Course Number: (PHS 731)
Course Title: The One and the Many
Term: Fall 2017

Professor:

Dr. Peter Redpath

predpath@holyapostles.edu

Phone: 718-208-3710

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is a study of the metaphysical teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas concerning the nature of the metaphysical principles of unity and multiplicity and the essential role that these principles play in the existence of things and all other principles of being, becoming, and knowing, including those of experience, art, philosophy, science.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will demonstrate, among other things, an improved understanding of St. Thomas Aquinas’s teaching about the nature of classical philosophy, metaphysics, and the influence metaphysical principles have on all forms of human experience, art, science, philosophy.

3. COURSE SCHEDULE:

NOTE: Because of cancellation of classes on Monday, 04 September 2017, for Labor Day, on the first day of class (Monday, 28 August 2017), we will cover the video-lectures, transcript, and other reading materials presently listed on the Populi site for weeks 1 and 2. If we do not make this adjustment at the start of the semester, where the content is easier to understand, I have found from prior experience teaching this class that making it toward the end of the course will tend to be much more difficult. Our second online meeting will cover the Populi assignment for Week 3. What is presently listed as on the Populi site as Week 15 will wind up being Week 14. Week 15 will become the week for the online oral exam. The syllabus below reflects the corrected order of the assignments as we will be covering them in class.

Week 1 A) (Week 1 on the Populi site): Introductions to explain the method of study used in this course and to get rid of some possible common misconceptions about St. Thomas’s teaching about science and philosophy

Process:

  1. To start the course, before the start of week 2, post an introduction of yourself in the designated discussion “tab” of Populi which reads:

Tell the members of the class something about yourself so we can get to know you a bit “

  1. Watch Video Lecture 1, both Videos:

Video lecture 1  http://youtu.be/hJPzciXYGWk

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/9SKdVHpxOto

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 1; Aristotle, Posterior Analytics, Bk.1; Metaphysics, Bk. 1, chs. 1 and 2; St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Posterior Analytics of Aristotle, lectures 1 and 2; Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 1, l. 3, nn. 53–68.

Suggested additional readings:

http://enroutebooksandmedia.com/academic-books/

  1. If enrollment numbers permit, participate in 2-hour, online, Instructor-led discussion of Video Lecture. Before the start of the course, students enrolled in this class will be contacted and given information about the online classroom.

Online Instructor-led discussion of Video-lecture and corresponding transcript pages for fall 2016 course will start at 8:30 PM, Eastern time (USA) on Monday evenings.*

Participate in 1-hour online, taped, student-led discussion of previous 2-hour Instructor-led discussion.

Online student-led, taped-discussion of Instructor-led discussion for fall 2017 course will start at 9:30 PM Eastern time (USA) on Tuesday evenings.**

* NOTE: If enrollment numbers do not make online discussion feasible, in place of online, instructor-led discussion, each week students will email instructor a minimum 500-word commentary on the video lecture and corresponding transcript pages in which the student will summarize at least 3 topics discussed in the video lecture and transcript. Before the start of class, the instructor will notify the students enrolled about the online conferencing site provider that we will use in this course.

If the course uses live, online, instructor-led discussion, but a student is unable to participate in the live, online discussion, the student will listen to a taped version of online discussion and email instructor a minimum 500-word commentary about the discussion in which the student will express agreement or disagreement with some claims made by at least one participant related to at least 2 topics discussed and state why the student agrees or disagrees. Email instructor your responses (at redpathp@gmail.com) so that instructor receives them by midnight the evening before the next instructor-led discussion class. Do not email the commentaries as an attachment! Put them into the body of the email. In the subject line of the email, put your Name, Lecture number, and type of discussion to which the email replies (for example, John Doe, Week 1, Instructor-led discussion; or John Doe, Week 1, student-led discussion).

** NOTE: If the course uses online discussion, but a student is unable to participate in the live, online, student-led discussion, the student will listen to a taped version of online, student-led, discussion and email instructor a minimum 500-word commentary on the discussion in which the student will express agreement or disagreement with some claims made by one or more student related to at least 2 topics discussed and state why the student agrees or disagrees. Name the student(s) who made the claim(s). Email instructor your responses (at predpath@gmail.com) so that instructor receives them by midnight the evening before the next instructor-led discussion class. Do not email the commentaries as an attachment! Put them into the body of the email. In the subject line of the email, put your Name, Lecture number, and type of Discussion to which the email replies (for example, John Doe, Week 1, Instructor-led discussion; or John Doe, Week 1, student-led discussion).

Week 1 B) (Week 2 on the Populi site): Discussion of 4 implications that necessarily follow from philosophy’s, science’s, foundation in sense wonder

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 2, both Videos.

Video lecture 1  http://youtu.be/3fvjJpibfY4

Video lecture 2  http://youtu.be/UTDWQqjkes8

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 2. Plato, Republic, Bk. 7. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk 4. Ch. 3 1005b35–1006a13; St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 5, l. 1; Book 10, l. 6; Summa theologiae, 1–2, proem., q. 90.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1 A).

Suggested additional readings:

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

REQUIRED READINGS for the 15 Lectures may be obtained in downloadable form from these sites:

Week 2 (Week 3 on the Populi site): Why the genus about which the philosopher, scientist, wonders is not the genus of the logician

  1. Watch Video Lecture 3, both Videos.

Video lecture 1   http://youtu.be/aausjOy46qI

Video lecture 2:  http://youtu.be/jRN8x5kqtCA  

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 3; Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 4, ch. 3, 1003b36–37; Bk. 5, ch. 24, 1023a26-32, and ch. 26, 1024a29–1024b4; Bk. 6, ch. 1, 1026b1–25; Bk. 10, 1, 1053b23–1054a19. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 3, lesson 8; Bk. 4, l. 2, n. 561; Bk. 5, l. 22, n. 1121; Commentary on the de Trinitate of Boethius, q.5, a. 4, reply, pp. 42–43.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Suggested additional readings:

Week 3 (Week 4 on the Populi site):  Understanding St. Thomas’s teaching about predication, univocity, and analogy in light of his teaching about the difference between a logical and philosophical, scientific, genus

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 4, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/jku9pPp-3e8

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/zGGOlnGItDI

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 4. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 4, lects. 1,2,3,4; Bk. 5, l. 8, n. 879;  Bk. 6, l. 4, n. 1229; Bk. 11, l. 3.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1 A).

Additional suggested readings:

Week 4 (Week 5 on the Populi site): How the generic subject of philosophy, science, is properly divided into species and how this division affects the nature of speculative philosophy, science, and philosophical, scientific, predication

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 5, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/FA-m4zuSm2k

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/Lkui4EtctIc

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 5. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 4, ch. 1, 1003b22–34; ch. 2, 1004a2–3; Bk. 5, ch. 28, 1024b10–13; Bk. 10, 1, 1052a15–1053b8, 1053b23–24; Bk. 12, ch. 1, 1069a18–1069b32; Posterior Analytics, Bk. 1, ch. 11, 75a18–37; Bk. 2, ch. 2, 90b14–16. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 5, lesson 19; l. 22, n. 1125; all of Book 10. Commentary on the Posterior Analytics of Aristotle, Bk. 1, l. 10 and l. 14.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Week 5 (Week 6 on the Populi site)  How St. Thomas’s teaching about virtual quantity, opposites, first principles, and privation relates to his teaching about the essential connection between the problem of the One and the Many and the nature of philosophy, science.

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 6, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/vyQJAx1Djho

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/dmjflcHidnk

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 6. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 4, ch. 1, 1004a34–1005a18, ch. 2, 1004b27-1005a13b; Bk. 5, ch. 1, 1013a1–24, ch. 5, 1015b10–15, ch. 12, 1020a18–1020b12, ch.16, 1021b12–1022a3; Bk. 10, ch.1, 1020a25–33, 1052a1–1053b10, 1052b32–1053a23, ch. 3, 1055a4–39, ch. 4, 1054a1–1055a; Bk. 12, ch. 1, 1069a18–1069b32; Bk. 14, ch. 1, 1087b29–1087b31,ch. 2, 1088a15–1093b30; Physics, Bk. 1, ch. 1, 184a17–21, Bk. 2, ch. 2, 194b11–12. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 4, lessons 1 through 4; Bk. 5, lessons 1 through 3, lessons 14 and 15, l. 16, n. 998, l. 18, nn. 1037-1039; Bk. 6, l. 2, nn. 1175–1176; Bk. 10, l. 2, nn. 1920–1960, l. 4, nn.1998–2022, 2035, l. 5, nn. 2024–2026, l. 6, n. 2058; On the Unity of the Intellect against the Averroists, Ch. 1, n. 29; Commentary on the de Trinitate of Boethius, q. 5, a. 3, reply to 3.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Suggested additional readings:

Week 6 (Week 7 on the Populi site): How St. Thomas relates Aristotle’s and his teaching about the problem of the One and the Many to his teachings about being a measure; how principles are measures; philosophical, scientific, demonstrations; predicating universals; and the nature, divisions, and methods of philosophy, of the sciences

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 7, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/pclGvsv7Kr4

Video lecture 2:  http://youtu.be/7e9il4w1Ul4

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 7. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 3, ch. 4, 1001b1–1002b10; Bk. 4, ch. 1,1003b22–34, 1087b34–1088b14; Bk. 5, 6, 1016b18–32; Bk. 10, ch.1, 1052a15–1053b8,1053b23–24; Posterior Analytics, Bk. 1, ch. 11, 77a5–9; St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Posterior Analytics of Aristotle, Bk. 1, l. 19.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Suggested additional readings:

Week 7 (Week 8 on the Populi site): The essential connection of the the metaphysical principles of virtual quantity and privation to being a measure and widespread and analogous predication of unity, plurality, and measure

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 8, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/A3oHDFVexHk

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/1H40Lazi2iU

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 8. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 5, ch. 14, 1020b18–25; Bk. 10, ch. 14, 1055a33–1055b18. St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa theologiae, 1, q. 1, a. 4, ad 1; 1, q. 1, a. 7, respondeo; 1–2, q. 5 a. 1, respondeo; Commentary on the de Trinitate of Boethius, q. 5, a. 3, reply to 3; Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 5, l. 14 nn. 962–965 and Lessons 15 through 18.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Suggested additional readings:

Week 8 (Week 9 on the Populi site): The relation between equal and unequal qualitative measurement, contrary opposition, and analogous predication to understanding the division and methods of the arts, sciences, philosophy and their respective forms of excellence

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 9, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/s9WdkpQ2wxQ

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/OActt_idr9U

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 9. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 4, ch. 1, 1003b11–19; Bk. 5, ch. 14, 1020b26–1021a14; Bk. 10, ch. 1, 1052b19–1053b8, ch. 4, 1055a33–1055b3, 1056a10–30; Bk. 14, ch. 1, 1087b38–42. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, all of Book 10.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Suggested additional readings:

Week 9 (Week 10 on the Populi site): How the substance known and the scientific knower are related to a scientific genus; the chief causes of the hierarchy of the sciences; and how the human person is a first principle of all science, philosophy

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 10, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/vVM1cr0zsEA

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/ME_aTiDCkvo

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 10. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 5, ch. 10, 1018a9–1019b9. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the de Trinitate of Boethius, questions 5 and 6.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Suggested additional readings:

St. Thomas Aquinas, The Division and Methods of the Sciences: Commentary on the de Trinitate of Boethius, Questions V and VI, ed. and trans., Armand A. Maurer (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 3rd rev. ed., 1963, or any newer editions, if available).

Week 10 (Week 11 on the Populi site): The essential connection of Aristotle’s 4 causes, virtual quantity, contrariety, and the division and methods of the sciences, philosophy, to organizational wholeness

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 11, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/a3fAHOUJKio

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/WJLymY2Rr4U

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 11. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 1, ch. 1, 980a–983a, ch. 2, 982a18; Bk. 12, ch. 10, 1075a14–16. Bk. 12, ch. 10, 1075a14–16. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the de Trinitate of Boethius, q. 5, a. 1, reply to 4; q. 6 a. 4, reply; Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 1, l. 1, n. 35; Bk. 5, lessons 2 and 3; Commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle, In I Eth., lect. 1, nn. 1–2; Summa contra gentiles, proem. to Bk. 1
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Additional suggested readings:

Week 11 (Week 12 on the Populi site): The dramatic impact that the reality of aims and of contraiety has on the nature and proper understanding of philosophy, science

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 12, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/gOCMb5kfQlM

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/PpbtlsGS4JY

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 12. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 5, lessons 19, 20, 21,  22; Summa theologiae, 1, q. 1, a. 4, ad 1 and 1–2, q. 5, 1. 1, respondeo.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Week 12 (Week 13 on the Populi site): Why metaphysics is the queen of the sciences

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 13, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/4O5d2wblHlU

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/o4Wz7UmxPc4

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 13. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 1. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 1, lessons 1, 2, 3; Commentary on the de Trinitate of Boethius, q. 6, articles 2, 3, 4.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Suggested additional readings:

Week 13 (Week 14 on the Populi site): Why the whole of philosophy, science, is chiefly a study of organizations involving overcoming oppositions so as better to know organizational truth

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 14, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/KiEqYkbRDSg

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/uv94tQE6Bx4

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 14. St. Thomas Aquinas: Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Book 6; Book 7, lessons 1 through 14.

Suggested additional readings:

Week 14 (Week 15 on the Populi site): The essential connection between all wonder and the existence of God, and some devastating cultural and civilizational damages that have ensued from forgetting this connection

Process:

  1. Watch Video Lecture 15, both Videos.

Video lecture 1: http://youtu.be/1ELgzl0t0mc

Video lecture 2: http://youtu.be/cuvo20JvTzE

  1. Read: Video Transcript pages for Lecture 15. Aristotle, Metaphysics, Bk. 6, ch. 1, 1026b1–25. St. Thomas Aquinas: Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Bk. 12.
  2. Repeat step 4 done for Video Lecture 1.

Suggested additional readings:

        Week 15:  Oral exam and syntopical paper due.

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

Students might wish to supplement the above readings by viewing a video of a talk Dr. Redpath gave at the Catholic Information Center, in Washington, D.C. related to volume 1 of a book he authored entitled A Not-So-Elementary Christian Metaphysics: Written in the Hope of Ending the Centuries-old Separation between Philosophy and Science and Science and Wisdom. 

7. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubric for the Major Papers and Discussion Board (DB) Postings

0 pts. – Paper
0 pts. – DB Posting;

3 pts. – Paper
2 pts. – DB Posting;

6 pts. – Paper
4 pts. – DB Posting;

9 pts. – Paper
6 pts. – DB Posting;

12 pts. – Paper
8 pts. – DB Posting;

15 pts. – Paper
10 pts. – DB Posting;

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Analysis shows no awareness of the discipline or its methodologies as they relate to the topic.

Lack of Understanding

Analysis seems to misunderstand some basic concepts of the discipline or lacks ability to articulate them.

Inadequate understanding

Analysis is sometimes unclear in understanding or articulating concepts of the discipline.

Adequate understanding

Analysis demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts of the discipline but could express them with greater clarity.

Solid Understanding

Analysis demonstrates a clear understanding and articulation of concepts with some sense of their wider implications.

Insightful understanding

Analysis clearly demonstrates an understanding and articulation of concepts of the discipline as they relate to the topic; highlights connections to other concepts; integrates concepts into wider contexts.

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.


WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Analysis is only partially written or completely misses the topic.

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Analysis fails to address the topic; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Episodic writing, a mix of strengths and weaknesses.

Analysis noticeably neglects or misinterprets the topic; simplistic or repetitive treatment, only partially-internalized; weak organization and development, some meandering; simple sentences, below-level diction; distracting errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Analysis is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors.

Solid writing, with something interesting to say.

Analysis is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples; level-appropriate syntax and diction; mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error.

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Analysis is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage.

COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting.

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

Peter A. Redpath, Ph.D., Adler-Aquinas Institute Rector, Fellow
Dr. Redpath was Professor of Philosophy at St. John’s University from 1970 to 2011. Author /editor of 11 philosophical books and many dozens of articles and book reviews; over 200 invited guest lectures nationally and internationally; CEO of the Aquinas School of Leadership; Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of the Great Ideas; co-founder of the Gilson Society (USA) and The International Etienne Gilson Society; former vice-president of the American Maritain Association; Founding Chairman of the Board of the Angelicum Academy; Member of the Board of the Great Books Academy; member Board of Trustees of the Institute for Advanced Philosophic Research; member of Board and Executive Committee of the Catholic Education Foundation; Academician of The Catholic Academy of Sciences (USA); former executive editor of Value Inquiry Book Series; former editor of the Studies in the History of Western Philosophy (SHWP), editor of the Gilson Studies (GS) special series for Editions Rodopi, B. V.; former associate editor, and current advisor of the journal Contemporary Philosophy; recipient of St. John’s University’s Outstanding Achievement Award, and Socratic Fellowship Award from the Great Books Academy; inaugural inductee as distinguished alumnus of Xaverian High School; and former Graduate Fellow of SUNY at Buffalo. In 2011 Dr. Redpath moved to Cave Creek, AZ in part to devote his time to teaching for and developing the Adler-Aquinas Institute.