Waterbury Public Schools                                                   High School Program of Studies 2021-2022


Waterbury Public Schools Senior Leadership Team

Dr. Verna D. Ruffin, Superintendent of Schools

Mr. Darren Schwartz

Chief Academic Officer

Mrs. Doreen Biolo

Chief Financial Officer

Vacant

Chief Operating Officer

Mr. Matthew Brown

Chief Turnaround Officer

Mrs. Nyree Toucet

Director of College and Career Readiness

Dr. Lara White

Director of Equity and Inclusion

Mr. Miguel Pabon

Director of Pupil Services

Mrs. Sujata Wycoff

Director of Communications

Ms. Tara Shaw

BOE Attorney

Mr. Juan Mendoza

Assistant Superintendent for Human Capital & Talent Management

Mrs. Noreen Buckley

Assistant Superintendent

Mrs. Jade L. Gopie

Assistant Superintendent

Waterbury Public Schools Board of Education Commissioners

Mayor Neil M. O’Leary, Chairman Ex-Officio

Charles (Chuck) E. Pagano Jr., President

Karen E. Harvey, Vice President

Ann M. Sweeney, Secretary

Elizabeth C. Brown

Juanita P. Hernandez

Amanda K. Nardozzi

Rocco F. Orso

Melissa Serrano-Adorno

Charles L. Stango

Thomas Van Stone, Sr.


Dear Students and Families,

The Waterbury Public School’s Academic Office is pleased to provide a comprehensive Program of Studies for students in grades 9-12. We believe in creating an environment that fosters exploration in areas of interest, while providing a solid foundation in core academic subjects. The district continues to refine courses to ensure students master standards and expand knowledge and skills through the fine arts and earn industry standard credentials in career and technical education. The vast array of offerings and career pathways provide a route to high school graduation that prepares each student for college and/or career.

It is imperative that students work with school counselors to fully understand graduation requirements and to advocate for course offerings of interest. All students with disabilities who are eligible for special education services participate in the secondary curriculum according to their Individualized Educational Plans (IEP).  Before making final decisions on courses, I suggest the following logic model as you prepare to enroll:

  1. Take the time to browse through the Program of Studies and know your options.  Jot down a few courses that are of particular interest to you.
  2. Pay particular attention to concentrators, courses that build on one another.  Completing the sequence of courses shows colleges/universities/employers that you have gained specific knowledge and skills in one area.
  3. Understand credit requirements, and in consultation with a school counselor, select core courses that are required for graduation first.
  4. Ask questions and don’t hesitate to keep asking!
  5. Maintain balance in your coursework and align it to your ultimate goal as a graduate.
  6. Register with your counselor as early as possible.

As you browse the courses available to you at your campus, do so with these words in mind by Mae Jemison, “It’s your place in the world;  it’s your life. Go on and do all you can with it, and make it the life you want to live.”  Seeking out subjects that you are interested in or have a budding passion for is one of the gifts of a high school education.  

Sincerely,

Darren M. Schwartz

Chief Academic Officer


Table of Contents

Waterbury Public Schools Senior Leadership Team        1

Waterbury Public Schools Board of Education Commissioners        1

Portrait of the Graduate        8

Waterbury Public Schools Academic Office Secondary Leadership Team        9

Waterbury Public Schools High School Administrative Team        10

Waterbury Public Schools High School Program of Studies 2021-2022        12

Vision Statement        12

Mission Statement        12

Theory of Action        12

Core Values        12

High School Graduation Exit Criteria for Graduating Class of 2022        13

Course Planning Worksheet for the  Graduating Class of 2022        14

High School Graduation Exit Criteria for Graduating Classes of 2023 and Beyond        15

Course Planning Worksheet for the  Graduating Class of 2023 and Beyond        16

High School Honor Roll, Grading, and Quality Point Ranking        17

Honor Roll        17

Passing Grades        17

Extracurricular Activities        17

Grade Point Average        18-19

Special Education Programming        20

Core Academics        20

State Street Program        20

Enlightenment School        21

Academies        22

Advanced Placement & College Course Offerings        23

University of Connecticut Early College Experience (ECE)        23

UCONN Early College Experience Program Courses        23

Post University High School Academy        24

Naugatuck Valley Community College Program Courses        25

English/Language Arts Department        26

Course Sequence        26

English/Language Arts Core Program Course Descriptions        25

English/Language Arts Elective Course Descriptions        28

Mathematics Department        30

Course Sequence        30

Mathematics Core Program Course Descriptions        31

Science Department        36

Course Sequence        36

Science Core Program Course Descriptions        37

Social Studies Department        42

Course Sequence        42

Social Studies Core Program Course Descriptions        43

Social Studies Elective Course Descriptions        44

World Languages Department        50

World Language Program Course Descriptions        51

ESL and Bilingual Programming        55

Bilingual Program Course Descriptions - Mathematics        55

Bilingual Program Course Descriptions - Science        56

Bilingual Program Course Descriptions - Social Studies        58

ESL Program Course Descriptions        59

Career & Technical Education        61

The Academy of Construction, Manufacturing, and Industrial Systems        63

Construction Career Pathway        63

Course Sequence        63

Construction Course Descriptions        63

Facility & Mobile Equipment Maintenance Career Pathway        66

Automotive Course Sequence        66

Automotive Course Descriptions        66

Transportation Operations        67

Aerospace Course Sequence        67

Aerospace Course Descriptions        67

Manufacturing Production        68

Manufacturing Production Course Sequence        68

Manufacturing Course Descriptions        68

The Academy of Business, Finance, Marketing & Entrepreneurship        72

General Management Career Pathway        72

Course Sequence        72

Business Management Course Descriptions        72

Accounting Services Career Pathway        74

Course Sequence        74

Accounting Course Description        74

Investments & Securities Career Pathway        76

Course Sequence        76

Investing & Securities Course Descriptions        76

Marketing Communications Career Pathway        77

Course Sequence        77

Marketing Communications Course Descriptions        77

The Academy of Health Sciences        78

Therapeutic Services Career Pathway        78

Course Sequence        78

Health Science Course Descriptions        78

The Academy of Education & Training        82

Restaurant, Food, Beverage, & Services Career Pathway        82

Course Sequence        82

Culinary Course Descriptions        82

Teacher / Training or Social Work Career Pathways        84

Course Sequence        84

Teacher Preparation Course Descriptions        84

Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) Career Pathway        89

Course Sequence        89

JROTC Course Descriptions        89

The Academy of Information Technology & Engineering        90

Information Support & Services Career Pathway        90

Course Sequence        90

Information Support & Services Course Descriptions        90

Programming & Software Development Career Pathway        91

Course Sequence        91

Programming & Software Development Course Descriptions        91

Web & Digital Communications Career Pathway        92

Course Sequence        92

Web & Digital Communications Course Descriptions        92

Engineering Design & Development Career Pathway        94

Course Sequence        94

Engineering Design & Development Course Descriptions        94

Fine Arts Department        96

Music Program Course Descriptions        97

Visual Arts Program Course Descriptions        105

Theater and Performing Arts Program Course Descriptions        111

Health and Physical Education Department        118

Course Sequence        118

Health and Physical Education Program Course Descriptions        119

Health and Physical Education Elective Course Descriptions        121

Waterbury Public Schools Non-Discrimination Policy        129

Non-Discrimination in the Instructional Program        129

NCAA Eligibility Information        130


Portrait of the Graduate


Waterbury Public Schools Academic Office Secondary Leadership Team

Mr. Darren M. Schwartz, Chief Academic Officer

Department

Supervisor

Email

Career & Technical Education

Mr. Michael Merati

mmerati@waterbury.k12.ct.us

English/Language Arts (Secondary)

Ms. Jennifer Sarja

jennifer.sarja@waterbury.k12.ct.us

ESL/Bilingual Education (K-12)

Mrs. Adela Jorge-Ferguson

ajorgeferguson@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Fine Arts (K-12)

Holly Maxson

hmaxson@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Health & Physical Education (K-12)

Mr. Joseph R. Gorman

jgorman@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mathematics (Secondary)

Dr. Susan Miller

susan.miller@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Science (K-12)

Mrs. Kari Nizzardo

knizzardo@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Social Studies (K-12)

Mrs. Veda Harris

pharris@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Technology for Teaching and Learning

Dr. Michelle Eckler

meckler@waterbury.k12.ct.us


Waterbury Public Schools High School Administrative Team

Mrs. Jade L. Gopie, Assistant Superintendent

School

Administrator

Email

Crosby High School

Mr. Michael Veronneau, Principal

mveronneau@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Ms. Cathi Newmark, Vice Principal

cnewmark@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mr. Salvatore Vollero, Vice Principal

svollero@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Ms. Melissa Richardson, Vice Principal

mrichardson@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mr. Sean Mosley, Vice Principal of ECHS

smosley@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Kennedy High School

Mr. Robert Johnston, Principal

rjohnston@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mr. George Smalley, Vice Principal

gsmalley@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mr. Matthew Gwiazdoski, Vice Principal

mgwiazdoski@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Ms. Karlyn Fitzpatrick, Vice Principal

kfitzpatrick1@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Wilby High School

Dr. Michelle Baker, Principal

mbaker@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Ms. Jeannine Minort-Kale,  Vice Principal

jminort-kale@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mr. Jason Martinez, Vice Principal

jmartinez@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Ms. Elizabeth Henson, Vice Principal

ehenson@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mr. Joseph Begnal, Admin. on Sp. Assign.

jbegnal@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mrs. Lauren Elias, Admin. on Sp. Assign.

lelias@waterbury.k12.ct.us

WAMS High School

Mr. Nicholas Albini, Principal

nalbini@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Dr. Maria Stasaitis, Vice Principal

mstasaitis@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mr. Joseph Nole, Vice Principal

jnole@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Ms. Jennifer Deeley, Vice Principal

jdeeley@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Waterbury Career

Academy High School

Mr. Michael Harris, Principal

mharris@waterbury.k12.ct.us

Mrs. Jennifer Franceskino, Vice Principal

jfranceskino@waterbury.k12.ct.us


Waterbury Public Schools High School Program of Studies 2021-2022

Vision Statement

ALL Waterbury Public Schools students will graduate ready to transform their world.

Mission Statement

The mission of Waterbury Public Schools is to inspire and prepare every student to be successful in and beyond school.

Theory of Action

If schools have:

  • Strong Leadership: A principal to prioritize improvement and communicate its urgency, monitor goals, customize and target support to meet needs
  • Instructional Transformation: Processes and supports that help teachers collaborate to improve standards-based instructional practice so that students can engage in deep learning tasks, respond to student learning needs, provide rigorous evidence-based instruction, and remove barriers while providing opportunities
  • Culture Shift: Staff ensure collective responsibility for both the quality of instruction and student learning and success, engage students and families in pursuing education goals
  • Talent Development: Recruit, develop, retain, and sustain talent, target professional learning opportunities, while setting clear performance expectations

Then schools will dramatically improve and student learning will increase.

Core Values

  • Holds high expectations for excellence in teaching and learning
  • Promotes equity in policy, practice and resources
  • Provides students a quality learning experience aligned to our Portrait of a Graduate
  • Acts as stewards for community resources and managing our assets to ensure equity and excellence
  • Recognizes that meaningful relationships are the foundation of a high-quality education
  • Committed to embracing a diverse community
  • Committed to civility, honesty, responsibility and transparency


High School Graduation Exit Criteria for Graduating Class of 2022

To complete the graduation requirements and receive a high school diploma from the City of Waterbury Public Schools, a student must meet the following requirements:

Graduation Requirements 22 credits

4.0    English

3.0    Mathematics

2.0    Science

3.0    Social Studies (1.0 US History & 0.5 Civics)

1.0     Physical Education (0.5 Health)

1.0     Arts and/or Vocational Education

8.0    Open Electives

  • A student must earn five (5) Carnegie units to be promoted to the 10th grade.
  • A student must earn ten (10) Carnegie units and have completed the 10th grade to be promoted to the 11th grade.
  • A student must earn fifteen (15) Carnegie units and have completed three (3) years of high school to be promoted to the 12th grade.

Twenty-two (22) Carnegie Units are required for graduation. All students must follow the core curriculum as outlined by the Board of Education. Further, if a student has credits withheld due to unexcused absences, in accordance with the Board of Education attendance policy, those credits are declared unearned credits.

Carnegie Units

Meeting Times

C.U.’s Earned

Extended courses

15 periods/per week

3.0 c.u.

Extended courses

10 periods/per week

2.0 c.u.

Lab Sciences courses

6 periods/per week

1.0 c.u.

Regular courses

5 periods/per week

1.0 c.u.

Elective courses

4 periods/per week

1.0 c.u.

½ year courses

5 periods/per week

.5 c.u.

½ year courses

4 periods/per week

.5 c.u.


Course Planning Worksheet for the  Graduating Class of 2022

Courses listed in grey are standard required courses for students in that grade level.

Subject

9th Grade

(5 credits required for promotion)

10th Grade

(10 credits required for promotion)

11th Grade

(15 credits required for promotion)

12th Grade

(22 credits required for graduation)

English

4.0 credits

English 9

English 10

English 11 

(or other approved junior level English course)

English 12 

(or other approved senior level English course)

Mathematics

3.0 Credits

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

Optional Elective Course (STEM)

Science

2.0 Credits

Integrated Earth and Physical Science OR Biology

Biology or Chemistry

Chemistry or Physics

Optional Elective Course (STEM)

Social Studies

3.0 credits

(1.0 Credit in US History,  Credit in Civics Required)

Modern World History

Civics (0.5)

US History II (0.5)

US History III

(or other approved junior year course)

Optional Elective Course (Humanities)

Physical Education

1.0 Credit

(0.5 Credit in Health Required)

Health Wellness

and Personal Conditioning 1

AND

Lifetime Health Wellness and Recreation 1

Arts and/or Career & Technical Education

1.0 Credit

Electives

8.0 Credits


High School Graduation Exit Criteria for Graduating Classes of 2023 and Beyond

To complete the graduation requirements and receive a high school diploma from the City of Waterbury Public Schools, a student must meet the following requirements:

Graduation Requirements 25 credits

9.0   Humanities (including civics and the arts)

9.0   STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)

1.0    World Language

1.0    Physical Education and Wellness

1.0    Health and Safety Education

1.0    Mastery-Based Diploma Assessment

3.0   Open Electives

  • A student must earn six (6) Carnegie units to be promoted to the 10th grade.
  • A student must earn twelve (12) Carnegie units and have completed the 10th grade to be promoted to the 11th grade.
  • A student must earn eighteen (18) Carnegie units to be promoted to the 12th grade.

Twenty-five (25) Carnegie Units are required for graduation. All students must follow the core curriculum as outlined by the Board of Education. Further, if a student has credits withheld due to unexcused absences, in accordance with the Board of Education attendance policy, those credits are declared unearned credits.

Carnegie Units

Meeting Times

C.U.’s Earned

Extended courses

15 periods/per week

3.0 c.u.

Extended courses

10 periods/per week

2.0 c.u.

Lab Sciences courses

6 periods/per week

1.0 c.u.

Regular courses

5 periods/per week

1.0 c.u.

Elective courses

4 periods/per week

1.0 c.u.

½ year courses

5 periods/per week

.5 c.u.

½ year courses

4 periods/per week

.5 c.u.

(NOTE: Graduating Class is defined as a group of students who started ninth grade for the first time and are expected to graduate in four years. For example, if a student started as a freshman in 2019/2020 then their expected graduating class would be 2023.)


Course Planning Worksheet for the  Graduating Class of 2023 and Beyond

Courses listed in grey are standard required courses for students in that grade level.

Subject

9th Grade

(6 credits required for promotion)

10th Grade

(12 credits required for promotion)

11th Grade

(18 credits required for promotion)

12th Grade

(25 credits required for graduation)

Humanities

9.0 Credits

English 9

English 10

English 11 

(or other approved junior level English course, e..g AP or ECE courses)

English 12 

(or other approved senior level English course, e..g AP or ECE courses)

Modern World History

Civics (0.5)

US History II (0.5)

US History III

(or other approved US History Social Studies course, e.g. AP or ECE courses)

Optional Elective Course (Humanities)

2 additional electives in the humanities are required (one in Fine or Performing Arts is required)

STEM

9.0 Credits

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

Optional Elective Course (STEM)

Integrated Earth and Physical Science

-OR-

Biology

Biology or Chemistry

Chemistry or Physics or Environmental

(or other approved junior level Science course, e.g. AP or ECE courses)

Optional Elective Course (STEM)

3 additional electives in the STEM program are required (one in CTE is required)

World Language

1.0 Credit

Physical Education and Wellness

1.0  Credit

Health and Safety Education

1.0 Credit

Health Wellness

and Personal Conditioning 1

AND

Lifetime Health Wellness and Recreation 1

Health Wellness

and Personal Conditioning 2

AND

Lifetime Health Wellness and Recreation 2

Mastery-Based Diploma Assessment

1.0 Credit

Open Electives

3.0 Credit

High School Honor Roll, Grading, and Quality Point Ranking

Honor Roll

The designation of High Honors and Honors will be based on GPA each marking period.

  • High Honor Roll: Average of 90 or above and no individual grade below 80
  • Honor Roll: Average of 80-89 and no individual grade below 70

In the event that schools are unexpectedly closed under a municipal, state or federal mandate for ten (10) or more consecutive school days, and with the approval of the Board of Education, the Superintendent will provide equitable grading procedures in the best interest of all students that account for such a closure and communicate the changes in procedures. In the event of such a closure, the Superintendent’s grading procedures will supersede the formulas and grading policies. These procedures will remain in effect, by decision of the Superintendent and the Board of Education, until a time deemed appropriate.

Passing Grades

The passing numerical grade is 65.  District-wide curriculum offerings at the high schools will consist of core academics and electives. Selected district-wide core and elective courses at the Accelerated Level will be modified to incorporate extended requirements for students to earn additional quality points.

To achieve a passing grade for the class for the year a student must have an average credit value of 1.0 for the entire year as calculated for a final grade.

Final grades will be calculated with each quarter worth 20% of a students’ grade and the midterm exam and final exam each worth 10% of the final grade. (In half-year courses, the final exam for the course will count as 20% of the course grade).

To qualify for Summer School students need to earn a numerical grade of 40 for the academic year as a sum of the four quarter credit values (exam grades are not included).

A grade of “E” is given to any student that is denied credit for excessive absences.  A grade of “I” is given if the teacher determines that the student’s work is incomplete. Grades of “I” can be changed by a teacher at any point during the year. Any grade of “I” that remains at the conclusion of September of the next school year will be changed to an “F”.

Extracurricular Activities

Students who have not earned the required Carnegie Units for the designated rank will be ineligible to participate in extracurricular activities. As soon as students exceed unexcused absences, in accordance with the Board of Education attendance policy, they will be immediately ineligible to participate in extracurricular activities (all after school programs). Students who have not maintained a 1.67 GPA or higher during the marking period preceding AND during the student’s participation will be ineligible to participate in extracurricular activities. (See Student –Athlete Eligibility Checklist-High School also)


Grade Point Average

Students are provided with a non-weighted Grade Point Average and a weighted Quality Point Ranking (QPR) at the end of each academic year, excluding senior year. Final senior GPAs and QPRs will be determined after seven semesters. GPA (non-weighted) ranges from 4.33 to 0 and is an indicator of academic success; QPR (weighted) ranges from 15.5 to 0 and is an indicator of average academic rigor. In each case, the higher the numeric value, the more successful the academic performance.

Overall Grade Point Average: An overall GPA will be calculated based on the un-weighted arithmetic average of grades in all courses, using numerical grade values as follows:

A+ = 4.33

B+ = 3.33

C+ = 2.33

D+ = 1.33

A = 4.0

B = 3.0

C = 2.0

D = 1.0

A- = 3.67

B- = 2.67

C- = 1.67

F = 0.00

Quality Point Ranking (QPR)/Class Rank: The Waterbury Public School System believes it is necessary and important to provide differentiated quality points for the purpose of weighting its academic course offerings at the high school. The current curriculum contains a wide variety of courses at various levels of academic challenge. Students are allowed considerable choice and are encouraged to strive for academic excellence. Grade weighting encourages and rewards students for selecting courses at more challenging levels of difficulty.

Quality points are the weights that are assigned to courses in order to communicate their differing academic challenge. Weights assigned to academic courses communicate the level of academic challenge inherent in each course to students and their parents; therefore, the weights assigned help students to make more appropriate course selections. Additional weights assigned to college preparatory courses recognize that more challenging courses require advanced levels of work; therefore, advanced courses have higher course weights.


A grade weighting/class ranking system shall be implemented for the high schools as follows:

MIN

MAX

AP/Post-Secondary

ACE/ATOMS/SOAR

HONORS

GENERAL

97

100

A+

15.5

14

13

11

93

96

A

14.5

13

12

10

90

92

A-

13.5

12

11

9

87

89

B+

12.5

11

10

8

83

86

B

11.5

10

9

7

80

82

B-

10

9

8

6

77

79

C+

9

8

7

5

73

76

C

8

7

6

4

70

72

C-

7

6

5

3

67

69

D+

6

5

4

2

65

66

D

5

4

3

1

Below 65

F

0

0

0

0

All grades shall be rounded to the nearest whole number.


Special Education Programming

The Waterbury Public Schools special education programming provides a comprehensive program to meet the needs of our diverse learners identified with specific exceptionalities.  Through the Planning and Placement Team (PPT) process, students with Individualized Educational Plans (IEPs) are provided with rich and robust programming to help them to reach their full academic and social potentials while maintaining the least restrictive environment (LRE) possible.  Students in all of the Waterbury Public Schools Special Education Programs are given opportunities to align themselves with the Vision of the Graduate in order to best suit their individual post-secondary track of choice.

Core Academics

All students, regardless of their academic placement or achievement, have the opportunity to earn credit in their core academic programming (English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and World Languages).  Whether in a regular classroom setting or a more specific, IEP based setting, all students are provided with the necessary support to work at their own pace in order to access the characteristics of the Vision of the Graduate.  Students requiring specialized instruction in the core academics receive more individualized instruction structured to meet the goals and objectives of their IEP.  

State Street Program

The State Street Program is a self-contained Special Education program housed in-district for students enrolled in Pre-K through 12th grade.  Our students have been identified as having some degree of social, emotional, mental health, and/or behavioral needs which impact their academic success at a comprehensive school.  Students participating in the State Street Program, through their Individualized Education Program (IEP) will have access to all extra curricular activities that take place at, or are sponsored by the child’s home school.  Students will have access to individual courses at their home school, as appropriate to their Least Restrictive Environment (LRE).  In alignment with the Waterbury Public Schools Portrait of a Graduate, our students benefit from learning in a small, therapeutic setting from teachers who implement lessons and deliver instruction in such a way that their unique, individualized needs are being addressed.  The State Street Program utilizes an extensive counseling component as well as the Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports system in order to promote healthy social-emotional development.  Every effort is made to establish collaborative relationships with the families and community providers of our students so that we can work together as a team to best position them for success.  Courses at the State Street program are offered in half year increments but follow the same full year curriculum as listed in the Program of Studies.

Enlightenment School

Enlightenment, in partnership with communities and families, works to provide all students the opportunity to achieve their academic potential, improve attendance and become responsible, independent, productive global citizens. Enlightenment provides a dynamic, nurturing, challenging, and safe school environment that assists all students in building positive relationships while attaining their educational, personal/social/emotional, and career goals. In alignment with the Waterbury Public Schools Portrait of a Graduate, our Enlightenment students benefit from learning in a small setting with teachers and interventionists who develop lessons and deliver instruction in tiered settings aimed at meeting the learning needs of each student.  Courses at Enlightenment School are offered in half year increments but follow the same full year curriculum as listed in the Program of Studies.   


Academies

All Waterbury Public Schools students have the opportunity to select into an Academy of their choice. Each Academy has multiple Career Pathways and rigorous Programs of Studies that details each sequenced course students will engage in. The focus of each Academy is to prepare all students for college, career & life readiness. To accomplish this, students will be provided with a comprehensive experience that focuses on middle skilled jobs, dual enrollment courses, industry recognized credentials, work based learning experiences, employability skills, Habits of Mind and Career Ready Practices. This focus will increase future opportunities for our students. The following are the Waterbury Public Schools Academies.

  • Business, Finance, Marketing & Entrepreneurship
  • Education & Training
  • Health Sciences
  • Information Technology & Engineering
  • Manufacturing, Construction & Industrial Systems
  • Early College High School with Post University


Advanced Placement & College Course Offerings

The Waterbury Public Schools believes strongly that all students should be provided with opportunities to achieve in advanced placement and college-credit bearing courses.  To that end, our Advanced Placement program is open to all students across the district.  While course prerequisites may exist (e.g., students must take a standard Biology course before taking an Advanced Placement Biology course), previous course levels and/or grades do not preclude a student from enrolling in an Advanced Placement course.  Certain college-level courses (UConn, NVCC, Post) may have university-required prerequisites that include specific courses, SAT scores, or grades in previous courses.  This, however, should not discourage a student from discussing enrollment in one of these courses with their counselor as alternatives to such prerequisites may be available.  Students interested in enrolling in one of our many advanced placement or college-level offerings should discuss their plans with their counselors in order to develop an academic plan that best aligns with their college and career goals.

Dual-enrollment courses are an excellent way for Waterbury Public Schools students to challenge themselves while also earning college credit. For all dual-enrollment courses, Waterbury Public Schools must adhere to its articulation agreement with each institution of higher education for course requirements. The successful completion of any dual enrollment course results in an official transcript from that institution with the grade earned. Students may attempt to transfer any and all dual-enrollment credits to the institution at which they enroll. Students are responsible for the application to each program.

Some Advanced Placement courses require a summer assignment that is due on the first day of school. Students are responsible for obtaining any summer assignments prior to the end of the previous school year. Because these are college-level courses, students are expected to complete summer assignments by the deadline.

University of Connecticut Early College Experience (ECE)

UCONN Early College Experience (ECE) provides students the opportunity to take university courses while still in high school. These challenging courses allow students to preview college work, build confidence in their readiness for college and earn college credits that provide both an academic and a financial head start on a college degree.

ECE instructors, who are certified as adjunct professors by the UConn faculty, create a classroom environment fostering independent learning, creativity and critical thinking – all pivotal for success in college. To support rigorous learning, University of Connecticut library resources are made available to all ECE students.

ECE students must successfully complete the courses with a grade of C or better in order to receive university credit. University credits are highly transferable to other universities. Students are charged a nominal per credit fee. The fee is waived for students who qualify for free and reduced lunch. For additional information visit:  www.ece.uconn.edu.  In addition, students will earn a full high school credit for the successful completion of an ECE course regardless of if the course is offered for a full or half year.

UCONN Early College Experience Program Courses

Seminar in Academic Writing (ENGL 1010)

Seminar in Writing through Literature (ENGL 1011)

Seminar in American Studies (AMST 1201)

Elementary Concepts of Statistics (STAT 1100Q)

Elementary Discrete Mathematics (MATH 1030Q)

Calculus I (MATH 1131Q)

Principles of Biology (BIOL 1107)

General Chemistry I (CHEM 1127Q)

General Chemistry II (CHEM 1128Q)

Environmental Science (NRE 1000E)

General Physics I (PHYS 1201Q)

Medical Terminology (AH 2001)

Introduction to Allied Health Professions (AH 1100)

EMT Training (AH 4092)

Individual & Family Development (HDFS 1070)

If You Love It, Teach It (EDCI 1100)

Introduction to Special Education (EPSY 1100)

Introduction to Human Rights (HRTS 1007)

Introduction to Genocide Studies (HRTS 2200)

Seminar in American Studies (AMST 1201)

Western Traditions Before 1500 (HIST 1300)

Modern Western Traditions (HIST 1400)

Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 1001)

United States History Since 1877 (HIST 1501)

Introduction to American Politics (POLS 1602)

Italian Composition & Conversation 1 (ILCS 3239)

Non-Western Music (MUSI 1004)

Post University High School Academy

Provides high school students the opportunity to enroll in undergraduate college courses. In these 3-credit courses, students interact with their peers and Post University faculty members in engaging, challenging, college-level coursework.

ACC111 -    Financial Accounting

ACC211 -   Managerial Accounting

MGT105 - Introduction to Management

MGT203- Foundations of Leadership

MKT200- Principles of Marketing

MKT235 - Social Media Marketing

Early College High School Post University

An Early College High School offers students the opportunity to take college courses to accelerate their progress through secondary and postsecondary education. ECHS provides intensive academic and personal support and the opportunity to earn college credit toward a degree or credential, at no cost to the student, while earning a high school diploma. They have proven effective for students from low-income families and other backgrounds underrepresented in higher education, many of whom earn an Associate degree upon graduating high school (Jobs for Future, 2017). ECHS prepares students for successful futures through a full integration of high school, college and career.

  • Early College High School allows students to earn a high school diploma and an Associate degree, or up to two years of college credit.
  • This differs from dual enrollment, where students are enrolled in a traditional high school and take college classes.
  • Students' college classes replace some of their high school classes.
  • ECHS challenges and inspires students by offering them the opportunity to earn significant college credit, and potentially an Associate degree, while still in high school.

Course Sequence

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

College Success

Seminar

Introduction to

Computing

College Writing

Introduction to

Communications

Literature And

 Composition

Humanities Or Liberal Arts Elective (I.E. Intro To Psychology, Intro To Law)

Determined by students expressed degree track

Determined by students expressed degree track

The College Career Pathways (CCP) program encourages students to pursue an associate or baccalaureate degree in their chosen career and technical education area. Students formally enroll in post secondary institutions and register for academic and technical courses. Students have the opportunity to earn college credit in a non-duplicative sequence of coursework.

Naugatuck Valley Community College Program Courses

Culinary (C, W)

Manufacturing (C, K, W) offsite

Various Manufacturing Courses (WCA)


English/Language Arts Department

Dr. Michelle Eckler, Supervisor of Secondary English Language Arts

The English/Language Arts department’s belief system is grounded in the notion that learners make meaning through sharing, discussing, exchanging, and refining experience and language. We encourage students to embrace reading and writing as an integral and important aspect of their high school and postsecondary lives. Our goal is to provide instruction that is relevant and rigorous, causing learners to think deeply. We encourage students to develop their sophistication as readers, writers, and thinkers of the 21st Century.

The ELA Curriculum provides students with a rigorous academic experience. The curriculum units are carefully designed to ensure skill practice in reading, writing, researching, and listening and speaking in order to provide rigorous learning experiences aligned to the CT Core Standards. Each unit of study builds on the previous one to ensure that students have acquired the prerequisite skills to move onto the next level of learning.  Students are required to take four years of English. The core English curriculum is a college preparatory program, with electives that accentuate aspects of fine arts, technology, mass communication, and the humanities.  Courses in the ELA department include the following instructional strategies:

  • explicit instruction in close reading of various texts;
  • guided discussions that lead to high-level, academic analysis;
  • a wide range of research-based reading strategies that empower students and helps them develop fluency;
  • scaffolded instruction and practice with complex text to move students toward learning independence.

Honors, AP, and College-Level Articulated Courses (UConn), which cover content to a greater depth and at a faster pace, will prepare students for admission requirements of colleges and universities.

Course Sequence

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

English 9

English 10

Course options include:

  • English 11
  • AP Language and Composition
  • ECE: Seminar in American Studies

Course options include:

  • English 12
  • AP Literature and Composition
  • ECE: Seminar in Academic Writing
  • ECE: Seminar in Writing Through Literature


English/Language Arts Core Program Course Descriptions

ENGLISH 9 (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 010/011

Credits: 1.0

Grade 9

The English 9 curriculum is comprised of four units of study including Telling Details, Pivotal Words and Phrases, Compelling Evidence, and Powerful Openings. Each unit of study builds on the previous one to ensure that students have acquired the prerequisite skills to move onto the next level of learning. The curriculum units are carefully designed to ensure skill practice in reading, writing, researching, listening, and speaking in order to prepare students for the next grade level. Students will engage in critical analysis of fictional literature and informational texts with a focus on developing vocabulary and reasoning skills.  Key literature studied during the course include Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, selected fiction, selected non-fiction, and poetry.  The English 9 curriculum is aligned with the SAT assessment in the skills it addresses.

ENGLISH 10 (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 020/021

Credits: 1.0

Grade 10

The English 10 curriculum is comprised of four units of study including The Power of Argument, Persuasion in Literature, Voice in Synthesis, and Praise, Mock, Mourn. Each unit of study builds on the previous one to ensure that students have acquired the prerequisite skills to move onto the next level of learning. The curriculum units are carefully designed to ensure skill practice in reading, writing, researching, listening, and speaking in order to prepare students for the next grade level.  Students will engage in critical analysis of fictional literature and informational texts with a focus on developing vocabulary and reasoning skills.  Key literature studied during the course include Things Fall Apart by Chinua Acheve, Antigone by Sophocles, selected fiction, selected non-fiction, and poetry. The English 10 curriculum is aligned with the SAT assessment in the skills it addresses.

ENGLISH 11 (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 030/031

Credits: 1.0

Grade 10

The English 11 curriculum is comprised of four units of study including The American Dream, The Power of Persuasion, American Forums: The Marketplace of Ideas, and An American Journey. Each unit of study builds on the previous one to ensure that students have acquired the prerequisite skills to move onto the next level of learning. The curriculum units are carefully designed to ensure skill practice in reading, writing, researching, listening, and speaking in order to prepare students for the next grade level.  Students will engage in critical analysis of fictional literature and informational texts with a focus on developing vocabulary and reasoning skills.  Key literature studied during the course include Their Eyes Were Watching God by Nora Zeale Hurston, The Crucible by Arthur Miller, selected fiction, selected non-fiction, seminal United States documents, and poetry. The English 11 curriculum is aligned with the SAT assessment in the skills it addresses.

ECE: SEMINAR IN

AMERICAN STUDIES (H)

K

Course Code: 030U

Credits: 1.0

Grade 10

Seminar in American Studies is a team taught, full year course that takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American culture. The course rests on two main pillars, the study of United States History and American Literature. The course also integrates art, architecture, and music to help the student develop a total picture of the American Experience. The course offers a variety of teaching strategies and learning activities. Students in Seminar in American Studies are assigned a double class period. After successful completion of the course, the student will have fulfilled the United States History requirement and the English 11 requirement.

AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (H)

K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 030A

Credits: 1.0

Grade 11

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is intended for advanced college preparatory junior level students. It is primarily a course in both effective writing and critical reading designed to strengthen the students’ skills in analyzing the reasoning and expression for ideas in prose passages. AP English Language requires students to demonstrate skill in composition through the development of various rhetorical modes. Students are able to hone their own writing skills through attentive and continued analysis of a variety of prose texts. This course prepares students for further Advanced Placement study in English Literature and Composition (senior year) as well as for college courses.

ENGLISH 12 (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 040/041

Credits: 1.0

Grade 12

The English 12 curriculum is comprised of four units of study including Perception is Everything, The Collective Perspective, Evolving Perspectives, Creating Perspectives. Each unit of study builds on the previous one to ensure that students have acquired the prerequisite skills to move onto the next level of learning. The curriculum units are carefully designed to ensure skill practice in reading, writing, researching, listening, and speaking in order to prepare students for the next grade level.  Students will engage in critical analysis of fictional literature and informational texts with a focus on developing vocabulary and reasoning skills.  Key literature studied during the course include The Tragedy of Othello by William Shakespeare, Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw, selected fiction, selected non-fiction, seminal United States documents, and poetry. The English 12 curriculum is aligned with the SAT assessment in the skills it addresses.

AP LITERATURE AND
COMPOSITION (H)

K, W, WAMS

Course Code: 040A

Credits: 1.0

Grade 12

The AP English Literature and Composition course is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students can deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. Writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of literature and include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays.

ECE: SEMINAR IN
ACADEMIC WRITING
 (H)

C, WAMS

Course Code: 040U

Credits: 1.0

Grade 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11, an ERW score of 550 or higher on the SATs (recommended).   This college-level course for advanced learners provides instruction in academic writing through interdisciplinary readings.  Assignments emphasize interpretation, argumentation, and reflection, as well as revision of formal assignments and instruction on grammar, mechanics and style.  The focus of this course is to prepare the advanced student for success on college writing assignments in a variety of disciplines.  Successful completion of this course meets the criteria for UCONN’s FYW (First Year Writing) requirement, and eligibility to earn 4 transferable credits from the University of Connecticut.  This course also meets the City of Waterbury requirements for grade 12 English.

ECE: SEMINAR IN WRITING
THROUGH LITERATURE
 (H)

C, WCA

Course Code: 051U

Credits: 1.0

Grade 12

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of English 11, an ERW score of 550 or higher on the SATs (recommended).   This college-level course for advanced learners provides instruction in academic writing, using literature as the assigned readings.  Assignments emphasize interpretation, argumentation, and reflection, as well as revision of formal assignments and instruction on grammar, mechanics, and style.  The focus of this course is to prepare the advanced student for success on college writing assignments in the area of humanities.  Successful completion of this course meets the criteria for UCONN’s FYW (First Year Writing) requirement, and eligibility to earn 4 transferable credits from the University of Connecticut.  This course also meets the City of Waterbury requirements for grade 12 English.


English/Language Arts Elective Course Descriptions

JOURNALISM 1 (H)

C, K, W, E, SS

Course Code: 057

Credits: 1.0

All Grades

Journalism introduces students to the editorial field of news, features, sports, and commentary writing as well as the business field of advertising. Emphasis is given to the language particular to journalistic conventions of writing and to editing. Learning is by "doing:" students are provided with practical opportunities to explore various styles of journalistic communication (which includes visual elements such as photography and illustrations), to produce articles and hard copy in these styles, and to experience diverse roles in the publishing process.  

JOURNALISM 2 (H)

C, K, W

Course Code: 058

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10-12

Journalism II extends the foundation of editorial writing skills and business savvy developed in Journalism I through additional emphasis on practical newspaper production and copy editing techniques.  Students will continue honing their critical thinking skills through various hands-on-exercises in reading, writing, interviewing, editing, and advertising activities.  This course leads students to develop a keen sense of observation as well as skills for effective communication through media production. Emphasis is placed on the reporter’s obligation for accuracy, reliability and a code of ethics. Through editorial conferences, students and teachers participate in the decision-making process resulting in the design and content of publications. Civic awareness and opportunities for community service participation are also explored.  

CREATIVE WRITING (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, E, SS

Course Code: 067

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10-12

This course is designed to give students opportunities for creative self-expression in writing and to further their writing skills.  Focus is on various types of creative writing from both poetry and prose and the development of a personal creative writing portfolio.  Student writing samples may include short stories, poetry, dramatic speeches, declamations, dialogues, biographies, and autobiography.

DRAMA 1 (H)

C, K, W, SS

Course Code: 085

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10-12

Students will gain an understanding of Artistic Perception, using the language and skills of theatre, Creative Expression, creating theatre to communicate meaning and intent, Aesthetic Valuing, analyzing theatre for meaning and intent as well as its ability to communicate effectively, and Connections, Relationships and Applications, developing lifelong skills such as creative problem-solving and planning for college and careers in the theatre, the arts, the communications and entertainment fields.  This course is also offered in the Fine Arts Department.

DRAMA 2 (H)

C, K, W

Course Code: 086

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Drama 1

This course continues to hone skills acquired in Drama 1, adding the art and technique of directing. Diction, projection, and elocution in speaking are practiced and studied. Playwriting becomes more complex, with emphasis on a deeper understanding of human nature through drama.


Mathematics Department

Ms. Jeannine Minort-Kale, Supervisor of Secondary Mathematics

The Mathematics Department believes that all students have the potential to achieve at high levels in the study of mathematics and is committed to providing every student a high quality mathematics education. To that end, content and instruction are aligned with the rigorous Connecticut Core Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The Standards for Mathematical Practice describe characteristics and traits that mathematics educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students.

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others
  • Model with mathematics
  • Use appropriate tools strategically
  • Attend to precision
  • Look for and make use of structure
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

Placement in the Mathematics Sequence

Honors and AP level and College-Level Articulated Courses (UCONN, NVCC) courses in the program, which covers content to a greater depth and at a faster pace, will prepare students for admission requirements of colleges and universities. Honors math courses differ from the core curriculum in the number of topics assessed, the pace of the course, and the complexity or depth to which topics are expected to be learned.

Course Sequence

Students are required to take three years of mathematics and are strongly encouraged to take a fourth year.  

3 Credit Pathway

4 Credit College Prep Pathway

4 Credit Honors Pathway

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

AND one of the following:

Precalculus

Trigonometry and Statistics

Honors Algebra I

Honors Geometry

Honors Algebra II  

AND one of the following:

Honors Pre-calculus

AP Calculus AB/BC

AP Statistics


Mathematics Core Program Course Descriptions

ALGEBRA I (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 301/301

Credits: 1.0

Algebra I expands upon the properties of equality, relationships between variables, and algebraic reasoning developed in middle grades to create the foundation for all future mathematics courses. Topics include the study of patterns, an introduction to functions, modeling with and solving equations and inequalities, graphing and modeling linear functions in various forms, systems of equations, exploring exponential functions, and polynomials. In addition, students engage in a beginning study of bivariate data analysis including correlation and lines of best fit. Common Core State Standards are taught and reinforced as the student learns how to apply these concepts in real-life situations.

ALGEBRA I HONORS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 300/300K

Credits: 1.0

The Honors level covers the same core skills as those in Algebra I but at a faster pace and with increased depth. In addition, students will extend their work with functions and equations to include quadratics and piecewise functions.  Additional topics such as introductory trigonometry and geometric applications will be explored as time allows.  (Includes ACE/ATOMS/SOAR Programs.)

GEOMETRY (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 351/351I

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I.  Based on the real-life applications of geometry, a student will investigate concepts in geometry such as congruence and similarity and apply that knowledge when conducting proofs and constructions. Coordinate geometry is also used, which integrates Algebra skills from the prior years. Critical thinking and problem-solving is emphasized as well as continued development of the skills needed to effectively communicate mathematical ideas.

GEOMETRY HONORS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 350/350K

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I. This is an accelerated course that focuses on an in-depth understanding of the relationships of congruence and similarity, the structures used to analyze them and the language used to communicate these ideas.  Constructing proofs, use of coordinate geometry and the study of conic sections are included. This course requires a greater degree of independence and competence in critical thinking and communicating mathematically. (Includes ACE/ATOMS/SOAR Programs.)

ALGEBRA II (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 321/321I

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry. Algebra II students build on the skills acquired in Algebra I and Geometry, revisiting and expanding on their understanding of linear, absolute value, and exponential functions. In addition, quadratic, radical, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions are introduced. Students focus on exploring the connections between graphical representations and equations while they study transformations of various functions and apply their understanding of domain and range to explore asymptotes. Students also build onto their statistical foundation by looking at random sampling.

ALGEBRA II HONORS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 320/320K

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry.   The Honors level covers the same core skills as those in Algebra II but at a faster pace and with increased depth. In addition, students will extend their understanding of the number system to include complex numbers  and explore how inequalities interact with systems and various functions including rational functions.  Additional topics such as normal distribution and unit circles will be explored as time allows.  (Includes ACE/ATOMS/SOAR Programs.)

TRIGONOMETRY /

TRIGONOMETRY ACE * (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, SS

Course Code: 393/393K

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II.  This is a one semester course for students who are interested in exploring the applications of trigonometry to the real world. After reinforcing understandings of right triangle trigonometry functions from Geometry, students extend their thinking to trigonometric functions, laws and applications.

STATISTICS / STATISTICS ACE (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E

Course Code: 394/394K

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II.  This course provides for the collection, organization, classification, analysis, interpretation and presentation of significant data as a basis of the study of events. Using real data-based applications taken from a variety of sources, students will develop skills to comprehend problems that describe situations to which techniques and the mechanics may be applied. Extensive use of algebraic skills and the graphing calculator will be applied throughout the course.

METHODS IN APPLIED

MATHEMATICS (S)

WCA

Course Code:

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful competition of Algebra II. This course will give students an opportunity to examine some of the key ways that mathematics affects their lives. Students will learn how to be better consumers of the statistics they are presented with on a daily basis, have an opportunity to develop their financial literacy skills in order to become more informed decision makers, and explore the ways that voting systems operate. The implications of these mathematical areas for equitable outcomes will be explored throughout the course and students will be given an opportunity to examine an issue of their choice to analyze through a mathematical lens.

PRECALCULUS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 371/371I

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II.  This course is designed to provide a strong foundation of pre-calculus concepts, techniques, and applications to prepare students for more advanced work. It places appropriate emphasis on discrete mathematics and data analysis as the mathematical framework for many important contemporary applications. Units covered include polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and inverse functions, graphs, and applications, trigonometry, and discrete mathematics. Extensive use of the graphing calculator will assist the student in a balanced approach to solving problems.

PRECALCULUS HONORS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 370/370K

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II. This course provides algebraic and graphical explorations of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions with real life applications in preparation for Calculus. In addition, trigonometric functions are studied as circular functions with applications to triangle problems. Topics include trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions and oblique triangle trigonometry. Limits and sequences and series will be introduced if time permits. Extensive use of the graphing calculator will assist the student in a balanced approach to solving problems. (Includes ACE/ATOMS/SOAR Programs.)

CALCULUS HONORS (S)

K, W, WAMS

Course Code: 380K

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: B or better in Precalculus.  This course serves to introduce students to the study of calculus. Students are exposed to several of the topics from the AP course including a study of functions, analysis of graphs, limits, continuity; derivatives at a point and of a function and applications and techniques of derivatives; and interpretations and properties of definite integrals, as well as applications of integrals; All topics are covered algebraically, geometrically, and analytically.

AP CALCULUS AB (S)

C, K, WAMS

Course Code: 380A

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: B or better in Precalculus Honors or Precalculus ACE or Calculus. This course includes the in depth study of functions, analysis of graphs, limits, continuity; derivatives at a point and of a function, applications and techniques of derivatives including those of trig functions, and second derivatives; interpretations and properties of definite integrals, as well as applications of integrals; and related rates and optimization; All topics are covered algebraically, geometrically, and analytically. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in May.

AP CALCULUS BC (S)

K

Course Code: 380A

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Calculus AB AP.   This course continues the study of Calculus begun in AP Calculus AB to the study of parametric, polar and vector functions; applications of integrals; polynomial approximations and series including the concepts of series, divergence versus convergence and types of series, series of constants, and Taylor/Maclaurin series. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in May.

AP STATISTICS (S)

WAMS

Course Code: 392A

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II.  This year-long course is equivalent to a one-semester college course in statistics.  Students will be introduced to the major concepts for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  Topics also include sampling and experimentation.  Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in May.

ECE: ELEMENTARY CONCEPTS

OF STATISTICS *  (S)

C (Fall ONLY)

Course Code: 391U

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra II; a Math score of 530 or higher on the SATs (recommended).  This semester-long college-level course for advanced learners takes a critical look at data: how can we organize, analyze and interpret data, how can we use data to make decisions, what role does randomness play in our decision making? Standard and nonparametric approaches to statistical analysis; exploratory data analysis, elementary probability, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, one- and two-sample procedures, regression and correlation. Learning to do statistical analysis on a personal computer is an integral part of the course. Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

ECE: ELEMENTARY DISCRETE
MATHEMATICS (S)

C, WCA (Spring Only)

Course Code: 390U

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II required, Precalculus recommended; a Math score of 530 or higher on the SATs recommended..  This semester-long college-level course for advanced learners looks at Problem solving strategies, solutions of simultaneous linear equations, sequences, counting and probability, graph theory, deductive reasoning, the axiomatic method and finite geometries, number systems.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

ECE: CALCULUS I (S)

WCA (Fall Only)

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Precalculus.. Limits, continuity, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, antidifferentiation, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, u-substitution, with applications to the physical and engineering sciences.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

ECE: ELEMENTARY CONCEPTS OF

STATISTICS / AP STATISTICS (S)

K

Course Code: 394A

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II. This year-long college-level course for advanced learners takes a critical look at data: how can we organize, analyze and interpret data, how can we use data to make decisions, what role does randomness play in our decision making? Standard and nonparametric approaches to statistical analysis; exploratory data analysis, elementary probability, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, one- and two-sample procedures, regression and correlation. Learning to do statistical analysis on a personal computer is an integral part of the course.Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in May.

SAT PREP - MATH * (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 373

Credits: 0.5

This is a half-year course that reviews test-taking strategies and problem solving techniques, and encourages both long-term and short-term preparation for the SAT and other standardized assessments. Tips on improving computational and reasoning skills are included. Practice sessions guide students to a better understanding of the problems that commonly appear on the SAT and related tests. The graphing calculator is used throughout the course.


Science Department

Mrs. Kari Nizzardo, Supervisor of K-12 Science

Why take science?

Science allows students to explore the natural world around them and the world within themselves. At the large scale students examine the universe and its stars, our solar system, and planet earth with its diverse ecosystems and life forms. At the micro scale they learn about cells, bacteria and viruses, and even molecules, atoms, and subatomic particles  such as gluons and quarks.

A New Way of Learning Science

Connecticut has adopted the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), which emphasize student discovery, developing models to explain real world phenomena, and finding engineering solutions to real world problems.  In the core science courses –integrated earth and physical science, biology, chemistry, and physics - Waterbury has adopted NGSS-aligned curricula that require students to think for themselves and apply science knowledge, rather than just memorize facts.  Our forensics course will soon be NGSS-aligned as well.

What science courses should students take?  

High school students in Waterbury are strongly encouraged to take three science courses.   The ideal course sequence for college-bound students is integrated earth and physical science followed by biology and chemistry.  Students opting for a fourth science would take physics, human biology, or one of the AP/ECE courses – AP/ECE Biology, ECE Chemistry, AP Physics, and AP Environmental Science.

Advanced students may begin with Biology in 9th grade, followed by Chemistry and Physics. They can elect to take two science classes in any year, and will be able to take AP or UCONN ECE classes in their junior and senior years.

Course Sequence

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Integrated Earth and Physical Science -OR- Biology

Biology -or- Chemistry

Chemistry

-or-

Physics

-or-

Environmental

(With the option of second science:  AP Biology, ECE Principles of Biology, ECE General  Chemistry, ECE  

Environmental Science, or other approved science elective)

Optional Elective Course (STEM)- Physics or any approved elective

Science Core Program Course Descriptions

INTEGRATED EARTH AND

PHYSICAL SCIENCE (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 431

Credits: 1.0

Grades 9

Students will discover chemical and physical properties of everything through the lens of earth and space science.  The theory of the Big Bang will explain how all matter was created, and how atoms in our bodies and all around usr were formed billions of years ago in exploding stars.    Students will explore the formation of the earth and moon, and the movement of continents riding on tectonic plates.  They will also investigate the biggest scientific issue of our time – climate change -  and separate natural influences from the impact of burning of fossil fuels.

INTEGRATED EARTH AND

PHYSICAL SCIENCE HONORS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 430/430K

Credits: 1.0

Grades 9

Designed for the high achieving student, this NGSS-aligned course uses the lens of earth and space science to investigate chemical and physical phenomena.   The theory of the Big Bang will explain how all matter was created, and how atoms in our bodies and all around us were formed in exploding stars billions of years ago.   Students will explore the formation of the earth and moon, and the movement of continents riding on tectonic plates.  They will also investigate the biggest scientific issue of our time – climate change -  and separate natural influences from the impact of burning of fossil fuels.  (Includes ACE/ATOMS/SOAR).

BIOLOGY (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 401

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10

Biology examines the basis for life including genetics, cellular function, and biochemistry. Scientific skills are developed including prediction, data collection, analysis, and reasoning. Biology is NGSS-aligned and emphasizes student-centered problem solving, engineering solutions to problems, and explaining real life phenomena.   Phenomena include how life returns after a forest fire, and how to survive a dying earth.  Genetics will be explored by studying how twins can look totally different and through investigating “What makes me, me” - the genetic and environmental factors that make each person a unique human being.  The course is geared to the college-bound student. The embedded labs focus on scientific investigation and processes.

BIOLOGY HONORS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 400

Credits: 1.0

Grades 9-10

This NGSS-aligned, laboratory course is designed for the high achieving student.  The curriculum emphasizes the cellular level of life forms, as well as heredity and evolution. Natural phenomena are explored in depth and scientific knowledge applied to solve real world problems.  Phenomena include how adaptations allow an antelope to escape cheetahs, the fastest animal on earth.  Genetics will be explored by studying how twins can look totally different, and through investigating “What makes me, me” - the genetic and environmental factors that make each person a unique human being. The course is oriented toward laboratory investigation, the use of technology, and the development of higher level thinking skills

BIOLOGY ACE/ATOMS/SOAR/ACCELERATED (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 400K

Credits: 1.0

Grades 9

This accelerated NGSS-aligned, laboratory course is designed for the high achieving student.  The curriculum emphasizes the cellular level of life forms, as well as heredity and evolution. Natural phenomena are explored in depth and scientific knowledge applied to solve real world problems.  Phenomena such as wooly mammoth extinction and coral reef decline will be studied from not just a biological perspective but also an Earth and Space science lens. Students will explore the genetics behind the differences in a set of twins in the unit “What makes me, me” as well as the environmental factors that make each person unique. The course is oriented toward laboratory investigation, the use of technology, and the development of higher level thinking skills.

ECE: PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY (S)

C, WCA

Course Code: 400U

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology. This course is aligned with the UCONN Storrs Biology department. Students will embark on a journey through what it means to be living, from a molecular level to the form and function of animal bodies.  In this course, students can expect lecture, reading & note-taking, independent and group projects, presentations to peers and intensive lab work.  This fast-paced and rigorous course will give students the opportunity to earn 4 college credits by passing full length college tests and labs sent directly from the UConn Storrs Biology Department.

AP BIOLOGY (S)

K, W, WAMS

Course Code: 400A

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology. This laboratory course provides a thorough and advanced study of biological principles and concepts at the college freshman level. Students must be highly motivated and competent in scientific experimentation and research. Availability of this and other AP courses in a given year depends on student enrollment.  Students are required to take the AP exam.

CHEMISTRY (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 421

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Algebra I. Chemistry is an NGSS-aligned, laboratory course that explores the structure of elements, compounds, and mixtures, and the chemical reactions they undergo. Emphasis is placed on chemical theories that are substantiated by experimentation in the laboratory. Students use their chemistry knowledge to solve problems in the real world, and develop explanations for chemistry phenomena.  Hands-on lab activities and demonstrations are used to show applications of chemistry to everyday life.  

CHEMISTRY HONORS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 420/420K

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10-11

Designed for the high achieving student, this NGSS-aligned, laboratory course explores a wide range of chemistry topics, including atomic structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, gas laws, and stoichiometry. Emphasis is on problem-solving and laboratory inquiry. Students apply chemistry knowledge to develop models, explain real world phenomena, and create engineering solutions to real world problems.  (Includes ACE/ATOMS/SOAR).

CHEMISTRY AP (S)

W

Course Code: 420A

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Chemistry. AP Chemistry is for high achieving students interested in exploring chemistry concepts in greater depth and complexity. These concepts include the structure and states of matter, intermolecular forces and reactions. Students will work in groups to think analytically about problems, identify experimental questions, and design experiments to answer those questions. This course includes embedded AP-laboratory activities. Availability of this and other AP courses in a given year depends on student enrollment.

ECE: GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (S)

WCA

Course Code: 420U

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Chemistry. Students Must Have Taken or Be Taking Pre-Calculus.  Designed to provide a foundation for more advanced courses in chemistry. Atomic theory, laws and theories concerning the physical and chemical behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. Properties of some of the more familiar elements and their compounds. Quantitative measurements illustrating the laws of chemical combination in the first semester lab. This fast-paced and rigorous course will give students the opportunity to earn 4 college credits by passing full-length college tests and labs sent directly from the UConn Storrs Chemistry Department.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 4 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

ECE: GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (S)

WCA

Course Code: 421U

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry I UCONN with a grade “C” or better.  Designed to provide a foundation for more advanced courses in chemistry. Atomic theory, laws and theories concerning the physical and chemical behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. Properties of some of the more familiar elements and their compounds. Equilibrium in solutions and qualitative reactions of the common cations and anions in the second semester lab. This fast-paced and rigorous course will give students the opportunity to earn an additional 4 college credits by passing full-length college tests and labs sent directly from the UConn Storrs Chemistry Department.   Though this course is only a half year, students earn 4 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

PHYSICS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 451

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Physics is an NGSS-aligned, laboratory course that presents a quantitative treatment of energy, mechanics, light, sound, electricity, and magnetism. In each area, quantitative problem-solving, explanation of phenomena, and engineering solutions to real life problems are emphasized. While a prerequisite for college and most technical careers, it is also geared to meet the needs of the general students. The embedded labs focus on scientific investigation and processes.

PHYSICS HONORS (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 450/450K

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

This NGSS-aligned, laboratory course is for students capable of moving at a fast pace and exploring concepts in-depth. The student should possess well-developed analytic and quantitative skills. Topics include motion, thermal energy, electricity, sound, and magnetism. In each area, quantitative problem-solving, explanation of phenomena, and engineering solutions to real life problems are emphasized. The embedded labs focus on scientific investigation and processes. (Includes ACE/ATOMS/SOAR).

ECE: GENERAL PHYSICS I (S)

C, W

Course Code: 450U

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Students Must Have Taken or Be Taking Pre-Calculus.  This course is aligned with the UCONN Storrs Physics Department. Students will         experience rigorous quantitative physics including mechanics, thermodynamics, sound waves, light waves, electricity, sound, and magnetism. In each area, students can expect lecture, reading and note-taking, independent and group projects, presentations to peers and intensive lab work.  Students will have the opportunity to earn 4 college credits by passing full length college tests and labs sent directly from the UConn Storrs Science Department.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 4 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

HUMAN BIOLOGY

HUMAN BIOLOGY WITH CPR/1ST AID (S)

C, K, WAMS, WCA, E

Course Code: 411/411K

              411B

Credits: 1.0

Grades 12

This NGSS-aligned, student-centered Human Biology course will focus on several medical mysteries. Students will engage in hands-on exploration of multiple body systems and their functions to undergo the process of solving these medical phenomena. The structure and function of the Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous, Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, Integumentary, Immune, and Reproductive Systems will be investigated. This course is designed to prepare students for a career in the medical field. 411B integrates the CPR/1st Aid course. Students will have an opportunity to obtain certification in both.

FORENSICS (S)

C, K, W, WCA, SS

Course Code: 446

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

This NGSS-aligned course will focus on several forensic cases that need to be cracked. Students will be tasked with a hands-on, problem-solving approach to crime scene investigation. While students explore physical and chemical evidence found at crime scenes, they will study techniques such as fingerprint and handwriting examination and DNA analysis that will bring them closer and closer to solving the case. 

ZOOLOGY (S)

K, WAMS. SS (offered every other year)

Course Code: 459

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite:  Biology.  This full year course is oriented toward students who enjoy biology and hands-on investigation. It examines the anatomy and physiology of invertebrates and vertebrates, from both the ocean and land. Students will investigate invertebrates such as protozoans, sponges, jellyfish, mollusks, echinoderms and arthropods. On the vertebrate side, students will learn about cold-blooded and warm-blooded animals from bony fish to mammals. Activities include microscopic examination, lab simulations and dissections. Alternate laboratory assignments are provided for students who elect not to dissect invertebrates.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (S)

C, K, W, WAMS, E, SS

Course Code: 445

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Offered as an option instead of Chemistry, this NGSS-aligned course begins with the creation of Earth itself and the idea that all environmental systems consist of matter. Students will then move on to explore the use of energy and its impact on our planet. Carbon cycling and global warming will be investigated and students will be tasked with brainstorming ways to reduce their carbon footprint. Finally, students will dive into our oceans to study how acidification is affecting life under the water as well as the impact on the world above it. Human impact on the planet will be examined throughout the course and an underlying chemistry theme is present throughout. Students may choose this course in place of Chemistry in grade 11.

ECE: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (S)

C, K, WAMS

Course Code: 445U

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of two years of high school science.  An introduction to basic concepts and areas of environmental concern and how these problems can be effectively addressed. Topics include human population; ecological principles; conservation of biological resources; biodiversity; croplands, rangelands, forestlands; soil and water conservation; pollution and water management; and wildlife and fisheries conservation. Students will have the opportunity to earn 3 college credits by passing full length college tests sent directly from the UConn Storrs Science Department.

MARINE BIOLOGY (S)

K, SS

Course Code: 480

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite:  Biology  This course introduces students to marine invertebrate organisms.  Students will investigate the evolutionary relationships and ecology of these organisms. Physiology, cell biology, embryology, and behavior are also examined. Students will gain an appreciation of the tremendous diversity in form and function of these fascinating organisms.

Social Studies Department

Mrs. Veda Harris, Supervisor of K-12 Social Studies

The Social Studies Program provides students with the skills and knowledge for a better understanding of history, geography, economics, politics and civic participation. More so than ever, students need a strong social studies education where they are asked to tackle tough and relevant problems that impact our daily life. They will also learn and apply problem solving and critical analysis skills needed to make informed decisions and become  global citizens. Teaching our students early on to understand and participate effectively in a diverse world will prepare them to be engaged in democratic activities that help improve lives and serve a common good.  

Course Sequence

*Civics and U.S. History must be included in a student’s course sequence.

Grade 9

Grade 10

Modern World History

Honors Modern World History

AP Modern World

Civics*

Honors Civics*

US II

Honors US II

AP European History

AP World History

Grade 11

Grade 12

US  History III*

Honors  US HistoryIII*

AP US History

ECE: Seminar in American Studies*

African American/Black /Latino/Puerto Rican  Studies

AP Human Geography

AP US Government and Politics

AP Comparative Governments

AP Psychology

ECE: Introduction to Human Rights / Introduction to Genocide

ECE: Introduction to Sociology

ECE: Introduction to American Politics

ECE: Modern Western Traditions

ECE: Western Traditions Before 1500

ECE: US History Since 1877

Law and Society (0.5)

Contemporary Issues (0.5)

Psychology (0.5)

Sociology (0.5)

Comparative Government Systems (0.5)

Geography (0.5)

Comparative Religions (0.5)

Social Studies Core Program Course Descriptions

MODERN WORLD  HISTORY (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 570/570A/571

Credits: 1.0

Grade 9

This course will focus on the 19th and 20th century beginning with the philosophical roots of economic and political conflict of the late 18th century. This will explore the impact of democratic and industrial revolutions, the wars that changed empires and the European dominance of the world, as well as, the ideas that lead to independence movements and the effects of global interdependence. Students in this course will continue to develop their historical thinking skills from previous years by emphasizing such skill areas as argumentative writing, oral communication, and evaluation of primary and secondary sources, map analysis, research techniques, and critical thinking dispositions.

CIVICS * (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 530/531

Credits: 0.5

Grade 10

This course will cover the development of democratic within the context of the United States government and the role of citizens within that government. It will prepare students to participate in their political responsibilities as thoughtful and informed citizens. Civics provides a basis for understanding the rights and responsibilities for being an American citizen and a framework for competent and responsible participation within society.  Emphasis is placed on the historical development of government and political systems, and the importance of the rule of law; the United States Constitution; Federal, State and local government structure; and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Students will actively investigate local, state and national issues, actively negotiate discussions, and develop informed arguments using a variety of writing forms.  *Pairs with 540/541

US HISTORY II * (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 540/541

Credits: 0.5

Grade 10

This course will take an in-depth look at the domestic and foreign policies that divided the United States leading it from Civil War to a newly industrialized nation. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources in order to interpret historical viewpoints, research important people and events in an effort to determine their significance, and evaluate the government's failures and success based on legislation and executive orders from the time. *Pairs with 530/531.

US HISTORY III (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 550/551

Credits: 1.0

Grade 11

U.S. History III is a mandatory course for all juniors. The course begins with the American Progressive Era and leads up to the present day. Topics will cover the social, cultural, political, military, and economic transformations of nineteenth century America. Typical course activities include analyzing primary and secondary sources, class debates, research into historical events of significance, and creation of argumentative writings.

Social Studies Elective Course Descriptions

ECE: SEMINAR IN

AMERICAN STUDIES(H)

K

Course Code: 550U

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11

Seminar in American Studies is a team taught, full year course that takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American culture. The course rests on two main pillars, the study of United States History and American Literature. The course also integrates art, architecture, and music to help the student develop a total picture of the American Experience. The course offers a variety of teaching strategies and learning activities. Students in Seminar in American Studies are assigned a double class period. After successful completion of the course, the student will have fulfilled the United States History requirement and the junior year American Literature requirement.  In addition, students electing the course are eligible to receive credit in history under the UCONN Co-Op program if all requirements are met.

AP U.S. History  (H)

K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 550A

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

The history of the Ancient Mediterranean and Near East and Medieval Europe, from the era of the Agricultural Revolution c. 10,000 BCE to c. 1500 CE.  As an introductory history course, this course is designed to develop not only specific knowledge of history of the period in question, but also to refine skills in dealing with history and to impart a recognition that every member of a society (including yourself) helps to ‘make’ history.  In addition, students shall discover that there is not one, but a multitude of roots to western culture, from the everyday life of peasant women to powerful thinkers, politicians and aristocrats of the times.  College credits (3) are awarded to students who successfully pass the Advanced Placement Examination which they are required to take in May.

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (H)

K, WAMS

Course Code: 580A

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10-12

The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of the AP program in European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European History, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. College credits (3) are awarded to students who successfully pass the Advanced Placement Examination which they are required to take in May.

AP MODERN WORLD HISTORY (H)       Course Code:  570A       Credits: 1.0      Grades 9-12

C, WAMS, WCA, W

The AP Modern European History course deals with the facts, ideas, events and personalities which have shaped Europe's history from approximately 1450 to the present. The journey through Europe's rich and diverse history takes the student from the tragedy of the Bubonic plague at the end of the Medieval Period to the establishment of contemporary Europe. Units of study will include the Renaissance and Reformation, the age of Absolutism, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and Napoleonic Europe, the rise of political ideologies, the Revolutions of 1848 leading to the emergence of nation states, the Age of Industrial and International expansion, the World Wars, the Cold War, and current issues.  College credits (3) are awarded to students who successfully pass the Advanced Placement Examination which they are required to take in May.

ECE: WESTERN TRADITIONS

BEFORE 1500 (H)

C, WCA (Fall Only)

Course Code: 501U

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Grades 12

The history of the Ancient Mediterranean and Near East and Medieval Europe, from the era of the Agricultural Revolution c. 10,000 BCE to c. 1500 CE.  As an introductory history course, this course is designed to develop not only specific knowledge of history of the period in question, but also to refine skills in dealing with history and to impart a recognition that every member of a society (including yourself) helps to ‘make’ history.  In addition, students shall discover that there is not one, but a multitude of roots to western culture, from the everyday life of peasant women to powerful thinkers, politicians and aristocrats of the times.   In addition, students electing the course are eligible to receive credit in history under the UCONN Co-Op program if all requirements are met.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

ECE: MODERN WESTERN

TRADITIONS (H)

C, WCA (Spring Only)

Course Code: 500U

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Grades 12

The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of the AP program in European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European History, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. In addition, students electing the course are eligible to receive credit in history under the UCONN Co-Op program if all requirements are met.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

AP PSYCHOLOGY  (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA

Course Code: 544A

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10-12

The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.  College credits (3) are awarded to students who successfully pass the Advanced Placement Examination which they are required to take in May.

PSYCHOLOGY * (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 546

Credits: 0.5

Grades 10-12

This course is designed to develop student interest in human behavioral patterns by learning fundamentals of psychological study. Further development of concentrated study will include the understanding of personality traits, the role of heredity and environment and their consequences on the intelligent world community.

SOCIOLOGY (H)

C. K, W, WAMS, WCA, SS

Course Code: 545

                         

Credits: 0.5

           

Grades 12

This course provides insights into human relations by incorporating characteristics that are common to groups, races, and cultures. Emphasis is on the problems approach and attempts are made to reduce narrow-mindedness and prejudice by promoting better understanding of inter-group relations.

ECE: INTRODUCTION

TO SOCIOLOGY (H)

C

Course Code: 545U                      

Credits: 1.0    

Grades 11-12

This course provides insights into human relations by incorporating characteristics that are common to groups, races, and cultures. Emphasis is on the problems approach and attempts are made to reduce narrow-mindedness and prejudice by promoting better understanding of inter-group relations.  In addition, students electing the course are eligible to receive credit in history under the UCONN Co-Op program if all requirements are met.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT  (H)

C, K, W, E, SS

Course Code: 504

Credits: 0.5

Grades 11-12

Emphasis is placed on the structure of the local, state and national governments, the goals of democratic society, and the prime role of the good citizen in an era of challenge. To appreciate the government of the United States, comparisons are made with selected major political systems throughout the world.

AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

AND POLITICS (H)

K

Course Code: 591A

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. In addition to covering the major concepts that are used to organize and interpret what we know about political phenomena and relationships, the course covers six specific countries and their governments. College credit can be earned by students who successfully pass the Advanced Placement Examination which they are required to take in May.

AP US GOVERNMENT

AND POLITICS (H)

K, WAMS, WCA, W

Course Code: 530A

Credits: 1.0

Grades 9-12

This course provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality. In addition to providing an analytical perspective on government in the United States, this course focuses on the six major categories assessed on the U.S. Government and Politics’ AP exam. These categories include: The Constitutional Underpinnings of United States Government, Political Beliefs and Behaviors, Political Parties, Interest Groups and Mass Media, Institutions of National Government: The Congress, the Presidency, the Bureaucracy, and the Federal Courts, Public Policy and Civil Rights and Civil 46 Liberties. College credit can be earned by students who successfully pass the Advanced Placement Examination which they are required to take in May.

GEOGRAPHY * (H)

C, K, W, SS

Course Code: 505

Credits: 0.5

Grades 10-12

Geography introduces students to the environmental factors that have so greatly influenced man. Studies are made on a regional basis and include a systematic approach to the physical, economic and cultural changes which help man satisfy his needs.

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES * (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 521

Credits: 0.5

Grades 11-12

Through discussion, this course focuses on the long-range problems of society as well as controversial issues of the day. Opportunity for understanding current affairs is also provided. Students will be encouraged to pursue individual topics of interest.

LAW & SOCIETY * (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, E, SS

Course Code: 525

Credits: 0.5

Grades 11-12

This course stresses the importance of law in our society to better enable the student to function as a citizen. An overview of the Anglo-American Legal System, the development and growth of the U. S. Constitution, and the salient features of American Criminal and Civil Laws are presented in this course.

ECE: INTRO TO HUMAN RIGHTS (H)

C (Fall Only)

Course Code: 502U

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Grade 12

Recommendation In recent years, “human rights” has become among the most powerful ways of thinking about and fighting for a more just world. This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concept, a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. We begin by considering definitions, historical and institutional foundations of human rights. We then focus on several particular human rights issues, groups of human rights and human rights of certain groups of people. Along the way, we will take different disciplinary approaches – legal, philosophical, literary, etc. – to our subject. By the end of the class, we will have developed an understanding of the institutions and processes related to human rights and familiarity with key intellectual debates as well as differing policy and advocacy strategies. . In addition, students electing the course are eligible to receive credit in history under the UCONN Co-Op program if all requirements are met.  Must take with 503U.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

ECE: INTRODUCTION TO

GENOCIDE STUDIES (H)

C (Spring Only)

Course Code: 503U

Credits: 1.0

½ year course

Grade 12

Introduction to Genocide Studies is an interdisciplinary will look at the origins of Genocide and various Genocides around the world through a critical, interdisciplinary and practical and applied approaches. Students will look at ways to address the different viewpoints of power along with legal and political definitions. Different approaches will be reflected upon when looking through the eyes and thoughts of those who have tried to understand genocide without taking the act for granted. Finally, the course is fundamentally anti-genocidal in its purpose, and students will have the opportunity to contribute to and/or develop practical efforts commemorate, advocate against, or prevent the perpetration of genocide.  In addition, students electing the course are eligible to receive credit in history under the UCONN Co-Op program if all requirements are met.  Must take with 502U.  Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.

AFRICAN AMERICAN / BLACK AND

PUERTO RICAN / LATINO STUDIES (H)

C, K, W, WAMS, WCA, SS

Course Code: 589

Credits: 1.0

Grades 11-12

The course is an opportunity for students to explore accomplishments, struggles, intersections, perspectives, and collaborations of African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino people in the U.S.  Students will examine how historical movements, legislation, and wars affected the citizenship rights of these groups and how they, both separately and together, worked to build U.S. cultural and economic wealth and create more just societies in local, national, and international contexts.  Coursework will provide students with tools to identify historic and contemporary tensions around race and difference; map economic and racial disparities over time; strengthen their own identity development; and address bias in their communities.

ECE: US HISTORY SINCE 1877 (H)

C

Course Code: 586U

Credits: 1.0

Grades 10-11

This challenging college level course is an overview of United States history from the end of the Reconstruction Era (1877) to the present. This course will emphasize both historical content and examine the ways that professional historians learn about, interpret, and explain America’s past. Successful completion of this course will meet the U.S. history requirement for graduation and may be eligible for UConn credit. To enroll in this course, a teacher recommendation by each student’s current social studies teacher is required. Summer Assignments may be required. In addition, students electing the course are eligible to receive credit in history under the UCONN Co-Op program if all requirements are met. Though this course is only a half year, students earn 3 UCONN credits and therefore will earn a full high school credit for successful completion of the course.