healthcare teams and legal and ethical considerations; and obtaining the knowledge, skills and attitudes essential for providing basic care in a variety of healthcare settings. Additionally, students will build their essential job related skills to record patient medical histories and symptoms; provide medication and treatments; consult with physicians and other healthcare providers; operate and monitor medical equipment; perform diagnostic tests; teach patients and families how to manage their illness or injury; and perform general health screenings. This course also provides students with the knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed to make the transition from school to work in health science careers. Students are encouraged to focus on self-analysis to aid in their career selection. Job seeking and job maintenance skills, personal management skills, and completion of the application process for admission into a post-secondary program are also areas of focus. Participation in HOSA encourages the development of leadership, communication and career related skills, and opportunities for community service. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (5274) Twin Rivers

Pre:  Twin Rivers Application and acceptance-January of prior year & placement scores

Medical Terminology prepares students with language skills necessary for effective, independent use of health and medical reference materials. It includes the study of health and medical abbreviations, symbols, and Greek and Latin word part meanings, all taught within the context of body systems. This course builds skills in pronouncing, spelling, and defining new words encountered in verbal and written information in the healthcare industry. Students have the opportunity to acquire essential skills for accurate and logical communication, and interpretation of medical records. Emphasis is on forming a foundation of a medical vocabulary including; appropriate and accurate meaning, spelling, and pronunciation of medical terms, and abbreviations, signs, and symbols. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:  HLHS 101 Medical Terminology, 3 Credits

 

PLTW PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (5218)*

Pre:  Biology or concurrent enrollment in Biology

PLTW Principles of the Biomedical Sciences provides an introduction to this field through “hands-on” projects and problems. Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bioinformatics. Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. A theme through the course is to determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person. After determining the factors responsible for the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. Key biological concepts included in the curriculum are: homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, and defense against disease. Engineering principles such as the design process, feedback loops, fluid dynamics, and the relationship of structure to function will be included where appropriate. The course is designed to provide an overview of all courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in the subsequent courses. NOTE: Use of the PLTW Course number is limited to schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network and follow all training and data collection requirements.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Core 40 Science requirement for all diplomas.

                Note:  May be required to travel to a neighboring school for participation.

 

 

 

 

CTE:  TRADE AND INDUSTRY

 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES TECHNOLOGY I (5510) Twin Rivers

Pre:  Twin Rivers Application and Acceptance-Apply January of prior year

Automotive Services Technology I is a one year course that encompasses the sub topics of the NATEF/ ASE identified areas of Steering & Suspension and Braking Systems. This one year course offering may be structured in a series of two topics per year offered in any combination of instructional strategies of semester based or yearlong instruction. Additional areas of manual transmissions and differentials, automatic transmissions, air conditioning, and engine repair should be covered as time permits. This one year offering must meet the NATEF program certifications for the two primary areas offered in this course. This course provides the opportunity for dual credit for students who meet postsecondary requirements for earning dual credit and successfully complete the dual credit requirements of this course. Mathematical skills will be reinforced through precision measuring activities as well as cost estimation and calculation activities. Scientific principles taught and reinforced in this course include the study of viscosity, friction, thermal expansion, and compound solutions. Written and oral skills will also be emphasized to help students communicate with customers, colleagues, and supervisors. • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:        AUTI 100 Basic Automotive Service, 3 credits

                                        AUTI 111 Electrical Systems, 3 credits

 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES TECHNOLOGY II (5546) Twin Rivers

Pre:  Auto Tech II and Twin Rivers Application and Acceptance-Apply January of prior year

Automotive Services Technology II is a one year course that encompasses the sub topics of the NATEF/ASE identified areas of Electrical Systems and Engine Performance. This one year course offering may be structured in a series of two topics per year offered in any combination of instructional strategies of semester based or yearlong instruction. Additional areas of manual transmissions /differentials, automatic transmissions, air conditioning, and engine repair should be covered as time permits. This one-year offering must meet the NATEF program certifications for the two primary areas offered in this course. Mathematical skills will be reinforced through precision measuring activities and cost estimation/calculation activities. Scientific principles taught and reinforced in this course include the study of viscosity, friction, thermal expansion, and compound solutions. Written and oral skills will also be emphasized to help students communicate with customers, colleagues, and supervisors. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:        AUTI 131 Engine Performance Systems, 3 Credits

                                        AUTI 141 Engine Fundamentals & Repair, 3 Credits

 

CONSTRUCTION TRADES I (5580) Twin Rivers

Pre:  Twin Rivers Application and Acceptance-Apply January of prior year

Construction Trades I classroom and laboratory experiences involve the formation, installation, maintenance, and repair of buildings, homes, and other structures. A history of construction, future trends and career options, reading technical drawings and transforming those drawings into physical structures are covered. The relationship of views and details, interpretation of dimension, transposing scale, tolerance, electrical symbols, sections, materials list, architectural plans, geometric construction, three dimensional drawing techniques, and sketching will be presented as well as elementary aspects of residential design and site work. Areas of emphasis will include print reading and drawing, room schedules and plot plans. Students will examine the design and construction of floor and wall systems and develop layout and floor construction skills. Blueprints and other professional planning documents will also be covered. Students will develop an understanding and interpretation of the Indiana Residential Code for one and two-family dwellings and safety practices including Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Safety & Health Standards for the construction industry. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

CONSTRUCTION TRADES II (5578) Twin Rivers

Pre:  Construction Trades I and Twin Rivers Application and Acceptance-Apply January of prior year

Construction Trades II builds on the formation, installation, maintenance, and repair skills learned in Construction Trades I. Information on materials, occupations, and professional organizations within the industry will be covered. Students will develop basic knowledge, skills, and awareness of interior trim and the installation of drywall, moldings, interior doors, kitchen cabinets, and baseboard moldings. Students will also develop exterior finishing competencies. The course includes instruction on the installation of cornices, windows, doors and various types of sidings currently used in industry. Studies will also focus on the design and construction of roof systems and the use of framing squares for traditional rafter and truss roofing. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  CTE: WORK BASED LEARNING

 

Work Based Learning (WBL) is an instructional strategy that can be implemented as a stand-alone course or a component of any CTE course that prepares students for college and career. This strategy builds students’ skills and knowledge in their chosen career path or furthers their study within their area of interest. A Standards Based Training Plan is developed by the student, teacher, and workplace mentor to guide the student’s work based learning experiences and assist in evaluating achievement and performance, whether WBL is a standalone course or a component of a discipline-specific CTE course.

 

WORK BASED LEARNING CAPSTONE (5974) Twin Rivers

Work Based Learning Capstone, Multiple Pathways

Pre:  Required Prerequisites: Preparing for College and Careers; Minimum of 4 credits of introductory and advanced courses related to a student’s pathway & work site placement

Work Based Learning Capstone is an instructional strategy that can be implemented as a stand-alone course or a component of any CTE course that prepares students for college and career. This strategy builds students’ skills and knowledge in their chosen career path or furthers their study within the area of interest. A standards based training plan is developed by the student, teacher, and workplace mentor to guide the student’s work based learning experiences and assist in evaluating achievement and performance, whether WBL is a stand-alone course or a component of a discipline-specific CTE course. In the stand-alone WBL Capstone courses, students have the opportunity to apply the concepts, skills, and dispositions learned in previous coursework in their pathways in real world business and industry settings. Therefore, at least two courses in a student’s pathway would be prerequisite to the student enrolling in the stand-alone WBL courses. Intensive applications are a required component of this course and may be either school based or work based or a combination of the two. Work Based Learning experiences need to be in a closely related industry setting. Instructors must have a standards-based training plan for each student participating in Work Based Learning experiences. When a course is offered for multiple hours per semester, the amount of project-based application or Work Based Learning needs to be increased proportionally. Students are monitored in their experiences by the content-related CTE teacher or a CTE teacher needs to be the teacher for the comprehensive course. Articulation with postsecondary programs is encouraged. Application of Content and Multiple Hour Offerings Intensive applications are a required component of this course and may be either school based or work based or a combination of the two. Work Based Learning experiences need to be in a closely related industry setting. Instructors must have a standards-based training plan for each student participating in Work Based Learning experiences. When a course is offered for multiple hours per semester, the amount of project-based application or Work Based Learning needs to be increased proportionally. Students are monitored in their experiences by the content related CTE teacher.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH

 

The State Board of Education requires eight credits in English/Language Arts for graduation from Indiana high schools. All courses should be based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts. The courses that meet Indiana Core 40 requirements should also meet the Indiana Academic Standards. A course that primarily emphasizes the completion of: (1) forms, (2) letter writing, (3) worksheets, and (4) skill-and-drill does not meet the English/ Language Arts graduation requirements. These courses must assist students in developing skills in all aspects of reading and language arts, especially the ability to think critically.

 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE (1022)

Pre:  English 9, English 10, or teacher recommendation

Biblical Literature, a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of the Bible, viewed from a literary standpoint, as a source of a wide variety of literary patterns, themes, and conventions. Students examine the different books in relation to the various historical time frames of the books and in relation to related literature as it pertains to Biblical themes. Students read, discuss, and write about Biblical references (allusions) in both classical and modern literature, formation of a canonical Bible, inclusion of apocryphal and heretical writings, oral versus literate transmission of sacred history and doctrine, and questions and problems of interpretation.  Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester.  Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas.  NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

 

ENGLISH 9 (1002)

Pre:  None

English 9, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9-10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, focusing on literature within an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write, responses to literature, expository (informative), narrative, and argumentative/persuasive compositions, and sustained research assignments. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.  Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas.

 

ENGLISH 10 (1004)

Pre: English 9 or teacher recommendation

English 10, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9- 10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, focusing on literature with an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write responses to literature, expository (informative) and argumentative/persuasive compositions, and sustained research assignments. . Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas.

 

ENGLISH 11 (1006)

Pre:  English 9 and English 10 or teacher

English 11, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 11-12, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing on literature with an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write narratives, responses to literature, academic essays (e.g. analytical, persuasive, expository, summary), and more sustained research assignments incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, charts and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.  Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas.

 

ENGLISH 12 (1008)

Pre:  English 9, English 10, and English 11 or teacher recommendation

English 12, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts for Grades 11- 12, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing on an exploration of point of view or perspective across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write narratives, responses to literature, academic essays (e.g. analytical, persuasive, expository, summary), and more sustained research assignments incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, charts and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.  Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas.

 

LANGUAGE ARTS LAB (1010)

Pre:  None

Language Arts Lab is a supplemental course that provides students with individualized or small group instruction designed to support success in completing course work aligned with the Indiana Academic Standards for English Language/Arts focusing on the writing standards. All students should be concurrently enrolled in an English course in which class work will address all of the Indiana Academic Standards.  This course allows for successive semesters of instruction for students who need additional support in any or all aspects of the writing standards. Counts as an elective for all diplomas.

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I, ADV. (1090)

Pre: English 9, 10, 11 with a B Average and placement scores

This class will briefly review the writing process focusing on the following areas: the thesis statement, development of body paragraphs, effective introductions and conclusions, and varied sentence structure. Weekly grammar reviews, which focus on different usage and mechanics topics, will also be a part of the coursework for this class. Throughout the course of the year, these skills will be applied in the nine papers that will be required of students taking this course. These papers, classified according to purpose are narration, exemplification, comparison/contrast, extended definition, classification/division, process, description, argumentation, and cause/effect. One of these nine papers will require research and citations and formatting, which conform to MLA guidelines.

College credit is available for this class, and all students who register for this class must also register for Advanced English Composition II

                Dual Credit:  ENGL 111 English Composition 1, 3 Credits

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION II, ADV. (1090)

Pre:  Advanced English Comp I

Builds on the writing skills taught in Advanced English Composition I (ENGL 111) and emphasizes research-based analytic and argumentative writing.  MAJOR COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon successful completion of this course the student will be expected to: 1. Present detailed and well-organized compositions using formal documentation. 2. Apply critical reading and thinking skills to the writing process. 3. Distinguish between primary and secondary sources. 4. Conduct research using primary and secondary sources. 5. Demonstrate an understanding of what constitutes a valid argument. 6. Recognize and explain issues and identify critical perspectives. 7. Clearly identify and address the audience and purpose to establish appropriate rhetorical contexts. 8. Apply research and writing strategies to research-based analytic and argumentative writing.

                Dual Credit:  ENGL 112 Exposition and Persuasion, 3 Credits

 

ETYMOLOGY (1060)

Pre:  4 credits in English Language Arts

Etymology, a language studies course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, is the study and application of the derivation of English words and word families from their roots in ancient and modern languages (Latin, Greek, Germanic, and Romance Languages). Students analyze meanings of English words by examining roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Students analyze the connotative and denotative meaning of words in a variety of contexts and the reasons for language change. Students write about word history and semantics in texts that require etymological sensitivity, such as Renaissance poetry or works in translation. ETYMOLOGY PROJECT: Students complete a project, such as doing a case study on specific words or creating an historical timeline of the development of specific words, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and progress in Etymology course content. Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester.  Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas. NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a literature or composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

 

INTRO TO LITERATURE, ADV. (1090)

Pre:  Earn a “C” or higher in ENGL 111

Development of basic strategies for critically reading and interpreting poetry, fiction, and drama; introduction to the premises and motives of literary analysis and critical methods associated with various literary concerns through class discussion and focused writing assignments.  MAJOR COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be expected to:  1. Develop an aesthetic appreciation for fiction, poetry, and drama through reading and discussing works of literature.  2.  Develop greater expressive proficiency through a better understanding of such literary conventions as plot, setting, characterization, meter, imagery, symbolism, figurative language, dialogue, and other such matters of literary style.   3.  Demonstrate a high degree of competency in the mechanical areas of writing in finished written projects, ranging from informal reading responses to formal expository essays.  4.  Demonstrate an appropriate awareness of online and computer resources to aid in the literary research and composition process.  5.  Explore various thematic elements and compare treatment of such elements in the different genres. 6.  Engage in exploratory writing techniques through the use of in-class writing exercises and prompts.  7.  Understand the organizational principles of exposition, narration, description, and argumentation.  8.  Identify perspective and point of view in a literary piece.

                Dual Credit:  ENGL 206 Introduction to Literature, 3 Credits

 

JOURNALISM (1080)  (Course offering contingent upon student demand)

Pre:  2 credits in English Language Arts

Journalism, a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of news elements, journalism history, First Amendment law, ethics, fact and opinion, copy editing, news, and features as they apply to print and digital media products. It includes a comparison study of journalistic writing to other types of English writing with practical application of news, features, editorials, reviews, columns and digital media writing forms. For the second credit: Students continue to develop journalistic writing skills in addition to studying graphic design, advertising, public relations, photojournalism and emerging media development and design. By the end of the semester, students write, shoot and design stories for print and digital media products. Second credit may be subtitled Advanced to allow for a successive semester of instruction at an advanced level.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

 

Note:  English/Language Arts credit (1080): If Journalism course work addresses the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, and the student also takes a two-credit English Advanced Placement course plus corresponding AP exams OR a two-credit English dual credit course, up to two (2) credits accrued can be counted as part of the eight (8) required English/Language Arts credits for all diplomas.

 

LIBRARY MEDIA (1082)

Pre:  None

Library Media is the study and application of procedures based on library science theory. Students examine the role of the library and technology in the current Information Age. Students use electronic resources for specific research needs and use multimedia presentation technology for practical applications. Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.

 

SHORT STORIES (1046)

Pre:  English 9, English 10, or teacher recommendation

Short Stories, a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of the distinct features of the short story, such as being tightly focused narrative fiction. The course may be organized by historical periods, themes, or authors. Students examine short stories with modernist and contemporary themes by a variety of authors from the perspective of audience, purpose, and historical development. Students analyze what distinguishes the short story genre from other literary genres, such as the novels, epics, romances, biographies, etc. Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester.  Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for all diplomas. NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

 

STUDENT MEDIA (1086)

Pre:  Journalism, Mass Media, or teacher recommendation

Student Media, a course based on the High School Journalism Standards and the Student Media Standards, is the continuation of the study of journalism. Students demonstrate their ability to do journalistic writing and design for high school media, including school newspapers and yearbooks, and a variety of other media formats. Students follow the ethical principles and legal boundaries that guide scholastic journalism. Students express themselves publicly with meaning and clarity for the purpose of informing, entertaining, or persuading. Students work on high school media staffs so that they may prepare themselves for career paths in journalism, communications, writing, or related fields.  Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, and 12.  The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at advanced levels. May be offered over three or four years by subtitling the course Beginning, Intermediate, or Advanced. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors. NOTE: This is the designated school Media course, including newspaper and yearbook.

 

SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION, ADV. (1078)

Pre:   Teacher recommendation or placement scores for dual credit

Advanced Speech and Communication, a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and emphasizing the High School Speech and Communication Standards, is the study and application of skills in listening, oral interpretation, media communications, research methods, and oral debate. Students deliver different types of oral and multi-media presentations, including speeches to inform, to motivate, to entertain, and to persuade through the use of impromptu, extemporaneous, memorized, or manuscript delivery. ADVANCED SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION PROJECT: Students complete a project, such as multi-media presentations that are reflective, reports or historical investigations, responses to literature, or persuasive arguments, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and speaking progress in the course content.  Fulfills an/English Language Arts requirement for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:  COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking, 3 Credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINE ARTS

 

INTRODUCTION

 

In order to provide a quality education for every child in Indiana, it is important to provide for all aspects of human growth. The artistic, expressive, and cultural aspects of each child’s intellectual, emotional, physical, and social development are vital components of this growth. Research involving the impact of arts education upon mental functions supports the convictions of many educators, parents, and business leaders that the fine arts are essential due to their ability to provide students with the means to think, feel, and understand the world around them in unique ways. Literacy in the arts strengthens a person’s participation in society by enhancing problem solving and communication skills as well as fostering self-expression, aesthetic awareness, and multiple points of view. For these reasons, a curriculum in each of the fine arts should be available to all students so that they may become self-directed toward lifelong learning in the arts.

 

The purpose of each fine arts curriculum is to promote lifelong participation in the arts by developing skilled creators, performers, critics, listeners, and observers of the arts. Students can use the arts as a means of: (1) self-expression and communication, (2) development of critical thinking skills, (3) self-knowledge and understanding of the world around them, and, (4) increasing awareness of the artistic heritage of other cultures, as well as their own. Students who are proficient in the fine arts grow in their ability to think and learn independently. Their view of the world expands as creative avenues to expression and understanding are developed. Ultimately, the entire community benefits through the creativity, vision, and empathy fostered in the fine arts. In order for this to happen, students must be immersed in opportunities to learn about the arts, perform and create in one or more of the art forms, and learn to analyze and critique the arts. The goals for students in grades kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12) are to enable each student to do the following: • develop one’s artistic skills; • become confident in one’s abilities in the arts; • become a creative problem solver; • appreciate the value of the arts; • communicate through the arts; • communicate about the arts; • exhibit knowledge of the historical and cultural diversity of the arts; and • exhibit knowledge of criticism and aesthetics in the arts.

 

ADVANCED CHORUS (L) (4188)

Pre:  Beginning Chorus

Advanced Chorus is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Advanced Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas. Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

 

ADVANCED CONCERT BAND (L) (4170)

Pre:  JH Band

Advanced Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. This course provides students with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas. Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma.

 

BEGINNING CHORUS (L) (4182)

Pre:  None

Beginning Chorus is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Beginning Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer's intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma.  Laboratory course.

 

MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION (4206)-Offered only in even years (2016-17)

Pre:  None

Music History and Appreciation is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Music and standards for this specific course. Students receive instruction designed to explore music and major musical styles and periods through understanding music in relation to both Western and Non-Western history and culture. Activities include analyzing and describing music; evaluating music and music performances; and understanding relationships between music and the other arts, as well as disciplines outside of the arts. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma.

 

MUSIC THEORY AND COMPOSITION (L) (4208)-Offered only in odd years (2017-18)

Pre:  None

Music Theory and Composition is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Music and standards for this specific course. Students develop skills in the analysis of music and theoretical concepts. They develop ear training and dictation skills, compose works that illustrate mastered concepts, understand harmonic structures and analysis, understand modes and scales, study a wide variety of musical styles, study traditional and nontraditional music notation and sound sources as tools for musical composition, and receive detailed instruction in other basic elements of music.  The nature of this course allows for two successive semesters of instruction, provided that defined standards are utilized.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills requirement for 1 to 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma • Laboratory Course

 

ADVANCED THREE-DIMENSIONAL ART (L) (4006)

Pre:  Intro to 2-D Art; Intro to 3-D Art

Advanced Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources. Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas. Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma.  Laboratory Course.

 

ADVANCED TWO-DIMENSIONAL ART (L) (4004)

Pre:  Intro to 2-D Art

Advanced Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma.  Laboratory Course.

 

CERAMICS (4040) *Not offered every year

Pre: Intro to 3D Art

In this first semester course, students create works of art in clay utilizing the processes of hand building, molds, wheel throwing, slip and glaze techniques, and the firing processes. Additionally, students: (1) reflect upon the outcome of these experiences, (2) explore cultural and historical connections, (3) write about the process, (4) make presentations about their progress at regular intervals, (5) work individually and in groups, (6) find direct correlations to other disciplines, and (7) explore career options related to ceramics.

 

DRAWING (4060)

Pre: Intro to 2D Art *Not offered every year

In this first semester course, students create drawings utilizing processes such as sketching, rendering, contour, gesture, and perspective drawing. Additionally, students: (1) reflect upon the outcome of these experiences, (2) explore historical connections, (3) write about the process, (4) make presentations about their progress at regular intervals, (5) work individually and in groups, (6) find a

direct correlation to other disciplines, and (7) explore career options related to drawing.

 

DIGITAL DESIGN (L) (4082) *Not offered every year

Pre:  Intro to 2-D Art

Digital Design is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in digital design engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. They incorporate desktop publishing, multi-media, digitized imagery, computer animation, and web design. Students reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art related careers.   Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diplomas.  Laboratory Course.

INTRODUCTION TO THREE-DIMENSIONAL ART (L) (4002)

Pre:  None

Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.  Credits: 1 semester course for 1 credit.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma.  Laboratory Course.

 

INTRODUCTION TO TWO-DIMENSIONAL ART (L) (4000)

Pre:  None

Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma.  Laboratory Course.

 

PAINTING (4064) *Not offered every year-approval of instructor required

Pre: Intro to 3D

In this second semester course, students: (1) create abstract and realistic paintings, (2) reflect upon the outcome of these experiences. (3) explore historical connections, (4) write about the process, (5) make presentations about their progress at regular intervals, (6a) work individually and in groups, (7) find direct correlations to other disciplines, and (8) explore career options related to painting. Art museums, galleries, studios and/or community resources are utilized.

 

SCULPTURE (L) (4044)-Not offered every year-approval of instructor required

Pre:  Intro to 2-D Art; Intro to 3-D Art

Sculpture is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in sculpture engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production. Using materials such as plaster, clay, metal, paper, wax, and plastic, students create portfolio quality works. Students at this level produce works for their portfolios that demonstrate a sincere desire to explore a variety of ideas and problems. They create realistic and abstract sculptures utilizing subtractive and additive processes of carving, modeling, construction, and assembling. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas. Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma.  Laboratory Course.

 

 

 

HEALTH EDUCATION AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

HEALTH & WELLNESS EDUCATION (3506)-Semester and Summer Health

Pre:  None

Health & Wellness, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for Health & Wellness and provides the basis to help students adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. Health education should contribute directly to a student’s ability to successfully practice behaviors that protect and promote health and avoid or reduce health risks. Through a variety of instructional strategies, students practice the development of functional health information (essential concepts); determine personal values that support health behaviors; develop group norms that value a healthy lifestyle; develop the essential skills necessary to adopt, practice, and maintain health-enhancing behaviors. This course includes the application of priority areas in a planned, sequential, comprehensive health education curriculum. Priority areas include: promoting personal health and wellness, physical activity, and healthy eating; promoting safety and preventing unintentional injury and violence; promoting mental and emotional health, a tobacco-free lifestyle and an alcohol- and other drug-free lifestyle; and promoting human development and family health. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills of health and wellness core concepts, analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills, health-enhancing behaviors, and health and wellness advocacy skills.  Fulfills the Health & Wellness requirement for all diploma types.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION I (L) (3542)

Pre:  8th Grade P.E.

Physical Education I focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum that provides students with opportunities to actively participate in at least four of the following: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all which are within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEP’s and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11. Required Prerequisites: Grade 8 Physical Education.  Classes are co-educational unless the activity involves bodily contact or groupings based on an objective standard of individual performance developed and applied without regard to gender.  Adapted physical education must be offered, as needed, in the least restricted environment and must be based upon an individual assessment. As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II (L) (3544)

Pre:  Phys Ed I

Physical Education II focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum that provides students with opportunities to actively participate in four of the following areas that were not covered in Physical Education I: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all which are within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEP’s and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11. Fulfills part of the Physical Education requirement for all diplomas.  Classes are co-educational unless the activity involves bodily contact or groupings based on an objective standard of individual performance developed and applied without regard to gender.  Adapted physical education must be offered, as needed, in the least restricted environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.  As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity.

 

P.E. WAIVER:

Pre:  Application must be on file by deadline.

One (1) P.E. credit will be given for a complete season of a BHS sponsored IHSAA sanctioned sport, competition cheerleading, or dance team.  All of these activities are within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness.  Retroactive credits will not be awarded.  A complete season is defined as:  first practice to final event.  The student must remain on the active roster the entire season or the duration of the activity.  Disciplinary suspensions from the team or activity may result in forfeiture of credit as determined by the coach, director, or sponsor.  At the conclusion of the season or activity, the coach, director, or sponsor will provide a roster of eligible students to the guidance office.  The school counselor will confirm successful participation and place the credit on the student’s transcript as a semester grade.  A grade of “A” will be granted to all students who meet the requirements for the alternative credit.

 

The alternative physical education contract must be completed, signed, and returned to the guidance office by August 14 for the fall semester and December 21 for the winter/spring semester (check the contract for a list of sports/activities that are assigned to each semester).  At the conclusion of the season or activity, you must submit a typed, one-page written reflection of your participation in the sport or activity (see form) to the guidance office by the last day of the semester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MATHEMATICS

 

ADVANCED MATHEMATICS, COLLEGE CREDIT (2544)-College Algebra and Trigonometry

Pre:  Algebra II, preferably Honors and placement scores

Advanced Mathematics, College Credit is a title covering (1) any advanced mathematics course (beyond Algebra 2) that is offered for credit by an accredited postsecondary institution and is not a course offered in the Indiana State Approved Course Titles.  Courses that use this title are most often those taught through the post-secondary campus, taught either online or in traditional settings or a combination; and taught by higher education faculty.  Courses that use this title are those that do not meet specific high school standards for a corresponding high school course, as they are standards beyond what is taught in the high school. Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

 

Dual Credit         MATH 136 College Algebra:  Presents an in-depth study of functions, quadratic, polynomial, radical, and rational equations, radicals, complex numbers, systems of equations, rational fractions and exponential and logarithmic functions. MATH 136 and MATH 137 together comprise a standard two-semester college algebra and trigonometry course. MAJOR COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon successful completion of this course the student will be expected to: 1. Determine, evaluate, and graph functions. 2. Simplify and perform operations on complex numbers. 3. Simplify rational expressions. 4. Simplify and perform operations on radicals. 5. Solve radical equations. 6. Solve quadratic and rational equations and inequalities. 7. Apply the concepts of ratio, proportion and combined variation. 8. Apply the properties of logarithms to solve exponential and logarithmic equations. 9. Solve polynomial equations and graph polynomial functions. 10. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions. 11. Graph rational functions. 12. Solve systems of equations with three variables. 13. Solve a variety of application problems in the above areas. 14. Use a scientific and/or graphing calculator proficiently as related to coursework. 15. Use computer technology which may include the Internet, the Web, and e-mail or computer tutorials to enhance the course objectives.

Dual Credit         MATH 137 Trigonometry with Analytic Geometry:  Presents an in-depth study of right triangle trigonometry, oblique triangles, vectors, graphs of trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, complex numbers in rectangular and polar/trigonometric forms, rectangular and polar coordinates, and conics. MATH 136 and MATH 137 together comprise a standard two-semester college algebra and trigonometry course. MAJOR COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon successful completion of this course the student will be expected to: 1. Convert between degree measure and radian measure. 2. Find trigonometric function values of any angle expressed in degree or radian measure. 3. Solve right triangles. 4. Solve oblique triangles using the law of sine and cosine. 5. Use and apply properties of vectors. 6. Graph trigonometric functions. 7. Utilize trigonometric identities. 8. Solve trigonometric equations. 9. Convert between rectangular and polar coordinate systems. 10. Apply properties of complex numbers in rectangular and polar forms. 11. Determine the features of a conic section from a standard equation. 12. Graph circles, parabolas, ellipses, and hyperbolas. 13. Use the above principles to solve practical applications. 14. Use a scientific and/or graphing calculator proficiently as related to coursework. 15. Use computer technology which may include the Internet, the Web, e-mail, or computer tutorials to enhance the course objectives.

 

ALGEBRA I (2520)

Pre:  None

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Algebra I is made up of 5 strands: Real Numbers and Expressions; Functions; Linear Equations, Inequalities, and Functions; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Exponential Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis and Statistics. These critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.  Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas • Fulfills the Algebra I/Integrated Mathematics I requirement for all diplomas.  Students pursuing Core 40, Core 40 with Academics Honors, or Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma should receive credit for Algebra I by the end of Grade 9.  Students who take Algebra I in 8th grade or lower are reminded that they must take 6 credits of math in high school for a Core 40 or higher diploma.

 

ALGEBRA I LAB (formerly Algebra Enrichment) (2516)

Pre:  Must also be enrolled in Algebra I.

Algebra I Lab is a mathematics support course for Algebra I. Algebra I Lab is taken while students are concurrently enrolled in Algebra 1. This course provides students with additional time to build the foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, grade-level appropriate courses. The five critical areas of Algebra I Lab align with the critical areas of Algebra I: Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling. However, whereas Algebra I contains exclusively grade-level content, Algebra I Lab combines standards from high school courses with foundational standards from the middle grades. Algebra I Lab is designed as a support for Algebra I. As such, a student taking Algebra I Lab MUST also be enrolled in Algebra I during the same academic year.  Counts as a Mathematics course for the General Diploma only.  Counts as an Elective for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors.  

 

ALGEBRA II (2522)

Pre:  Algebra I

Algebra II builds on work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and allows for students to extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. Algebra II is made up of 5 strands: Complex Numbers and Expressions; Functions; Systems of Equations; Quadratic Equations and Functions; Exponential & Logarithmic Equations and Functions; Polynomial, Rational, and Other Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. • Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas.  Fulfills the Algebra II/Integrated Mathematics III requirement for all diplomas.

 

AP CALCULUS AB (2562)

Pre:  Pre-Calculus or M135/136

AP Calculus AB is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. AP Calculus AB is equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. This course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.  Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas.  Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

                Dual Credit:  MATH 211 Calculus, 4 Credits

 

 

CCR BRIDGE: MATH READY (2514)

Pre:  In grade 11, students who have not passed the Grade 10 Math ISTEP+ (or old Algebra 1 ECA) and have scored below a 45 on the PSAT test OR students who score below proficient on a diagnostic test should be placed in the Math Ready.

CCR Bridge: Math Ready will include and reinforce the Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 and Statistics skills necessary to be ready for an entry-level college math course. This course emphasizes understanding of math concepts rather than just memorizing procedures. Math Ready students learn the context behind the procedure: why to use a certain formula or method to solve a problem, for example. This equips them with higher-order thinking skills in order to apply math skills, functions and concepts in different situations. The course is intended for students who currently have achieved the minimum math requirements for college entry. The content of this course is designed to enhance students’ math skills so that they are ready for college-level math assignments. It is not designed to prepare students for college-level math in STEM majors. Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas.

 

FINITE MATHEMATICS (2530)

Pre:  Algebra II

Finite Mathematics is an umbrella of mathematical topics. It is a course designed for students who will undertake higher-level mathematics in college that may not include calculus. Finite Math is made up of five strands: Sets, Matrices, Networks, Optimization, and Probability. The skills listed in these strands indicate what students should know and be able to do in Finite Math. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.  Due to the level of rigor, it is recommended that Finite Mathematics be offered as a 2 semester, 2 credit course.  Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit         MATH 135 Finite Math

 

GEOMETRY (2532)

Pre:  Algebra I

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Five critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Logic and Proofs; Points, Lines, Angles, and Planes; Triangles; Quadrilaterals and Other Polygons; Circles; Transformations; and Three-dimensional Solids. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.  Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas.  Fulfills the Geometry/Integrated Mathematics II requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

Math 10 (2531)

Pre:  Algebra I

Math 10 is a new two-semester course designed to reinforce and elevate the Algebra 1 and 7th and 8th grade geometry knowledge and skills necessary for students to successfully complete high school mathematics courses beyond Algebra 1 and essentials for passing the state's graduation qualifying exam in mathematics. Enrollment will be contingent upon recommendation of the Algebra I or Integrated Math I teacher based on diagnostic results of performance in Algebra I and/or mathematics competency assessments. The standards for this course are aligned to the state standards that students need to master for success with the state's graduation qualifying exam in mathematics and the next level math courses. Emphasis is on a variety of instructional methods designed to meet each student's needs and delivered through competency-based units with frequent pre and post assessment data analyzed to drive instructional design and delivery.  Counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma only or as an Elective for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

MATHEMATICS LAB-Algebra II (2560)

Pre:  Must also be enrolled in Algebra II.

Mathematics Lab provides students with individualized instruction designed to support success in completing mathematics coursework aligned with Indiana’s Academic Standards for Mathematics. Mathematics Lab is to be taken in conjunction with a Core 40 mathematics course, and the content of Mathematics Lab should be tightly aligned to the content of its corresponding course. Mathematics Lab should not be offered in conjunction with Algebra I or Integrated Mathematics I; instead, schools should offer Algebra Enrichment or Integrated Mathematics Enrichment to provide students with rigorous support for these courses.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.

 

PRE-CALCULUS (2564)

Pre:  Algebra II-Only offered on Plato as a semester course-Must have permission of counselor.

Pre-Calculus extends the foundations of algebra and functions developed in previous courses to new functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level sequences and series. The course provides students with the skills and understandings that are necessary for advanced manipulation of angles and measurement. Pre-Calculus is made up of five strands: Polar Coordinates and Complex Numbers; Functions; Quadratic, Polynomial, and Rational Equations and Functions; Exponential and Logarithmic Equations and Functions; and Parametric Equations. Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. The course is designed for students who expect math to be a major component of their future college and career experiences, and as such it is designed to provide students with strong foundations for calculus and other higher-level math courses. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas.

 

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (2546)

Pre:  Algebra II; only offered on Plato as a semester course-Must have permission of counselor.

Probability and Statistics includes the concepts and skills needed to apply statistical techniques in the decision-making process. Probability and Statistics are made up of three strands: Data Analysis, Experimental Design, and Probability. Practical examples based on real experimental data are used throughout. Students plan and conduct experiments or surveys and analyze the resulting data. The use of graphing calculators and computer programs is encouraged. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas.  

 

 

 

 

 

 MULTIDISCIPLINARY EDUCATION

 

CADET TEACHING EXPERIENCE (1112)

Pre: GPA of 2.5 or higher and good school attendance

This elective course provides students in Grades 12 organized exploratory teaching experiences in Kindergarten through grade 9. All teaching experiences are preplanned by the high school Cadet Teaching Experience teacher-trainer and the cooperating teacher(s) who are interested in supervising prospective teachers and providing them with pre-training experiences in one or more classes. This course provides a balance of class work relating to: classroom organization, classroom management, the curriculum and instructional process, observations of teaching, and instructional experiences. Study topics and background reading provide the cadets information concerning the teaching profession and the nature of the cadet teachers’ assignments. Evaluation is based upon the cadet

teacher’s cooperation, day-to-day practical performance, and class work including the cadets’ potential ability to teach. The total workload of the Cadet Teaching course is comparable to those for other subjects in the high school curriculum. In general, Cadet Teachers are an aide to the regular teacher and are hoping to get a firsthand look at the teaching profession. On the enrollment form, students

should enter their cadet teaching preference. (PE, Elementary, etc.)

 

COLLEGE-ENTRANCE PREPARATION (0532)-Not offered every year and offered opposite Short Stories

Pre:  Min. concurrent enrollment in Algebra II

College-Entrance Preparation utilizes individual student score reports from the PSAT, PLAN, and/or ACCUPLACER to prepare students for the SAT, ACT, ACCUPLACER and/or Compass college readiness assessments. Based on student score reports, students will receive targeted instruction to strengthen their foundations in critical reading, writing, mathematics, and science sections of college admission and placement exams. As appropriate, the course will also encompass test taking strategies to prepare students for success on a high-stakes assessment. Teachers are encouraged to use a curriculum with longitudinal, successful results. Course may also include college selection and application units, to better prepare students for overall college-readiness. Being “college ready” means being prepared for any postsecondary education or training experience, including readiness for study at two-year and four-year institutions leading to a postsecondary credential (i.e., a certificate, license, Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree). Being ready for college means that a high school graduate has the English and mathematics knowledge and skills necessary to qualify for and succeed in entry-level, credit-bearing college courses without the need for remedial coursework.  Counts as an Elective credit for all diplomas.

 

CREDIT RECOVERY LAB (0500)-Summer Lab

Pre:  Student must be pre-approved.

Students who have earned less than a C- in a course that would count towards an Academic Honors and/or a Technical Honors Diploma; or Students who have failed a required course may request to retake the course(s)  may elect to take (the) course(s) a second time through Bloomfield Jr/Sr High School’s credit recovery program.  Students must have the approval of both the school counselor and the high school principal prior to enrolling in the credit recovery program.  A student may NOT retake a course simply to increase their cumulative GPA.   We acknowledge that in some cases students may be required to retake a course to meet prerequisites for advancement into an upper-level or dual credit course.  Once a student completes a course regardless of the option listed above, the grade is submitted to the school counselor for inclusion on the student’s transcript.  The grade is then placed on the transcript along with the prior grades.  The credits are reduced to .5 for each semester in both course completions, so that the two (2) course grades/points are averaged.  This is to ensure that cumulative GPAs are not unfairly weighted towards students who choose to retake a course a second time.

 

Seniors who have taken a course elsewhere, including through our credit recovery program, must submit documentation no later than May 10th of each school year for inclusion on the transcript.  No late submissions will be accepted.

 

NAVAL JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS (0516) NJROTC

Pre:  None

This course is designed to develop: (1) citizenship and patriotism, (2) self-discipline, (3) physical fitness, (4) reliance and leadership, and (5) the skills used in decision making, communications, and problem-solving. The course content and experiences enable the students to understand the role of the military in support of national objectives and to become familiar with basic military knowledge, gender equity issues, benefits, and requirements. Topics to be included in the course are: (1) military history, (2) ROTC in the military, (3) substance abuse, (4) map reading, (5) marksmanship and firearm safety, (6) military drill, (7) field activities, (8) reserve components, and (9) first aid and hygiene. Opportunities are provided to explore the qualities and traits of courage, self-sacrifice, and integrity. Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps programs must be approved by and meet the requirements of the appropriate military organization.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.

Note:  Students have the opportunity to earn a P.E. credit and Health and Wellness credit during year 1 and a second P.E. credit during year 2.  This is contingent upon meeting certain requirements while enrolled in the program.

 

PEER TUTORING (0520)

Pre:  Grade 12 only.  Students must interview with and be accepted into the program through the Special Education Dept.  Interviews take place at the time of registration.

Peer Tutoring provides high school students with an organized exploratory experience to assist students in kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12), through a helping relationship, with their studies and personal growth and development. The course provides opportunities for the students taking the course to develop a basic understanding of individual differences and to explore career options in related fields. Peer Tutoring experiences are preplanned by the teacher trainer and any cooperating teacher under whom the tutoring is to be provided. It must be conducted under the supervision of a licensed teacher. The course provides a balance of class work relating to the development of and use of: (1) listening skills, (2) communication skills, (3) facilitation skills, (4) decision-making skills, and (5) teaching strategies. Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SCIENCE

 

Introduction

 

Indiana’s Academic Standards for Science--2010 were adopted by the State Board of Education in April, 2010. They are organized by grade level from kindergarten through Grade 8 and by individual courses for high school. The standards contain both content and process standards. In grades K-8 the Process Standards precede the Content Standards and are organized as the Nature of Science and the Design Process. In grades 9-12 the Process Standards precede the Content Standards for each course offering. Through Grade 8, the standards are organized in four content strands: (1) Physical Science; (2) Earth Science; (3) Life Science; (4) Science, Technology, and Engineering; high school courses each have a differing number of standards and each address a core concept in the given content area.

 

 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (5276)-not on core transfer list-driven by student demand

Pre:  Biology I and placement scores

Anatomy & Physiology is a course in which students investigate concepts related to Health Science, with emphasis on interdependence of systems and contributions of each system to the maintenance of a healthy body. It introduces students to the cell, which is the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms, and covers tissues, integument, skeleton, muscular and nervous systems as an integrated unit. Through instruction, including laboratory activities, students apply concepts associated with Human Anatomy & Physiology. Students will understand the structure, organization and function of the various components of the healthy body in order to apply this knowledge in all health related fields.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas • Fulfills a Core 40 science course requirement for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:        APHY 101, 3 Credits

 

BIOLOGY I (L) (3024)

Pre:  Grade of C or better in 8th Grade Science or recommended for 10th Grade

Biology I is a course based on the following core topics: cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity; genetics and evolution. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.  Fulfills the Biology requirement for all diplomas.

 

BIOLOGY II (L) (3026)

Pre:  Biology I with B or higher and placement scores

Biology II is an advanced laboratory, field, and literature investigations-based course. Students enrolled in Biology II examine in greater depth the structures, functions, and processes of living organisms. Students also analyze and describe the relationship of Earth’s living organisms to each other and to the environment in which they live. In this course, students refine their scientific inquiry skills as they collaboratively and independently apply their knowledge of the unifying themes of biology to biological questions and problems related to personal and community issues in the life sciences.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas • Fulfills a Core 40 science course requirement for all diplomas.

                Dual Credit:        BIOL 101, 3 Credits

 

CHEMISTRY I (L) (3064)

Pre:  Biology I and Algebra III (can be taken concurrently)

Chemistry I is a course based on the following core topics: properties and states of matter; atomic structure; bonding; chemical reactions; solution chemistry; behavior of gases, and organic chemistry. Students enrolled in Chemistry I compare, contrast, and synthesize useful models of the structure and properties of matter and the mechanisms of its interactions. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.  Fulfills a Core 40 science (physical) course requirement for all diplomas. Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

 

CHEMISTRY II (L) (3066)

Pre:  Chemistry I and Algebra II with B’s or higher and placement scores

Chemistry II is an extended laboratory, field, and literature investigations-based course. Students enrolled in Chemistry II examine the chemical reactions of matter in living and nonliving materials. Based on the unifying themes of chemistry and the application of physical and mathematical models of the interactions of matter, students use the methods of scientific inquiry to answer chemical questions and solve problems concerning personal needs and community issues related to chemistry.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Core 40 science course requirement for all diplomas.  Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

                Dual Credit:    CHEM 101, 3 Credits

 

EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE I (L) (3044)

Pre:  None

Earth and Space Science I is a course focused on the following core topics: study of the earth’s layers; atmosphere and hydrosphere; structure and scale of the universe; the solar system and earth processes. Students analyze and describe earth’s interconnected systems and examine how earth’s materials, landforms, and continents are modified across geological time. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a Core 40 science course requirement for all diplomas.

 

INTEGRATED CHEMISTRY-PHYSICS (L) (3108)

Pre:  Algebra I (may be taken concurrently with this course)

Integrated Chemistry-Physics (ICP) is a course focused on the following core topics: motion and energy of macroscopic objects; chemical, electrical, mechanical and nuclear energy; properties of matter; transport of energy; magnetism; energy production and its relationship to the environment and economy. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas. Fulfills a Core 40 science (physical) course requirement for all diplomas.

 

PHYSICS I (L) (3084)-Offered every other year in even years (2016-17)

Pre:  Algebra II

Physics I is a course focused on the following core topics: motion and forces; energy and momentum; temperature and thermal energy transfer; electricity and magnetism; vibrations and waves; light and optics. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures. Fulfills a Core 40 science (physical) course requirement for all diplomas.  Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

AP WORLD HISTORY (1576)

Pre:  B or higher in JH Social Studies courses and/or any HS social studies courses

AP World History is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. AP World History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Five themes of equal importance — focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. AP World History encompasses the history of the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with special focus on historical developments and processes that cross multiple regions.   Students should be able to read a college level textbook and write grammatically correct, complete sentences. Fulfills a Social Studies requirement for all diplomas.

Note:  Students must pay for the AP exam in March.  They sit for the AP exam in May regardless of their grade in the course.

 

CURRENT PROBLEMS, ISSUES, AND EVENTS (1512)-Not offered every year

Pre:  None

Current Problems, Issues, and Events gives students the opportunity to apply investigative and inquiry techniques to the study of significant problems or issues. Students develop competence in (1) recognizing cause and effect relationships, (2) recognizing fallacies in reasoning and propaganda devices, (3) synthesizing knowledge into useful patterns, (4) stating and testing hypotheses, and (5) generalizing based on evidence. Problems or issues selected will have contemporary historical significance and will be studies from the viewpoint of the social science disciplines. Community service programs and internships within the community may be included.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.

 

ECONOMICS (1514)

Pre:  None

Economics examines the allocation of resources and their uses for satisfying human needs and wants. The course analyzes economic reasoning and behaviors of consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, institutions, governments, and societies in making decisions. Students explain that because resources are limited, people must make choices and understand the role that supply, demand, prices, and profits play in a market economy. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity and economic reasoning; supply and demand; market structures; the role of government; national economic performance; the role of financial institutions; economic stabilization; and trade.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills the Economics requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, Core 40 with Technical Honors and International Baccalaureate diplomas.  Fulfills a Social Studies requirement for the General Diploma only.  Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

 

GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF THE WORLD (1570) (online)

Pre:  None

Geography and History of the World is designed to enable students to use geographical tools, skills and historical concepts to deepen their understanding of major global themes including the origin and spread of world religions; exploration; conquest, and imperialism; urbanization; and innovations and revolutions. Geographical and historical skills include forming research questions, acquiring information by investigating a variety of primary and secondary sources, organizing information by creating graphic representations, analyzing information to determine and explain patterns and trends, planning for the future, and documenting and presenting findings orally or in writing. The historical geography concepts used to explore the global themes include change over time, origin, diffusion, physical systems, cultural landscapes, and spatial distribution/patterns and interaction/relationships. Students use the knowledge, tools, and skills obtained from this course in order to analyze, evaluate, and make predictions about major global developments. This course is designed to nurture perceptive and responsible citizenship, to encourage and support the development of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning, and to help prepare Indiana students for the 21st Century.  Counts as a Social Studies requirement for the General Diploma • Counts as an Elective for all diplomas. Fulfills the Geography History of the World/World History and Civilization graduation requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

 

LAW EDUCATION (1526)

Pre:  US Government or teacher recommendation

Law Education provides an understanding of the American legal system and its basis in the United States Constitution. The course is designed to promote an understanding of society and its system of laws by indicating how citizens may effectively function within the law. Ways of dealing with interpersonal conflict in order to secure constructive change are included, along with the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills. Case studies, field trips, simulations, and mock trials will be used in this course whenever feasible.   Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.

 

PSYCHOLOGY, ADV (1574)

Pre:  Must meet placement criteria

Surveys behavior and cognitive processes as they affect the individual. The course focuses on biological foundations, learning processes, research methodologies, personality, human development and abnormal and social psychology. MAJOR COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon successful completion of this course the student will be expected to: 1. Identify and differentiate theoretical perspectives of psychology. 2. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of research methods. 3. Exhibit a fundamental understanding of the biological basis of behavior. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of classical and operant conditioning, and social cognitive learning. 5. Identify theories and characteristics of processing, storing and retrieving memory. 6. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the major theories of personality. 7. Demonstrate a basic understanding of physical, cognitive and social aspects of human development. 8. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of symptoms, classification and causes of psychological disorders. 9. Demonstrate an understanding of how social and culture context impacts individual behavior and cognition.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.  Note:  This is an Ivy Tech course taught utilizing the Professor on Loan Program.

                Dual Credit         PSYC 101, 3 Credits

 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (1540)

Pre:  None

United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States. Responsible and effective participation of citizens is stressed. Students understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and governments; the rights and responsibilities of citizens; and how these are part of local, state, and national government. Students examine how the United States Constitution protects rights and provides the structure and functions of various levels of government. How the United States interacts with other nations and the government’s role in world affairs will be included. Using primary and secondary resources, students will articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues. As a result, they will be able to explain the role of individuals and groups in government, politics, and civic activities and the need for civic and political engagement of citizens in the United States.  Fulfills the Government requirement for all diplomas.

  

UNITED STATES HISTORY (1542)

Pre:  None

United States History is a two-semester course that builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of U.S. History and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. After reviewing fundamental themes in the early development of the nation, students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History. Students develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time.  Fulfills the US History requirement for all diplomas.

 

URBAN AFFAIRS (1544)-Not offered every year

Pre:  None

Urban Affairs examines the history, organization, processes, and distinctive aspects of urban affairs. The rise of modern cities and an analysis of modern urban problems are dealt with in this course. The politics of governing urban areas, including the selection of political leaders and citizen participation in the decision-making process, is to be emphasized. Data collection and research skills may be taught in conjunction with the study of this course.  Counts as an Elective for all diplomas.

 

WORLD HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION (1548)

Pre:  None

World History and Civilization emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Key events related to people and places as well as transcultural interaction and exchanges are examined in this course. Students are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. They will examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice and process skills of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes. There will be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.  Fulfills the Geography History of the World/World History and Civilization graduation requirement for all diplomas.

The following 2 courses are offered in an online format through various vendors.  One online partner is the Indiana Online Academy.  

 

INDIANA STUDIES 1518

Indiana Studies is an integrated course that compares and contrasts state and national developments in the areas of politics, economics, history, and culture. This one semester course uses Indiana history as a basis for understanding current policies, practices, and state legislative procedures. It also includes the study of state and national constitutions from a historical perspective and as a current foundation of government. Examination of individual leaders and their roles in a democratic society is included. Students will examine the participation of citizens in the political process.

Topics:

                    Unit 1: Indiana Territory

                    Unit 2: Statehood

                    Unit 3: Civil War through World War 1

                    Unit 4: Indiana in the 1900s

                    Unit 5: Civics and Government

                    Unit 6: Constitution and Indiana Citizens

                    Unit 7: Famous Hoosiers and Landmarks

 

ETHNIC STUDIES 1516

Ethnic Studies is a one semester course that provides opportunities to broaden students’ perspectives concerning lifestyles and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States. This course will focus on various ethnic groups and use a comparative approach to the study of patterns of cultural development, immigration, and assimilation, as well as the contributions of ethnic or cultural groups. The course will also analyze the political impact of ethnic diversity in the United States.

Topics:

                    Unit 1: Origins of Race and Ethnicity

                    Unit 2: Historical Experiences of African Americans

                    Unit 3: Historical Experiences of Latino Americans

                    Unit 4: Historical Experiences of Asian Americans

                    Unit 5: Historical Experiences of Native Americans

                Unit 6: Modern Condition of Race and Ethnicity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

 

Students who are seeking an Academic Honors Diploma must complete one of the following:

1)     Either six (6) credits in French or Spanish; or

2)     Four (4) credits in French and four (4) credits in Spanish.

Students who are seeking a Core 40 or Technical Honors Diploma are strongly encouraged to take a World Language (depending upon their career goals); however, they are not required to do so.

 

 

FRENCH II (2022) (Online only)

Pre:  C or higher in French I

French II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for French language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of French-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding French language and culture outside of the classroom.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma.

 

FRENCH III (2024) (Online in partnership with Ivy Tech)

Pre:  C or higher in French II and applicable placement scores for dual credit

French III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for French language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending detailed written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of French-speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding French language and culture outside of the classroom.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma.

                Dual Credit:        FREN 101 and 102, 4 Credits each semester

 

SPANISH I (2120)

Pre:  None

Spanish I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Spanish language learning, and to various aspects of Spanish-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write short passages with guidance. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as reading isolated words and phrases in a situational context and comprehending brief written or oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma.

 

SPANISH II (2122)

Pre:  C or higher in Spanish I

Spanish II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma.

 

SPANISH III (2124)

Pre:  C or higher in Spanish II and applicable placement scores for dual credit

Spanish III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending detailed written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of Spanish-speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma.

                Dual Credit:        SPAN 101 and 102, 4 Credits each semester

 

SPANISH IV (2126)

Pre:  Dual Credit accrual and grades of greater than a C in SPAN 101 and 102

Spanish IV, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, provides a context for integration of the continued development of language skills and cultural understanding with other content areas and the community beyond the classroom. The skill sets that apply to the exchange of written and oral information are expanded through emphasis on practicing speaking and listening strategies that facilitate communication, such as the use of circumlocution, guessing meaning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts, and using elements of word formation to expand vocabulary and derive meaning. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of Spanish-speaking culture through explaining factors that influence the practices, products, and perspectives of the target culture; reflecting on cultural practices of the target culture; and comparing systems of the target culture and the student’s own culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas through the design of activities and materials that integrate the target language and culture with concepts and skills from other content areas. The use and influence of the Spanish language and culture in the community beyond the classroom is explored through the identification and evaluation of resources intended for native Spanish speakers.  Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas.  Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma.

                Dual Credit:        SPAN 201 and 202, 3 Credit each semester