USER EXPERIENCE OF YWCA VICTORIA DIGITAL

2nd September, 2015

Jessica Ferguson-Phillips

Solomon Reich

Evon Tan

General Assembly UX Team


Table of Content

Executive Summary

1. Project Brief

1.1 Problem Statement

1.2 Solution Statement

2. User Research Report

2.1 User Surveys

2.2 User Interviews

2.3 Personas

2.4 Scenarios & Tasks

2.5 User-flows

2.6 Journey Map

2.6.1 Current User Experience

2.6.2 New User Experience

2.7 Scenario & Tasks

3. Competitive Analysis

3.1 Method

3.2 Findings

3.3 Summary

3.4 Recommendations

4. Site Audit and Analytics Report

4.1 Findability

4.1.1 Understanding Visits

4.1.2 Traffic Source

4.1.4 AdWords Keyword Planner

4.1.5 Top Landing Pages

4.2 Users’ Browsers and Operating System

4.3 Country of Origin

4.2 Issues

4.3 Recommendations

5. Information Architecture

5.1 Current Sitemap (Live)

5.1.1 Problems

5.2 New Global Navigation and Sitemaps

5.2.1 Option 1

5.3 Testing & Findings

5.3.1 In-depth Analysis - Task 2 (Mentoring)

5.4 Recommendations

6. Conceptualisation

6.1 Navigation

6.2 Homepage

6.3 Events Home

6.4 Individual Event Pages

6.5 Checkout

7. Usability Testing

7.1 User Test report

7.1.1 User Participant Recruitment

7.1.2 Assigned Tasks based on pathways

7.1.3 Key Findings

7.2 Summary of findings

7.3 Design solutions

7.3.1 Suggestions after each usability testings

7.4 Recommendations

8. Final Recommendations

Appendix B

B.1 - Interview Questions

Appendix C

C.1 - Competitive Analysis Results

Appendix D

D1 - Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool Tutorial

D1.1 - Step 1 / Download Software

D1.2 - Step 2 / Launch SEO Spider Tool

D1.3 - Step 3 / Analyse Response Codes

D1.4 - Step 4 / Analyse URL Structure

D1.5 - Step 5 / Analyse Page Titles Structure

D1.6 - Step 6 / Analyse Meta Description Structure

D1.7 - Step 7 / Analyse Image and Alt Text

D1.8 - Step 8 / Analyse Directives

D2 - Using AdWords Keyword Planner

Appendix E

E1 - Sitemaps

E2 - Treejack Surveys & Results


Executive Summary

YWCA Victoria wants to increase user engagement by making YWCA Victoria a leader within the feminist community in Australia. The General Assembly UX Team was engaged to perform an in-depth discovery in order to pinpoint the business opportunities available within the market for YWCA Victoria's new business growth.

Working with existing YWCA Victoria members, the team has conducted surveys on users’ demographics, behaviours, goals and needs. The team reviewed the results and extracted data based on their specific needs, ways and reasons users are currently connected to YWCA Victoria. The survey data helped identified three significant groups of users: the change maker, the professional women and the socialist. The team followed up with interviews to understand and document each significant user group’s pain points. Based on qualitative and quantitative data collected, personas were created to help the team focus and create user process flows on an empathic level through the personas’ perspectives.

Competitive analysis was performed on six websites, which helped identify design opportunities available for YWCA Victoria's new interactive homepage. As the improvements have to be implemented to an existing website, a detailed assessment on YWCA Victoria Web analytics including site performance, has been documented along with recommendations. The information architecture of YWCA Victoria’s proposed new interactive website and a clear set of benchmarks were established before the conceptualisation phase started.

To validate the team's design solutions, the team set up a design studio to work in an Agile environment to spur ideas through series of paper prototypes and usability testing in an efficient and low-cost manner before moving forward to high-fidelity prototyping using the industry-standard software Axure RP.  

User participants were recruited based on their main characteristics similarity with the persona. Each user participant's test sessions were recorded for study purposes. The behaviours of the users’ interactions with the prototype and the way they carried out the specific tasks allowed the team to note for recommendations for iterations. YWCA Victoria’s new interactive web design exploration has key findings with minor iterations identified from usability testing.

Based on other scenarios (user process flow), before moving forward to develop an optimised responsive web design well for the future, it is recommended to work closely with a visual designer on the color schemes needed to implement on the prototype for clearer call-to-action motivation before performing the next usability testing, where users on the move are able to access the site through the wide variety of devices. The responsive web design is an elegant and seamless way for YWCA Victoria website to load much quicker on mobile devices, eliminating the need to zoom in or out. Other attributes to YWCA Victoria’s responsive web design are that event pages, memberships and donation pages are responsive, making it easy for users to purchase regardless of the device that they are accessing the site from. The events booking experience for the users across all devices at one unique destination is thus optimised and pleasant.

1. Project Brief

YWCA Victoria, the oldest women’s organisation in Australia, is in the process of repositioning their offerings as a feminist organisation. They have always been a feminist organisation supporting women, but now they want to focus their message on a younger audience of 16-39. From a tactical point of view, YWCA Victoria feels that their homepage does not promote and describe what they have to offer to Victorians. Currently, YWCA Victoria’s events are under-subscribed, and they would like to change that by making their events more visible on the website and social media. Another problem area is expanding the donation base from the existing older 40-65 audience to the younger 16-39 audience.

The user-centered design project was planned to meet the needs of the success-critical stakeholders.


Project Plan


1.1 Problem Statement

After assessing the interviews conducted with current YWCA Victoria supporters, we extracted the pain points they were experiencing and focused on them.

A large percentage of YWCA Victoria’s target users are currently accessing news and events via mobile, as they are time-poor and always on the go. YWCA Victoria’s website is currently not optimised for HTML5 in a responsive layout, and this putting them at a disadvantage in these modern times, when a large portion of users access websites while traveling.

Lack of Online Presence

YWCA Victoria has no online presence, as its website doesn’t even appear in Google searches without being explicit.

Event Pages

Event pages on the website do not list dates, times and other critical information, nor do they support ticket purchases internally (having to use external sites such as Eventbrite and PayPal). As a result, YWCA Victoria events are currently under-subscribed.

Difficult Site Navigation

The global navigation sections and subsections are not intuitively categorised, causing problems for users trying to find specific content pages within the YWCA Victoria site.

Other issues identified:

  1. Lack of regular engaging content
  2. The term ‘Donations’ was too broad
  1. Donation location on the webpage was not findable.
  2. Confusing form
  3. Lack of information on where the money will be donated to
  1. Unable to identify the benefits of being a YWCA Victoria member and users were unable to differentiate what the different type of memberships provides.
  2. Unclear social media integration
  3. There’s no systematic data collection integrated into the backend
  1. Mentor feedback
  2. Events followup
  3. CMS web analytics

1.2 Solution Statement

  1. Identify improvements that can be made to the current YWCA Victoria URLs that will increase its Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) organically.
  2. Create a seamless flow to purchase tickets online within YWCA Victoria website.
  3. Create a new site structure with navigation labels that users can clearly identify with.
  4. Provide YWCA Victoria with written recommendations for the other problems identified.



2. User Research Report

2.1 User Surveys

Introduction:

We conducted a survey to gain an understanding of current users pain-points and for the development of the personas based on the real users.

Method:

As a team, we developed an online survey with a range of demographics and psychographic-focused questions. These questions were formatted to find out who ‘YWCA’ user groups are, how people are discovering events, making donations, what they are using YWCA Victoria’s social media for, what type of content they would like to see, and the type of devices they use. There were 18 responses, all female.


Quantitative Results:

A full quantitative results table from our user survey

Quantitative Summary:

Above: Summary table of YWCA Victoria quantitative survey results

Qualitative Results:

A full qualitative results table from our user survey

Qualitative Summary:

Above: Summary table of YWCA Victoria qualitative survey results


Recommendation:

Based on the survey results above, we recommend that the design be built using HTML5 in a responsive layout, as the majority of users are using smart-phones and desktops. Implement a content structure which places news and events information above the fold on the homepage. Also to include: features to share content via social media, as well as benchmarking the KPIs of events, ticket purchases, social media shares, and news content read. For pushing new content out, it must go both on the site and via social media - we also recommend YWCA Victoria does this between 7-8am and 5-6pm (traveling to and from work), as that when majority of users are online browsing.


2.2 User Interviews

Introduction:

To gain a more in-depth understanding about the behaviours our participants, we interviewed four respondents provide by YWCA Victoria. These four people were selected based on their willingness for participation, their availability and their experience using YWCA Victoria’s services.

Participant 1 Demographics:

Name: Carmen Hawker

Gender: Female

Age: 26

Occupation: Founder of Global Women's Project

Relationship: De Facto

Participant 2 Demographics:

Name: Rachel Short

Gender: Female

Age: 29

Occupation: Freelance Writer/ Student

Relationship: Single

Participant 3 Demographics:

Name: Nicole Saliba

Gender: Female

Age: 27

Occupation: Project Coordinator BBF

Relationship: Single

Participant 4 Demographics:

Name: Steph Amir

Gender: Female

Age: 30

Occupation: Evaluation Manager FYA

Relationship: Long Term

        


Method:

We sat down with our participants and did a in-context interview with them individually. We used the same script of open-ended questions to keep the results consistent, and we recorded these sessions (with permission from the participants). The purpose for asking the open-ended questions is to:

*Appendix A: Questions the team asked participants in the interviews


Results:

Result summaries from our user interviews:

Table 2.1: User Participants’ comments

User Behaviour

Result

Participant

1

Participant

2

Participant

3

Participant

4

Are there any factors that would stop you from donating?

  1. Definitely not based on what I see.
  2. Based on my own financial status.
  3. Know where my funds are going. Basic summary on where my money will be contributed to.
  4. It would be important to give the option to receive/see the development on the impact on the people my money contributed to them.
  5. Personally it would be satisfying to see the people who are impacted by the money I have donated.
  1. I want to know where my money is going to because there’s a lot of scam out there.
  2. I want to know the breakdown maybe of what money has been contributed to in the past.
  3. How are they using my money (Where is my money going to)?
  1. Yes. I don’t know who YWCA Victoria are. I don’t know what they do. I have to look through a lot of stuff to piece it together.
  2.  I don’t understand what  I am donating for.
  3. The thing is, a majority of people have things that they are already donating to other things.

I don’t know who YWCA Victoria are.


User Behaviour

Result

Participant

1

Participant

2

Participant

3

Participant

4

What type of contents would you like to be engaged with?

Following their instagram feeds (lots of empowering post throughout the day that gives you a boost) and using it to pop things like this volunteering opportunities and promote events.

Website wise, the prototype covers what I would expect.

Facebook wise similar to the Instagram feeds but more tailored to upcoming events, posting about the upcoming speakers and what they would experience by attending the upcoming events.

Do not relate TINAtalk to Clementine Ford.

Internal language such as Y Events, Y News shouldn’t be used on the website.

Interested to read the news on the website.

N/A

TINAtalks definitely appeals.

Inclined to any event that shed a light on how women can move forward (upskill), believe in ourselves (yes, I can), create wonderful things myself even with the barriers in place at the moment - but as a team together we have the power to change the current dynamics and create (and see) change in our lifetime.

A sense of community and seeing some wonderful talented women who have achieved things themselves and sharing skills to others who are younger.  

Always interested with cheese and wine events.

Holds a lot of appeal to people my age in Melbourne.

Fun and casual and a chance to engage with like-minded people and share their vision.

Top three pain-points:

Donation

Why they are not donating:    


Membership Value

Participants were not sure of the value that being a ‘Y’ member would bring to them:

Not mobile optimised

100% of participants use their mobile phones for most activities, as they are time-poor and on the go:

Other findings to note:

Confusion where YWCA Victoria sits within the global YWCA organisation’s pages:

Attraction to the target market

YWCA Victoria wasn't seen as an innovative modern organisation:

Where participants learn about about about events and news

Email marketing:

Twitter:

Facebook:


Instagram:

Flyers/ booklets:

Social media/article content participants want

Content participants would like to see come through on their social media from YWCA Victoria:


Event content feedback and what participants want

Events and event topics participants would be interested in:

       

Comments about www.ywca.net:


Opportunities:

As a team, we used affinity diagramming. We choose this methodology as it taps into the team's creativity and intuition skills. As a result, the pain-points were organised into natural relationships which highlighted the top level opportunities that YWCA Victoria could take advantage of.

Above: Affinity diagram breakdown of the opportunities for YWCA Victoria

Opportunities highlighted:


Recommendations:

Above: Recommendations based on highlighted opportunities


2.3 Personas

Introduction:

We built our personas from our survey and one-on-one interviews. We compared patterns in the quantitative data gathered, as well as their behavioural and personalities traits. From this data, we were able to construct three different types of personas, all offering different needs and pain-points.


Persona 1:


Persona 2:


Persona 3:

Above: Visual construction of the 3 personas

Three personas representing different types of users:

From the three personas we created, we chose Business Belinda as the main persona to focus our design solutions around. The decision was based on the large portion of our survey users having the same demographic and psychographic details.


2.4 Scenarios & Tasks

Introduction:

 

We produced several different types of scenarios that our persona (Business Belinda) could be using the YWCA Victoria website for.

Method:

We based our user scenarios on pain-points that were highlighted from our user surveys, as well as comments made during the one-on-one interviews.

Results:

Scenario 1

Belinda has just moved to Melbourne to work in a new law firm. She has previously been involved with the YWCA in Perth. She's curious to see what the YWCA Victoria offers. She logs into the YWCA Victoria website and sees pleased to see that Clementine Ford is speaking at an event that the YWCA Victoria are hosting. She decides to purchase a ticket.

Scenario 2:

Every morning Belinda takes the train into the CBD to work. She uses this downtime to catch up on the news, and see what’s happening around town. She's doesn’t go to any particular news sites, but instead just relies on her social media platforms’ feeds to see what’s happening. She see that there they currently trying to raise some money to help young women who have been in abusive relationships learn self defence. She believes every woman should know how to defend themselves, she goes into the YWCA Victoria’s website to go and donate to this cause.

Scenario 3:

Belinda is frustrated with how the Law industry is over crowded by men. She wants to see more Law articles on females doing great things in this field. She knows that YWCA Victoria understands her frustrations. She has decided to take things into her own hands and wants to write an article about her work and post it through the YWCA Victoria blog. She goes onto the website to find out who she can contact to do this.


Selected Scenario

We selected Scenario 1 to test on our users. We chose this scenario because from our user research, there were a lot pain-points within this process, as well as it being an area that YWCA Victoria wants to start expanding on.

2.5 User-flows

Introduction:

We created two user flows that represent the previous user flow and the proposed user flow that we will be testing. The first user-flows displays the what the current golden path is for purchasing tickets on the current YWCA Victoria’s website. The second user-flow displays the golden path for the proposed YWCA Victoria’s website

Current user flow:

Proposed and tested user flow:


2.6 Journey Map

2.6.1 Current User Experience

Below is the current user journey map for Business Belinda. This map based on a series of steps which represents her interactions searching for events with the current YWCA Victoria website.

2.6.2 New User Experience

Below is the new user journey map for Business Belinda. This map based on a series of steps which represents her interactions searching for events with the new design of YWCA Victoria’s website.

 

2.7 Scenario & Tasks

Belinda has just moved to Melbourne to work in a new law firm. She has previously been involved with the YWCA in Perth, and she's curious to see what the Victorian branch offers. She logs into the YWCA Victoria website and is pleased to see that Clementine Ford is speaking at an event which YWCA Victoria are hosting. She decides to purchase a ticket.

Task 1:

1.0        What are your first impressions?

1.1        Find the Clementine Ford event

1.2        Purchase 1 ticket for yourself

Card Details

Card Type: Any

Card number: 13476297402

Name: Your first name

Expired date: 08/15

CVC: 223

Task 2:

2.0         Locate the donation button

2.1         Did you find it easily?

2.2         Are there any factors that would stop you from donating?


3. Competitive Analysis

Introduction:

We researched the following companies’ sites to do a competitive analysis as a benchmark for YWCA Victoria, and where they sit in the market. The competitors we used were identified from the list provided by YWCA Victoria. They were selected as the top five female/feminism focused sites, and one sports site recommended by the CEO.

Competitors from survey results:

3.1 Method

As as team, we identified a range of features to look for on the competitors’ websites - this was largely based on the participants’ pain-points and feedback from the user research. We also created a set of evaluation criteria with which to rate each site’s performance for each feature and the ease of findability.

Evaluation:

  1. Took so long we almost gave up looking and provided minimal information
  2. Could locate but look a while and provided minimal information
  3. Experience could be better, but could also be worse
  4. Good but needs could benefit from little more work
  5. Great, couldn’t be any better

      N/A. Not Available

Core tasks based on user research pain-points:


Features:

Header        

What information/ is placed in this section of real-estate

Global Navigation

Global navigation labelling

Ease of searching through the navigation

Secondary Navigation

Type of interaction/ feature used

Secondary navigation labelling

First Impressions

Can we understand what their values from the homepage?

Membership

Do they offer membership?

Ease of findability?

Social Media

What type of social media are they using for their organisation?

How clearly do they promote this within competitors' websites?

Contact Details

What details to they provide users to contact them on?  

Where do they place content details within the site?

Design Structure

How many columns?  

Responsive or not?

Donations

Where its located within the site

Ease of findability

How complicated was the form/payment

Events

What/where ‘events’ is labeled as under the navigation  

Ease of fundability

Single event page structure

We researched a selection of websites from the list, and compiled our findings into a spreadsheet for further analysis. The spreadsheet includes both qualitative and quantitative data.

3.2 Findings

Figure 3.1 Summary ratings of each feature on the competitors sites (Refer to Appendix C for full detailed results of feature analysis.)

3.3 Summary

50% of the competitors here were not designed to be responsive and had very poor multi-device experiences. Daily life had a separate mobile version of the website; Get Up! and Collective Shout were both built in a responsive structure.

All competitors (with the exception of Get Up! who had no secondary navigation) use dropdown menus for their navigation. It’s effective to use when you have a large amount of secondary content, and being used via a mobile.

For all websites that allowed online donations, this button was located in the top right corner of the sites page.

Daily Life had social media features integrated into every piece of content within their site. This reflects back on their high presence within the social media realm.

Collingwood was the most transparent when providing users with multiple contact details. It was also interesting to see that Daily Life has listed their senior managers email addresses, we assume for the purpose of people wanting to write content.

UN Women provided users the option to donate to the specific campaigns they are currently running. Was an effective structure with information about the cause and what their donation could achieve.

3.4 Recommendations

Structure to be designed in modules and two columns for easy responsive breakdown structure

Having a clean and simple header which contains a small 2 lined intro about who YWCA Victoria is and what their values are, as well as placing a call for action to sign up to their newsletter.

Global navigation structure not to be done in a dropdown style, instead using a double overlapping menu. The secondary level overlaps the global level, with a button to allow the user to go back on global navigation (a convention used in a lot of app design).

Donation button to be located at the top of the global navigation bar in a bright and contrasting colour, so it is what the eye sees second to the organisation’s logo.

Social media integration on all content, as most of the content will be pushed through social media.

Providing the following details on the contact page:

Events to be clearly displayed within the global navigation, and on the product page that prices, location, and time are clearly displayed, as well as second “Buy tickets” button above the fold.


4. Site Audit and Analytics Report

We performed a site audit using an SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) Spider Tool and a detailed assessment on YWCA Victoria CMS Web analytics. Refer to Appendix D1 for a tutorial walk through on  how to analyse and run an in-house site audit.

In particular for YWCA Victoria analytics, we were able to identify traffic sources, unique traffic from different devices (desktop/laptop, tablets and mobile devices) and to assess the searchability of the YWCA Victoria website.

4.1 Findability

YWCA Victoria CMS web analytics provided the team with useful data for:

Unfortunately, it does not provide sufficient data for the team to identify:

4.1.1 Understanding Visits

Visitors’ behaviour can provide an insight into content consumption patterns, content publishing schedules, sources, campaigns, and outcomes. A general logged summary report retrieved from YWCA Victoria’s web analytics provided the team with data of 3205 unique visitors from July 7th to August 7th 2015.

The general logged summary report does not have any record of returning visitors. The team was unable to determine how often each particular user visits the website in a given time, or the time between each visit from the same user. Without the Length of Visit and Depth of Visit of each user’s visit, the team was unable to assess what each user was doing when they arrived on the YWCA Victoria website.

Figure 4.1 - General summary of the YWCA Victoria website analytics

4.1.2 Traffic Source

The traffic source data report provides a clear indication of the YWCA Victoria website’s current online marketing strength.

Figure 4.2 - Balanced portfolio traffic source vs. YWCA Victoria current traffic source

A diversified customer acquisition strategy, based on expert evaluation, involves a balanced traffic source of 40% Search Engine, 30% Referrer Sites, 20% Direct Traffic and 10% Campaigns, as shown in the chart above in blue.

The YWCA Victoria website traffic source (in red on the chart above) is currently 22.75% Search Engine, 9.92% Referrer Sites, 67.33% Direct Traffic and 0% Campaigns. This shows that the majority of traffic is via Direct Traffic - people who already know about YWCA Victoria.  It is important to increase organic search results from Google’s search engine, to gain more engagement and an expanded audience (as 20% out of the 22.75% search engine traffic is coming from Google). Refer to 4.1.4 AdWords Keyword Planner to manipulate keywords results.

Figure 4.3 - Traffic source from referrers 

The current data does not provide sufficient metrics to analyse where the traffic is coming from. In order to optimise referrer sites’ traffic from 9.92% to 20%, YWCA Victoria has to find partners that will link YWCA Victoria causes (events, write up about YWCA Victoria and otherwise link to YWCA Victoria URL.) Implementation of tracking codes for each referrer site enables measurement of traffic and provides a clear indication of which referrer site or sites for YWCA Victoria to focus on for audience growth.

YWCA Victoria should consider diversifying traffic to the website by creating campaigns such as email campaigns, banner ad campaigns, social media display campaigns (e.g. Facebook, Instagram and Twitter) inviting audiences to the YWCA Victoria website.

 4.1.3 Keywords Result

In 2013, Google switched all keyword searches over to encrypted searches using HTTPS, which caused all keywords data user tracking within web analytics software to no longer work.

Figure 4.4 - Keywords search under YWCA Victoria CMS web analytics

Therefore, the keywords retrieved from YWCA Victoria’s CMS web analytics (shown above) identify keywords searched from other search engines, such as Ask, Bing and Yahoo.

Keywords such as YWCA Melbourne Accommodation, YWCA Melbourne, YWCA of Melbourne, ASSISTA, YWCA Victoria, YWCA Melbourne Jobs etc reflect known keyword searches, identifying that users who were searching knew about YWCA Victoria beforehand.

Figure 4.5 - Traffic source from Search Engines

The team had to uncover more insights to discover what keywords would provide the best performance in terms of keyword search result. Looking at Google Adwords (Google’s online advertising program) helped identify the idea and volume of words that would be there.

4.1.4 AdWords Keyword Planner

Google AdWords is an online advertising service and Google’s main source of revenue. It enables advertisers to display brief, keyword-based ads at the top of Google searches.

While we aren’t going to advise you on advertising, AdWords’ Keyword Planner tool can be freely used for SEO (Search Engine Optimisation).

Opening the tool and inputting a number of keywords and the corresponding website will display the average number of relevant searches over a time period. These results can be used to determine which keywords are more likely to be searched for and, therefore, which keywords to use in the website’s text content. See Appendix D2 of the report for detailed instructions on using this tool.

We threw over 40 words and phrases into the keyword planner at the same time to see which ones ranked well and which ones didn’t. The high- and middle-ranking ones should be used deliberately to increase YWCA Victoria’s SEO (Search Engine Optimisation). The rest, while they shouldn’t be avoided, should not be relied on to boost SEO.

Figure 4.6 - Screen 1 (Google Adwords High Ranks)

Figure 4.7 - Screen 2 (Google Adwords Middle Ranks)


Figure 4.8 - Screen 3 (Google Adwords Low Ranks)


4.1.5 Top Landing Pages

Figure 4.9 - Current Sitemap indicated with page visits

The distribution of the top landing pages retrieved from Entry Pages Report focus on a huge number of niches in the long tail. According to Chris Anderson the Long Tail had been largely neglected until recently in favor of the Short Head of hits. When consumers are offered infinite choice, the true shape of demand is revealed.

Figure 4.10 - Number of page visits vs. Pages  

It is evident that visitors to YWCA Victoria’s website are interested in the following URLs:


Figure 4.11 - Page Visits data under YWCA Victoria CMS web analytics

YWCA Victoria CMS web analytics do not provide any bounce rates. It is important to analyse the bounce rates as the data clearly identifies which pages on the website users are refusing to click through.

Bounce rates indicate issues such as:

  1. Campaigns and SEO problems - bringing in the wrong users (audience).
  2. Bad user experience - where users are unable to find information and call-to-action buttons.

Without the bounce rate data, the team was only able to provide recommendations for YWCA Victoria to perform (once Google analytics has been implemented).

4.2 Users’ Browsers and Operating System

55.14% of users browsing YWCA Victoria website use MAC operating systems, but the browsers data shows 83.17% Internet Explorer 6 and several outdated browsers such as Internet Explorer 3 and Firefox 1. Refer to Figure 3.8 below to see the image capture of current CMS web analytics data. Not only does the data not match up, it does not indicate what IOS users are on. Therefore, we were unable to identify which device is used to access YWCA Victoria website. The information is crucial for YWCA Victoria to focus on, in particular the devices which have the largest amount of traffic.

It is evident that YWCA Victoria CMS has not been updated, as the analytics are using old data to match the users to the browsers and operating systems. Updating the CMS or implementing Google Analytics will provide an up-to-date source of data.


Figure 4.12 - YWCA Victoria CMS web analytics data on users’ browsers and operating systems


4.3 Country of Origin

58.5% of the traffic is coming from United States. The team performed a quick search, and discovered YMCA’s United States site URL - http://www.ymca.net/ is inherently similar to YWCA Victoria’s website URL - http://www.ywca.net/; this explains the large amount of traffic from the United States.

Without the bounce rates data, it was assumed that the large amount of traffic pouring in from the United States left the website quickly.

Figure 4.13 - YWCA Victoria CMS web analytics


4.2 Issues

4.3 Recommendations

It is recommended that YWCA Victoria focus on creating great content and implementing the following marketing strategies:

http://www.screamingfrog.co.uk/seo-spider/


5. Information Architecture

Introduction

Our initial sitemap of YWCA Victoria’s current website was, based on the layout of the current global navigation. However, to determine the best version for the high-fidelity prototype and recommendations, we used an SEO spider called Screaming Frog to identify all pages on the site. In doing so, we were able to determine all the website’s pages and plot out a hierarchical sitemap (Current) displaying levels 0-3 (‘Home’ being 0).

Using the SEO spider, we discovered a number of pages that weren’t findable or reachable from the current site navigation. Additionally, we discovered how an entire section of the site - the News section - had been partially hidden from public view, and figured out precisely what content it had in it.

After identifying a variety of problems with the current site’s information architecture, we devised two new sitemap hierarchies (Options 1 and 2) to test against each other and against the current version. Ignoring the obvious issues we were going to resolve regardless (these being donations, membership, news, and events), the purpose of these tests was to determine the most ideal set-up of the other existing sections and subsections.

Remote testing on basic interfaces with those different layouts confirmed our assumptions about the current site’s poor layout - as well as revealing that while virtually everything we tested benefits from a strong call-to-action, some sections (namely Advocacy) need it considerably more, and some can stand to be consolidated under other section headings (services for young women, children, and housing services all being placed under ‘support services’).

After analysing our remote testing results, we combined the best parts of Options 1 and 2 to create the final sitemap we are presenting, which is our recommended layout for further development.


5.1 Current Sitemap (Live)

Despite issues on the front-end (discussed previously), the existing live sitemap for YWCA Victoria is actually fairly simple (with the exception of the News section, explained below). The level 1 navigation consists of the four major sections (from left to right) ‘About Us’, ‘What We Do’, ‘Get Involved’, and ‘News’. These four sections make up the current site’s global navigation (although ‘News’ is presently not on the global navigation bar itself). Each of these has six or seven subsections, which make up level 2.

Figure 5.1

The only one of the sections to extend down to level 3 is ‘News’ - each of its six subsections has a further number of child pages, 67 in total. Figure 5.2 shows an example below, expanding on the Student Blogs:

Figure 5.2

All subsections’ sitemaps are in the appendices.

5.1.1 Problems

The main problem arises from the subsection labeled as ‘Random Articles’. When viewing the current site’s hierarchy, there are no less than 47 additional news articles that haven’t been filed properly in the six subsections which the rest are in - instead, they are strewn everywhere. Given that none of the articles have dates, and that there is a reasonable amount of overlap between the six news subsections and the extras, it is virtually impossible to refile these other articles without prior knowledge. The articles are also very difficult to find from the public side of the site.

Additionally, because of how they are stored within the hierarchy, these 47 articles are technically level 2 when they should be level 3 where the rest of them are. This reduces the accessibility of the orderly filed articles by essentially hiding them in the unordered mess that ensues. Anyone who needs to change anything behind the scenes is going to have trouble with the existing layout. Below is a representation of what this looks like on a sitemap:

Figure 5.3

Except in a seemingly random order, with the subsections we want (on the left) somewhere in the middle of all that. And then all the level 3 navigation is underneath that.

A band-aid fix would be to stick all of those extras in an archive folder on level 2, so they at least don’t pollute the back-end navigation for whoever has to deal with it. But that is, as said, a band-aid fix - not a permanent solution. In an ideal world, those articles would be filed appropriately by date and subject matter. Deleting the extras would cause problems for SEO, so that isn’t an option right now.


5.2 New Global Navigation and Sitemaps

Two new sets of global navigation sections were devised to be tested against the current navigation and each other.

5.2.1 Option 1

Option 1 features Donations, Membership, Events and Careers with their own calls-to-action, as well as reinstating the news section (with some modifications), renaming ‘What We Do’ to ‘Support Services’, and rearranging the contents of Support Services, Get Involved, and About Us. Figure 5.4, below, displays an expanded version of the interface shown to testers:

Figure 5.4

Option 2

Option 2 features Women’s Advocacy having its own section heading and call-to-action, as well as the various services being grouped under three sections: services for ‘Young Women’, ‘Children’ and ‘Housing’. The contents were also shuffled around again. Figure 5.5, below, shows an expanded version of the interface shown to testers:

Figure 5.5


5.3 Testing & Findings

Testing was conducted remotely, using a tree testing program called Treejack. We created three surveys, each with the same set of questions (explained in the figures below), but each with a different site hierarchy. The ‘Current Site’, ‘Option 1’, and ‘Option 2’ layouts were tested by 5, 6 and 8 participants respectively, with no participant testing more than one layout. Figures 5.6, 5.7 and 5.8 detail the tasks used and their aims, results for each layout, and contextual recommendations based on the results.

Figure 5.6

Task 1: Student Living

You have just been accepted into Melbourne University. You are currently living in out in the countryside of Melbourne, and cannot afford private renting in the city. You go into the YWCA Victoria website to see if they can provide you with living help.

Aims

Results

Recommendations

To determine which sections participants were more likely to open while looking for housing services.

Current Site

40% of participants went to ‘About Us’ then ‘About Social Housing Victoria’.

Another 40% went to ‘What We Do’ then ‘Housing Services’.

The other 20% failed the task.

The ‘About Social Housing Victoria’ should be either merged with the ‘Housing Services’ or equivalent section, placed in the same section, removed entirely, or buried deep enough that it doesn’t confuse users. Failing that, it should definitely be linked.

Options 1 and 2 both tested very well on this task, and either could be used depending on tests on similar headings. The best method would be to pick the other sections first and choose whichever of these is consistent with that theme.

Further Analysis:

‘What We Do’ is NOT a strong call-to-action, and lacking other options, most users turned to ‘Get Involved’ for tests using the current site’s layout.

‘Housing Services’ was relatively easy to find, even on the current site, but participants also went to the corresponding ‘about’ subsection. This wouldn’t be a bad idea, if the current site linked that to anything (it doesn’t).

Option 1


All participants completed the task by going to ‘Support Services’ then ‘Housing Services’.

One user who checked two other sections before completing the task like the others.

Option 2

All participants completed the task by going to ‘Housing Services’ then ‘Housing for Students’, although one went to ‘About Social Housing Victoria’ in between.

Figure 5.7

Task 2: Mentorship

You are a female lawyer. You want help younger girls to help them build strength/ confidence within themselves as well as providing support. You go to YWCA Victoria to sign-up to be part of their mentorship program.

Aims

Results

Recommendations

To determine which sections participants were more likely to open while trying to sign up to be a mentor, and to see whether ‘volunteer’ had a stronger call to action.

Current Site

80% of participants failed the task.

The remaining participant completed the task, but took over six times as many clicks in order to do so.

100% of participants first went to ‘Get Involved’. This was not where it was, but should have been.

Mentoring should have its own call-to-action, ideally in the sidebar. To differentiate between users looking to provide mentoring and looking to receive mentoring, those sections should be respectively organized as follows (or very similar):

For mentors -

Home -> Get Involved -> Become a Mentor

For students -

Home -> Support Services -> Mentoring Programs

OR

Home -> Services for Young Women -> Mentoring Programs

It should be noted that ‘Volunteering’ is not as clear a call-to-action for Mentoring, although it suffices in its absence.

Pages intended as portals for students seeking mentorship absolutely must have links to pages for those looking to provide mentoring, as searching for mentor info via the programs is recurring theme.

Option 1 presented the best method for this, although those that failed Option 2 didn’t come close to the right section.

Option 1

66% of participants completed the task by going to ‘Get Involved’ then ‘Become a Mentor’, mostly without having to look around first.

The remaining participants were split between ‘Assista Mentoring’ (in this case, the portal for people being mentored) and ‘Volunteering’, both of which are relevant areas.

Option 2

63% of participants completed the task by going to ‘Get Involved’ then ‘Volunteering’ and then ‘Mentoring’.

One participant went to ‘Services for Young Women’ then ‘Assista Mentoring Program’, which is close.

The remaining 25% failed the task, ending up in ‘Women's’ Advocacy’.


Figure 5.8

Task 3: Advocacy

You are long time feminist and advocate for women's equality. You go into the YWCA Victoria website to find out about their values and what they are fighting for now, and to see if there is anything you can get involved in on the advocacy side.

Aims

Results

Recommendations

To determine which sections participants were more likely to open while trying to research YWCA Victoria’s values and advocacy options, and to see how well the concept of advocacy is understood.

Current Site

All participants failed the task, in one case despite performing a large number of actions towards completing the task.

For a number of reasons, ‘Advocacy’ should have its own call-to-action on the homepage, whether it be a linked section in the global navigation or sidebar, or as a link near the top of the homepage.

Advocacy is a big deal for YWCA Victoria, so it makes sense for that to be one of their main info sections.

Not everyone understands the concept of Advocacy, so without it having a call-to-action via a direct link, it isn’t entirely clear where to go looking for it.

Option 2 presented the best method for this. ‘About Us’ should undoubtedly have obvious - and well described - links to Advocacy and similarly important topics.

Advocacy could also be removed as a specific section, seeing as most news and blog articles essentially are advocacy to begin with.

Option 1

50% of participants completed the task by going to ‘About Us’ then ‘Women's’ Advocacy’.

The other 50% failed the task, none coming close - and one visiting many other pages, to no avail.

Option 2

All but one participant completed the task by selecting ‘Women's’ Advocacy’ from the home menu.

The other participant went into ‘About Us’ instead.


5.3.1 In-depth Analysis - Task 2 (Mentoring)

The objective of this task was to reach the area of the site where people could sign up to be mentors for YWCA Victoria.

Task 2 Test on Current Site Layout

Figures 4.9, 4.10, and 4.11 detail the results of this task on the current interface. In this case, the correct path was ‘What We Do’ -> ‘Assista Mentoring Program’.

The main take-aways here are as follows:

Shown in Figure 5.9, 80% of participants failed the task, and the other 20% only succeeded indirectly.

Shown in Figure 5.10, participants went to a total of six different incorrect pages.

Shown in Figure 5.11, all participants went to ‘Get Involved’ first, and 80% of them stayed there and picked an incorrect page. This implies that ‘Get Involved’ is a strong call-to-action and that ‘What We Do’ is not. This confirms an earlier hypothesis, that the page the testers are looking for should logically be found under ‘Get Involved’. Also, the only participant to reach the correct page performed many more actions to do so and took much longer.

Overall, the current site did not sufficiently enable participants to complete this task.

Figure 5.9

Figure 5.10

Figure 5.11


Task 2 Test on Option 1 Layout

Figures 5.12, 5.13, and 5.14 detail the results of this task on the current interface. In this case, the correct path was ‘Get Involved’ -> ‘Become a Mentor’.

The main take-aways here are as follows:

Shown in Figure 5.12, 67% of participants completed the task, with the remaining 33% failing the task.

Shown in Figure 5.13, participants visited four incorrect pages (three incorrect branches), down from six on the current site; additionally, three of these pages were relevant to the task, if not precisely correct.

Shown in Figures 4.13 and 4.14, the two incorrect answers submitted were pages that could have had the correct content. This, in particular, implies that these pages and the correct ‘Become a Mentor’ page should be linked together.

Shown in Figure 5.14, participants took far less steps to find their choice of final page.

Overall, Option 1 presents a stark improvement over the current site.

Figure 5.12


Figure 5.13

Figure 5.14


Task 2 Test on Option 2 Layout

Figures 5.15, 5.16, and 5.17 detail the results of this task on the current interface. In this case, the correct path was ‘Get Involved’ -> ‘Volunteering’ -> ‘Mentoring’.

The main take-aways here are as follows:

Shown in Figure 5.15, 63% of participants completed the task, and the other 38% failed the task.

Shown in Figure 5.16, participants visited four incorrect pages (two incorrect branches, down from three from Option 1).

Shown in Figures 4.16 and 4.17, one of the participants who chose incorrectly ended on the still-relevant page of ‘Assista Mentoring Program’, similar to in the Option 1 tests. This further illustrates the need for these sections to be linked.

Shown in Figure 5.17, all participants who chose the correct path made no deviations from it. This implies that this interface’s extra level of hierarchy necessary to reach the end page is not a hindrance, provided with strong enough calls-to-action on each level.

Overall, Option 2 has around the same level of effectiveness for this task as Option 1 (and, again, much more than the current site).

Figure 5.15


Figure 5.16

Figure 5.17


5.4 Recommendations

The following lists our recommended modifications for the current site layout:

1. Provide strong calls-to-action in the global navigation for donations, membership, news, and events.

For donations, news, and events, each of these deserve a section heading in global navigation.

Membership is a special case, as it is worth noting that becoming a member is something that people are rarely going to do more than once. Therefore, it doesn’t need to be intrusive and in-your-face for regular use of the site - just easily findable when it’s needed. Our recommended sitemap places it in a subsection of ‘Get Involved’, which is itself a decent call to action and intuitive enough for people wanting to join the community.

This is actually where membership is on the current site - however, it still is missing the necessary background info on being a member, as stated in the next recommendation.

2. Provide motivation for people to donate or become members, rather than simply presenting them with a form to fill out. This is easily accomplished by displaying specific causes to donate to and the benefits of becoming a member, which then proceeds to the appropriate form.

3. Rename ‘What We Do’ to provide a stronger call-to-action. This is fairly simple: namely, ‘What We Do’ isn’t particularly obvious as to what it contains on the current site, and it needs to be changed into something else. We have chosen ‘Support Services’ for this section.

4. Re-organise subsections within the main sections of the global navigation until they make sense. The major reordering we’ve done has been shifting a few things into ‘About Us’ and consolidating a number of pages, as well as the various news sections. Most pages under ‘About Us’, ‘Get Involved’ and ‘Support Services’ (i.e. ‘What We Do’) are still more-or-less grouped under the same sections in the new sitemap as in the current, as catalogued by Figure 5.19.

Nonetheless, it is a good idea to do this internally as well, just to see if you have any changes you want to make.

5. Put ‘Housing Services’ and ‘About Social Housing Victoria’ in the same section and link them, or merge them. We have opted for the same section, but merging is still an idea. This is to decrease confusion, as testers on the current site frequently went to ‘About Social Housing Victoria’ while looking for housing, and that page doesn’t provide any real help or even link to the page they want.

6. Group all services under a few specific headings to increase findability. We have actually taken this a step further by grouping ‘Services for Young Women’, ‘Services for Children’ and ‘Housing Services’ all under the blanket section heading of ‘Support Services’ due to space constraints in the global navigation. ‘Support Services’ is itself a strong call-to-action and performed well in the remote testing sessions.

7. Place Advocacy in the global navigation to provide it with the strong call-to-action it requires. Testing found that participants found this section much more easily with a strong call-to-action, as in Option 2; additionally, the topic is one of YWCA Victoria’s main themes, therefore it should be more prominent.

Recommended Sitemap

With those recommendations in mind, we created the final recommended sitemap displayed in Figure 5.18, below:

Figure 5.18

The global navigation sections (Level 1), from left to right, are as follows:


Page List & Purpose Table

The table shown in Figure 5.19 lists all pages on the recommended sitemap, detailing for each page what section it’s in, what it’s purpose is, where it is (if at all) on the current sitemap, and any other important notes.

Figure 5.19

Section

Page Name & Number

Purpose

Current Position / Notes

Home

Home

0.0

Promotes YWCA Victoria's news, activities and services.

Provides navigation to the rest of the site.

Does what the old home page does but better - and prettier.

Footer

Contact Us

0.1

Provides contact details for YWCA Victoria's call center.

Current 0.1

Links to 8.0 (itself).

Footer

Membership

0.2

Provides a link to apply for YWCA Victoria membership.

Current 3.2

Links to 4.1 (itself).

Location at bottom of page means users will have scrolled through content and learned about the organisation before reaching this

Footer

Subscribe

0.3

Provides a link for users to subscribe to YWCA Victoria.

Current 0.3

Footer

Sitemap

0.4

Provides navigable sitemap for users who prefer one.

NEW

Footer

Disclaimer

0.5

Self-insurance for YWCA Victoria.

Current 0.6

Footer

Privacy

0.6

Ensure users that the personal information they give to YWCA Victoria is confidential.

Current 0.5

Index

Inspirational Quotes

0.7

Storage of inspirational quotes.

Contains source info for quotes.

NEW

Not publicly accessible.

Donate

Donate

1.0

Inspires users to donate to YWCA Victoria and/or their causes.

Current 0.4/3.4

Section header in global navigation.

Donate

Our Causes

1.1

Describes YWCA Victoria's specific causes, link to donation form.

NEW

Donate

Donation Form

1.2

Enables users to donate

Currently part of 0.4/3.4

Support Services

Support Services

2.0

Contains services for users looking to YWCA Victoria to receive help.

Derived from current 2.0.

Section header in global navigation.

Blanket section name encompassing three sections that COULD all be in global navigation; this way conserves space. Has a strong call-to-action.

Support Services

Services for Young Women

2.1

Contains services tailored towards young women.

NEW; created to contain suitable child sections.

Support Services

Assista Mentoring Program

2.1.1

Matches young women with volunteer female mentors, who guide them on their own path to independence.

Current 2.4

Support Services

Student Leadership Program

2.1.2

Provides scholarships for university.

Current 3.9

Support Services

SheLeads

2.1.3

Women's leadership movement.

Current 2.8

Page exists in current back-end but is not linked to the public.

Support Services

Women Achieving New Directions

2.1.4

Program to encourage single women's economic and social participation.

Current 2.7

Support Services

Y Rowing Centre

2.1.5

Social opportunity for people of all ages to learn to row.

Current 2.6

Support Services

Services for Children

2.2

Contains services tailored towards children.

NEW; created to contain suitable child sections.

Support Services

Childcare Placement Services

2.2.1

Provides childcare placement.

Current 2.5

Support Services

Bendigo Region School Holiday Program

2.2.2

Details a school holiday program in the Bendigo Region.

Current 2.9

Page exists in current back-end but is not linked to the public.

Support Services

Housing Services

2.3

Contains housing services.

NEW; created to contain suitable child sections.

Support Services

Housing for Students

2.3.1

Provides housing for university students.

Derived from current 2.3.

Links to 2.3.2 and vice versa.

Support Services

About Social Housing Victoria

2.3.2

About page for Social Housing Victoria.

Current 1.2

Links to 2.3.1 and vice versa.

Events

Events

3.0

Contains a list of (and links to) current and past events run by YWCA Victoria.

Current 4.6

Section header in global navigation.

Events

Individual Events

3.1 - 3.x

Individual event pages linked from the Events section or the home page.

Current 4.6.1 - 4.6.x

Unknown amount of pages, to be expanded on in the future.

Get Involved

Get Involved

4.0

Contains membership and subsections for users looking to volunteer or otherwise help out YWCA Victoria members.

Current 3.0

Section header in global navigation.

Get Involved

Membership

4.1

Link to membership process.

Current 3.2

Get Involved

Membership Benefits

4.1.1

Inspire users to become members by noting the advantages and benefits.

Displays specific membership types.

NEW.

Get Involved

Membership Application Form

4.1.2

Enables users to become members.

Currently part of 3.2.

Get Involved

Volunteering

4.2

Links to general-purpose volunteering and other options not listed in subsections.

Current 3.8, also currently links from 2.4.

Get Involved

Be a Mentor

4.3

Enables users to become mentors for the mentorship program.

Currently links from 2.4

Testing determined that this was a strong call-to-action such that it should be separated from the ambiguous term of 'volunteering'. This will likely apply to other specific methods of volunteering as well.

Women's Advocacy

Women's Advocacy

5.0

Contains subsections pertaining to women's advocacy.

Current 2.2

Section header in global navigation.

Testing determined that this needs its own subsection, as the term is poorly understood. Has a strong call-to-action in and of itself, but lacking this, testers were unsure as to which section it would be in.

Women's Advocacy

What We Do

5.1

Describes YWCA Victoria's advocacy.

Current 2.0

Women's Advocacy

Issues We Care About

5.2

Lists specific advocacy issues YWCA Victoria is interested in.

Current 4.5

News & Blog

News & Blog

6.0

Contains YWCA Victoria's News and Blog posts.

Derived from 4.0, 4.1, 4.4

Section header in global navigation.

Not publicly advertised on the current site, although reachable.

News & Blog

Y News

6.1

Contains a list of (and links to) current and past news from YWCA Victoria.

Current 4.1

News & Blog

Individual

News Posts

6.1.1 - 6.1.x

Individual news pages linked from the Y News section or the home page.

Current 4.1.1 - 4.1.x

News & Blog

YWCA Victoria Blog

6.2

Contains a list of (and links to) current and past blog posts from YWCA Victoria's Blog.

(Posts can come with videos.)

Current 4.4

News & Blog

Individual

Blog Posts

6.2.1 - 6.2.x

Individual blog posts linked from the Blog section or the home page.

Current 4.4.1 - 4.4.x

About Us

About Us

7.0

Contains subsections pertaining to YWCA Victoria's history and inner workings.

Derived from current 1.0, 1.1, 2.1, 3.1.

Section header in global navigation.

About Us

Our History

7.1

Details the history of YWCA Victoria and how it ties in with the global YWCA organisation.

Current 1.4

About Us

Annual Report

7.2

Annual report.

Current site has this, buried somewhere.

About Us

Board Members

7.3

List of current YWCA Victoria board members.

Current 1.3

About Us

Board Member Recruitment

7.3.1

Details the recruitment process for board members.

NEW

About Us

YWCA World Council

7.4

Details the 2011 YWCA World Council meeting.

Current 4.2

About Us

Investments & Partnerships

7.5

Details those invested in and partnered with YWCA Victoria.

Current 3.7

About Us

YWCA & the Media

7.6

Another outlet to talk about Women's Advocacy.

Current 4.3

Links to Women's Advocacy.

About Us

Careers

7.7

Offers career opportunities for those interested in working with YWCA Victoria.

Current 1.6

Second-most viewed page on the current site after the home page, according to an analytic sample.

About Us

FAQs

7.8

Frequently Asked Questions.

Current 1.5

Contact Us

Contact Us

8.0

Displays contact information and links to the inbuilt contact form.

Current 0.1

Contact Us

Contact Form

8.1

Enables users to contact YWCA Victoria from within the site.

Part of current 0.1, should be separate.

6. Conceptualisation

6.1 Navigation

Figure 6.1: Header & Footer

Figure 6.2: Menu - First Level

Figure 6.3: Menu - Second Level


Figure 6.4: Second Level


6.2 Homepage

Figure 6.5: Homepage Part 1

Figure 6.6: Homepage Part 2


6.3 Events Home

Figure 6.7: Events Home Part 1


Figure 6.8: Event Home Part 2


6.4 Individual Event Pages

Figure 6.9: Event Page Part 1


Figure 6.10: Event Page Part 2


6.5 Checkout

Figure 6.11: Checkout Part 1

Figure 6.12: Checkout Part 2


7. Usability Testing

7.1 User Test report

The purpose of the low fidelity paper prototype test is to test the usability of the new homepage layout and to understand the mental model of the users. Tasks were created to test the user behaviour towards the pathway designs, findability of YWCA Victoria offers and the understandability of YWCA Victoria causes. Key findings were retrieved through assessing the users’ navigations through the path they take. After validating the team’s low fidelity paper prototype test, the team started on high-level fidelity prototyping using the industry-standard software Axure RP.

Usability testing with a new group of user participants provided insights for immediate improvements to be optimised for better user experience. Second iterations were made on the high-level fidelity prototype for the third round of usability testing, where users were recruited by the client, in-house and guerilla.

7.1.1 User Participant Recruitment

Based on the main user characteristic of the selected persona, Social Sarah (23 year old), a matrix was created to identify a preliminary list of users with (1) as bad and (5) as very good.

Table 7.1 User Participants matrix for Usability Testing 1 on low fidelity.

User Groups

Tech Knowledge

Event Booking Knowledge

Socialist

Sarah, 23

Student

5

5

User Participant 1

Daniel Setiawan, 32

User Experience Consultant

5

5

User Participant 2

Tung Van Trung, 32

User Experience Consultant

5

5

User Participant 3

Rita Isareenuruk, 32

User Experience Designer

5

5


Table 7.2 User Participant matrix for 2nd round of Usability Testing using industry standard high-level fidelity prototype Axure.

User Groups

Tech Knowledge

Event Booking Knowledge

Socialist

Sarah, 23

Student

5

5

User Participant 1

Rita Isareenuruk, 32

User Experience Designer

5

5

User Participant 2

Jacinta McMahon, 32

User Experience Designer

5

5

User Participant 3

Jacqueline Chang, 24

User Experience and Visual Designer

5

5

Table 7.3 User Participant matrix for 3rd round of Usability Testing using industry standard high-level fidelity prototype Axure.

User Groups

Tech Knowledge

Event Booking Knowledge

Socialist

Sarah, 23

Student

5

5

User Participant 1

Emily Briggs, 23

Volunteer Resource Assistant
Cancer Council

5

5

User Participant 2

Monique Aronica, 28

User Experience Designer

5

5

User Participant 3

Fiona Slocombe, 32

User Experience Designer

5

5

User Participant 4

Matilda Mattsson, 23

Cafe Waitress

5

5

7.1.2 Assigned Tasks based on pathways

Tasks assigned to the user participants were as follows:

  1. Browse for featured events / Find the Clementine Ford event.
  2. Purchase 2 tickets.

The tasks were chosen to test that the

  1. Events element on the homepage is clear for users.
  2. Icons and labels are not an issue for users.
  3. The new side menu is not confusing for users.
  4. Navigation is not confusing.
  5. Language used in prompt is not confusing.
  6. Carrying out the tasks is smooth (no stages of user drop off).

7.1.3 Key Findings

High Level Fidelity Test 1:

Figure 7.1 User participant 1 during 2nd round of usability testing         


Figure 7.2 User participant 1 during 2nd round of usability testing         

Figure 7.3 User participant 1 during 2nd round of usability testing

Figure 7.4 User participant 3 during 2nd round of usability testing

High Level Fidelity Test 2:

Figure 7.5 User participant 2 during 3rd round of usability testing         


Figure 7.6 User participant 3 during 3rd round of usability testing

Figure 7.7 User participant 3 during 3rd round of usability testing


Figure 7.8 User participant 3 during 3rd round of usability testing

Figure 7.9 User participant 3 during 3rd round of usability testing         

Figure 7.10 User participant 4 during 3rd round of usability testing

Figure 7.11 User participant 3 during 3rd round of usability testing         


Figure 7.12 User participant 2 during 3rd round of usability testing         

Figure 7.13 User participant 2 during 3rd round of usability testing         

Figure 7.14 User participant 3 during 3rd round of usability testing         


7.2 Summary of findings

Task 1 - Find Clementine Ford event.

Task 2 - Purchase ticket.

Table 7.4 Low Fidelity Test 1

Task

Aims

Result

Recommendations

Participant 1

Participant 2

Participant 3

1

To observe if user follows the golden path.

Home >> Event Category Page >> Event Page

User followed the golden path.

User followed the golden path.

User followed the golden path.

N/A

To see if the task is completed.

Yes

Yes

Yes

2

To observe if user has difficulty navigating.

No issue.

No issue but User participant 2 prefers to make payment using PayPal.

No issue.

YWCA Victoria can consider to have an option for PayPal payment implemented on Checkout page.

To see if the task is completed.

Yes

Yes

Yes


Table 7.5 High Fidelity Test 1

Task

Aims

Result

Recommendations

Participant

1

Participant

2

Participant

3

1

To observe if user follows the golden path.

Home >> Event Category Page >> Event Page

User click straight to “Order Ticket Now” from the homepage’s main element thus bypassing the golden path.

Home>>Checkout Page

User click straight to “Order Ticket Now” from the homepage’s main element thus bypassing the golden path.

Home>>Checkout Page

User click through using global navigation (side menu instead of main element on homepage) YWCA Victoria Events page.

Home >> Event Category Page >> Event Page

N/A

To see if the task is completed.

No.

No.

Yes

2

To observe if user has difficulty navigating.

User was unable to view and make changes to ticket quantity at Checkout Page.

User was unable to view and make changes to ticket quantity at Checkout Page.

User was unable to view and make changes to ticket quantity at Checkout Page.

Make changes to on Checkout page for user to be able to edit ticket quantity if user selects option to buy ticket immediately the moment they arrives on website homepage.

To see if the task is completed.

Yes

Yes

Yes


Table 7.6 High Fidelity Test 2

Task

Aims

Result

Recommendations

Participant 1

Participant 2

Participant 3

Participant 4

1

To observe if user follows the golden path.

Home >> Event Category Page >> Event Page

User skip the step to view all events.

Home >> Event Page

User is confused with TINAtalks 2 Event in relation to Clementine Ford.

Home >> Event Category Page >> Event Page >> Event Category Page

User accidently click on Event Page.

Home >> Event Page

User followed the golden path.

Home >> Event Category Page >> Event Page

There is no issue through the designed pathways.

Increase marketing around TINAtalks 2 to create similar public knowledge around it similar to TedxTalk.  

To see if the task is completed.

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

2

To see if user has difficulty navigating.

User found the Checkout page (layout) accessible, easy and straightforward.

User was confused at first task thus unable to complete task 2.

User found page layout clear. Expected to see confirmation pop up but would expect to see a process page before confirmation page.

User found page easy to navigate but would prefer to have a confirmation prompt before purchase.

“Just to make sure I‘ve got the quantity right.”

Add

  • A confirmation prompt to ensure that user is able to double check on quantity selected.
  • A process page before confirmation page.
  • An option for user to pay by PayPal.

To see if the task is completed

Yes

No

 Yes

Yes


7.3 Design solutions

7.3.1 Suggestions after each usability testings

The team was confident to move forward in the project and build the high-level fidelity interactive prototype using Axure, as there were no design changes recommended after the first low fidelity paper prototype testing. With the same tasks, the team evaluated users behaviour accordingly for the second round of usability testing.

The following changes were made after the second usability testing (high fidelity prototype):

Task Flow 1

Task Flow 2

Based on the recommendations, the team optimized the high-fidelity paper prototype for an rapid iteration cycle. A third round of usability testing was performed with a new group of recruited user participants with the same tasks. User behaviour towards the iterated design functions were evaluated to identify if the issues found from the second usability testing have been eliminated.

The team proposed the following changes after the third usability testing (high fidelity prototype):

Task Flow 1

Task Flow 2


7.4 Recommendations

Overall the project proves that the new homepage layout proposal is viable. It is recommended to work closely with a visual designer on the color schemes needed to implement on the prototype for clearer call-to-action motivation and visual content enhancement before performing the next usability testing based on other scenarios (user process flow such as “Be a mentor” or “Find social housing services”). Once the visual design theme has been implemented, it is advisable YWCA Victoria move forward to responsive web design. At this stage, it is advised to perform usability testing on different breakpoint (such as mobile and tablet).


8. Final Recommendations

8.1 Responsive Web Design

Recap: this means that the website layout is fluid and changes to suit the device it is being viewed with. As previously stated, this is fast becoming the norm for modern organisations, so YWCA Victoria should embrace this standard. The structure we’ve provided in the desktop web prototype is quite modular, so it can be adapted easily to both smart-phones and tablet devices.

8.2 Data Collection

YWCA Victoria should initiate a variety of regular data collection strategies, including but not limited to:

Feedback from mentors, either into a Google Document or a private, in-house format.

Feedback from members attending events, via sending attendees follow-up emails.

Data Analytics - monitoring what content (events, information pages, etc) is most engaging to YWCA Victoria’s members by checking which pages on the site get the most hits.

8.3 Site Navigation

The sections in the global navigation, as well as their subsections, need to be provided with stronger and more definitive calls-to-action, as well as being redistributed.

8.4 Content Creation

Many of our interviewees expressed interest in seeing a wider range of content, both modern and historical, but there was an emphasis on seeing content produced by other members.

8.5 Donations

We received feedback from multiple users stating that they would be more likely to donate if they knew where their money was actually going. Provide this information by detailing the current causes or campaigns which are being donated to - before the donation form. This motivates people to donate by showing them what they are donating to.


8.6 Membership

A new membership structure should be implemented. The vast majority of responders on this topic were surprised at how inexpensive the baseline membership is (one-time fee of $5), and many agreed that they would probably pay more if they had to - either via a higher one-time fee, in a yearly subscription format, or both.

On the other hand, interviewees largely agreed that more information about membership should be provided - namely, the advantages and benefits of being a member. Similar to the donations recommendations above, the benefits of membership should be the first thing people see, and the membership application form should be second.

8.7 News

The news sections need to be consolidated, and individual news posts categorized more obviously (with less overlap between sections). The unfiled articles should be archived to provide a smoother experience for the staff working with this system.

All news articles need to state their date of publication, ideally both in the URL and in the page content itself. This provides a means to order them by.

8.8 Events

The event pages need to list important details, including dates, times, prices, locations, schedules if applicable, people in attendance - and information about them or links to that information. Multiple users were discouraged by the payment structure opening another window or tab to another site, especially when it took longer; use of PayPal and Eventbrite is fairly commonplace, but implementing an in-house ticket purchasing function would be better if possible.

TINAtalks were of particular interest to the users we spoke with, so following up with content similar to that would probably attract more attendees. As mentioned in Data Collection, this sort of thing needs to be monitored.

8.9 Continuous Engagement

More than anything, users want to know more. They want to hear back from YWCA Victoria, and be asked what they want to know about. A regular email should be sent to the entire mailing list, simply asking for feedback.

An example suggested by users is that donors can opt in to receive follow-up emails about what their money did for someone else. This level of engagement would be very uplifting and inspiring, as well as making them more likely to donate again in the future.


Appendix B

B.1 - Interview Questions

Biography & Demographics

Did you fill out the survey online?

Behaviour

YWCA Victoria

YWCA Victoria Events & Other Events

YWCA Victoria Donation or Other Donations That You Support

YWCA Victoria Website & Social Media Content

YWCA Victoria Volunteering / Involvement

Areas to Improve

Others

What do you think the biggest misconception is about feminism?


Appendix C

C.1 - Competitive Analysis Results

Appendix D

D1 - Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool Tutorial

URL - http://www.screamingfrog.co.uk/seo-spider/

Screaming Frog SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) Spider Tool is used to run website audit to identify flaws (such as error 404 within the site) that can affect YWCA Victoria website’s performance in search results.

Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool follows links within YWCA Victoria website, grabbing content and adding it to search engine databases from an SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) perspective. It helps identify if YWCA Victoria website’s URL structure, page titles, meta descriptions, images have been kept to the rule (e.g. good titles) to ensure how YWCA Victoria website will show up within search engine.

Google factor in the number and quality of links to site; which directly impact rankings in the search results. Therefore it is important to identify where YWCA Victoria website is link out to so as to increase the probability and value of YWCA Victoria website SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) authority.  

The following tutorial will walk you through on how to analyse on-site elements, such as response codes, URL structure, page titles, meta descriptions, images and directives; help optimize and boost search result pages.

It is recommended a health check of YWCA Victoria website to be run once a month.


D1.1 - Step 1 / Download Software

Download Screaming Frog SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) Spider Tool locally on your desktop refer to Figure D.1. Select the software compatible to the operating systems that is suitable for your PC.

Note that the YWCA Victoria website is under 500 URL’s therefore downloading the free license version of Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool is sufficient.

Figure D.1 - Install Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool


D1.2 - Step 2 / Launch SEO Spider Tool

Once Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool has been installed locally to desktop, start up software program by entering YWCA Victoria’s URL “http://www.ywca.net/” into the textbox and hit the Start button.

Figure D.2 - Getting started with Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool

D1.3 - Step 3 / Analyse Response Codes

Start analysing the results by clicking on the Response Codes tab. The class of status codes indicates the action requested by the client. The following list of hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) response status code are the ones to take note of:

Figure D.3 - Response Codes Data tabulation

Assessed

D1.4 - Step 4 / Analyse URL Structure

Click on URI tab (refer to Figure D.4) and check the length of each URL. URL are displayed within search engine results, therefore proper descriptive keywords would impact visibility and click-through.  

Filter the following accordingly to check as they cause indexation problems:

Figure D.4 - URL Data tabulationNote that a good URL is short and descriptive e.g. ywca.net/news/student-blogs instead of ywca.net/nsb123.

D1.5 - Step 5 / Analyse Page Titles Structure

Check Page Title by clicking on the Page Title tab (refer to Figure D.5). Each page should have a unique title and the most important keyword of the page should be used in the beginning.Title tags that communicate a clear, coherent thought earn a higher click-through rate on Google. From our analysis shown in Figure D.5, same titles are reused on many pages. This is something that need to be solved.

Guidelines:

Figure D.5 - YWCA Victoria Page Titles


D1.6 - Step 6 / Analyse Meta Description Structure

Refer to Figure D.6 for a detailed tabulation of URLs, meta description 1, meta description length, meta description 1 pixel width. Our analysis identify that YWCA Victoria URLs’ meta description 1 are all the same. Meta descriptions are used in search engine results pages (refer to Figure D.8 for an example of how meta description tags would appear under search engine) under page title; having the same meta description 1 pose as the major factor for bad search result.

Figure D.6 - YWCA Victoria Meta Description

Guidelines:

Figure D.7 - Select SERP snippet tabFigure D.8 - Meta Description Tags displayed under Search Engine result

D1.7 - Step 7 / Analyse Image and Alt Text

Not only does Google considers page speed when ranking web pages, page speed is of great importance for mobile users. High resolution images takes up bandwidth and are the main reason that would contribute to page slowing down. Check speed of each page under Response codes tab under response time. Retrieve pages that stand out and crosscheck with PageSpeed Insights by Google Developers to analyse more on the speed and user experience.

In the event that images are turned off on a visitor’s web browser, the text description provided by alt text is visible where the image supposed to be. Alt text tag is also very important for visually impaired users as it allows read aloud description of the image.

To check, select Image tab and filter images according to:

  1. Images over 100kb
  2. Images with missing Alt Text

Guidelines:

Figure D.9 - Select Images tab

D1.8 - Step 8 / Analyse Directives

Select Directives tab for  information about the meta robots 1, x-robots-tag 1, meta refresh 1, canonical link element 1, HTTP canonical, rel=”next” and rel=”prev” annotations.

Guideline:

To implement appropriate tags when necessary.

Figure D.10 - Select Directives tab


D2 - Using AdWords Keyword Planner

Google AdWords is an online advertising service and Google’s main source of revenue. It enables advertisers to display brief, keyword-based ads at the top of Google searches.

While we aren’t going to advise you on advertising, AdWords’ Keyword Planner tool can be freely used for SEO.

Opening the tool and inputting a number of keywords and the corresponding website will display the average number of relevant searches over a time period. These results can be used to determine which keywords are more likely to be searched for and, therefore, which keywords to use in the website’s text content.

Figure D2.1: Getting started with AdWords Keyword Planner.

Once the search is done, the results can be analysed for useful information.

Figure D2.2: Example Search:

In this example, it’s clear that feminism garners the most hits out of the keywords being compared, and should be used more frequently. It also has a lower rate of competition for ad space.


Appendix E

E1 - Sitemaps

Figure E1.1 - Current Sitemap (Level 2)

Figure E1.2 - Current Sitemap, Organisation News (Level 3)


Figure E1.3 - Current Sitemap, YWCA World Council (Level 3)

Figure E1.4 - Current Sitemap, YWCA Victoria and the Media (Level 3)


Figure E1.5 - Current Sitemap, Student Blogs (Level 3)

Figure E1.6 - Current Sitemap, Issues We Care About (Level 3)


Figure E1.7 - Current Sitemap, Events (Level 3)

Figure E1.8 - Current Sitemap, Random Articles (Level 2)

Figure E1.9 - Current Sitemap, Random Articles (Long View) (Level 2)

Figure E1.10 - Final Recommended Sitemap (Level 3)

(Next Page)

Figure E1.11 - Current Sitemap (Level 2, large image) (left)

Figure E1.12 - Final Recommended Sitemap (Level 3, large image) (right)

                                     

E2 - Treejack Surveys & Results

Figure E2.1 - Treejack Surveys, Current Site Layout


Figure E2.2 - Treejack Surveys, Option 1 Layout


Figure E2.3 - Treejack Surveys, Option 2 Layout


Figure E2.4 - Treejack Results, Task 1, Current Site (Pie Chart)

Figure E2.5 - Treejack Results, Task 1, Current Site (Pie Tree)


Figure E2.6 - Treejack Results, Task 1, Current Site (Paths)

Figure E2.7 - Treejack Results, Task 2, Current Site (Pie Chart)


Figure E2.8 - Treejack Results, Task 2, Current Site (Pie Tree)

Figure E2.9 - Treejack Results, Task 2, Current Site (Paths)


Figure E2.10 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Current Site (Pie Chart)

Figure E2.11 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Current Site (Pie Tree)


Figure E2.12 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Current Site (Paths)

Figure E2.13 - Treejack Results, Task 1, Option 1 (Pie Chart)


Figure E2.14 - Treejack Results, Task 1, Option 1 (Pie Tree)

Figure E2.15: Treejack Results, Task 1, Option 1 (Paths)


Appendix E2.16: Treejack Results, Task 2, Option 1 (Pie Chart)

Figure E2.17 - Treejack Results, Task 2, Option 1 (Pie Tree)


Figure E2.18 - Treejack Results, Task 2, Option 1 (Paths)

Figure E2.19 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Option 1 (Pie Chart)


Figure E2.20 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Option 1 (Pie Tree)

Figure E2.21 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Option 1 (Paths)


Figure E2.22 - Treejack Results, Task 1, Option 2 (Pie Chart)

Figure E2.23 - Treejack Results, Task 1, Option 2 (Pie Tree)


Figure E2.24 - Treejack Results, Task 1, Option 2 (Paths)

Figure E2.25 - Treejack Results, Task 2, Option 2 (Pie Chart)


Figure E2.26 - Treejack Results, Task 2, Option 2 (Pie Tree)

Figure E2.27 - Treejack Results, Task 2, Option 2 (Paths)


Appendix E2.28 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Option 2 (Pie Chart)

Figure E2.29 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Option 2 (Pie Tree)


Figure E2.30 - Treejack Results, Task 3, Option 2 (Paths)