-DRAFT SS 10-12 with competencies March 11 version MoE[a]

SS10 Canada and the World - 1919 to the Present

BC First Peoples

Contemporary Indigenous Studies

20th Century World History

Human Geography

Law Studies

Physical Geography

Social Justice

Political Studies

Comparative Cultures

Philosophy

Comparative World Religions

Asian Studies 1850-present

Genocide Studies

Urban Studies

Economics

Sociology

Classical Studies

SS10 Canada and the World - 1919 to the Present

Social Studies

SS10 Canada and the World - 1919 to the Present

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

Global and regional conflicts have been a powerful force in shaping our contemporary world and identities.

The development of political institutions is influenced by economic, social, ideological, and geographic factors.

Individual worldviews lead to different perspectives and ideas about developments in Canadian society.

← This big idea seems to include obvious redundancies? Aren’t worldviews and different perspectives essentially the same things?

Suggestion: Canadians have different perspectives and ideas about important developments.

Historical and contemporary injustices challenge the narrative and identity of Canada as a tolerant, multicultural society.  

Curricular Competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Sample Activities:[b]
  • - Active citizenship project
  • Model Parliament
  • Key Questions:
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)

Sample Activities:

Key Questions:

  • Assess the justification for competing accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence)

Sample Activities:

Key Questions:

  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups during this time period (continuity and change)

Sample Activities:

Key Questions:

  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups influence events, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)

Sample Activities:

Key Questions:

  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and determine appropriate ways to remember and respond  (ethical judgment)

  • Development, structure, and function of Canadian and other political institutions, including First Peoples governance
  • Political and economic ideology, stakeholders and civic engagement, the development of public policy
  • Identities in Canada
  • Canadian autonomy
  • Discriminatory  policies and injustices in Canada and the world
  • International conflicts and cooperation
  • Human-Environment Interaction

  1. Development, structure, and function of Canadian and other political institutions, including First Peoples governance
  1. Forms of government and decision-making models: republic, monarchy, constitutional monarchy, autocracy, consensus
  2. Level and branches of government including Aboriginal self-governments
  3. Passing legislation
  4. Indian Act - Crown and federal government imposed governance structures on First Peoples communities (e.g. band councils)
  5. Title, treaties and land claims (Nisga’a Treaty, Haida Gwaii Strategic Land Use Decision, Tsilhqot’in decision)
  6. Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  7. Elections, electoral systems, voting and recall movements, minority and majority government imposition of government structures on First Peoples communities

Key Questions:

  • What are the strengths and limitations of different forms of government?
  • What is needed to establish true nation-to-nation relationships between the Canadian federal government and First Peoples?
  • How could the Haida Gwaii Strategic Land Use Decision be a model for land use management in your local area?
  • At what point does civil society have the greatest influence in the legislation-passing process?
  • Should the Canadian Senate be abolished, reformed, replaced or maintained?
  • Should the electoral system in Canada be reformed?
  • What are the continuities and changes in contemporary and historical treaty and land use processes? (continuities and change)
  • How should the Indian Act be changed to maintain the distinct identities of First Peoples and guarantee the rights lost in historical treaty processes?
  • What are the strengths and limitations of the Indian Act for First Peoples?

  1. Political and economic ideology, stakeholders and civic engagement, the development of public policy
  1. Classification of political and economic ideologies on a spectrum (socialism, communism, capitalism, fascism, liberalism, conservatism, environmentalism, etc.)
  2. Indigenous peoples’ ways of living (organizational relationships within the community and to the land)
  1. Matriarchy, Reciprocity, etc.
  1. The relationship between economic and political systems (i.e. democracy and capitalism)
  2. Roles of individuals and groups in influencing national and international policy
  3. Social welfare programs (health care, education, basic income)

Key Questions:

  • To what extent did the Great Depression influence the establishment of the welfare state? (cause and consequence)
  • To what extent have First Peoples influenced the development of economic and political policy in Canada? (perspective; significance; cause and consequence)
  • What impact do political-economic ideologies have on humans’ relationships with land? (cause and consequence)
  • How would different political ideologies address specific historical and contemporary problems? (cause and consequence)
  • What are significant events, individuals or organizations who have influenced national or international policy? (evidence; significance; perspective)
  • To what extent is Canada a democracy? (evidence; perspective)
  • What are the most effective methods of influencing government policy? (perspective)
  • Are mandatory living wages an effective solution for eradicating poverty? (evidence, ethical judgment)
  • Who is more influential in determining national/international policy: individuals, groups or government actors?(cause and consequence)

  1. Identities in Canada
  1. First Peoples Identities
  1. Status, Non-Status, First Nations, Metis, Inuit (Federal)
  2. Self and community-based identification
  1. Immigration & Multiculturalism
  1. Immigration and refugee policies and practices
  2. Bilingualism and Biculturalism (Official Languages Act)
  3. Multiculturalism Policy (Canadian Multiculturalism Act)
  4. Cultural identities of subsequent generations
  1. Nature of Canadian identity
  1. Renaissance of Indigenous Arts
  2. Media & art (Group of 7, establishment of CBC radio and television, Massey Commission, National Film Board, CRTC, Canadian Content)
  3. scientific and technological innovations.
  4. sports and international sporting events: hockey, Olympics, Summit Series
  1. Systemic racism and privilege

Key Questions:

  • Whose stories are told and whose stories are missing in the narratives of Canadian history? (perspectives, significance)
  • What are the continuities and changes in Canada’s immigration and refugee policies in the  past 100 years? (continuity and change)  
  • To what extent has Canadian identity been imposed by the federal government? (cause and consequence, evidence)
  • What events, values, worldviews, actions have influenced Canadian identity? (evidence)
  • Is there a Canadian identity? (perspectives)
  • How has Canadian identity changed and stayed the same over the past 100 years? (continuity and change)
  • To what extent are Canadians’ perceptions of Canadian identity similar or different from non-Canadians’ perceptions? (perspectives)
  • What are the most important aspects of how did Canada’s multiculturalism policy came about and what were the short term and long term consequences? (cause and consequence)
  • To what extent has the multiculturalism policy been successfully implemented? (significance)
  • What might Canadian identity look like in the future? (cause and consequence)
  • How relevant is the need for management of Canadian content in a global digital world? (significance)
  • How does systemic racism continue to pervade Canadian society? (continuity and change, significance)
  • How successful has Canada’s bilingual policy been and to what extent is it still necessary? (continuity and change)
  • How do art, media, and innovation  contribute to a shared collective identity? (cause/consequence)
  • What impact has the imposition of identities (Metis, Status, landed-immigrant, Citizen, Persons) on different groups by government had?

  1. Canadian autonomy  
  1. Canadian constitutional issues (Statute of Westminster, Supreme Court 1949, Canadian Constitution Act,  Meech Lake, Charlottetown Accord, Calgary Accord/Declaration)
  2. Quebec sovereignty (Quiet Revolution, October Crisis, Parti Quebecois, Bill 101, 1980 & 1995 referenda, Bloc Quebecois)
  3. First People’s actions:  Meech Lake Accord, Oka Crisis, Gustafsen Lake, Ipperwash, Shannon’s Dream (Attawapiskat), Idle No More
  4. National and regional First People’s organizations e.g. National Indian Brotherhood (Assembly of First Nations)
  5. International Relations & foreign policy (WW I, Paris Peace Conferences, League of Nations; Chanak Crisis, Halibut Treaty, Statute of Westminster, World War II, Constitution Act).

Key Questions:

  • To what extent has Canada, Quebec and/or First Peoples become more autonomous? (continuity and change, evidence)
  • Which events have been most significant in establishing Canadian, Quebec, or First Peoples’ autonomy? (significance)
  • What are the important continuities and changes in the Quebec sovereignty movement? (continuity and change)
  • Did X event cause increased autonomy for Y (Canada, Quebec, First Peoples)? (cause and consequence)
  • To what extent has the Canadian constitution been fair for First Peoples? (ethical judgment)
  • What are the key causes of First Nations autonomous movements (i.e. Idle No More)? (cause and consequence)
  • Has Canada’s involvement in international conflicts contributed to its autonomy? (cause and consequence)
  • Did the Canadian government act fairly towards Quebec when negotiating the patriation of the constitution in 1982? (ethical judgment)
  • What would the consequences have been for a “Yes” vote in the 1995 referendum? (cause and consequence)
  • What individuals have been most significant in establishing autonomy for Canada, Quebec, and/or First Peoples? (significance, cause and consequence)

  1. Discriminatory  policies and injustices in Canada and the world
  1. Women’s rights
  1. Women’s suffrage, Persons Case
  2. Royal Commission on the Status of Women (RCSW)
  3. Contraceptives and abortion
  1. LGBTQ+
  1. Same-sex marriage
  2. Decriminalisation of homosexuality
  3. LGBTQ+ civil liberties
  1. Racism
  1. Immigration policy and restrictions or exclusions for specific groups (i.e.  Chinese Exclusion Act, Jewish, Roma)
  2. World War II internment: Japanese Canadian, Italian
  3. Indian Act, Residential schools, voting rights for First Peoples, reserves and pass system, 60s scoop and foster care
  4. Destruction of Africville
  5. Refugee policy
  1. Intellectual and Physical Challenges
  1. Employment and Inclusion Rights
  2. Health and institutionalization (forced sterilization, electric shock treatment, )
  3. Stigmas and (mis)perceptions
  1. Responses
  1. Human Rights Tribunals
  2. Bill of Rights and Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  3. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
  4. Supreme Court cases and changes to legislation
  5. International Declarations: (Rights of the Child, Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples, Rights of Persons with Disabilities)
  6. Anti-racism education and actions
  7. Protest and advocacy movements

Key Questions:

  • Are relationships between groups in Canada inclusive or exclusive? (evidence)
  • What are the causes of agreements and tensions in Canadian society? (perspective)
  • Why has Canada adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and not the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples? (evidence, perspective, cause and consequence)
  • What is the most significant type of discrimination in Canada today? (evidence, perspective)
  • How can individuals act to counter discrimination individually and collectively? (ethical judgement, cause and consequence)
  • What methods have been most effective in changing discriminatory policies and attitudes? (continuity and change)
  • What have been the historically privileged groups in Canada and how does that privilege impact contemporary realities? (evidence, perspective)
  • What are the intended and unintended and/or short and long term consequences of Residential Schools over time? (cause and consequence)
  • What impact has systemic discrimination had on individuals over time? (cause and consequence)
  • What cultural and political beliefs have informed discrimination over time? (cause and consequence, continuity and change)

6. International conflicts and cooperation  

  1. Global armed conflicts and Canada’s role in them (World War II, Korea, Suez, Cyprus, Gulf War, Somalia, Rwanda, Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Syria).
  2. Non-participation in global armed conflicts (Chanak Crisis, Vietnam War, Iraq War)
  3. Canada’s involvement in international organisations: League of Nations, United Nations, La Francophonie, Commonwealth, NATO, G7, NORAD, APEC, WTO
  4. Support of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO’s)

Key Questions:

  • What term describes Canada’s involvement in international conflicts after WWII? (evidence, ethical judgment)
  • What role should Canada play in international affairs? (evidence)
  • What are the continuities and changes in Canada’s involvement in international affairs and international organizations? (continuity and change)
  • What factors influenced Canada’s decision about participation in international conflicts? (cause and consequence)
  • To what extent has participation in armed conflicts influenced individuals’ or governments’  abilities to build and advocate for peace? (cause and consequence)
  • To what extent does membership in inter-governmental organizations compromise sovereignty? (consequences)
  • What responsibilities should nations have to and for each other? (ethical judgment)

7. Human-Environment Interaction

  1. Standard of living and inequalities (UN Sustainable Development Goals, Human Development Index)
  1. Other indices (Transparency Index, World Happiness Report),
  1. Demographics
  1. Population growth/decline
  2. Voluntary/involuntary migration
  3. Urbanization and suburbanization
  1. Land and Resources
  1. Conflicts with resource management and supply
  2. Conflicts with land use and ownership (First Peoples and their concept of land use)
  3. Stakeholders and decision making processes - (Aboriginal title and consultation vs. collaboration)
  1. Climate change
  1. Consumerism, impact of housing/transportation, industry, agriculture
  2. Distribution of risks associated with climate change
  3. Adaptations to prevent/mitigate/survive climate changes
  4. Worldviews and metaphors in conceptualising the relationship between humans and the environment

Key Questions:

  • How will changing populations affect policies and priorities in developed and developing countries? (cause and consequence)
  • To what extent is industrialization a root cause of modern challenges in human geography? (cause and consequence)
  • Who decides the value of resources? And can value be represented in ways other than money?
  • What are the most useful / effective ways of measuring standards of living? (evidence; perspective)
  • What measures other than the Human Development Index would help us have a full picture of the story? (perspective)
  • What impact does the level of consumerism in more economically developed countries (MEDC) have on the standards of living in less economically developed countries (LEDC)? (cause and consequence; perspective; ethical judgments)
  • What will be the BRICS countries in the next 50 years? (perspective)
  • For whom is the city built? (perspective)
  • What would a truly sustainable city look like? (continuity and change; cause and consequence)
  • What are the consequences of increasing urbanization? (cause and consequence)
  • How does a European-influenced conception of land ownership and terra nullius impact how land has been predominantly used and organized in Canada? (perspective; ethical judgment)

8. Economic development and Canada’s role in a global economy

  1. Fundamental economic concepts (taxation, inflation, nationalization, debt and deficit, stimulus, employment levels, economic cycle of prosperity, recession, depression, recovery)
  2. Relationships between environment and economy
  3. National economic programs and projects (CPR, National Policy, NEP, stimulus programs, infrastructure projects)
  4. Free trade agreements and economic organisations (NAFTA, WHO, Trans-Pacific Partnership, WTO)
  1. Offshore labour/capital
  1. Leveraging economic relationships for social and political purposes  (Apartheid sanctions, tied-aid, arms embargoes, import/export control, asset freeze, technical assistance prohibition)

Key Questions:

  • What are the continuities and changes between contemporary and historical resource infrastructure projects? (continuity and change)
  • What would the platforms of a contemporary National Policy be? (continuity and change)
  • In what circumstances are economic sanctions justified or not justified to bring about social or political change? (ethical judgement)
  • What were the causes and consequences of economic recessions and depressions?(cause and consequence)
  • Is tying humanitarian aid to democratization justified? (ethical judgement)
  • What operating metaphor would represent a truly sustainable relationship between economy, environment and human society? (evidence)
  • In what ways has the development of a resource-extraction economy contributed to climate change? (cause and consequence)

BC First Peoples

Social Studies

BC FIRST PEOPLES

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

First Peoples are part of the land and water, and this interconnected relationship continues to shape and influence First Peoples' worldview.

Contact and colonialism have impacted and continue to impact the political, social, and economic lives of BC First Peoples.

Cultural expressions speak to the richness, diversity, and resiliency of BC First Peoples.

BC First Peoples' governance, leadership, and self-determination demonstrate their challenge and resistance to Canada's ongoing colonial history.

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use inquiry processes (ask questions, listen to Elders and other local knowledge holders through oral traditions, gather, interpret and analyze ideas, and communicate findings and decisions)
  • Use holistic, experiential, reflective and relational experiences (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and the sense of place)
  • Recognize the consequences of one’s actions (cause and consequence)
  • Assess and compare the significance of the interconnections between people, places, events, and developments over time and place, and determine what they reveal about issues in the past and present (significance)
  • Ask questions and corroborate inferences of Elders and other local knowledge keepers through oral traditions, Indigenous Knowledge, memory, history, and story (evidence)

  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups across different periods of time and space (continuity and change)

  • Determine and assess the long-and-short term causes and consequences and the intended and unintended consequences of an event, decision, or development
    (cause and consequence)

  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues and events, and distinguish between worldviews of today and the past (perspective)

  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical claims in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)

  • Recognize and understand that some knowledge is considered sacred and only shared with permission and/or in certain situations, with certain people (ethical judgment)

  • Make reasoned ethical claims about actions in the past and present after considering the context and values of the times (ethical judgment)  Determine and assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences and the intended and unintended consequences of an event, decision or development

  • Traditional territories of the BC First Peoples' and their relationships with the natural world
  • Influence of oral tradition in informing the shared histories of First Peoples
  • Impact of historical exchanges of ideas, practices, and materials among local BC First Peoples and with non-Indigenous peoples.

  • Provincial and federal governmental policies and practices that have affected and continue to affect the First Peoples and their responses to colonialism

  • BC First Peoples' resistance to colonialism
  • Role and significance of media in both challenging and supporting the continuity of culture, language, and self-determination of the First Peoples
  • Commonalities and differences of traditional and contemporary BC First Peoples' systems of  governance
  • Contemporary challenges

  1. Traditional territories of the BC First Peoples' and their relationships with the natural world
  • First Peoples whose traditional territory their school and home are situated
  • traditional territories may overlap
  • difference between political boundaries and traditional territories
  • how the land shapes and influences First Peoples' worldview (i.e., stewardship, cultural practices of the land)
  • cultural and linguistic diversity exists among First Peoples in BC

  1. Influence of oral tradition in informing the shared histories of First Peoples
  • Elders are knowledge keepers who share the history of their people and lands
  • oral tradition as valid and legal evidence (e.g., Delgamuukw v. BC, 1997; ownership of property, territory, and political agreements)
  • stories, songs, music, and dance as a are forms of narrative
  • oral tradition shapes identity and connects to the past, present, and future
  • oral tradition provides guiding principles for living
  • Indigenous concept of time (i.e., spiralling v. linear)

  1. Impact of historical exchanges of ideas, practices, and materials among local BC First Peoples and with non-Indigenous peoples.
  • trade networks and routes
  • settlement and migration patterns
  • maritime and land fur trade
  • exchange of goods, technology, economy, knowledge
  • industries (e.g., gold rush, whaling)

  1. Provincial and federal governmental policies and practices that have affected and continue to affect the First Peoples and their responses to colonialism
  • Indian Act and its amendments
  • Enfranchisement
  • White Paper, Red Paper (AB), Brown Paper (BC)
  • Residential schools including federal apology, Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Report
  • Treaties, including fishing and hunting rights
  • 60s scoop and foster care system
  • Constitutional (e.g., Meech Lake and Charlottetown Accords, Charter of Rights and Freedoms)
  • UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

  1. BC First Peoples' resistance to colonialism
  • political actions of local and provincial Indigenous groups (e.g., Union of BC Indian Chiefs; Metis Nation of BC)
  • Tsilkoh'tin War
  • Gustafson Lake
  • Idle No More
  • Judicial cases (e.g., Calder, 1973; Guerin, 1984; Sparrow, 1990; Van der Peet, 1996)
  • Ecological justice and protests (e.g., pipeline, logging, hydraulic fracturing, liquefied natural gas, hydro-electricity).  (Just a little update-I will be getting a package from local FN about a mercury mine used during WW2-its history and the soon to come apology)  Kim

  1. Role and significance of media in both challenging and supporting the continuity of culture, language, and self-determination of the First Peoples
  • Portrayal and representation of First Peoples in media
  • Repatriation and ownership of cultural objects
  • Ethics of copyright, patent, intellectual property, and appropriation

  1. Commonalities and differences of traditional and contemporary BC First Peoples' systems of governance
  • Traditional governance
  • Band system
  • Land claims and self-governance

  1. Contemporary challenges
  • Missing and murdered women
  • Stereotypes and institutionalized racism
  • Intergenerational trauma
  • Judicial and correctional system
  • Child welfare system
  • Conditions on reserves (e.g., water, housing, education)


Contemporary Indigenous Studies

Social Studies

CONTEMPORARY INDIGENOUS STUDIES - 1945 to Present

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

Indigenous identities, worldviews and language are renewed, sustained and transformed through their connection to the land

Indigenous peoples are reclaiming their mental, emotional, physical and spiritual well being despite the continuing effects of colonialism

Indigenous Peoples continue to advocate and assert their rights to self-determination

Reconciliation is all Canadians working together to foster healing and to address injustices and mistreatment for the better future for all

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use inquiry processes:  ask questions, listen to Elders and other local knowledge holders through oral traditions, gather, interpret and analyze ideas, and communicate findings and decisions
  • Use holistic, experiential, reflective and relational experiences (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and the sense of place)
  • Recognize the consequences of one’s actions (cause and consequence)
  • Assess and compare the significance of the interconnections between people, places, events, and developments over time and place, and determine what they reveal about issues in the past and present (significance)

  • Ask questions and corroborate inferences of Elders and other local knowledge keepers through oral traditions, Indigenous Knowledge, memory, history, and story (evidence)

  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups across different periods of time and space (continuity and change)

  • Determine and assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences and the intended and unintended consequences of an event, decision, or development
    (cause and consequence)

  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues and events, and distinguish between worldviews of today and the past (perspective)

  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical claims in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)

  • Recognize and understand that some knowledge is considered sacred and only shared with permission and/or in certain situations, with certain people (ethical judgment)

  • Make reasoned ethical claims about actions in the past and present after considering the context and values of the times (ethical judgment)  

  • Indigenous Peoples' identities and worldviews, and the importance of the interconnection of family, relationships, language, culture and land

  • factors that  sustain and challenge Indigenous Peoples' identities and worldviews

  •  The resilience and survival of Indigenous peoples  in the face of colonialism

 

  • Community development, partnerships and control of economic opportunities

  • Inequities  in Indigenous peoples relationships with the Canadian government and citizens.

  • Restoring balance through truth, healing and reconciliation in Canada

1. Indigenous Peoples' identities and worldviews, and the importance of interconnection of family, relationships, language, culture and land

  • Members of different cultures have different world views as a result of their beliefs, values, practices and experiences
  • connections to land - language, culture, values and practice
  • relations - family, Elders, community
  • being a member of a community shapes one’s identity
  • roles, responsibilities and experiences as member of one or more cultural groups shapes one’s identity  
  • concepts of respect, reciprocity, relevance, responsibility, resilience

2. factors that sustain and challenge Indigenous Peoples' identities and worldviews

  • connections to family and community, the land, the spirits, and the ancestors
  • Elders presence, guidance and wisdom
  • speaking one’s Indigenous language
  • practicing ceremony
  • oral traditions - story, song, music

  • disconnection from traditional territories and cultural teachings
  • evolving sense of Indigeneity
  • education - residential schools and modern education
  • stereotypes and institutionalized racism
  • media portrayals and representations of Indigenous Peoples
  • legislation (including Indian Act, Bill C-31, enfranchisement)
  • migration to urban areas

3. The resilience and survival of Indigenous peoples in the face of colonialism

  • Resurgence of traditional forms of Art, literature, dance, music
  • Emergence of contemporary Indigenous Arts (Tribe Called Red, Sonny Assu, Going Home Star)
  • Media - APTN, 8th Fire, Unreserved
  • Internet based - social media (Indian and Cowboy, ReMatriate, Native Appropriations, âpihtawikosisân )
  • Indigenous literature
  • Academia - increase presence and decolonizing places of study and learning
  • Language revitalization
  • Practicing our traditional systems; including protocols, ceremonies

4. Community development, partnerships and control of economic opportunities

  • economic strategies and approaches (e.g., joint ventures, co-management partnership, community development corporation, cooperatives, public-private relationships)
  • current development - e.g., Osoyoos Indian Band and Nk’mip; Inuit of Cape Dorset and Co-operative of Artist; Tk'emlups First Nations - Kamloops Indian Band Development Corporation, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation - Air North)
  •  consultation vs. collaboration - economic development
  • Utilization of natural resources - e.g. oil, natural gas, diamonds, forestry, minerals, fisheries
  • conflicting views of stewardship, ownership, and use of lands and resources

5. Responses to inequities in relationships between Indigenous peoples, the Canadian government and its citizens.

  • United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (framework for Reconciliation)
  • National organizations (e.g., Assembly of First Nations; Metis National Council; Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami; Native Women's Association of Canada; Congress of Aboriginal Peoples)
  • Local and Regional indigenous organizations
  • Modern Treaties and Self-government (e.g., Sec. 35 of Canadian Constitution Act, 1982; Nisga'a; Nunavut; Delgamuukw)

  • Indian Act; White paper, Brown paper and Red Paper
  • Meech Lake and Charlottetown Accords
  • Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
  • Indian Residential Settlement Agreement
  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission  
  • Land rights and use (e.g., Oka, Ipperwash, Gustafsen Lake)
  • Metis status and rights (e.g., Daniels case)
  • Advocacy and Activism (e.g., Idle No More, Walking with Our Sisters, First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada in reaction to the 60s scoop and foster care system)

         

6. Restoring balance through truth, healing and reconciliation in Canada

  • Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
  • Final Report of The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada and Calls to Action
  • Community healing initiatives
  • cultural resilience (e.g., language, art, music, and dance as healing)
  • Culturally relevant systems - Restorative justice model

Inquiry questions:

How do we as Canadians continue to do the work established by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission?

How as individuals can we begin to implement the Calls to Action?

Are the Calls To Action a responsibility of all Canadians?

20th Century World History

Social Studies

20th Century World History

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

Nationalist movements can unite people in common causes or lead to intense conflict between different groups

The rapid development and proliferation of communication and transportation technologies in the 20th century led to profound changes in personal and national identities

The breakdown of long-standing imperialist structures created new economic and political systems

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • 1. Use historical inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • 2. Assess the significance of people, places, events, and developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • 3. Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence)
  • 4. Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups during this time period (continuity and change)
  • 5. Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, and developments (cause and consequence)
  • 6. Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • 7. Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • 8. Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past and present, and whether we have a responsibility to respond (ethical judgment)

Key Questions:

2.  Evaluate the significance of Cuban Missile Crisis on the relationship between the superpowers in the Cold War.

2.  Which of the following battles was the most significant turning point of World War Two:  el Alamein, Stalingrad, or Normandy?  

3.  What do the propaganda posters of authoritarian regimes reveal about the preoccupations of regime leaders?

3.  Weigh the value of competing historical accounts of the motives for the US decision to drop atomic bombs on Japanese cities in August, 1945.

4.    To what extent was apartheid unsustainable in South Africa in context of global changes in human and civil rights in the second half of the 20th Century?

4.  How did the 6 day war sustain or alter the experiences of different groups in Israel?

4.  How did the rapid advances in factory production change citizens' patterns of consumption?

5.  To what extent did the Treaty of Versailles lead to extremist political movements in Weimar Germany?

5.  How did the perseverance of the African National Congress against government repression ultimately overcome apartheid?

6.  How did increasing television coverage of the war in Vietnam alter the collective American mood?

7.  Assess the prevalence of a Eurocentric bias in collection of primary and secondary sources on a given topic.

8.  Why did ordinary Soviet citizens not oppose the abuses of Stalin's purges?

Activities:

 

2. Assess the significance of people, places, events, and developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)

 

  • “Draw the History of the World” activity from Historical Thinking Concepts book
  • Discuss whether each generation of historian can move closer to ‘historical truth’ & be more objective because they are further away from an event and have more sources to work from
  • Create an annotated bibliography, topic of choice primary/secondary sources
  • Create a timeline with a very limited number of entries and have students justify inclusion of events using historical significance language.

 

3. Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence)

  • Consider the origin, value purpose and limitations of a source

 

 

4. Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups during this time period (continuity and change)

  • Compare and contrast the domestic policies of any authoritarian leaders
  • Compare and contrast the rise of a right wing and a left wing authoritarian leader

 

5. Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, and developments (cause and consequence)

  • Treaty of Versailles Simulation

 

6. Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)

  • Using sources such as www.johndclare.net  to compare various political cartoons to make a judgment on what message is being conveyed

 

7. Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)

 

8. Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past and present, and whether we have a responsibility to respond (ethical judgment)

  • Debate on strategic bombing, example - Bombing of Dresden and/or Atomic Bomb
  • Model United Nations

  • rise and rule of authoritarian regimes
  • civil war, independence movements and revolution
  • human rights movements, including Indigenous peoples
  • religious, ethnic and/or cultural conflicts; including genocide
  • global conflicts including World War I, World War II, and the Cold War
  • migrations, movements and territorial boundaries
  • interdependence and international cooperation
  • social and cultural developments
  • mass consumption and production of communication and transportation technologies

  • rise and rule of authoritarian regimes
  • Chile (Pinochet); Cambodia (Pol Pot); Cuba (Castro); Soviet Union (Lenin to Gorbachev); North Korea (KIm Dynasty) ; China (Mao to now);  Germany (Hitler); Italy (Mussolini)
  • civil war, independence movements and revolution
  • Soviet Union 1917-21
  • China 1945-49
  • Decolonization
  • Iranian Revolution
  • Guerilla warfare in Central and South America
  • Vietnam 1945-1975
  • human rights movements, including Indigenous peoples
  •  women’s movement towards equality
  • USA Civil rights movement (segregation and desegregation)
  •  To what extent did judicial interpretations of Jim Crow laws further suppress African-American rights?
  • Struggle against Apartheid
  • Latin-American workers’ movements
  • religious, ethnic and/or cultural conflicts, including genocide
  • Cultural genocide of Indigenous Peoples
  • Genocide in Armenia, during the Holocaust, in Cambodia, in Rwanda
  • Separatist movements e.g. Quebec,  Basque, Catalan, Ireland
  • global conflicts including World War I, World War II, and the Cold War
  • Evolution of military technology e.g. machine gun to nuclear weapons to drones
  • Arms race
  • Militarism
  • Espionage
  • migrations, movements and territorial boundaries
  • Palestine/Jewish settlement; suburbanization of USA/Canada; Post-WW1 Middle East;
  • interdependence and international cooperation
  • UN peacekeeping missions
  • Social and cultural developments
  • Changing role of women
  • Suffrage
  • Pay equity
  • ‘Second-Wave’ Feminism 1960s
  • consumerism/capitalism
  • 20s boom
  • 50s suburbanization & car culture
  • Post WWII Soviet satellite states scarcity of goods
  • Globalization
  • Change from nation state to internationalism
  • EU supranationalism
  • Free Trade
  • WTO
  • mass consumption and production of communication and transportation technologies
  • Propaganda in democratic and totalitarian regimes
  • Social and cultural impact of the automobile
  • Role of media in shaping response to international conflicts
  • Role of television and radio in creating mass culture

Human Geography

Social Studies

Human Geography

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

Analyzing data from a variety of sources allows us to better understand our globally connected world.

Demographic patterns and population distribution are influenced by physical features and natural resources.

Human activities alter landscapes in a variety of ways.

A geographic region can encompass a variety of physical features and/or human interactions.  

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use geographic inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze data and ideas; and communicate findings and decisions (evidence and interpretation)
  • Assess the significance of places by identifying the physical and human features that characterize places (sense of place)
  • Assess the interpretations of geographic evidence after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence and interpretation)
  • Draw conclusions about the variation and distribution of geographic phenomena over time and space (patterns and trends)
  • Evaluate how particular geographic actions or events influence human practices or outcomes (geographical value judgments)
  • Evaluate the features or aspects of geographic phenomena or locations to explain what makes them worthy of attention or recognition (geographical importance)
  • Identify and assess how human and environmental factors and events influence each other (interactions and associations)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past and/or present, and whether we have a responsibility to respond (geographical value judgments)
  • Use geographic inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze data and ideas; and communicate findings and decisions (evidence and interpretation)
  • this includes mapping skills, reading topographic maps, using GIS tools, satellite imagery, photos
  • Assess the significance of places by identifying the physical and human features that characterize places (sense of place)
  • Assess the interpretations of geographic evidence after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence and interpretation)
  • Draw conclusions about the variation and distribution of geographic phenomena over time and space (patterns and trends)
  • how and why do cities change?
  • why does manufacturing shift locations?
  • is resource use and development always a bad thing for the landscape?
  • Evaluate how particular geographic actions or events influence human practices or outcomes (geographical value judgments)
  • Evaluate the features or aspects of geographic phenomena or locations to explain what makes them worthy of attention or recognition (geographical importance)
  • features that cities have
  • are certain farming methods more or less appropriate?
  • why is English so widespread as the language of business, academia, the Internet?
  • Identify and assess how human and environmental factors and events influence each other (interactions and associations)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past and/or present, and whether we have a responsibility to respond (geographical value judgments)
  • demographic patterns of growth, decline, and movement
  • relationships between cultural traits, the use of physical space, and impacts on the environment, including First Peoples cultures  
  • global agricultural practices
  • industrialization, trade, and natural resource demands
  • increased urbanization and influences on societies and environments
  • relationships between natural resources and patterns of population settlement and economic development
  • political organization of geographic regions


Law Studies

Social Studies

Law Studies

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

Understanding legal rights and responsibilities allows citizens to reflect critically on the role of law in society.

Laws can maintain the status quo and also be a force for change

A society’s legal framework affects many aspects of people’s lives.

Laws are interpreted and these interpretations evolve over time.  

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze legal concepts, issues and procedures ; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess and compare the significance and impact of legal systems and codes (significance)
  • Assess the justification for differing legal perspectives after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence)
  • Analyze continuities and changes in legal systems and thought during different periods of time and across jurisdictions (continuity and change)
  • Assess the development and impact of legal systems and ideas of justice (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events by  considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial decisions, legislation, and/or policy (ethical judgment)

  • key areas of law such as criminal law, civil law, and family law
  • historical basis of Canadian law
  • structures and powers of the federal and provincial courts
  • the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  • legislation concerning First Peoples

  • role of the Supreme Court as a constitutional check on legislative power
  • Canada’s correctional system

  • Legislation concerning children and youth

  • The structures and roles of global dispute resolution agencies (elaboration-International Court of Justice, World Trade Organization, United Nations)

  • key areas of law such as criminal law, civil law, and family law

Criminal Code

Burden of Proof (Reasonable doubt v. Balance of Probability)

  • historical basis of Canadian law

Discriminatory laws and reform processes

Importance of independence of the judiciary and lawyers

Case/Common Law

  • structures and powers of the federal and provincial courts

Importance of victims’ rights and the rights of the accused

Appeals Process

Small Claims

  • the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

renewed focus on individual rights

  • legislation concerning First Peoples

 Aboriginal self-government/Treaty Process

 Alternative dispute resolution processes including restorative justice

1763 Royal Proclamation

  • role of the Supreme Court as a constitutional check on legislative power

Greater role of judicial oversight/re-interpretation of legislation

  • Canada’s correctional system

provincial v. federal institutions

rehabilitation v. punishment

  • Legislation concerning children and youth

(Elaboration-Young Offenders’ Act, Youth Criminal Justice Act)

  • The structures and roles of global dispute resolution agencies (elaboration-International Court of Justice, World Trade Organization, United Nations)

Physical Geography

Social Studies

Physical Geography

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

Analyzing data from a variety of sources allows us to better understand our globally connected world.

Natural processes have an impact on the landscape and human settlement.

Human activities and resource use affect the environment.

Interactions between human activities and the atmosphere affect local and global weather and climate.

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use geographic inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze data and ideas from a variety of sources; and communicate findings and decisions (evidence and interpretation)
  • Develop geographic thinking and literacy through frames of understanding such as the use of the five themes of geography (evidence and interpretation; geographical importance)
  • Assess the significance of places by identifying the physical and/or human features that characterize places (sense of place)
  • Assess the interpretations of geographic evidence after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence and interpretation)
  • Draw conclusions about the variation and distribution of geographic phenomena over time and space (patterns and trends)
  • Evaluate how particular geographic actions or events affect human practices or outcomes (geographical value judgments)
  • Evaluate the features or aspects of geographic phenomena or locations to explain what makes them worthy of attention or recognition (geographical importance)
  • Identify and assess how human and environmental factors and events influence each other (interactions and associations)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past and/or present, and whether we have a responsibility to respond (geographical value judgments)

  • Use geographic inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze data and ideas from a variety of sources; and communicate findings and decisions (evidence and interpretation)
  • this includes mapping skills, reading topographic maps, using GIS tools, satellite imagery and photos
  • Develop geographic thinking and literacy through frames of understanding such as the use of the five themes of geography (evidence and interpretation; geographical importance)
  • also the understanding of the interactions and interconnectedness between Earth’s four spheres [atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere]
  • Identifying regions and their common features
  • Assess the significance of places by identifying the physical and/or human features that characterize places (sense of place)
  • identify unique characteristics and how they formed that help to make a place stand out; for example river valleys and floodplains, volcanic activity
  • Assess the interpretations of geographic evidence after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence and interpretation)
  • environmental issues around resource development, urban sprawl, infrastructure development in the form of dams or pipelines lend themselves to applications of this competency
  • Draw conclusions about the variation and distribution of geographic phenomena over time and space (patterns and trends)
  • identify why the Ring of Fire encircles the Pacific and how that has impacted life in coastal British Columbia
  • how does urban growth impact soil erosion, the water cycle, agricultural land?
  • Where are the world’s jungles or deserts found?
  • How are mountains formed? Where are they found?
  • Evaluate how particular geographic actions or events affect human practices or outcomes (geographical value judgments)
  •  do issues of climate change and rising sea levels affect the planet and people equally?
  • Evaluate the features or aspects of geographic phenomena or locations to explain what makes them worthy of attention or recognition (geographical importance)
  • landform features and how they formed (e.g. glaciated landscapes, volcanic features, deserts, etc.)
  • weather patterns, and possible changes to them
  • extreme weather (hurricanes, tornadoes, hail) and distribution of these events (No tornadoes in Victoria - why not?)
  • Identify and assess how human and environmental factors and events influence each other (interactions and associations)
  • global climate change, deforestation, coral reef bleaching, ozone layer depletion, acid precipitation, wild species at risk
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past and/or present, and whether we have a responsibility to respond (geographical value judgments)
  • how much responsibility do we have towards the environment?
  •  Can global climate change be halted?
  • Can the oceans survive human impacts?
  • Should we stop logging? Or mining?

  • features and processes of plate tectonics  (e.g., mountain building, volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis)
  • features and processes of gradation (e.g., mass wasting, running water, wind, waves and ice)
  • humans and resources
  • interactions between humans and the atmosphere
  • global biomes

  • features and processes of plate tectonics  (e.g., mountain building, volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis)
  • features and processes of gradation (e.g., mass wasting, running water, wind, waves and ice)
  • humans and resources

resource extraction practices

what  is a resource?

  • interactions between humans and the atmosphere

structure and functions of the atmosphere

human disruptions of atmospheric patterns

  • global biomes

distribution of biomes

characteristics/significant features

Social Justice

Social Studies

SOCIAL JUSTICE

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

Social justice issues are interconnected

Individual worldviews shape and inform the understanding of social justice issues

The causes of social injustice are complex and have lasting impacts on society

Social justice initiatives have individual and systemic transformation

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use inquiry processes (ask questions, gather, interpret and analyze ideas, and communicate findings and decisions) - elaboration: action plan focusing on a particular social justice issue
  • Assess and compare the significance of people, places, events, and developments over time and place, and determine what they reveal about issues of social justice in the past and present (significance)
  • Ask questions and corroborate inferences about the content, origins, purposes, and context of multiple sources and multiple perspectives (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups and individuals across different periods of time and space (continuity and change)
  • Determine and assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences and the intended and unintended consequences of an event, legislative and judicial decision, development, policy, and movement (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present people, places, issues and events,
    and distinguish between worldviews of the past and present (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past and present after considering the context and standards of right and wrong (ethical judgment)

Key Questions:

  1. What is an action plan?  What criteria is used to develop an action plan?

  1. To what extent are various sources / documents biased?  To what extent do sources corroborate and differentiate each other?

  1. Why and how have social justice issues changed over time?

  1. What characteristics do individuals and groups share and differ in addressing social injustice?

  1. How have individuals, groups, and institutions affect social justice issues?

  1. What are the different perspectives, arguments, and opinions on social justice issues?  How and why are they different?

  1. What makes an issue controversial?

  1. How do we address controversial issues?

  1. Who and what determines the standards used to judge a decision, policy, or action as  “right” or “wrong”?  

Activities:

  1. Barnga or Bafa Bafa
  2. Discussion styles - debate, consensus
  3. Social service activity (visit local food bank, non-profit organization or agency)
  4. Social justice action plan
  5. Letter campaign

  • various theoretical frameworks, interpretations, and concepts of social justice

  • connections between self-identity and an individual's relationship to others in society

  • connections of social justice issues

  • past and present social injustices locally in Canada and globally in the world, their possible causes and their lasting impact on individuals, groups, and society
  • roles of governmental and non-governmental organizations in issues of social justice and injustice
  • processes, methods, and approaches of individuals, groups, and institutions use to promote social justice

  1. Various theoretical frameworks, interpretations, and concepts of social justice
  • equity and equality
  • access, agency, advocacy, solidarity action
  • values, morality, ethics
  • social service, social responsibility
  • justice - restitution, restorative justice

2. Connections between self-identity and an individual's relationship to others in society and to the environment

  • privilege and power
  • diverse belief systems and worldviews of minoritized groups
  • Indigenous Peoples' traditional and unceded territories
  • inclusive and non-inclusive language

3. Connections of social justice issues

  • Eg. connections between and among issues of race, poverty, LGBTQ, status of women, environmental and ecological justice, peace and globalization, disabilities, and other marginalized and vulnerable groups

4. Past and present social injustices locally in Canada and globally in the world, their possible causes and their lasting impact on individuals, groups, and society

  • individual ideas, thoughts, beliefs, and actions
  • group ideas, thoughts, beliefs, and actions
  • institutional and systemic policies and practices

5. Roles of governmental and non-governmental organizations in issues of social justice and injustice

  • international laws
  • UN resolutions and declarations
  • Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  • Human Rights codes
  • civil and criminal laws
  • Indigenous rights

6. Processes, methods, and approaches of individuals, groups, and institutions use to promote social justice

  • activism, advocacy, and ally building
  • dispute and conflict resolution processes and practices
  • social media and technology
  • schooling and education

Political Studies

Social Studies

Political Studies

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

Politics occurs at every level of society and understanding it is critical to becoming informed and engaged citizens in a healthy common democracy.

Political institutions and ideology shape both the exercise of power and the nature of political outcomes.

The equal political status of citizens in a democracy co-exists uneasily with inequalities in the distribution of social and economic power

The relationship of countries and other actors in the international system is a balancing act of competing and overlapping values and priorities.

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

Use inquiry processes (ask questions, gather, interpret and analyze data, and communicate findings and decisions)

  Evaluate the significance of factors, forces, events and people  on developments, outcomes, and decisions. (significance, relevance & pertinence)

Assess the origins, purpose of, quality, and impact of political data. (evidence)

Analyze the methods used by the media, governments, and other important groups to influence public perception of an issue or event

Explain how different ideologies and worldviews shape perspectives on the same political issues and information (political perspectives)

Analyze interrelationships between objectives and intended and/or unintended results (interrelationships, objectives & results)

Assess the factors that promote political stability or instability  (stability and change)

Recognize the influence of implicit and explicit ethical judgments in political decision-making and formulate positions on issues of ethics in politics. (judgements in political ethics)

Use inquiry processes (ask questions, gather, interpret and analyze data, and communicate findings and decisions)

  • Political data examples:  voter participation, opinion polls, election results, composition of parliamentarians etc.
  • Optional student-directed activity with choices ranging from research into an issue of interest, to planning and carrying out an action project

Evaluate the significance of factors, forces, events and people  on developments, outcomes, and decisions. (significance, relevance & pertinence)

  • Examples of forces:  ideology, public opinion, economics, institutional factors, identity politics, role of media.

  • Activity:  Examine a case study of a political decision or outcome, and consider different interpretations of the factors that contributed to the outcome.

Assess the origins, purpose of, quality, and impact of political data. (evidence)

  • Question: What factors influence the accuracy of opinion polling data (ie sample size and composition, question, polling method - telephone or online forum)
  • Activity:  Compare poll-by-poll election results with other statistical information and try to make inferences.

Analyze the methods used by the media, governments, and other important groups to influence public perception of an issue or event.

  • Activity:  Analysis of media coverage from a variety of print, web-only, and broadcast sources of one day in an election campaign or significant day in politics.  Consider placement and size of stories, images chosen, accuracy, spin / bias.

Explain how different ideologies and worldviews shape perspectives on the same political issues and information (political perspectives)

  • Self-study: how were my own political perspectives influenced?
  • How do political perspectives change over time? What would cause this? Look at voter demographics and draw inferences.

Analyze interrelationships between objectives and intended and/or unintended results (interrelationships, objectives & results)

Assess the factors that promote political stability or instability  (stability and change)

Recognize the influence of implicit and explicit ethical judgments in political decision-making and formulate positions on issues of ethics in politics. (judgements in political ethics)

  • Debate topics:
  • Should politicians be held accountable for keeping promises made in campaigns?
  • Are we responsible for the well-being of future generations?
  • What ought to be done about the growing inequality between rich and poor?
  • Do countries have obligations  outside of their own borders?

The structure and function of political institutions of in Canada.

Main families and key indicators of ideologies and political systems

Elections and electoral systems

 Mass media in democratic societies.

Power relationships between citizens, government, and other bodies in the creation of public policy.  

The scope and characteristics of the international system, and the relationship of the actors within the system.

Issues in local, regional, or national politics in Canada.

Issues in global politics, such as security, conflict management, development, sustainability.

The structure and function of political institutions of in Canada

  • Parliament, provincial and territorial legislatures, First Peoples’ governance etc
  • Reform of institutions:  Senate of Canada, power of Prime Minister, British monarch as Head of State of Canada

Main families and key indicators of ideologies and political systems.

  • Examples of ideologies and systems:  ie. democracy, liberalism, capitalism, authoritarianism, conservatism, command-economy. libertarianism.
  • Left to right political spectrum and two-dimensional compass

Elections and electoral systems

  • Topic examples:
  • Electoral systems:  Single Member Plurality (First Past the Post), proportional representation, STV, majoritarian etc
  • Consensus model elections  in Nunavut and NWT.
  • Local elections
  • Outside factors:  opinion polls, campaign financing, third party involvement, election advertising, social media etc.
  • Inquiry:
  • Should Canada reform its electoral system?
  • Should the voting age be reduced?                
  • Activity:
  •  Electoral Reform citizens’ assembly simulation
  • Comparison of Canadian electoral system and rules with US or another democracy, or with an authoritarian state.

 Mass media in democratic societies.

Power relationships between citizens, government, and other bodies in the creation of public policy.

  • Theories:  Theories of power that range from authoritarian to democratic:  Power Over (power to compel, direct, or dictate) vs. Power To (power influence, enable, empower)
  • Key questions:
  • Proactive versus reactive government: when are governments proactive when creating policy and when are they reactive to the needs and demands of the population?
  • Identify and assess leading factors that empower certain groups in society while disempowering others.
  • Analyze the circumstances in which political power shifts from one group (or amalgam of groups) to another. 

The scope and characteristics of the international system, and the relationship of the actors within the system.

  • Actors include: states, nations, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, corporations
  • Activity:  Model United Nations or Model Security Council

Issues in local, regional, or national politics in Canada.

Issues in global politics, such as security, conflict management, development, sustainability.

Comparative Cultures

Social Studies

COMPARATIVE CULTURES

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

  • understanding the diversity and complexity of cultural expressions in one culture will enhance the understanding of other cultures

  • interactions between belief systems, social organization and language influences artistic expressions of culture

  • Geographic and environmental factors influenced the development of agriculture and trade, which directly led to increasingly complex cultures  

  • Value systems -- including religion, law, and governance -- within and among cultures are diverse  

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use inquiry processes (ask questions, gather, interpret and analyze ideas, and communicate findings and decisions)
  •  Assess and compare the significance of cultural elements over time and place (historical significance)
  •  Evaluate inferences about the content, origins, purposes, context, reliability, and usefulness of multiple sources both past and present (evidence)
  • Analyze continuities and changes in diverse cultures over diverse periods of time and space (continuity and change)
  • Assess development and impact of diverse cultures of thought, artistic expressions, power and authority, and technological adaptations ( cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present cultures (perspective)    
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)

  • definitions of culture

  • how understandings of culture have changed over time

  • elements of culture  and cultural expressions
  • artistic expression
  • philosophy
  • legal system / governance / social       organization / power and authority
  • religion / spiritual beliefs / morals / ethical viewpoints
  • architecture
  • language, literature
  • methods of cultural transmission over time
  • cultural archetypes

  • conflict and conflict resolution within and between cultures
  • interactions between cultures and the natural   environment

  • definitions of culture
  • key elements of culture (anthropology / sociology of culture)

  • how understandings of culture have changed over time

(elaboration:  supremacy, superiority, equality, “White man’s burden”, imperialism, colonialism, postmodernism, eurocentrism, etc.)  

3.  elements of culture / cultural expressions

  • explore the following concepts through case studies of specific cultures and comparisons between cultures  (elaboration:  possible topics:  Ancient world, Europe (Celts, Goth, Middle Earth, medieval world, renaissance, enlightenment to modern), Oceanic cultures, pre- and post-contact Americas, Asian cultures (China, India, Mongolia, Japan, Cambodia, Africa)
  • artistic expression
  • philosophy
  • legal system / governance / social organization / power and authority
  • religion / spiritual beliefs / morals / ethical viewpoints
  • architecture
  • language, literature
  • methods of cultural transmission over time
  • cultural archetypes

4.  conflict and conflict resolution within and between cultures

5.  interactions between cultures and the natural   environment

Philosophy

Social Studies

PHILOSOPHY

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

  1.        Philosophy is a discipline that examines the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence 

  1.        Philosophy provides the necessary tools for investigating meaning and fostering understanding of multiple discourses    

.           Philosophy allows individuals to make literate, rational, and relevant connections between ideas and their situations.

.          Philosophical discourse in one form or another is one of the most fundamental modes of being human.

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

Use philosophical inquiry processes including analytical and phenomenological methodologies (processes)

·         Analyze philosophical ideas and assess their significance  (significance)

·         Construct complex inferences about the content, origins, purposes, context, reliability, and usefulness of multiple philosophical sources (evidence)

·         Compare and contrast continuity, change, and contrast between ideas, disciplines, and schools of thought (continuity and change)

  • Assess the development and impact of diverse ideas as well as systems of thought (cause and consequence)

·        

·         Explain different philosophical perspectives with respect to various traditions of thought (perspective)  

  • Logical fallacies, deduction, induction, and arguments  
  • Ontological theories of being, such as nominalism, universalism, Idealism, and Teleology.        
                     
  • Metaphysical theories, such as Idealism Realism, Dualism, and Materialism
  • Epistemological theories of knowledge such as rationalism, empiricism, and skepticism
  • Theories of Self; including the mind-body problem and theories of consciousness.
  • Theories of  Justice and Freedom, such as distributive justice, free will, soft and hard determinism, and libertarianism.
  • Theories of morality and ethics such as Egoism versus Altruism, deontology, consequentialism, virtue ethics, and nihilism.

  • Logical fallacies, deduction, induction, and arguments  

-. Logic: What is Rational Argument?

-. Socratic Dialogue

-. Syllogisms                                                                    -. Induction & Deduction

 - Criticising and Closing Arguments                                  

  • Ontological theories of being, such as nominalism, universalism, Idealism, and Teleology.        - deism, theism vs atheism,

-arguments for and against God/gods, -

-problem of evil,

- Reality & Appearance,  

                        

                                         

  • Metaphysical theories, such as Idealism Realism, Dualism, and Materialism

-Cartesian theory,

- Kantian and Hegelian theory,

-nihilism, existentialism, Hume & Skepticism, positivism, post-modernism

  • Epistemological theories of knowledge such as rationalism, empiricism, and skepticism

-pragmatism

-relativism,

-subjective truth,

  • Theories of Self; including the mind-body problem and theories of consciousness.  

  • Theories of  Justice and Freedom, such as distributive justice, free will, soft and hard determinism, and libertarianism.

-anarchism

- social justice,

-restorative justice,

- retributive justice,

-communalism,

autonomy,

-positive and negative freedom,

  • Theories of morality and ethics such as Egoism versus Altruism, deontology, consequentialism, virtue ethics, and nihilism.

-the good life

-utilitarianism

-altruism,

-ethical egoism

Comparative World Religions

Social Studies

Comparative World Religions

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

  1. Religious belief, across time and place, is a common aspect of human societies.

  1. Religion can powerfully shape social, political, legal, and environmental values

  1. Comparing beliefs provides insights and understanding of diverse global cultures and peoples.

  1. An individual’s search for existential insight and transcendence can be shaped by a variety of different religious, spiritual, or philosophical traditions.

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use inquiry processes (ask questions, gather, interpret and analyze ideas, and communicate findings and decisions)
  • Explain the significance of texts, beliefs, places, events, and developments over time and place within various belief systems (significance)
  • Compare and evaluate artefacts as evidence of the cultural influence of religion (evidence).
  • Compare the growth and decline of religions over time, and determine the extent of continuity and changes in core beliefs and practices (continuity and change).
  • Assess origins and influences of religious movements and groups (cause and consequence).
  • Explain different religious perspectives on past or present people, places, issues and events (perspective).
  • Construct arguments about the accuracy of representations in media and popular culture. (critical media literacy)
  • Use inquiry processes (ask questions, gather, interpret and analyze ideas, and communicate findings and decisions)
  • Explain the significance of texts, beliefs, places, events, and developments over time and place within various belief systems (significance)
  • Compare and evaluate artefacts as evidence of the cultural influence of religion (evidence).
  • How is building design evidence of the religion’s cultural influence?
  • Compare the growth and decline of religions over time, and determine the extent of continuity and changes in core beliefs  and practices (continuity and change).
  • To what extent do modern practices of religious adhere to ancient practices?
  • Assess origins and influences of religious movements and groups (cause and consequence).
  • What was the role of the Roman Empire in the early growth of Christianity in the 1st century?
  • In what ways did Christianity influence the Roman Empire?
  • Explain different religious perspectives on past or present people, places, issues and events (perspective).
  • What arguments do mainstream Canadian religious communities make about doctor assisted suicide?
  • Is the “golden rule” common to all major religious belief systems?
  • Construct arguments about the accuracy of representations in media and popular culture. (critical media literacy)
  • To what extent are stereotypes about Muslims in popular media portrayed accurately?

  • characteristics of religion, mythology and spirituality
  • core beliefs, practices and ethics of world religions, including First Peoples spirituality
  • approaches to doctrines or belief systems
  • institutional and social structures, leadership and organisation; power relationships
  • sacred texts, traditions and narratives;
  • art, architecture, narratives and other forms of expression
  • Religions, including indigenous beliefs
  • relationship between religion and government in different times and places

  • characteristics of religion, mythology and spirituality
  • What is religion?
  • core beliefs, practices and ethics of world religions, including First Peoples spirituality
  • doctrines; worship; teachings; meditation; prayer; pillars of Islam; observances and holidays
  • approaches to doctrines or belief systems
  • role of Baptism; conversion to belief; evangelism; etc.
  • institutional and social structures, leadership and organisation; power relationships
  • i.e. monastic communities; theocracy; caliphates; church councils & assemblies; churches; mosques; temples
  • sacred texts, traditions and narratives;
  • indigenous oral traditions; Biblical texts; Pentateuch; Qu’ran, Shari’a; myths  
  • art, architecture, narratives and other forms of expression
  • Cordoba, Spain; Hagia Sophia;
  • Renaissance;
  • Religions, including indigenous beliefs
  • founders; early histories; spread and growth
  • relationship between religion and government in different times and places
  • What is the role of religious communities in Canadian society?

Asian Studies 1850-present

Social Studies

Asian Studies 1850-present

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

The breadth and diversity of Asia’s physical and human resources have made the region a powerful political, cultural and economic force in the late 20th century.

OR

The breadth and diversity of Asia’s physical and human resources have contributed to the development of distinct and disparate political, cultural, and economic regions in the late 20th century.

Colonialism, Imperialism, and resource discrepancies have been the primary conditions for conflict and movement of peoples in Asia.

Ethnic, regional, and national identities, shaped in part by geography and migration, exert a significant political and cultural influence in Asia.

Rapid industrialization, urbanization and economic growth in Asia in the late twentieth century have created complex environmental challenges

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups (continuity and change)
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present(ethical judgment)

  • physical geography, including resource distribution,  and physiographic features
  • human geography, including demography, migration, urbanization, and environmental issues
  • industrialization, globalization, economic systems, and distribution of wealth and resources
  • Interdependence and cooperation
  • Development, structure, and function of political and social institutions
  • social and political movements, including human rights initiatives
  • Local, regional, and global conflict
  • Local, regional, and national identities

·            Physical geography

  • Geographic features, population density, climates and environments of Asia
  • Defining “Asia”
  • Natural borders, resource distribution, and impact of climate and physiographic features on trade, migration, economies
  • Different standards of living and economic activities in Asian countries and regions
  • Southeast Asia cross-border haze
  • Pollution politics (China)
  • South-North Water Transfer Project (China)
  • Bhopal disaster (India)
  • Rising sea levels, impact on dense urban areas
  • The Maldives and its “Island President”

Local, Regional, and Global Conflict

  • Imperial weakening, Opium Wars
  • Taiping and Boxer Rebellions
  • Fall of the Qing, Republican China, May 4th Movement
  • Warlord Era, unequal treaties, rise of Chinese Communist Party
  • Japanese invasion of Manchuria
  • Chinese Revolution 1949
  • Mao era: Land reform, 100 Flowers, Anti-Rightist Campaign
  • Mao era: Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution
  • Deng era: Reforms and opening up, Tiananmen Square
  • Colonization of northeast China, Korea, Taiwan
  • Annexation of Ryuku Kingdom (Okinawa) and northern territories
  • East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere
  • Bombing of Pearl Harbor
  • Surrender and US occupation 1945-52
  • San Francisco Peace Treaty
  • Politics of apologies
  • Unresolved maritime claims, tensions with China, the two Koreas
  • Meiji Restoration
  • Japanese colonialism in Taiwan and  Korea
  • Impact of colonialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia
  • Indian Independence Movement (Amritsar, Gandhi, Non-violent movement, Jinnah)
  • WWII in the Pacific
  • India-Pakistan partition
  • 1971 creation of Bangladesh
  • Pakistan civil war
  • Korean War
  • Vietnam War
  • Sri Lanka ethnic conflict/civil war
  • French, Japanese occupations of Vietnam
  • Khmer Rouge in Cambodia
  • Contemporary conflict, including the South China Sea, Island disputes between Japan vs. Korea and Japan vs. China, India-Pakistan border dispute and water treaties, Tibetan Independence, Russian-Chinese border disputes (Manchuria), Indigenous movements
  • Postcolonial and indigenous theories
  • Contested border areas in Indonesia, Myanmar
  • Late 1990s North Korean nuclear crisis, famine, South’s “Sunshine Policy” of engagement

Industrialization, globalization, economic systems, and distribution of wealth and resources

  • Growth, poverty, and inequality
  • Pros and cons of foreign trade and investment in Asia and with Asia
  • Environmental sustainability and economic growth
  • Labour conditions and economic development
  • Export-led growth models
  • Japan and the four ‘tiger economies’
  • Role of the state in economic development
  • Uneven development, growing inequality
  • Economic growth, rising expectations in ‘youth bulge’ countries (India, Bangladesh, Vietnam)

Human geography

  • Migration within, between, and away from Asia
  • Population growth and decline
  • Urbanization, the rise of megacities and
  • Role of the state and markets in affecting migration patterns
  •  Impact of climate change on livelihood
  • Standards of living (rural vs urban and between regions and countries)

Development, structure, and function of political and social institutions

  • Rise of contemporary nation-states
  • Authoritarian (China, Vietnam); democratic (India, Japan, Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan); hybrid (Malaysia, Singapore); transitioning (Myanmar)
  •  Corruption
  • Post-War North Korea – Juche (self-reliance) and dynastic politics
  • Post-War South Korea – military dictatorship, economic growth and transition to democracy
  • Confucianism (China, Vietnam, South Korea, North Korea)
  • Leninist party-state organization (China, Vietnam, North Korea, Taiwan pre-1980s)
  • India’s caste system
  • Varieties of political Islam in Asia
  • History of Christianity in Asia
  • Hindu nationalism
  • Rise of ‘global’ megacities (Tokyo, Seoul, Singapore, etc.)

Social and political movements, including human rights initiatives

  • Aging populations in Japan and Korea
  • Caste system in India
  • Rise economic inequality and youth unemployment
  • Human rights issues
  • Contemporary social and political movements including Indigenous rights
  • Corruption
  • Japanese anti-nuclear movements
  • Tiananmen Square
  • Southeast Asia’s modern statehood and multi-ethnic, multi-faith, multi-lingual populations
  • European and US colonization and national liberation movements
  • Buddhism as a force for both peace and conflict
  • Neo-Confucianism
  • Women’s rights movements
  • Automated future (Japan)
  • Controlled immigration, social engineering (Singapore)
  • Birth planning and modification (China One-Child Policy)
  • Child labour issues
  • China’s 150 million migrant workers; ‘left behind’ villages and children; the ‘rat tribe’ of Beijing
  • State-led urbanization (China and ‘ghost cities’)
  • Entrenched urban poverty and slums (Dhaka, Manila, etc.)

Genocide Studies

Social Studies

Genocide Studies

Big Ideas:

Elaborations

The intentional destruction of peoples and their cultures is not inevitable and attempts can be disrupted and resisted.  

The use of the term genocide to describe atrocities is dependent on time, place and perspective; and where the term is used has political, legal, social, and cultural ramifications

Despite international condemnation and a commitment to prohibit genocide, violence targeted against groups of people or minorities has continued to challenge global peace and prosperity

The purpose, expectations, and methods of genocide are unique to their context but share core similarities in progression and scope.

Curricular competencies

Elaboration

Content

Elaboration

  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • Assess the credibility and justifiability of evidence after investigating the reliability of sources/data, the adequacy of evidence, and bias of accounts and claims by contextualizing and corroborating the sources.  (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups, at different times or places (continuity and change)
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and actions of individuals or groups influence events, places, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions and assess varying responses to events in the past or present.

  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to: ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • Assess the credibility and justifiability of evidence after investigating the reliability of sources/data, the adequacy of evidence, and bias of accounts and claims by contextualizing and corroborating the sources.  (evidence)
  • Contextualize = the origin, purpose, values, and limitations of the source document. worldviews prevalent at the time; and conditions and features of a place; values & sensitivities of the people in that place.
  • adequacy: to support an argument; are there omissions?
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups, at different times or places (continuity and change)
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and actions of individuals or groups influence events, places, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions and assess varying responses to events in the past or present. (ethical judgment)
  • To what extent is it accurate to label pre-1945 events as “genocides”?

  • Origins and development of the term “genocide”
  • economic, political, social, and cultural conditions of genocide
  • characteristics and stages of genocide
  • Acts of mass violence and atrocities from different global regions
  • strategies used to commit genocide
  • uses of technology in promoting and carrying out genocide
  • Recognition and responses to genocides
  • Movements who deny the existence or minimize the scope of genocides
  • Evidence used to demonstrate the scale and nature of genocides
  • International law and enforcement

  • economic, political, social, and cultural conditions of genocide
  • perpetrators; regimes and leaders
  • demographics; vulnerability of minorities
  • Heros, bystanders, perpetrators
  • characteristics; stages of genocide
  • (8 stages = Classification Symbolization Dehumanization Organization Polarization Preparation Extermination Denial)
  • Acts of mass violence and atrocities from different global regions - Case Studies
  • indigenous peoples and cultures
  • Beothuk extinction; epidemics  Namibia; Armenia; pogroms; Soviet Union/Ukraine (Holodomor); Japanese occupation of Korea & China; Holocaust; Khmer Rouge/Cambodia;   Rwanda, Sudan, Guatemala, Yugoslavia(Bosnia)
  • strategies used to commit genocide
  • rape; stereotyping; propaganda; social pressure; classification; symbolization; dehumanization; organization; polarization; preparation; extermination; denial; starvation
  • Recognition and responses to genocides
  • Recognition, responses, apologies, reparations, redress, reconciliation, memorialisation
  • human rights tribunals; war crime trials; international intervention; memorials
  • uses of technology in promoting and carrying out genocide (i.e. radio; transportation networks; industrialization)  
  • Movements who deny the existence or minimize the scope of genocides