Kā Tiritiri o te Moana – An Uplifting Story

 

EVALUATE the Ngāi Tahu and Plate Tectonic accounts of the formation of the Southern Alps (Kā Tiritiri o te Moana)

To achieve this, complete the following tasks, then write a paragraph (or two) to EVALUATE your opinion about the two accounts of the formation of Kā Tiritiri o te Moana. In Google Classroom, submit:

  1. A sequence of the formation of Kā Tiritiri o te Moana according to the Ngāi Tahu narrative
  2. A sequence of the formation of Kā Tiritiri o te Moana according to the Plate Tectonic Theory
  3. A paragraph (or two) evaluating the two accounts

The Ngāi Tahu Narrative

Ngāi Tahu oral traditions record that Aoraki was the eldest son of Rakinui and Pokoharuatepō. Aoraki and his three brothers brought the great waka, Te Waka o Aoraki, down from the heavens in order to visit their step-mother, Papatūānuku.

When attempting to return to the heavens some time later, Aoraki misquoted his karakia and the canoe fell back into the water and turned over onto its side, becoming stranded and overturning, tipping the brothers into the water.

They climbed onto the upturned canoe awaiting rescue, but as time passed their hair went white and they turned to stone, becoming Ka Tiritiri o te Moana (the Southern Alps) with Aoraki forming its highest peak.

 

They remain there today as the principal mountains in the Southern Alps, with Aoraki being the highest. It is for this reason that Ngāi Tahu knows the South Island as ‘Te Waka o Aoraki’.

 

SOURCES:                  http://ngaitahu.iwi.nz/whanau/aoraki-bound/about-aoraki-bound/

                                http://ngaitahu.iwi.nz/ngai-tahu/the-settlement/settlement-offer/aoraki/

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6q8E1laQjY

Make a SEQUENCE of the key parts of the Ngāi Tahu narrative:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How did you do? Use the Rubric on the next page to reflect on your work so far…

Plate Tectonics

Plate tectonics is an important theory developed in the 1960s to explain how the continents move across the Earth's surface. Early 20th century geologist Alfred Wegener realised that the puzzle-like fit of many the continents was more than a coincidence, but he couldn't correctly explain what powered their movement.

Geologists now know that the Earth's outermost layer, the crust, is divided into independently moving plates. These plates move (“float”) and collide due to the heat of a semi-liquid layer below them, called the mantle. When the magma from the mantle breaks through the crust, we call it lava.

There are different types of plate boundary. Spreading centres at mid-ocean ridges are where undersea volcanoes create new plate material. Subduction zones are where one plate sinks below another, causing volcanic eruptions and earthquakes and, sometimes, building mountains, such as Kā Tiritiri o te Moana.

SOURCES:    http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/earth/surface_and_interior/plate_tectonics

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/earth/surface_and_interior/mountain_formation#p00fzsnd

(Video – requires Flash installed and Javascript turned on; use Firefox as your browser)

http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/mountains/page-3

http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/mountains/page-6

 

 

 

Make a SEQUENCE of the key parts of the Plate Tectonic explanation:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How did you do? Use the same Rubric as before to reflect on your work so far…

EVALUATE the Ngāi Tahu and Plate Tectonic accounts of the formation of the Southern Alps (Kā Tiritiri o te Moana)

 

Write 1-2 paragraphs to summarise your work so far and address at least one of these bullet points: