A pro-drop language basically means that pronouns such as the subject and/or object of a verb can be omitted ("dropped") when it is obvious from the context who the agents are in a sentence. In Kah, this context-dependance is embraced:

ya wepi

it burn

it is burning

yunyo kwan Nihonka

they learn japanese

they are studying Japanese

wa nong jo ya

i not know it

I don't know

wepi

burn

it is burning

kwan Nihonka

learn japanese

they are studying Japanese

nong jo

not know

I don't know

Pronouns involved in possessive constructions as possessor are dropped easily also, along with the possessive marker na:

titi na wa yai

head of i hurt

my head aches

uma na wa denu chipola

mother of i go market

my mother went to the market

titi yai

head hurt

my head aches

uma denu chipola

mother go market

my mother went to the market

In this manner, depending on the conversation preceding a simple phrase, it gets to mean different things. Take for instance the following phrase:

weyun tanu

 see         movie

When accompanied by the following preceding questions, it gets to mean:

"Have you seen this movie?"

-Weyun tanu.

I saw the movie

"Has he read the book?"

-Weyun tanu.

He saw the movie

"What have they been doing?"

-Weyun tanu.

Watching a movie

This principle of terseness also extends to things like plurality or aspect:

paza binki

 buy bread

"Have you bought anything?"

- Paza binki.

I bought a bread

"Did you bring the five loafs I asked for?"

- Paza binki.

I bought the bread

"Have you bought enough bread for the entire orphanage?"

- Paza binki.

I bought the bread

Also, note how none of the verbs below are marked for aspect, yet how this is obvious from the temporal expressions already:

ninye kwan

yesterday study

Yesterday I studied

zemanta kwan

tomorrow study

Tomorrow I will study

tau kwan

now study

Now I'm studying