OVERVIEW OF LESSON

    •    10/21/13

    •    45 minutes

    •    Miss Ashley Smith

    •    Grade Level: 7th Grade

I. BIG IDEA

  1. Students will critically think about the effects of the Holocaust on the Jewish people and analyze the history of the Holocaust and World War II and the morals found in the story “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.”

II. GENERAL OBJECTIVES:

  1. Students are going to take their previous knowledge of the Holocaust and use that to evaluate how they would feel if they were forced to leave their homes. Then students will learn through visuals, class and small group discussions, and independent work vocabulary needed to study the Holocaust and students will start to think critically about what they’ve learned in class to try and pre think what “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” is about. By the end of the class students should be able to know:

1. The Jewish people were forced to move from their homes to unknown locations during the Holocaust

2. Background History of the Holocaust

3. How to use this information to try and think about what “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” is about

III. STANDARDS

    E07.B-K.1.1.3: Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, how individuals influence ideas or events).

    E07.E.1.1.1: Introduce text(s) for the intended audience, state an opinion and/or topic, establish a situation, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose..

IV. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  1. Why is it important to learn about the Holocaust?
  2. How can literature affect our morals?
  3. How can one apply what they’ve learned from history to the present?

   

V. BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Students evaluate how it would be like if they were forced to move somewhere where they didn’t know where they were going and how the Jewish people would have felt during this time.
  2. Students will analyze the history and effects of the Holocaust.
  3. Students will make inferences about literary terms and their definitions.
  4. Students will make inferences through previous knowledge and class discussion about what the class novel is about.

   

VI. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. Suitcase
  2. Computer/Educational Video: http://www.ushmm.org/remember/days-of-remembrance/about-days-of-remembrance/why-we-remember-the-holocaust
  3. Paper
  4. Pens
  5. Vocabulary Worksheet
  6. Story Knowledge Worksheet

               

VII. VOCABULARY

  1. Nazi
  2. Holocaust
  3. Swastika
  4. Ghetto
  5. Concentration Camp
  6. Genocide
  7. Aryan Race
  8. Racism
  9. Semitism
  10. Prejudice

VIII. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES:

a.) Warm Up (5 min)

  1. The teacher will start the class by having a warm up on the board asking students to write down what they already know about the Holocaust.
  2. After two minutes of writing the teacher will call on students and students should mention things like concentration camps, Nazis, World War II, etc.
  3. Then the teacher will explain that they will start a novel that takes place during the Holocaust and that before they start students need a bit of background information.

b) Suitcase Writing  (10 min)

  1. Then the teacher will then show students a suitcase and tell students to pretend that they have arrived home and their parents have told them that they are moving. They don’t know where they’re going or how long they will be gone. The teacher will tell students they have two minutes to write what they would bring.
  2. After the two minutes the teacher will ask students what they would bring. Students should mention food, clothes, pets, etc.
  3. The teacher will explain that Jewish people were put in the situation. That the Nazis told them that they were moving and that the Jewish people were told they had no idea where they were going or for how long.
  4. The teacher will then ask students how they would feel if they were put in this situation. Students should say they would feel stressed, sad, or confused.
  5. The teacher will explain that the Jewish people had to feel this way and this was just part of what they had to go through and to keep this in mind as they read the story.

c ). Educational Video  (7 min)

  1. The teacher will then show students a short educational video about the Holocaust with the subtitles on, so that students with all kinds of learning styles can learn about the Holocaust.
  2. The teacher will then ask students what they learned from the video or any thoughts about the video.

d.) Anticipation Guide (15 min)

    1. The teacher will then say that before they start reading the story they will fill out an anticipation guide, so that they can start to understand what lessons they will learn about the story and this will help students with IEP take steps to starting to understand what the novel is about.

    2. Once students have filled out their guide the teacher will review their answers and justifications and then explain that all these lessons apply to the story and they should keep these questions in mind as they read the story.

e). Wrap Up (8 min)

  1. The teacher will ask if the students if they have any questions about the class.
  2. The teacher will assign homework.
  3. Then the teacher will have students write an exit slip stating one new thing they learned about the Holocaust.

IX. HOMEWORK: The teacher will tell students based off of their previous knowledge and class discussion to try and write what they think is the best definition for various terms relating to the novel.

X. ASSESSMENT: The student’s competency of the anticipation guide, student participation during class discussions, the student’s answers to the exit slip, homework, and future projects.

XI. REFLECTION AND SELF EVALUATION

XII. STRATEGIES FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS

    a.) Spoken and written examples of what is involved with the Holocaust during the warm up.

    b.) Actual suitcase for visual assistance during the class game and then written and spoken descriptions of the game.

    c.) Video with subtitles so that students have visual and written descriptions of the Holocaust.

    d.) Anticipation guide so that IEP students can take steps to learn what the story is through written and spoken discussion.

XIII. SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

W:  How will you help your students to know where they are headed, why they are going there

and what ways they will be evaluated along the way?

    The teacher will explain to students that they are going to start a novel about the Holocaust so that students know where they are heading and what they will be reading in the future.

H:  How will you hook and hold students’ interest and enthusiasm through thought-provoking

experiences at the beginning of each instructional episode?

    The teacher started the lesson with a suitcase writing lesson where students wrote what they would bring if they had to move and had no idea where they were going or how long they would be gone. This allowed students to have connect issues from the past to themselves and it allowed students to relate to what some characters in the story may be feeling. The teacher will try and hook students with writings and projects at the beginning of class that relate to the student’s everyday life. Students like talking about their lives and the teacher will think if the subject relates to the students. Students will not only understand the topic better, they will be more interested.

E:  What experiences will you provide to help students make their understandings real and  

equip all learners for success throughout your course or unit?

    I will try and use projects such as the anticipation guide and the suitcase writing experiment to try and get the material that students are reading about seem real to the students and the teacher will use multiple teaching methods, from individual writing work, class discussion, visuals from the class video and suitcase, and reading for students to read while watching the video will help students understand the course. Also the teacher will use scaffolding methods starting with the anticipation guide so that students have steps in understanding the main novel and have the tools needed to analyze and evaluate the novel.

R:  How will you cause students to reflect, revisit, revise, and rethink?

    The teacher will start the class with a journal question about the class topic that relates to the student’s lives so that students have the chance to reflect on what they are going to learn and how that relates to their lives. The teacher will revisit what the students have learned through class projects, quizzes, and discussion so that students are forced to remember what they learned in past classes. The teacher will offer class discussions and scaffolding techniques such as the anticipation guide so that students have the chance to revise any knowledge they may not be clear on and the teacher will encourage students to rethink the lesson through discussion, because class discussion allows for students to express different opinions and when there are different opinions that means that students have the chance to rethink what they already knew about a topic.

E:  How will students express their understandings and engage in meaningful self-evaluation?

    Students will be offered journal entries, class writings, class discussion, homework, and future projects in order to self evaluate what they know and so they can think deeply about what they learned in class and what they are still struggling with.  





























Opinion Time!

Directions: For each of the statements, write an “A” if you agree with the statement or a “D” if

you disagree with the statement.  If you’re not sure if you agree or disagree, pick the one you

relate to most strongly with.  Then underneath the statement explain why you wrote A or D, and

if you weren’t completely one or the other bring that up there.


Your Rating

Statements

Just because I don’t like someone doesn’t mean that I am mean to them.

Justification:

Everyone has fundamental basic rights as a human being.

Justification:

If you know of something that is morally wrong, you should do something

about it.

Justification:

You should do everything your boss tells you to, even if you don’t think it

is right.

Justification:

You should do everything your boss tells you to, even if you don’t think it

is right.

Justification:

Friends are the most important things.

Justification:

THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PAJAMAS VOCABULARY

Based off what you know and what we discussed in class try and give your best definition for the bolded word. If you don’t know the word, just try and guess what the definition of the word would be. Definitions should be at least one full sentence.

1.  Nazi:








2. Swastika:






3.  Concentration Camp:







4. Ghetto:




5. Genocide:



6. Holocaust:







7. Racism:







OVERVIEW OF LESSON

•    10/22/13

•    45 minutes

•    Miss Ashley Smith

•    Grade Level: 7th Grade

I. BIG IDEA

a)     Students will analyze the meaning of vocabulary words and explore the different modules of the novel’s vocabulary so that one can better understand the novel. Students will also use the author’s biography to take steps of understanding the novel and to understand in general the importance of an author’s purpose. Finally, students will hear, read, and write about the first two chapters in the class novel to both learn about the story and so that students can improve their text decoding skills in general.

II. CONCEPT:

a) Students are going to take their knowledge of Holocaust and through their homework, class and group work determine class definitions for the novel’s vocabulary. Students will also work through individual and group and class work to read the author’s biography and determine his reason for writing. Students will also listen to, read, and write reactions to the first two chapters of “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” and analyze major aspects of those novels through class discussion.  By the end of the class students should be able to know:

1.  The definition of the novel’s vocabulary words.

2. The author’s biography.

3. The main characters of “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” and some major themes.

III. STANDARDS

           a) E07.B-V.4.1.2: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary and mythological allusions) in context. b. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of the words. c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending).

           b) R7.A.1.6.1: Identify and/or describe the author’s intended purpose of text.

IV. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

a) What can we infer about the novel based on class context clues?

b) Why is setting important in a story?

c) How can an author’s background affect their writing?

d) How does studying vocabulary affect our understanding of literature?

   

V. BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

a) Students will make inferences about the novel’s vocabulary definitions through previous knowledge and discussion in groups and with the class.

b) Students will analyze the first two chapters of the novel and determine what themes are in important and who the main characters are through class discussion and written responses.

c) Students will analyze the author’s biography and determine his reasons for writing through group work, readings, and class discussion.

   

VI. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

a) Vocabulary Homework

b) Vocabulary Worksheet

c) Paper

d) Writing Utensil

e) Biography Sections

f)   “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” Novel

g) Holocaust Homework

               

VII. VOCABULARY

a) Bannister

b) Desolate

c) Lamenting

d) Setting

VIII. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES:

a.) Warm Up (10 min)

  1. The teacher will tell students that they are going to start their lesson by looking at the vocabulary for the novel to get some background information before the class begins the story.
  2. Then the teacher will tell students to pass around their homework in the groups they are arranged at where they sit and each student will write their definitions along with the previous student’s definition, so that every student will get a chance to put what they think the words means.
  3. Once everyone at the table has written their definitions to the vocab on the homework, students will discuss for two minutes what definitions they think is best for the vocabulary words given.

b.) Vocabulary Definitions (8 min)

  1. The teacher will pass out a handout with visuals of the vocabulary words, so that students get the chance to see what their vocabulary looks like.
  2. Then the teacher will call on each table to give the group’s definition of a vocab word. Once the students give their definition to a word the teacher will ask the class if they agree with this definition.
  3. If the class agrees and the definition is correct, the teacher will write the class definition on the board and the teacher will have the students write the definition down next to the word and image on handout. This allows students to both see what the vocabulary is, read what the vocabulary is, write, and remember the vocabulary in a way that is understandable to them.
  4. This will continue until the class has defined all of the words on the vocabulary sheet.

c). Author’s Biography (12 min)

  1. The teacher will explain to the students that to take steps in understanding the lesson, one should know about the author.
  2. Then the teacher will give students a part of the author’s biography labeled one, two, or three.
  3. Then the teacher will tell students that they must join together with a person who has a one, two, and three piece of the biography and together they will have the whole author’s biography.
  4. Once the students have created groups that form the whole biography then the teacher will tell students to then read their section of the biography and then as a group discuss what they learned about the author as a whole.
  5. Then the teacher will call on groups to have them name facts they learned about the author’s biography and students should mention things like the author’s birthday, home, and school life.
  6. Once students have discussed what they have learned about the author, then the teacher will introduce the book “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.”

d). Intro, Chap. 1 and Chap 2 (10 min)

1.     The teacher will read the back of the book to give the students an idea of what they will be reading about.

2.     The teacher will ask students what they think will happen in the book. Students should mention things like Bruno getting in trouble for being friends with a Jewish kid, or someone dying in the concentration camp.

3.     Then the teacher will read the first chapter to the students, stopping every few pages to ask students questions about the chapter such as who the main character is, where the story takes place, what is the conflict, etc.

4.     Then the teacher will read the second chapter and will have students write down their reactions or questions to the chapter. Then the teacher will stop every few pages to ask students what their reactions are. Students should mention things they find funny, questions as to where Bruno is going, and any questions about vocabulary words.

e). Wrap Up (5 min)

  1. The teacher will ask if the students if they have any questions about the class.
  2. Then the teacher would assign homework to the class
  3. As an exit slip, students will write the name of the main character of the story. Students should say Bruno.

IX. HOMEWORK: Students will be given a worksheet with two pieces of art inspired from the Holocaust and students will be told to write three reactions to the piece. On the back of the sheet is a history of the Holocaust students should read those facts, underline interesting facts from the piece and write three reactions to the piece.

X. ASSESSMENT: Students will been assessed to have meeting my objections by:

        1.) Making inferences about the vocabulary through their completion of the homework, written and spoken group activity, class discussion on vocabulary definitions, filling out the in class vocabulary sheet, and future vocabulary project.

        2.) Analyzing the first two chapters of the novel through their written responses to the novel, exit slips, and class participation to oral questions about the text.

        3.) Analyzing and determining the author’s biography and reason for writing through competence of written biography, group participation, and class participation in class discussion.

XI. REFLECTION AND SELF EVALUATION

XII. STRATEGIES FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS

           a.) Small group and class discussion for learning vocabulary.

           b.) Visuals and self created vocabulary definitions.

           c.) Readings, and small group and class discussion for learning about the author.

           d.) Steps and scaffolding used to introduce students to the novel.

           e.) Reading the chapter aloud and having students write their reactions

           f.) Class discussion of the chapter.

Art Reaction

Look at the pieces of art below and write three reactions (feelings, questions, etc.) you have when looking at the images. Make sure your three reactions are one full sentence (capital letter, punctuation, etc.) per reaction

Reaction 1: _____________________________________________________________

Reaction 2: _____________________________________________________________

Reaction 3: _____________________________________________________________

Background Reaction

Read the informational article below and write three reactions (feelings, questions, etc.) you have when reading the excerpt. Make sure your three reactions are one full sentence (capital letter, punctuation, etc.) per reaction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Holocaust was the mass murder of six million Jews and millions of other people leading up to and during World War II.

The killings took place in Europe between 1933 and 1945. They were organized by the German Nazi party which was led by Adolf Hitler.

The largest group of victims were Jewish people. Nearly 7 out of every 10 Jews living in Europe were murdered.

Most of the victims were killed because they belonged to certain racial or religious groups which the Nazis wanted to wipe out. This kind of killing is called genocide.

The Nazis also murdered politicians, trade unionists, journalists, teachers and anyone else who spoke out against Hitler.

We will never know exactly how many died but there were many millions of non-Jewish victims, including:

Background information courtesy of the Holocaust Educational Trust

Reaction 1: ________________________________________________________

Reaction 2: _______________________________________________________

Reaction 3: ________________________________________________________

Author Biography

I was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1971, and studied English Literature at Trinity College, Dublin, and creative writing at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, where I was awarded the Curtis Brown prize.

My early writing consisted mostly of short stories and I published a number of them. My first story, The Entertainments Jar, was shortlisted for the Hennessy Literary Award in Ireland. In total, I’ve published about 70 short stories.

My 2006 novel, THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PYJAMAS, was made into an award-winning Miramax film. The novel itself won 2 Irish Book Awards, the Bisto Book of the Year, and was shortlisted or won a host of international awards. Amongst other accolades, it spent more than 80 weeks at no.1 in Ireland, topped the New York Times Bestseller List, and was the bestselling book in Spain in both 2007 and 2008. Worldwide, it has sold more than 5 million copies.

My novels are published in 46 languages. Details of which languages each novel is available in can be found on the fiction pages.

My most recent novel for adults is THIS HOUSE IS HAUNTED, while a new novel for young readers, STAY WHERE YOU ARE AND THEN LEAVE, will be published in the UK on September 26th 2013 and in the US in April 2014.

TERM                                        IMAGE                                        DEFINITION

1. NAZI:

  1. SWASTIKA:            

  1. CONCENTRATION CAMP:    

  1. GHETTO:        

  1. GENOCIDE:                      

  1. HOLOCAUST:                

7. RACISM:                                

                        

OVERVIEW OF LESSON

•    10/23/13

•    45 minutes

•    Miss Ashley Smith

•    Grade Level: 7th Grade

I. BIG IDEA

a)     Students will analyze their reactions to art and facts about the Holocaust in order to truly understand what happened during the Holocaust and why it should never happen again. Students will discuss and analyze chapters in the class novel in order to have better textual decoding skills and so that students can become better readers. Finally, students will do a vocabulary booklet so that students can have a deeper understanding of vocabulary and learn why it’s so important to understand vocabulary in order to understand and event and the written word.

II. CONCEPT:

a) Students are going to take their reactions to the class homework the discuss and understand why the Holocaust is so dangerous. Students will also analyze chapters three and four of the class novel in order to understand literature and improve text decoding. Finally students will use their knowledge of class vocabulary to make a project that can be a reference and visual for vocabulary. By the end of the class students should be able to know:

1.  A summary of what occurs in chapters three and four of  The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.

2. Why the Holocaust was so dangerous.

3. How to deeply analyze class vocabulary words.

III. STANDARDS

           a) R7.A.2.1.2: Identify and/or apply meaning of content-specific words used in text.

           b) R7.A.2.3.1: Make inferences and/or draw conclusions based on information from text.

    c) R7.A.2.3.2: Cite evidence from text to support generalizations.

IV. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

a) What can we infer about the Holocaust based on our reactions to facts and art based on that time?

b) How does mood affect a story?

c) How does studying vocabulary affect our understanding of an event?

   

V. BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

a) Students will evaluate what they feel about the Holocaust and why the Holocaust was so bad by class discussion of the individual homework.

b) Students will analyze the definition of the novel’s vocabulary words by creating images and a booklet based off of class made definitions of the novel.

c) Students will analyze chapters three and four and determine what is happening in the story and what literary elements are being used by writing about, listening, and reading the novel.

   

VI. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

a) Reaction Homework

b) Vocabulary Booklet Rubric/Instructions

c) Paper

d) Writing Utensil

e) Vocabulary Booklet Example

f)   “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” Novel

g) Propaganda Homework

               

VII. VOCABULARY

a) Auschwitz

b) Barren

c) Muse

d) Propaganda

VIII. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES:

a.) Warm Up (10 min)

  1. The teacher will tell students that they will continue reading The Boy in the Striped Pajamas and that they will begin a vocabulary project.
  2. Then the teacher will ask students to name what reactions they got from the art they were supposed to look at for homework. Students should mention that their reaction was sadness, fear, pain, etc.
  3. Then the teacher will ask students for their reactions to the facts about the Holocaust that they were supposed to read for homework. Students should mention surprise, sadness, and that they didn’t know how many people were killed.
  4. The teacher will then tell students to keep all of this in mind as they read the novel.

b.) Chapter 3 and 4 (12min)

  1. Then the teacher will read the third chapter to the students, stopping every few pages to ask students questions about the chapter such as who the how the characters are feeling, what is going on in the story, etc.
  2. Then the teacher will read the second chapter and will have students write down their reactions or questions to the chapter. Then the teacher will stop every few pages to ask students what their reactions are. Students should mention things they find funny, questions as to where Bruno is going, and any questions about vocabulary words.
  3. The teacher will then ask the students if they have any questions about the reading, and the teacher will tell them they will continue the story the next day but they are going to discuss their vocabulary booklet.

c). Vocabulary Book Introduction (8 min)

  1. The teacher will hand out the rubric and instructions to the vocabulary booklet.
  2. Then the teacher will explain to the students that in order for students to truly grasp the novel’s vocabulary they will make a booklet (made out of folded paper stapled together).
  1. In the booklet the student will write one vocabulary word per page, give the correct class definition of the word and draw or create a school appropriate picture that represents that word.
  2. This way students will have a visual and written example of the vocabulary that they can look back on throughout the story and the teacher can assess the student’s knowledge of vocabulary without forcing students to take a test because many of the students in the class are poor test takers.
  3. The teacher will read these instructions and give out a handout so that students have multiple options of learning the instructions.
  1. Then the teacher will show a teacher made example of a vocabulary book so that students have a visual of what they will be making .
  2. Then the teacher will take any questions about the project.

d). Vocabulary Book Work (10 min)

1.     The teacher will give students ten minutes to begin working on the booklet.

2.     As the students are working, the teacher will walk around the room making sure that students understand what they need to do and conferencing one on one with the students to make sure they understand the project.

e). Wrap Up

  1. The teacher will ask if the students if they have any questions about the class.
  2. Then the teacher would assign homework to the class
  3. As an exit slip, students will write the summary of either chapter three or four in a sentence.

IX. HOMEWORK: Students will be given a worksheet with a WWII propaganda poster and they will be told to answer question about the poster to get students thinking about propaganda which will be discussed in the next class.

X. ASSESSMENT: Students will be assessed through their completion of the homework, class participation and comprehension and work on the vocabulary books, written reactions to the chapters and exit slips

XI. REFLECTION AND SELF EVALUATION

XII. STRATEGIES FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS

           a.) Class discussion and written and visual examples of the history of the Holocaust.

           b.) Visuals of the vocabulary booklet.

           c.) Class time for one on one conferencing.

           d.) Written and spoken explanations of the vocabulary booklet.

           e.) Reading the chapter aloud and having students write their reactions.

           f.) Class discussion of the chapter.

Exploring Propaganda  

   

 

 

Respond to the following questions in full sentence based on the above image.  

 

1. What message does this image send?  

2. Who do you think the intended audience was?

3. What do you think its purpose was?  

4. What might we learn about society based on this image?

Vocabulary Booklet Rubric and Instructions

The following project is to allow one to have a better understanding of the novel’s vocabulary. This project allows one to understand the definitions of main vocabulary words and allow for school appropriate visuals that you can look back on during the reading of the novel.

Vocabulary Book Rubric

Poor

1pt

Fair

2pt

Good

3pt

Vocabulary Words

Student does not provide words.

Student provides a majority of definitions.

Student accurately gives each word.

Definitions

Definitions are not correct.

Definitions are not complete.

Definitions are mostly correct.

Definitions relate to a different word selection

Definitions are correct.

Examples

Has no examples of word.

Has some examples of words.

Has examples of all words.

Neatness

Work is messy and difficult to read.

Some of the work is messy and difficult to read.

Work is neat and easily read

Instructions:

1. Fold two pieces of paper together and staple the folds to make a book.

2. On the front of the book write Vocabulary Booklet and draw a cover for your book.

3. On each page after the title put a vocab word.

4. On each page with a vocab word put a definition of that word. (Must be a complete sentence)

5. On each page with a vocab word draw or create a school appropriate visual example of that word.

OVERVIEW OF LESSON

•    10/1/13

•    45 minutes

•    Miss Ashley Smith

•    Grade Level: 7th Grade

I. BIG IDEA

a)     Students will analyze their homework and journal answers during written individual work and class discussion to learn about propaganda and how they can apply this knowledge of propaganda in real life so that they don’t blindly follow what the media tells them. Students will discuss and analyze chapters in the class novel in order to have better textual decoding skills and so that students can become better readers. Also students will use a characterization sheet  during this chapter analyzation so that students can not only learn about that literary device, but how their own chacter defines them in a student’s everyday life. Finally, students will do a vocabulary booklet so that students can have a deeper understanding of vocabulary and learn why it’s so important to understand vocabulary in order to understand and event and the written word.

II. CONCEPT:

a) Students are going to take their answers to the homework and their answers to the in class journal question to discuss and understand what propaganda is and how it affects the way people live. Students will also analyze chapters five and six of the class novel in order to understand literature and work on a characterization chart as they analyze the novel in oder to learn about this literary element. Finally students will use their knowledge of class vocabulary to make a project that can be a reference and visual for vocabulary. By the end of the class students should be able to know:

1.  A summary of what occurs in chapters five and six of “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.”

2. What propaganda is and its effects on society.

3. What characterization is.

III. STANDARDS

          a) R7.A.2.4.1:Identify and/or explain stated or implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from text.

b) R7.A.1.1.2: Identify and/or apply a synonym or antonym of a word used in text.

    c) 1.9.7.B: Interpret and analyze techniques of particular media messages.

IV. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

a) How can propaganda affect our life understandings?

b) How can characterization in literature teach us about real life interaction?

c) How does studying vocabulary affect our understanding of an event?

   

V. BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

a) Students will analyze what propaganda is and its effects on cultural understanding.

b) Students will analyze chapters five and six and determine what is happening in the story and what literary elements are being used by writing about, listening, and reading the novel.

c) Students will evaluate the definition of novel vocabulary words by creating their own definitions and by creating their own school appropriate visuals to these words.

   

VI. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

a) Propaganda Homework

b) Vocabulary Booklet and Rubric/Instructions

c) Paper

d) Writing Utensil

e) Character Venn Diagram

f)   “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” Novel

g) Journal Homework

h) Computer Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fH4XHwefPVY and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5yJYdbiB5w

                 

VII. VOCABULARY

a) Characterization

b) Venn Diagram

c) Sinister

d) Comparison and Contrast

VIII. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES:

a.) Warm Up (10 min)

  1. The teacher will have students take two minutes to write in a journal that asks them what they think propaganda is and how propaganda is used in modern day life.
  2. After two minutes the teacher will ask students to say their answers. Students should say that propaganda is printed or advertised biased information.
  1. The teacher will then write on the board and tell students that propaganda is when people give biased information to try and persuade a person or group.
  1. Then students should give examples that they wrote in their journal of propaganda including, ads, news networks, commercials, political debates, etc.
  2. Then the teacher will tell students that they will look at examples of past and present propaganda so that they can get a visual of how propaganda is used.

b.) Propaganda Video (5 min)

  1. Then the teacher will show the students a video of propaganda during the WWII answer. While students are watching the video they should write down any reactions they have when watching the clip
  2. Then the teacher will ask students to express their reactions and students should mention how the films lied, how the films seem silly now, and surprise at what the video said,
  3. Then the teacher will show a short ad for a children’s toy. After the clip the teacher will ask students how this relates to what they know about propaganda.

a) Students should mention that the video is trying to get people to believe something that may not be true.

b) Then the teacher will ask students why it’s so important to be aware of propaganda and its effects. Students should mention that one could be brainwashed to believe lies or be told to do something they shouldn’t do if they aren’t aware of propaganda.

c). Chapters Five and Six (15 min)

  1. Then the teacher will read the fifth chapter to the students, stopping every few pages to ask students questions about the what the characters are like and what differences are found between Bruno and Schmuel. Students should mention that one is Jewish and one is the son of a Nazi, they’re both the same age, one is allowed outside, one is in a concentration camp, etc.
  1. Students should write these similarities and differences in their characterization Venn diagram.
  1. Then the teacher will read chapter six of the novel and take time to ask students questions about the novel, such as what is occurring, and any vocabulary words. Then the teacher will have students fill our more of their characterization Venn diagram so that students have a written visual of characterization and learn about comparison and contraction in literature.
  1. Then the teacher will tell students they have a few minutes to continue their vocabulary project.

d). Vocabulary Book Work (10 min)

1.     The teacher will give students ten minutes to continue working on the vocabulary booklet.

2.     As the students are working, the teacher will walk around the room making sure that students understand what they need to do and conferencing one on one with the students to make sure they understand the project and are using time wisely.

e). Wrap Up (5 min)

  1. The teacher will ask if the students if they have any questions about the class.
  2. Then the teacher would assign homework to the class
  3. As an exit slip, students will write the summary of either chapter five or six in a sentence.

IX. HOMEWORK: Students will do a Venn diagram comparison chart of Bruno and Gretel..

X. ASSESSMENT: Students will be assessed through their completion of the homework, class participation and comprehension and work on the vocabulary books, written character sheets and exit slips

XI. REFLECTION AND SELF EVALUATION

XII. STRATEGIES FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS

          a.) Class discussion and written and visual examples of the history of propaganda.

          b.) Graphic Organizer, individual work and discussion of characterization.

          c.) Class time for one on one conferencing for project.

          d.) Reading the chapter aloud.

          e.) Class discussion of the chapter.

   










Your Name:___________________

Venn Diagram

        BRUNO                                                                                        Schmuel












Your Name:___________________

Venn Diagram

Complete the Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Bruno and Gretel. You should put three points in Bruno’s section, Gretel’s section, and in the similarities section.

Bruno                                                        Gretel




OVERVIEW OF LESSON

•    10/25/13

•    45 minutes

•    Miss Ashley Smith

•    Grade Level: 7th Grade

I. BIG IDEA

a)     Students will analyze the meaning of vocabulary and explore the different modules of the novel’s vocabulary so that one can better understand the novel. Students will visuals, writings, and discussion to learn about characterization and from that learn about what makes people who they are. Finally, students will hear, read, and write about chapter seven in the class novel to both learn about the story and so that students can improve their text decoding skills in general. Students will also work in literature circles to deeply analyze the novel in different sections to improve both their people skills and their megacognition.

II. CONCEPT:

a) Students are going to discuss and show examples of their Venn Diagram homework on the board and then through discussion, class writing, and visual examples, the students will learn about the importance of characterization to a story. Students will also listen to, read, and write reactions to the seventh chapter of “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” and analyze major literary aspects of chapter eight through group discussion, and individual reading and writing. Finally, students will uses their inferences of the novel’s vocabulary words to make a vocabulary book for the class. By the end of the class students should know:

1.  The definition of characterization and its importance to literature.

2. The major themes and plot of chapter seven and eight of “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas”.

3. Definitions of the novel’s vocabulary words.

III. STANDARDS

           a) R7.A.1.3.1: Make inferences and/or draw conclusions based on information from the text.

           b) R7.A.1.4.1:  Identify and/or explain stated or implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from text.

IV. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

a) What how can studying the characterization of charters in a novel improve our understanding of people in real life?

b) How do people still judge each other today?

c) What can we do to stop prejudice?

d) How does studying vocabulary affect our understanding?

   

V. BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

a) Students will evaluate the importance of characterization to a novel through homework and class discussion, class work, and visual examples.

b) Students will analyze chapter seven and its themes and plot by listening, reading, and writing responses to the chapter.

c) Students will analyze chapter eight through individual reading, written responses to various literary aspects of the chapter and by small group discussion.

d) Students will make inferences about the definition of the novels vocabulary through making a vocabulary booklet.

   

VI. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

a) Venn Diagram Homework

b) Vocabulary Book/Rubric and Instructions

c) Paper

d) Writing Utensil

e) Literature Circle Instructions

f)   “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” Novel

g) Computer/Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJQ0_9R3nPo

h) Markers

               

VII. VOCABULARY

a) Character

b) Trait

c) Personality

d) Main Idea

VIII. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES:

a.) Warm Up (7 min)

  1. The teacher will tell start the lesson by drawing a Venn diagram on the board and having students come up and put their answers from their Venn diagram homework on the board.
  2. Then the teacher will ask students why it’s important to note the differences and similarities between characters. Students should mention that this allows the reader to experience different characters, and for students to see how all the characters are like real people.
  3. The teacher will then explain that noting these differences is important in that it allows one to study the character of the people in the stories and that characterization is why the characters act like they do.
  4. Then the teacher will show students a short clip of a cartoon and have students write the characteristics of this cartoon.
  5. The teacher will then ask students for their answers. (Students should mention the character as being loud, silly, funny, etc.)
  6. The teacher will then explain that what people say and do and how the one to study the character of the people in the stories and that characterization is why the characters act like they do.
  7. Then the teacher will show students a short clip of a cartoon and have students write the characteristics of this cartoon.
  8. The teacher will then ask students for their answers. (Students should mention the character as being loud, silly, funny, etc.)
  9. The teacher will then explain that what people say and do and how they do these things makes them who they are and gives them character and that it’s important when we read about a character to keep track of what they do because this says a lot about what kind of person this character is.

b.) Chapter Seven (8 min)

  1. The teacher will read chapter seven aloud to the students.
  2. While the teacher is reading students will write down any reactions they have to the novel as they listen and read along.
  3. The teacher will stop every few pages to ask students about their reactions. Students should mention anything they find funny, words their confused about, personal experiences, etc.
  4. This will continue until the chapter has been read.

c). Literature Circle (10 min)

  1. The teacher will give each student a piece of paper with the name of a literature circle job on it (Vocabulary, Characterization, Discussion Leader, and Discussion Question).
  2. Then the teacher will give students the hand out that tells students what their job is for the literature circle. The teacher will read the instructions to the class and have students highlight the job they need to do.
  3. Then students will read chapter eight individually writing down what they need to do for their literature circle job. (This means students are writing vocab words, discussion questions, a summary, or characterization).
  4. Once the chapter has been read and the jobs have been written, students will discuss what they have written in their group and as students are discussing the novel, the teacher will walk around to make sure students are on track and to add input to any findings or questions the students may have.

d). Vocabulary Work (10 min)

1.     The teacher will give students ten minutes to continue working on the vocabulary booklet.

2.     As the students are working, the teacher will walk around the room making sure that students understand what they need to do and conferencing one on one with the students to make sure to answer any questions.

3.     Then the teacher will collect any finished vocabulary books and tell students that this is the last day to work on the vocabulary book in class. If they have not finished yet, they will have to work on it for homework.

e). Wrap Up (5 min)

  1. The teacher will ask if the students if they have any questions about the class.
  2. Then the teacher would assign homework to the class
  3. As an exit slip, the teacher will ask students to write a character trait of Bruno.

IX. HOMEWORK: Students will be told to finish their vocabulary book if they have not finished it yet and they will turn in their books on Monday.

X. ASSESSMENT: Students will be assessed through their completion of the homework. Journal entry for class work, class discussion, written responses to jobs given to students during literature circles, exit slip, and future vocabulary booklet

XI. REFLECTION AND SELF EVALUATION

XII. STRATEGIES FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS

           a.) Small group and class discussion of characterization homework

b) Visual clips, written journal, and class discussion to offer every way to learn about characterization.

           c.) Visuals and self created vocabulary definitions.

d.) One on one interaction with the teacher to monitor and re read progress of class project.

           e.) Aloud reading and verbalized questions about chapters seven.

           e.) Small group literature circle to analyze different parts of chapter eight.

           f.) Class time for a class project.

Literature Circle Jobs

Individually read chapter four. While you are reading chapter four write your responses to the following literature circle jobs that you have been assigned. Once everyone in your group has read the chapter and written their job’s responses, discuss your responses in the group.

Jobs:

1. Vocabulary: When reading the chapter write down any vocabulary that you either are not sure of the definition of or think is important to the chapter. You should write down at least three vocabulary words and their page numbers. Find the definition of these words then discuss what words you didn’t know or thought was important to the group once everyone is done.

2. Discussion Questions: When reading the chapter think of at least three questions that you have about the chapter and the main idea of the novel. Write your questions down and once everyone is done ask the group your questions.

3.Imagery: When you are done reading the chapter draw a picture that you feels sums up the chapter, then write at least three sentences explaining what you drew and why you drew what you drew.

4. Discussion leader: You are to read the chapter and note the summary of the chapter. You will write a summary of the chapter (five sentences) and then you will make sure that your group stays on task and that everyone gets to talk about their section.