Course Number: HIS 203
Course Title: History of Western Civilization I
Term: Fall 2017

Professor

John P. Bequette, Ph.D.

jbequette@holyapostles.edu

(260)515-6793

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course covers the history of Western civilization from the dawn of civilization through the Council of Trent. The intent of this course is for the student to develop an understanding of both the flow of history as an integrated whole, as well as an understanding of the significant part played by the Catholic Church in building Western civilization.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

        - Significant persons and events;

        - Major movements of decline/reform/renewal and their causes.

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1 (8/28-9/3)

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Week 2 (9/4-9/10)

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Week 3 (9/11-9/17)

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Week 4 (9/18-9/24)

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Week 5 (9/25-10/1)

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Week 6 (10/2-10/8)

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Week 7 (10/9-10/15)

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Week 8 (10/16-10/22)

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Week 9 (10/23-10/29)

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Week 10 (10/30-11/5)

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Week 11 (11/6-11/12)

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Week 12 (11/13-11/19)

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Week 13 (11/20-11/26)

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDn71XK3V3M

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Week 14 (11/27-12/3)

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Week 15 (12/4-12/8)

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4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

7. EVALUATION        

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

GRADING RUBRIC FOR DISCUSSION BOARD (DB) POSTINGS

Instructor Questions

3 points – Student demonstrates an acceptable understanding of the concepts and ideas in the reading.

2 points – Student demonstrates a deficient understanding of the concepts and ideas in the reading

1 point – Student fails to address the question in an intelligible manner

Student Questions

3 - points – Student’s question is thoughtful, and well-articulated

2 points – Student’s question is obtuse and somewhat difficult to understand

1 point – Student’s question is unintelligible


Student Responses

3 points – Student adequately answers the question of his/her classmate.

2 points – Student less-than-adequately answers the question of his/her classmate.

1 point – Student’s response is unintelligible

GRADING RUBRIC FOR ESSAYS

The grading rubric is constructed according to a 30-point scale.  The first two categories are graded according to a 10-point scale, while the last two are graded according to a 5-point scale, for a total of 30 possible points.  Your total points are then divided by 30 in order to yield a percentage, which is then applied to the possible points for the assignment. For example, if a given essays is worth 20 points, and you earn 25 points on the grading rubric, you receive 16.6 points for the paper (25/30 = 0.83; 0.83 x 20 = 16.6).

Understanding of concepts and ideas (10 points):

  • Paper demonstrates an accurate and thorough comprehension of ideas and concepts at a level appropriate for an undergraduate general education course.
  • Paper demonstrates an appropriate and intelligent use of primary and secondary sources.

 

 

Prose, sentence structure, clarity of expression, organization and flow (10 points):

  • Prose is consistently clear.
  • Sentences are consistently well-constructed.
  • Word choice demonstrates a well-developed vocabulary.  
  • Essay is well-organized and flows logically from beginning to end.

 

Grammar, spelling, punctuation, typography (5 points):

  • Paper is free from mistakes in grammar, spelling, or punctuation.
  • Paper is thoroughly proofread for typographical errors.

 

Following directions (5 points):

  • Paper completely follows directions given.
  • Paper correctly cites sources within the text.
  • Paper includes a bibliography.

 

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the students part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

My name is John Bequette. I earned my doctoral degree in historical theology at Saint Louis University.  My specialization is in the medieval theological tradition, with an emphasis on the lives of the saints. I have published articles in various theological journals and have recently published a book Rhetoric in the Monastic Tradition (Peter Lang, 2012).