Friday

10:00am – World’s Finest Comics Scholarship – Comics Track (Mart2 - 204A)

Comic scholars give in-depth analyses of your favorite DC Comics superheroes.

        Moderator: Damien Williams (Kennesaw State)

        Presentations:

  1. John Patrick Bray (University of Georgia), “‘It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane!’: Regality and the Use of Triads in Shaping Superman’s Identity”
  2. Gregory C Bray (The State University of New York at New Paltz), “Tugging Batman's Cape: Tensions in the Producer/Fan Paradigm”
  3. Durf Humphries (Independent Scholar), “Anti-Systemic Movements in DC Comics: Black Adam, Starfire, and the Red Lanterns”

11:30am – Representations of Super/Women – Comics Track (Mart2 - 204A)

Scholarly analyses of the representations of women in the Superhero genre, from “fridging” to the nuanced portrayal of the new Ms Marvel.

        Moderator: Kari Storla (USC Annenberg)

        Presentations:

  1. Morgan Clapp (Georgia State University), “Gutted Girlfriends and Halted Heroines: The Women In Refrigerators Trope and Female Disposability in the Superhero Genre”
  2. Sofia Brewer-Berres (Independent Scholar), “He’s Fast and She’s Weird: Representation of Women in Superhero Films”
  3. Kari Neely (Middle Tennessee State University), “Evolution of Comic Hijab: Comic Dressing of the Muslim Woman”

1:00pm – Horses, Humans, and Magic – Animation Track (Hyatt - Dunwoody)

Scholars discuss depictions of humanity, horses, and magic, and the ways two beloved American animations show them helping and supporting each other.

        Moderator: Damien Williams (Kennesaw State)

        Panelists: Ness Creighton (Georgia State University), Joan Miller (USC Annenberg)

2:30pm – The Economics of Star Trek – Trek Track (Mart2 - 204DE)

This panel will examine the post-scarcity, currency-free economics of the United Federation of Planets, and how we may, in fact, be on the cusp of such a system in real life.

        Moderator: John Flowers (SIU Carbondale)

Presentation: Robert Lloyd (Georgia State University), “‘What Does it Mean - “Exact Change”?’: The Economy of the United Federation of Planets in Theory and Practice

4:00pm – D&D and Philosophical Pedagogy – Tabletop Gaming Track (Westin - Augusta 1-2)

An interactive workshop demonstrating how tabletop RPGs can be used for experiential education.

Moderator: Daniel Amrhein (Journey into Awesome)

Presentation: Ryan Gabriel Windeknecht (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), “Would the Paladin Push the Fat Man?”

5:30pm – CPAC Scholars Forum

Private Gathering of CPAC Presenters. An address and open discussion of the challenges to public intellectuals on the job market and tenure track.

Topic: Public Engagement as an Academic: Doing It Well and Getting Credit.

        Moderator and Presenter: Richard Scott Nokes (Troy University)

6:45pm – CPAC Board Meeting

        Members of the CPAC Board only.

Saturday

10:00am – What would Time Lords call anthropology? Brit Track (Sheraton - Athens)

The Doctor might be a Time Lord, but what can he teach us about being human? Come join us for a roundtable discussion with experts in cultural anthropology to talk about everything from cosmic colonialism to why an alien keeps protecting humans against other aliens. [Roundtable]

        Moderator: Kari Storla (USC Annenberg)

        Presentations:

  1. Robert L. Lloyd (Georgia State University), “All the Strange, Strange Creatures: Lessons in Cultural Anthropology from the Worlds of Doctor Who
  2. Advitiya Sachdev (Florida Atlantic University), “The ‘Other’ Doctor”

11:30am – Subjectivity and Anime – Anime/Manga Track (Hyatt - Courtland)

Ever wonder what it's like to be the subject of an Anime? This panel explores what it means to be an anime character through examining the perspective of the main character of the anime Mardock Scramble. Additionally, this panel will explore what it means to be a "magical boy" in an anime, including those that switch genders in their transformations.

        Moderator: Kari Storla (USC Annenberg)

        Presentations:

  1. Shien-Hauh Leu (Southern Methodist University), “Embodying the Exception—an Agambenian Reading of Subjectivity in Tow Ubukata’s Mardock Scramble”
  2. LindaMarie Tonn (Wesleyan College), “Wombats and Hedgehogs and Magic Oh My! The Emergence of Magical Boys and their Feminist Consequences”

11:30am – History, Race, and Nationalism – Comics Track (Mart2 - 204A)

Historical and scholarly perspectives on the way that race, nationalism, and eurocentrism have intersected with mainstream comics.

        Moderator: Damien Williams (Kennesaw State)

        Presentations:

  1. Daniel Amrhein (Journey into Awesome) & Johnathan Flowers (SIU Carbondale), “The Comics Code and the Death of Diversity”
  2. Advitiya Sachdev (Florida Atlantic University), “Creating a Significant Other for the American Audience: Issues of Race and Ethnocentrism in Iron Man
  3. Rachel Hartnett (University of Florida), “Children of the Atom: Eurocentrism and Assimilation within the X-Men”

7:00pm – Taking a Bite Out of Zombie Media – Apocalypse Rising Track (Westin - Chastain FH)

The walking dead have infected media for over a century—and sometimes media bites right back. Come talk about how we go from patient zero to an apocalypse of zombie media!
        Moderator: Richard Scott Nokes (Troy University)

        Presentations:

  1. Jennifer Crumley (University of Texas at Dallas), “The Accidental Apocalypse: The Missing Link”
  2. Jordan Leigh Frederick (Queens Grant HS), “Zombies at Netherfield, Ninjas at Pemberley: Resurrecting Jane Austen in Pride and Prejudice and Zombies”

7:00pm – History of Trek Fanfiction – Trek Track (Mart2 - 204DE)

This panel will will examine the history of one of the most famous fandoms in the world, and the origins of fanfiction and fanart within it.

        Moderator: Vickie Willis (Georgia State University)

Presentation: Erica Massey (Southern Methodist University), “A History of Star Trek Fanfiction”

7:00pm – Representing Disability and Trauma  – Comics Track (Mart2 - 204A)

Academic panelists explore representations of disability and of trauma in mainstream and indie comics.

        Moderator: Daniel Amrhein (Journey into Awesome)

Presentations:

  1. Courtney Bliss (Bowling Green State University), “Are Mutants Deaf?: The Similarities Between Deaf Culture and the Mutants of the X-Men Comics”
  2. Erica Massey (Southern Methodist University), “The Clint Barton Experience: Disability Portrayal and Erasure
  3. Kari Storla (USC Annenberg), “Becoming/Unbecoming and communicating the incommunicable experience of trauma”

7:00pm – RPGs: Subverting the Win – Tabletop Gaming Track (Westin - Augusta 1-2)

A philosophical discussion about games, such as Dungeons and Dragons, which lack traditional winning conditions and how this absence influences play.

        Moderator: Damien Williams (Kennesaw State)

        Presentations:

  1. Brandon Underwood (University of Hawai'i, Manoa), "Playing to Lose: Tabletop Teleology"
  2. Commentary by Johnathan Flowers (SIU Carbondale)

8:30pm – Constructing the Self: Gender and Artificial Intelligence – SciFi Lit Track (Hyatt - Embassy AB)

An scholarly discussion of how Neal Stephenson and Isaac Asimov explore issues of identity and technology in their work.

        Moderator: Richard Scott Nokes (Troy University)

        Presentations:

  1. Katie Googe (University of Georgia), “The Real Robots: A Historical Perspective on Isaac Asimov and Artificial Intelligence”
  2. Commentary by Damien Williams (Kennesaw State University)

Sunday

10:00am – Reimagining Anime – Anime/Manga Track (Hyatt - Courtland)

Through Madoka Magica’s reimagination of fandom and community, this panel explores the way that Anime allows us to rethink and reimagine our world and our stories.

        Moderator: John Flowers (SIU Carbondale)

        Presentations:

  1. Simon Gough (Monash University), “Producing databases, consuming databases: (un)official remix culture and the Madoka Magica franchise”

12:00pm – CPAC Presenters Luncheon

4:00pm – Myth and History in Fantasy – Fantasy Literature Track (Hyatt - Embassy DE)

A scholarly panel on mythic origins in Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series, and the politics of colonialism in George RR Martin’s  representation of  Daenerys Targaryen.

        Moderator: Richard Scott Nokes (Troy University)

        Presentations:

  1. Sargon Donabed (Roger Williams University), “Subtle and Evident Influences and Derivations of Robert Jordan in the Wheel of Time Mythos”
  2. Rachel Hartnett (University of Florida), “Mhysa or Monster: Imperialism and the White Savior in A Song of Ice and Fire”

7:00pm – Subverting Gender – Comics Track (Mart2 - 204A)

Comics scholars discuss works that subvert gender roles and stereotypes, from undermining hegemonic masculinity to creating monstrous women.

        Moderator: Daniel Amrhein (Journey into Awesome)

        Presentations:

  1. Madison Butler (Pennsylvania State University), “Ms. Monster: Misogyny, Othering, and Abjection in Female Characters”
  2. Melanie Jordan (University of West Georgia), “Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered: The Witch in Contemporary Comics”

Monday

1:00pm – Horror and Folklore – Horror Track (Westin - Peachtree)

Scholars Emily Rodriguez & Richard Scott Nokes discuss the geographical nature of horror & urban legends through their connection to the PURGE series.

        Moderator: Damien Williams (Kennesaw State)

Presentation: Emily Rauber Rodriguez (University of Southern California), “Urban and Suburban Legends: Horror by Geography in The Purge Series”

Commentary by Richard Scott Nokes  (Troy University)

1:00pm – Comics in the College Classroom – Comics Track (Mart2 - 204A)

College professors discuss their experiences and advice for incorporating comics into their classrooms to help teach social theory, identity, and philosophy.

        Moderator: John Flowers (SIU Carbondale)

        Presentations:

  1. Robin L. Zebrowski (Beloit College), “Welcome to College, Where Bitch Planet   Meets the Lumberjanes! Teaching Social Change and Critical Identity Through Contemporary Comics
  2. J.J. Sylvia IV (North Carolina State University), “Using Comics in the Classroom To Make the Abstract Ideas of Philosophy and Critical Theory Concrete”