Draft 1: 26 May 2016

Innovation Configuration Map: Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards                                                                  

Component 1:  Assessment

5

4

3

2

1

Consistently, assessments are used in an appropriate fashion to guide instruction, provide meaningful feedback to students or evaluate student performance.

By the end of each unit of study, each applicable NGSS performance standard has been assessed in both formative and summative manners.  

Teachers have utilized formative assessment both as informative for steering subsequent instruction, and as a means to provide meaningful feedback to students prior to summative assessments.  

Summative assessments evaluate each of aspects of the NGSS:  science and engineering practices, cross cutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas.  

Frequently, assessments are used in an appropriate fashion to guide instruction, provide meaningful feedback to students or evaluate student performance.

Units of study include both formative and summative assessments that are aligned to the NGSS performance standards, however formative assessments are either not utilized to guide subsequent instruction or to provide meaningful feedback to students.  

Summative assessments evaluate each of aspects of the NGSS:  science and engineering practices, cross cutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas.

Occasionally, assessments are used in an appropriate fashion to guide instruction, provide meaningful feedback to students or evaluate student performance.

Units of study include either formative or summative assessments that are aligned to the NGSS performance standards, but not both.  

Rarely are assessments used appropriately for guiding instruction, providing meaningful feedback to students, or evaluating student performance.

Units of study do not include either formative or summative assessment.

Rarely are assessments used appropriately for guiding instruction, providing meaningful feedback to students, or evaluating student performance.

Units of study include either formative or summative assessments that are not aligned with the NGSS performance standards.

Component 2:  Engagement with Science and Engineering Practices

5

4

3

2

1

Consistently, students engage with science and engineering practices; in each lesson, students replicate behaviors that scientists engage in.  Such behaviors include: building models, developing theories, utilizing appropriate scientific investigation techniques and engineering practices that require incorporation of both skills and scientific knowledge.  


In each lesson, students are able to articulate the difference between scientific inquiry and engineering design approaches as they relate to the DCI being addressed.

Frequently, students engage with science and engineering practices; in nearly all lessons, students replicate behaviors that scientists engage in.  Such behaviors include: building models, developing theories, utilizing appropriate scientific investigation techniques and engineering practices that require incorporation of both skills and scientific knowledge.  


In most lessons, students are exposed to and able to articulate the difference between scientific inquiry and engineering design approaches as they relate to the DCI being addressed.

Frequently, students engage with science and engineering practices; in most lessons, students replicate behaviors that scientists engage in.  


In most lessons, students are able to articulate principles of scientific inquiry and/or engineering design, but they may not be able to articulate both and/or the difference between them as they apply to the DCI being addressed.  

Occasionally, students engage with science and engineering practices; in some lessons, students replicate behaviors that scientists engage in.  

Students may occasionally be exposed to principles of scientific inquiry and/or engineering design, but they are frequently not able to articulate one or both.

Rarely are students engaged in replicating behaviors scientists engage in.  Instead, students are primarily passive consumers of science-related knowledge.   There is very limited or no time devoted to students’ hands-on, active engagement with scientific skills or processes.

Consistently, students are neither exposed to or able to articulate the distinction between scientific inquiry and engineering design approaches, as they relate to the DCI being addressed.

Component 3:  Engagement with Cross Cutting Concepts

4

3

2

1

Consistently, students engage with crosscutting concepts; in each lesson, students are able to state and articulate at least one Cross Cutting concept as it relates to the DCI being addressed.  

These Cross Cutting concepts may be patterns, similarity, and diversity; cause and effect; Scale proportion and quantity; Systems and system models; Energy and matter; Structure and Function; or Stability and Change.

Frequently, students engage with crosscutting concepts; in nearly all lessons, students are able to state a cross cutting concept, but may not always be able to fully articulate at least one Cross Cutting concept as it relates to the DCI being addressed.  

Occasionally, students engage with crosscutting concepts; in some lessons, students may able to state and articulate at least one Cross Cutting concept as it relates to the DCI being addressed.

Rarely are students engaged with crosscutting concepts; in most lessons, students are neither exposed to nor able to state or articulate that is relevant to the DCI being addressed.  

Component 4:  Engagement with Disciplinary Core Ideas

5

4

3

2

1

Consistently students have productive engagement with Disciplinary Core Ideas; by the end of each lesson, every student is able to articulate at least one new Disciplinary Core Idea, identified in the applicable NGSS performance standard(s).  Student articulation includes understanding of broad importance of the DCI, and/or the DCI’s relevance as an organizing principle, and/or understanding of how the DCI is a key understanding for further investigations.  

Consistently students have productive engagement with Disciplinary Core Ideas; by the end of each lesson, every student is able to articulate at least one new Disciplinary Core Idea, identified in the applicable NGSS performance standard(s).  

However, student articulation may be lacking in demonstrating an understanding of a key aspect of the DCI, such as its  relevance as an organizing principle, or understanding of how the DCI is a key understanding for further investigations.  

Frequently, students have productive engagement with Disciplinary Core Ideas; by the end of most lessons, most students are able to articulate at least one new Disciplinary Core Idea.

In the instances when students have engaged with Disciplinary Core Ideas, they are usually able to articulate understanding of the broad importance of the DCI, or the DCI’s relevance as an organizing principle, or understanding of how the DCI is a key understanding for further investigations.

Occasionally, students have productive engagement with Disciplinary Core Ideas; by the end of some lessons, most students are able to articulate at least one new Disciplinary Core Idea.

In the instances when students are engaged with DCI’s they still may occasionally not be able to fully articulate understanding of the broad importance of the DCI, or the DCI’s relevance as an organizing principle, or understanding of how the DCI is a key understanding for further investigations.

Rarely do students have productive or meaningful engagement with Disciplinary Core Ideas; by the end of most lessons, most students are unable to state or articulate at least one new Disciplinary Core Idea.

Notes:

This document references and adopts terminology utilized by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).  Some of the language used in the document originates with descriptions of the NGSS as presented on the Next Generation Science Standards website and the National Science Teacher’s Association’s (NSTA) NGSS Hub.

The Innovation Configuration Map, itself, is structured to align with the Next Generation Science Standards
three-dimensional structure with an additional component focusing on assessment.