Student & Family Handbook

Table of Contents

Why Learning Cultures?

Vision for Inclusion

Mixed Grade Classes

Special Education

English Language Learners

Career & Technical Education Pathways

Overview

Green Buildings

Horticulture

Student Rights & Responsibilities

Keepers of the Culture

Additional Counseling Opportunities

Bell Schedule

Typical Class Period

Attendance Policy

Scanning Policy

Dress Code

Lunch Policy

Electronic Communication Policy

Homework Policy

Grading Policy

Award Ceremonies and Honor Roll

Credit Requirements

Exam Requirements

Student Advisement

College & Career Guidance

UAGC Student Service Opportunities

Extracurricular Opportunities

Internships

Sports

Arts

Parent Involvement Policy

School Parent Compact

I.   School Responsibilities

II.   Parent/Guardian Responsibilities

III.   Student Responsibilities

School Contact Information


Why Learning Cultures?

How does your mind work?

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The Urban Assembly School for Green Careers (UAGC) is a Learning Cultures school. We believe that every student can reach high learning standards, that students are most successful when they are held responsible for their own learning, and that learning is a social process.

For millennia, humanity has believed that knowledge can only move from the people who know to the people who don't. Paulo Freire, in Pedagogy of the Oppressed, talks about how this idea silences those whose voices most need to be heard. We reject this oppression, so our classrooms don’t look like those above. In the 21st century, learning must, and will,  look a lot less like that Sumerian classroom.

Learning Cultures®, the revolutionary teaching method developed by NYU professor Cynthia McCallister, turns this idea on its head. We believe that knowledge isn't pushed from one person to another, but rather it is created by people engaging in conversation, in discourse.

Our core values, intention, collaboration, and responsibility, reflect our belief that students are most successful when they have ownership and choice over their environment.

To support this belief across every classroom, students’ learning experiences are framed by common formats. Our students are given direct access to the standards, the curriculum, and a wide variety of resources with which to meet and exceed the expectations of the standards. By learning to navigate the resources of their classroom, and to communicate and collaborate effectively, students gain the college and career-ready skills that empower them to both learn and master learning standards, and to promote the learning of their peers. In every class, our students experience the same simple set of classroom practices, routines and structures called Formats. These formats are designed to promote student independence, responsibility, cooperation, deep learning, and achievement.

UAGC made the choice to be a Learning Cultures school so that we can provide your children with the best, most college- and career-ready education possible. Every year, new students entered our school unprepared for the intellectual and academic demands of high school and life after high school. Our students could not work effectively with their classmates. They could not communicate clearly. They didn’t ask questions, and too often didn’t know they were allowed to ask questions. They took little personal responsibility for their learning—expecting all of their teachers to just tell them what to do, think and say. They lacked adequate work, study and writing skills. They didn’t know how to learn, and they didn’t know how to think critically. Screen Shot 2016-06-15 at 11.52.20 AM.png

In our one-of-a-kind writing program, Genre Practice®, every project begins, and ends, with the student's own purposes. This intentionality extends across all curriculum. Our students explore the world on their own terms, and find their own voice.

Since implementing Learning Cultures®, we have experienced tremendous growth, moving from an F rating to a Well-Developed School. Graduation rates and regents pass rates have steadily increased. While, at the same time, suspension rates have dramatically decreased. The community at UAGC - teachers, students, and parents - have worked hard for this success, and it is only through constant collaboration that such success has been achieved.

All of this work is anchored in the principle of equity. New York City states that "the right to a free public school education is a basic 'student right' guaranteed to all children." On that foundation, we maintain a policy of open enrollment and do not reject students from UAGC based on past performance, which is the policy of many New York City public schools. Instead, we work to support all students who wish to attend our school.


Vision for Inclusion

At UAGC, every curriculum is individualized to each learner. Students ask their own questions of state and federal standards, and are coached by teachers to not just learn the content of a course, but learn how to learn. They work together with peers to answer these questions, with the support of their teachers. Therefore, the more diverse perspectives are represented, the stronger the learning opportunities will be.

Research proves that the tracking of students by age or ability undermines democracy. Tracking is another form of segregation. There are three ways we work to desegregate our classes:

Mixed Grade Classes

Classes are heterogeneously mixed wherever possible by grade to provide maximum opportunities for students to lead and be mentored by their peers. For example, a reading group about solar power may have two freshmen new to the school community, a sophomore and a junior currently studying alternative power sources in a class, and a senior who participates in the mentoring program. The more perspectives that are represented, the stronger the learning opportunity.

Special Education

Rather than segregate students with special needs from their peers (whether those needs qualify the student as learning disabled or gifted and talented), teachers and students work together to differentiate the curriculum based on each individual’s needs. Most classes have two teachers in them to support students; students with IEPs are guaranteed a special education teacher in each of their core classes. This represents the most democratic approach to education, and responds to the sad statistic that only 4.4% of students in segregated, self-contained classes graduate.

English Language Learners

Similarly, we work to include all English Language Learners in the classroom, whether they are newly-arrived to the country or have persisting limited English proficiency. Opportunities for both conversational immersion and interaction with peers who are able to translate and support beginners are spread across all classrooms, providing sufficient engagement.

We know that the best way to achieve our school’s mission, preparing your children for success in college and the workforce, your children need to know how to identify challenges, and determine how best to address and overcome those challenges through collaborative problem-solving, effective communication, and strong writing.


Career & Technical Education Pathways

Overview

In addition to our rigorous academic program, all of our students are required to complete a 4-year pathway in one of our two technical sciences, Building Science or Horticulture. Our CTE program gives our students a broad introduction to both the important environmental issues and solutions, as well as potential pathways to either deeper study in college or entry into a career. It is our belief that if our students immerse themselves in the curriculum, they will emerge from our program truly well-versed, and be in a position to not merely fit into the work world as it is, but also to actively imagine and define new pathways, and help potential employers see the need for these new pathways. This is accomplished by developing the students’ hard skills, soft skills, research techniques, and knowledge of career & financial management, as well as giving them access to off-site learning experiences, professional certifications, and internships.

Our ninth graders are given the foundational skills needed to advance into either of our two pathways by completing hands-on projects that introduce them to the major issues covered by environmental science, as well as the basic technical skills needed to succeed in those pathways. It is here where they learn what we mean by "green" or "sustainable," where they will gain the language of an environmental scientist, and learn how our problems might be addressed.  These environmental issues will be framed to introduce them specifically to our academic pathways of Horticulture and Green Buildings.  Eligible students will have the opportunity to earn their first nationally-recognized professional certifications in ninth grade.

Green Buildings

In response to both the worldwide mission of "greening" our built environment, and New York City's leadership position on green building via GreeNYC and Local Laws 84-88, our Green Buildings pathway is structured to introduce and prepare students for a variety of careers and/or additional study after graduation in this exciting industry.

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The vast content is taught through a combination of hands-on building and student-led research projects. The focal point is the full-scale, high-performance "tiny house" that the students build. Nearly every aspect of green building is made tangible through this year-long building project. Their skills are further reinforced by building one of these buildings every year they are in the program. To support this ambitious endeavor, the students also research both complementary and supplemental material and present their knowledge to the class. The entire life-cycle of a green building is illustrated in the "tiny house", beginning with sourcing materials, progressing to construction, operations & maintenance, auditing, retrofitting, and finally deconstruction and salvage.

In January 2016, 21 UAGC juniors and 1 senior in the Building Science pathway sat for their first industry certification exam: GPRO Fundamentals of Green Building, provided by the US Green Buildings Council. Starting in September 2016, with program approval, successful completion of students’ CTE coursework in the Building Science pathway will provide students with the option for an additional diploma credential and certification in their field through both the US Green Buildings Council and the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER).

Horticulture

Our Horticulture pathway at UAGC takes advantage of the very special opportunities afforded by our school/community garden located at the corner of Amsterdam and W. 84th Street. This goal of this unique space aims beyond "garden" and strives to be an urban farm and CSA. Educating our students about the dangers (to both environment and their health) of industrial farming and the ancillary issue of food deserts/unhealthy food choices in poor neighborhoods is one of the most important environmental issues we must engage in. Urban farming needs to be a solution to these problems. The WHO has explicitly stated that small-scale organic farming must be the way forward to combat global food shortages.IMG_0759.jpg

Our farm is built on the principles of Permaculture. Ninety percent of the plantings are edible. We have rotations of crops going in all seasons. We take advantage of natural symbiotic relationships between plants, animals, and humans to grow our crops in a healthy manner. Our farm is biodiverse. Our farm produces enough fresh and healthy food to function as a CSA for our students' families, school staff, and the surrounding community. Our farm connects to the larger notion of green and ​personally to ​our students' personal interests in a complete, personal, and hands-on way by eschewing stand-alone topics for a holistic concept of farm/building/city as an organism or system of organisms that is constantly growing, changing, and tended by us.


Student Rights & ResponsibilitiesBlue Book 2017.jpg

In much of the world school is offered to children as a privilege.  In the United States, public school is a right.  Tax payers commit around $250,000 for each student to receive a public education.  With all rights, come responsibilities, in NYC these rights and responsibilities are outlined in the “Citywide Behavioral Expectations to Support Student Learning,” or as we refer to it, “The Blue Book.”

Right: Right to a free and public education until 21 or conferral of a diploma

Responsibility: Attend school regularly and punctually and make every effort to achieve in all areas of their education

In traditional schooling, discipline is a culture of compliance and obedience and curriculum is task oriented, direction driven, and limited. To create a true “Culture of Learning,” UAGC teaches agency, responsibility, intention, and self control.

We believe that students can be agents of their own learning. We believe that students should have autonomy to develop their own intentions around learning. We believe that students have the responsibility to adhere to the social contract. In order to experience the agency and autonomy that Learning Cultures provides, students must take responsibility too. We live these beliefs through the Classroom Responsibility Ladder.

The ladder is designed by students at the beginning of each academic year. Behaviors that get in the way of learning are listed at the bottom, and students then organize successive in-class interventions they need to rejoin the classroom’s culture of learning. No student or behavior comment is referred outside of the classroom without due process. The only reason for removing a student from class is if they pose immediate danger to themselves or to others.

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Keepers of the Culture

To protect these rights and uphold our social contract, the Keepers of the Culture were created. Students nominated by their peers and staff to be Keepers are placed into an elective class that focuses on understanding the behaviors that infringe upon the rights afforded students’ learning, and how to better assist students in overcoming these academic or behavioral challenges.

The Keepers are trained to develop and revise Promise Cards with fellow students. Promise Cards are behavior contracts that have a list of the student’s behaviors that get in the way of their learning and getting along with others. After the student whose Promise Card it is describes their behaviors, they need to identify how the behaviors violated the social contract (Blue Book). Next, students must make a verbal promise to the Keepers indicating that they would like to change their behavior. The Keepers then help the student strategize how to change the behavior.  

Additional Counseling Opportunities

UAGC provides additional therapeutic opportunities. Teachers make themselves available to students to work through conflicts and issues. Our guidance counseling staff is also available for students, and throughout the year an additional school counselor provides counseling both to struggling students and coaching to help students better help each other.

Bell Schedule

Typical Class Period

Across content areas, classes are structured the same to provide consistency and clarity. Classes are seventy minutes long and begin with a ten minute mini lesson where the teacher highlights competencies and best practices of students in the class. The rest of the class is spent in work time, where students are responsible for completing their learning arcs and assignments independently or with peers.. During this time, students meet in groups to read and problem solve together in Unison Reading. Writing class begins with a lesson, followed by work time to write and concludes with a writing share where the whole class convenes to share and get feedback on writing pieces.


Attendance Policy

UAGC expects a minimum of 90% attendance from all students. If a student needs to be absent for any reason, documentation must be provided. An “excused” absence is still considered an absence, as learning time is missed.

If a student misses more than two days per month, or are absent for more than two days at a time, it is considered chronic absenteeism and the school will reach out to parents to support in raising attendance.

Attendance at school in NYC is compulsory for students until they finish the school year in which they turn 17. School support staff (counselors, parent coordinator, secretary) reach out regularly to support attendance and are available to provide additional support for families.

If your child will be absent:

1. Can this absence be avoided? For all appointments**, please reschedule for after school hours.

2. Please call 212-787-1189 x5774 as soon as you know your child will be out* (please call each day)

3. After the absence, please provide a note indicating where the child was. Any appointments require official documentation***.

*Illness: if it is self-treated illness, please keep these days to a minimum.  This is not an excused absence

**Appointments: These are not excused absences, even if a doctor asks that a student not return to school.  We require documentation from a physician, NOT an appointment card.

***Travel: this is not an excused absence. Reschedule all travel for official vacation time when school is not in session. Central Calendar

In order to be "Not at risk for graduation,” a student must maintain 95%+ attendance all year.

Scanning Policy

Because of the history of Brandeis High School, a scanning procedure remains in place for all students and visitors who enter the building. Increasingly, public buildings are using this procedure to ensure safety. We welcome all students and their families to the building. If you are visiting, make sure to carry a photo ID to sign in at the front desk before going through security.

Students swipe their school issued photo identification card through a machine and proceed to the scanning station where the safety team directs them.

The following items are placed on the conveyor belt of the scanning machine:

Students and visitors then walk through an airport-style metal detector. If an alarm does not sound and if the security agent does not detect a weapon or other banned material in personal belongings, students proceed to the cafeteria or to their class and visitors to the main office (101A).

If an alarm goes off and/or the security agent detects a weapon or other banned material as a result of scanning personal belongings, the individual proceeds to a table in the lobby to identify the object that activated the alarm with a School Safety Agent who uses a hand-held wand.  After the object is identified and removed from possession, the student or visitor is scanned again.


Dress Code

UAGC does not have a uniform dress code. However, students are expected to dress appropriately for school.  Guidelines for student apparel are as follows:

In addition, students must change for gym class.  Required gym clothes are: white t-shirt, athletic shorts or sweatpants, and sneakers.

If a student is dressed inappropriately, a staff member will speak to him/her privately and ask them if s/he has appropriate clothing that s/he could change into.  If s/he does, s/he will be allowed to use the bathroom to change, when necessary. If s/he does not or has left clothing in the lockers, they will be referred to the dean.

Lunch Policy

Students have lunch in the cafeteria or, based on attendance, off-campus. There are a variety of restaurants and food choices, and packed lunches can be enjoyed in nearby Central Park.

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Electronic Communication Policy

SUMMARY

AS OF THE SPRING OF 2015, STUDENTS ARE ALLOWED TO BRING CELL PHONES INTO SCHOOLS. AT UAGC, THEY ARE ALLOWED TO USE THEM FOR LEARNING WITH PERMISSION FROM THE TEACHER. THE SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM BELIEVES THAT STUDENTS SHOULD LEARN TO USE THEIR CELL PHONES AS A TOOL AND RESOURCE FOR LEARNING AND THEREFORE SHOULD NOT BE BANNED. CONSEQUENCES FOR NON-EDUCATIONAL USES ARE OUTLINED IN THE FULL POLICY BELOW.

SCHOOL-BASED POLICY FOR USE OF CELL PHONES, COMPUTING DEVICES, AND PORTABLE MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEMS ON SCHOOL PROPERTY

Students are permitted to bring the following electronic items to school: 1) cell phones; 2) laptops, tablets, iPads and other similar computing devices (“computing devices”); and 3) portable music and entertainment systems, such as iPods, MP3 players, PSP, and Nintendo DS.  This privilege is subject to the following limitations and restrictions:

  1. The use of cell phones, computing devices and portable music and entertainment systems at school is subject to the restrictions below.
  2. Cell phones and portable music and entertainment systems may not be turned on or used during the administration of any school quiz, test or examination.
  3. Computing devices may not be turned on or used during the administration of any school quiz, test or examination, except where such use has been explicitly authorized by the school or is contained in an Individualized Education Program (“IEP”) or Section 504 Accommodation Plan.
  4. Use of cell phones, computing devices, portable music and entertainment systems and other electronic devices is prohibited during the administration of state standardized examinations (e.g. Regents) as governed by State Education Department Rules.
  5. Cell phones, computing devices and portable music and entertainment systems may not be turned on or used during school fire drills, other emergency preparedness exercises or during the event of an actual emergency unless otherwise directed by school staff.
  6. Cell phones, computing devices, and portable music and entertainment systems may not be used in locker rooms or bathrooms.
  7. Cell phones, computing devices, and portable music and entertainment systems may not be used for audio/video or photographic recording of a person without their explicit consent.

CELL PHONES MAY BE USED AS SET FORTH BELOW:

During the school day:

  • Cell phones must be turned off and put away out of sight during instructional time and/or on a field trip, except for instructional and educational purposes with the explicit approval of the teacher.
  • During non-instructional time, cell phones may only be used in the cafeteria during a student’s designated lunch period.

After the school day:

  • Cell phones may not be used during school-sponsored programs or activities, except with the explicit approval of the supervising staff member.

COMPUTING DEVICES MAY BE USED AS SET FORTH BELOW:

During the school day:

  • Computing systems may not be turned on or used during instructional time, except for instructional and educational purposes with the explicit approval of the teacher.
  • During non-instructional time, computing devices may only be used in the cafeteria during a student’s designated lunch period.

After the school day:

  • Computing devices may not be used during school-sponsored programs or activities, except with the explicit approval of the supervising staff member.

PORTABLE MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEMS MAY BE USED AS SET FORTH BELOW:

  • Portable music devices and entertainment systems may not be turned on or used while on school property.

CONFISCATION AND RETURN OF ELECTRONIC ITEMS

Students will get one expectation reminder as per the Classroom Discipline Ladder for a violation of this policy.  If a student continues to misuse cell phones, computing devices, and portable music entertainment systems after one expectation reminder, it will be an immediate Principal Referral.  Such consequences may include:

  • confiscation of item and return at end of school day
  • confiscation of item and return to parent/guardian following a conference
  • confiscation of item and return following student entering into behavioral contract
  • revocation of privilege to bring item to school

DISCIPLINE

Students who use cell phones, computing devices, and/or portable music and entertainment system in violation of any provision of the DOE’s Discipline Code, the school’s policy, Chancellor Regulation A-413, and/or the DOE’s Internet Acceptable Use and Safety Policy (“ISUSP”) will be subject to discipline in accordance with the guidance interventions and disciplinary responses set forth in the Discipline Code.

NO LIABILITY FOR DAMAGE, THEFT, OR LOSS

The School is not responsible for stolen, damaged or lost cell phones, computing devices or portable music and entertainment systems brought onto school grounds.  In the event that a cell phone, computing device, or portable music and entertainment system is reported stolen, our staff will thoroughly investigate the incident and address any student related misconduct accordingly.

Homework Policy

Students are expected to spend about one hour per night on homework, with at least thirty minutes of that time devoted to reading.

This homework does not take the form the worksheets and packets you may be familiar with from middle school. Instead, students bring home work that is relevant to their inquiries in each class. Their work at home should be coordinated with the members of their Responsibility Teams and Unison Reading groups (emailing and texting can be a valid part of homework!) and should align with a phase of the activity arc. The activity arc is a simple graphic used in every UAGC class to illustrate the universal process of  authentic, meaningful, challenging projects: excitement and energy when an idea is conceived; an uphill battle as ideas slowly become reality through trial and error, failure and revision, research and application; and finally deep satisfaction when the goal is achieved.

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Parents: Ask your students these questions to understand their schoolwork and help them make a homework plan.


Grading Policy

The UAGC Grading Policy is designed to reflect our core values of intention, collaboration, and responsibility and to support the implementation of Learning Cultures.

Intention

Traditionally, grades are given based on completion of assignments, but not at UAGC. Instead of assignments, specific outcomes have been identified for each course. Over the course of the school year, students work to demonstrate mastery of each of the course outcomes in a variety of assessment genres.

Students must identify their individual strengths and challenges, then develop an intention to master specific outcomes over time and decide how best to demonstrate those outcomes with the assistance of their teachers and peers.

Collaboration

Instead of working on assignments in isolation, teacher-student feedback and student-student feedback is central to developing mastery. Using the language of the outcomes, feedback is specific and actionable.

As students develop competencies around specific outcomes, they become resources, developing depth of knowledge by providing expert feedback to peers.

Responsibility

Mastery-based grading is transparent, allowing students to take responsibility for the outcomes and assessments they are working to master. At UAGC students are in control of their learning, guided and supported by their teachers and the resources of their environment.

How Courses Are Graded

When a student submits an assignment he or she receives feedback on a set of outcomes. A student progress on an outcome can be either “Not Yet,” meaning they must revise their work; “Approaching,” which has a grade equivalent of a 70; “Proficient,” which has a grade equivalent of an 85; or “Exemplary,” which has a grade equivalent of a 100. U shows missing grades.

These outcomes are assessed multiple times during each marking period. When a student has received feedback for an outcome 3 times a summary* evaluation is calculated for the outcome. More recent assessments count more to encourage growth.

*This summary is a decaying average of the marks he or she has received on that outcome.

Each prior assessment is weighted two thirds of the more recent assessment.


Student will receive marking period grades four times during the academic year. These grades are entered into the Department of Education STARS system and are official. Marking periods for 2018-2019 are:

Marking Period

Ends on

1

11/16

2

1/30

3

4/15

4

6/17

        At UAGC we believe that students should be given every opportunity to demonstrate mastery. However, students must also learn time management. As such work submitted after a marking period has ended cannot receive a mark higher than Proficient. For most assessments there is no limit on the number of times a student may revise work to improve it in response to feedback and to improve their marks on the assessment. Teachers may, at their discretion, determine that certain assessments cannot be revised, although this should be avoided whenever possible.

Courses that end in a Regents exam will not have the score for that exam factored into the grade for the class.

Scale of Marks Awarded:

All marks will be entered as a letter grade into STARS and the final grade will appear on the student transcript. Jumprope will calculate a numeric grade; teachers will convert this to a letter grade on the following scale:

A+

A

B

C

D

F

100-95

94-90

80-89

70-79

65-69

<65

A student’s Grade Point Average (GPA) will be computed as a simple average of all classes.

Additional Marks

When Grades Are Awarded


Implementation

Other Considerations

Award Ceremonies and Honor Roll

At the end of both the first and second semester, UAGC holds an awards ceremony to celebrate students and their achievements. Awards are given for high honor roll, academic excellence, academic and personal improvement, demonstration of core values, commitment to the school community and perfect attendance.

High Honor Roll Requirements

Honor Roll Requirements

Grade point average above 90%

All grades above 80%

Grade point average above 85%

All grades above 70%


Credit Requirements

Subject

Regents Diploma

Advanced Regents Diploma

UAGC College/Career-Ready

Reading

8

8

8

Writing

8

Math

6

6

8

Social Studies

Global History (4)

US History (2)

Participation in Government (1)

Economics (1)

8

8

8

Science

6

6

8

Career and Technical Education

7

7*

8

Languages Other Than English

2

2

2

Physical Education

4

4

4

Health

1

1

1

Art

2

2

2

Total

44

44

57

*Students at CTE schools are able to earn an Advanced Regents Diploma

by completing an approved CTE course sequence


Exam Requirements

Exam

Regents Diploma

Advanced Regents Diploma

UAGC College/Career-Ready

English Language Arts

65 or higher

65 or higher

75 or higher*

Math

65 or higher on

one math exam:

 Algebra I

Geometry

AND Algebra II

65 or higher on

three math exams:

 Algebra I

Geometry

AND Algebra II

70 or higher in Algebra I

AND

successful completion of the Algebra 2/Trigonometry or higher-level course

Social Studies

65 or higher on

one social studies exam:

US History

OR

Global History & Geography

65 or higher on

one social studies exam:

US History

OR

Global History & Geography

65 or higher on

two social studies exams:

US History

AND

Global History & Geography

Science

65 or higher on

one science exam:

Living Environment

Earth Science

OR Physics

65 or higher on

 Living Environment

AND one other science exam:

Earth Science

OR Physics

65 or higher on

 Living Environment

AND Earth Science

Languages Other Than English

Not Required

65 or higher on NYC LOTE exam*

65 or higher on NYC LOTE exam OR CTE pathway*

Plus One Option

65 or higher on any additional Regents exam or State-approved assessment

65 or higher on any additional Regents exam or State-approved assessment

65 or higher on any additional Regents exam AND CTE assessment (e.g. GPRO)

SAT/ACT

Not required

Not Required

SAT Critical Reading

score of 480 or higher

OR

ACT English score of 20 or higher

AND

SAT Math score of 500 or higher

OR

ACT Math score of 21 or higher

* Students completing a CTE endorsement to the Advanced Regents diploma and students whose IEPs indicate

a disability that affects their ability to learn a language are not required to take the LOTE exam


Student Advisement

The Urban Assembly School for Green Careers utilizes a comprehensive advisory program to help each student clarify, plan, implement and monitor a program of academic work, or “workout plan”, that is consistent with their values, goals, interests and strengths.

At the beginning of the school year, each student is given an advisor. The primary responsibility of each advisor is to meet with their students throughout the school year to ensure their success and to be a resource for them and their family. Through looking at the student’s transcripts, discussing the student’s progress in classes, observing the student in their classes the advisor creates a workout plan with students that enables them to strive toward their highest goals.

FAQs

How do I as a parent login to Jumprope?

Login credentials are the same for student and parent:

My child is in the wrong class, how do I request a program change?

Students or their advisor may request a program change on the school website using the “Program Change Request.” After the first two weeks of school, student requests are not generally honored unless it has a direct impact on their necessary credit accumulation.

How do I check my student’s grades?

Login to Jumprope (see above)

How do I check my student’s attendance?

Login to Jumprope

What is the out-to-lunch policy?

Students need a permission slip, which are distributed at the beginning of the year and are in the main office. Come on time to every period in one school day, go out to lunch the next school day. For example, if you make it to class and advisory on time every period on Friday, you can go out for lunch on Monday.

Students are ineligible for the rest of the week and the following week if they violate this policy. Repeated violations will lead to an intervention that includes family involvement.

College & Career GuidanceIMG_2903.JPG

All students at UAGC participate in individualized post-secondary planning. This planning takes into account each student’s interests, abilities, and vision for their future, and draws upon experiences they have had both in and out of the classroom at UAGC to develop a thoughtful and unique plan for their future. Students create both short and long term goals pertaining to post-secondary enrollment, career aspirations, and life planning, and determine the best path for themselves to accomplish those goals. While the majority of our students enroll in college immediately after high school, others choose to pursue non-academic, career training programs.

Graduates of the Class of 2016 were accepted to a wide range of colleges and vocational programs including Baruch College, the City College of New York, Fordham University, Goucher College, Green Mountain College, Hunter College, Ithaca College, Manhattan College, The New School, New York University, Paul Smith’s College, the School of Cooperative Technical Education, SUNY Cobleskill, SUNY New Paltz, SUNY Potsdam, Syracuse University, the University at Albany, the University at Buffalo, and many more.

UAGC Student Service Opportunities

Keeping in mind our school’s core values, students are given many chances to give back to the school community through a wealth of internships outside of school, as well as being able to participate through academic opportunities that take place within the school. Students are encouraged to provide leadership, rule #23, by working together to form strong support systems for their peers and increase student learning.

Ambassadors

Students who are selected to join the Ambassadors are those who are recognized by peers and teachers as members of class who promote a culture of learning and excel in most class formats. Ambassadors meet to identify common challenges they see in classrooms, and problem solve ways to mentor students through their academic struggles. Moreover, these students are another friendly face to turn to should a struggling student need an extra hand (or mind, rather).

Working with students inside and outside of classrooms in a mentoring capacity, they are strong representatives of the school’s values, and as such, also contribute to the school by facilitating school tours, recruitment fairs, and other activities that require the presence of students who are fully immersed in our school’s theory and are excited to talk about it with others! The group is supervised by a teacher who works closely with the students, and frequently checks in with the members about their own academic standings, as they must maintain a GPA of an 85 or above to stay in the program.

Student Council

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The Citywide Behavioral Expectations outlines responsibilities of all NYC students. One of these is “13. participate and vote in student government elections.” Our student council is entirely student-run and supported by teacher advisors. At the beginning of each year, students convene and hold elections. Throughout the year, student council organizes events and represents student voice in the decision-making process of the school.


Extracurricular Opportunities

Internships

UAGC students have opportunities to participate in internships and other work based learning opportunities with our partners and other organizations, as part of our CTE programs.  Internships are an investment in yourself and your own future.  They are also the perfect opportunity for you to explore potential careers, gain valuable job experience, expand your resume and college applications, and learn about yourself.  Your CTE Teachers and our Partnership Coordinator will work with you to find suitable internships and other career focused opportunities.

Some examples of previous UAGC student internship hosts:

The Nature Conservancy's LEAF program

Central Park Conservancy

ACE (Architecture, Construction, and Engineering) Mentoring

NYC Department of Education Division of School Facilities and Division of Design and Construction

Wave Hill Botanical Garden

City Growers on Brooklyn Grange rooftop farms

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Broadway Mall Association

UAGC School Garden


Sports

Students at UAGC participate in PSAL sports on the Brandeis Campus team. The team is made up of students from all of the schools in the Brandeis building. The following sports are offered to our students:

Fall Sports:

(Some of these start in August)

Boys Varsity Bowling

Boys Varsity Soccer

Girls Varsity Bowling

Girls Varsity Volleyball

Girls Varsity Soccer

Girls Varsity Tennis

Winter Sports:

Boys Varsity Basketball

Boys Junior Varsity Basketball

Girls Varsity Basketball

Spring Sports:

Varsity Baseball

Junior Varsity Baseball

Varsity Softball

Boys Varsity Volleyball

PSAL Eligibility

Academic Requirements

The 5+1 Rule

A student must pass five credit bearing subjects and physical education. 3 of the 5 classes must be major subjects. CTE classes may not be counted as majors

A senior programmed for 4 or 5 classes who fails one class, in his/her senior year, will be eligible for PSAL so long as the failed class is not required for graduation

The 10 Credit Rule

A student must accumulate ten credits for the two semesters prior to the eligibility period not counting PE.

The student must pass Physical Education.

GPA

Student-athletes must achieve a passing GPA at time of eligibility evaluation (65).

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90% during the marking period of the sport

Directions on Downloading PSAL Athletic Forms

  1. Click on the website: www.psal.org
  2. On top in orange color:  click on Resources and Procedures
  3. Then click PRINTABLE FORMS
  4. Scroll down to second chart
  5. There are 3 forms that you will need:
  1. Concussion
  2. Interscholastic Athletes Parental Consent Form
  3. Interscholastic Sport Medical Forms

On the parent consent form, the parent or guardian that signs the consent form must initial each item.  There are 13 initials in all. Write ONLY ONE SPORT ON THE PARENT CONSENT FORM!

On the medical form, make sure that:

Students must hand in completed medical forms and PSAL parent consent forms to the team’s coach, Brandeis Athletic Director Vera Spring or UAGC PE teacher.  Students interested in trying out should listen to announcements and look for postings by the gym for tryout dates.

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Most of our offerings are in conjunction with other schools on the Louis D. Brandeis campus and other community arts programs. For the past few years, UAGC teachers have been working closely with music educators at Pioneer Valley Performing Arts Charter Public School (PVPA) in South Hadley, MS. in providing a special program that taps into student love and interests for both poetry and music dubbed M. A. P. S. (Music and Poetry Synchronized). Throughout the course of the Fall semester, once a week after school, students are exposed to a variety of exercises and poetry genres, learning skills and strategies in reading and writing their own poems . In the winter, students finalize, select and submit their best pieces to PVPA, where student musicians work together in composing songs inspired by these original works.

This ambitious endeavor culminates every year in performances here at UAGC and in Western Massachusetts; poets read their poems, followed by a grand music performance!

In addition, educators at Global Learning Collaborative provide classes and after-school programs and end-of-the-year performances in drama and dance that are open to all Brandeis campus students.

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Parent Involvement Policy

Educational research shows a positive correlation between effective parental involvement and student achievement.  The overall aim of this policy is to develop a parent involvement program that will ensure effective involvement of parents and community in the school. The Urban Assembly School for Green Careers in compliance with the Section 1118 of Title I, Part A of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, is responsible for creating and implementing a parent involvement policy to strengthen the connection and support of student achievement between the school and the families. The school’s policy is designed to keep parents informed by actively involving them in planning and decision-making in support of the education of their children. Parents are encouraged to actively participate on the School Leadership Team, Parent Association, and Title I Parent Committee as trained volunteers and welcomed members of the school community.

The Urban Assembly School for Green Careers will support parents and families of Title I students by:

  providing materials and training to help parents work with their children to improve their achievement level, e.g., literacy, math, and use of technology;

  providing parents with the information and training needed to effectively become involved in planning and decision making in support of the education of their children;

  fostering a caring and effective home-school partnership to ensure that parents can effectively support and monitor their child’s progress;

  providing assistance to parents in understanding City, State and Federal standards and assessments;

  sharing information about school and parent related programs, meetings and other activities in a format, and in languages that parents can understand;

  providing professional development opportunities for school staff with the assistance of parents to improve outreach, communication skills and cultural competency in order to build stronger ties between parents and other members of the school community;

 

The school’s Parent Involvement Policy was designed based upon a careful assessment of the needs of all parents/guardians, including parents/guardians of English Language Learners and students with disabilities. The school community will conduct an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of this parent involvement policy with Title I parents to improve the academic quality of the school. The findings of the evaluation through school surveys and feedback forms will be used to design strategies to more effectively meet the needs of parents, and enhance the school’s Title I program. This information will be maintained by the school.

 

In developing the Title I Parent Involvement Policy, parents of Title I participating students, parent members of the school’s Parent Association (or Parent-Teacher Association), as well as parent members of the School Leadership Team, were consulted on the proposed Title I Parent Involvement Policy and asked to survey their members for additional input.

To increase and improve parent involvement and school quality, the school will:

  actively involve and engage parents in the planning, review and evaluation of the effectiveness of the school’s Title I program as outlined in the School Comprehensive Educational Plan, including the implementation of the school’s Title I Parent Involvement Policy and School-Parent Compact;

  engage parents in discussion and decisions regarding the required Title I set-aside funds, which are allocated directly to the school to promote parent involvement, including family literacy and parenting skills;

  ensure that the Title I funds allocated for parent involvement are utilized to implement activities and strategies as described in the school’s Parent Involvement Policy and the School-Parent Compact;

  support school-level committees that include parents who are members of the School Leadership Team, the Parent Association (or Parent-Teacher Association) and Title I Parent Committee. This includes providing technical support and ongoing professional development, especially in developing leadership skills;

  maintain a Parent Coordinator (or a dedicated staff person) to serve as a liaison between the school and families. The Parent Coordinator or a dedicated staff person will provide parent workshops based on the assessed needs of the parents of children who attend the school and will work to ensure that the school environment is welcoming and inviting to all parents. The Parent Coordinator will also maintain a log of events and activities planned for parents each month and file a report with the central office;

  conduct parent workshops with topics that may include: parenting skills, understanding educational accountability, grade-level curriculum, and assessment expectations; literacy, accessing community and support services; and technology training to build parents’ capacity to help their children at home;  

  provide opportunities for parents to help them understand the accountability system, e.g., NCLB/State accountability system, student proficiency levels, Annual School Report Card, School Quality Report, Quality Review Report, Learning Environment Survey Report;

  host the required Annual Title I Parent Meeting on or before December 1 st  of each school year to advise parents of children participating in the Title I program about the school’s Title I funded program(s), their right to be involved in the program and the parent involvement requirements under Title I, Part A, Section 1118 and other applicable sections under the No Child Left Behind Act;

  schedule additional parent meetings, e.g., quarterly meetings with flexible times, such as meetings in the morning or evening, to share information about the school’s educational program and other initiatives of the Chancellor and allow parents to provide suggestions;

  translate all critical school documents and provide interpretation during meetings and events as needed;

  conduct an Annual Title I Parent Fair/Event where all parents are invited to attend formal presentations and workshops that address their student academic skill needs and what parents can do to help;

The school will further encourage school-level parental involvement by:

  holding an annual Title I Parent Curriculum Conference;

  hosting educational family events/activities during Parent-Teacher Conferences and throughout the school year;

  encouraging meaningful parent participation on School Leadership Teams, Parent Association (or Parent-Teacher Association) and Title I Parent Committee;

  supporting or hosting Family Day events;

  establishing a Parent Resource Center/Area or lending library; instructional materials for parents;

  encouraging more parents to become trained school volunteers;

  providing written and verbal progress reports that are periodically given to keep parents  informed of their children’s progress;

  developing and distributing a school newsletter or web publication designed to keep parents informed about school activities and student progress;

  providing school planners/folders for regular written communication between teacher and the home in a format, and to the extent practicable in the languages that parents can understand.

School Parent Compact

The Urban Assembly School for Green Careers, in compliance with the Section 1118 of Title I, Part A of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, is implementing a School-Parent Compact to strengthen the connection and support of student achievement between the school and the families. Staff and parents of students participating in activities and programs funded by Title I, agree that this Compact outlines how parents, the entire school staff and students will share responsibility for improved academic achievement and the means by which a school-parent partnership will be developed to ensure that all children achieve State Standards on assessments.

I.   School Responsibilities

Provide high quality curriculum and instruction consistent with Common Core State Standards to enable participating children to meet the State’s Standards and Assessments by:

  using academic learning time efficiently;

  respecting cultural, racial and ethnic differences;

  implementing a curriculum aligned to the Common Core  State Learning Standards;

  offering high quality instruction in all content areas;

  providing instruction by highly qualified teachers and when this does not occur, notifying parents as required by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act;

Support home-school relationships and improve communication by:

  conducting parent-teacher conferences each semester during which the individual child’s achievement will be discussed as well as how this Compact is related;

  convening an Annual Title I Parent Meeting prior to December 1st  of each school year for parents of students participating in the Title I program to inform them of the school’s Title I status and funded programs and their right to be involved;

  arranging additional meetings at other flexible times, e.g., morning, evening and providing (if necessary and funds are available) transportation or child care for those parents who cannot attend a regular meeting;

  respecting the rights of limited English proficient families to receive translated documents and interpretation services in order to ensure participation in the child’s education;

  providing information related to school and parent programs, meetings and other activities is sent to parents of participating children in a format and to the extent practicable in a language that parents can understand;

  involving parents in the planning process to review, evaluate and improve the existing Title I programs, Parent Involvement Policy and this Compact;

  providing parents with timely information regarding performance profiles and individual student assessment results for each child and other pertinent individual school information;

  ensuring that the Parent Involvement Policy and School-Parent Compact are distributed and discussed with parents each year;

Provide parents reasonable access to staff by:

  ensuring that staff will have access to interpretation services in order to effectively communicate with limited English speaking parents;

  notifying parents of the procedures to arrange an appointment with their child’s teacher or other school staff member;

  arranging opportunities for parents to receive training to volunteer and participate in their child’s class, and to observe classroom activities;

  planning activities for parents during the school year, e.g., Parent-Teacher Conferences;

Provide general support to parents by:

  creating a safe, supportive and effective learning community for students and a welcoming respectful environment for parents and guardians;

  assisting parents in understanding academic achievement standards and assessments and how to monitor their child’s progress by providing professional development opportunities (times will be scheduled so that the majority of parents can attend);

  sharing and communicating best practices for effective communication, collaboration and partnering with all members of the school community;

  supporting parental involvement activities as requested by parents;

  ensuring that the Title I funds allocated for parent involvement are utilized to implement activities as described in this Compact and the Parent Involvement Policy;

  advising parents of their right to file a complaint

II.   Parent/Guardian Responsibilities

  monitor my child’s attendance and ensure that my child arrives to school on time as well as follow the appropriate procedures to inform the school when my child is absent;

  ensure that my child comes to school rested by setting a schedule for bedtime based on the needs of my child and his/her age;

  check and assist my child in completing homework tasks, when necessary;

  read to my child and/or discuss what my child is reading each day (for a minimum of 15 minutes);

  set limits to the amount of time my child watches television or plays video games;

  promote positive use of extracurricular time such as, extended day learning opportunities, clubs, team sports and/or quality family time;

  encourage my child to follow school rules and regulations and discuss this Compact with my child;

  volunteer in my child’s school or assist from my home as time permits;

  participate, as appropriate, in the decisions relating to my child’s education;

  communicate with my child’s teacher about educational needs and stay informed about their education by prompting reading and responding to all notices received from the school or district;

  respond to surveys, feedback forms and notices when requested;

  become involved in the development, implementation, evaluation and revision to the Parent Involvement Policy and this Compact;

  participate in or request training offered by the school, district, central and/or State Education Department to learn more about teaching and learning strategies whenever possible;

  take part in the school’s Parent Association or Parent-Teacher Association or serve to the extent possible on advisory groups like the School Leadership Team;

  share responsibility for the improved academic achievement of my child;

 

III.   Student Responsibilities

  attend school regularly and arrive on time;

  complete my homework and submit all assignments on time;

  provide leadership for others to follow the school rules and be responsible for my actions;

  show respect for myself, other people and property;

  try to resolve disagreements or conflicts peacefully;

  always try my best to learn.

.  Faculty & Staff of the Urban Assembly School for Green Careers . 

Signature of School

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Signature of Parent

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Signature of Student

School Contact Information

THE URBAN ASSEMBLY SCHOOL FOR GREEN CAREERS

www.uagreencareers.org 

03M402

145 W 84TH ST

NEW YORK, NY 10024

PHONE: 212.787.1189

 FAX: 212.787.1455

info@uagreencareers.org 

Parent Coordinator Maria Soto:

msoto@uagreencareers.org 

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