Lashley

Transcendentalism, Anti-Transcendentalism,

and

 Grammar “Boot-Camp”

Michelle Lashley

Willamette University

January 2013

Table of Contents

I.Context………………………………………………………………………………………...3

A. Community/School District …………..………………………………………….…4

B. School Setting/ Staff………………………………………………………….……...5

C. Classroom Environment……………………………………………………………..6

D. Students Characteristics….………………………………………………………….7

E. Personal Context……………………………………………………………………..8

F. Curriculum Context………………………………………………………………….9

        1. Modifications and Adaptations…………………………………………...….10

2. Literacy………………………………………………………………..…..…11

3. Technology and Resources………………...………………………………...11

II. Unit Overview………….…………………………………………………………..………..12

III. Curriculum Content…………….………………………………………………….……….15

        A. Day One………………………………………………………………….…...……..15

        B. Day Two………………………………………………………………….…...……..25

        C. Day Three…………………………………………………………………...…….…32

        D. Day Four………………………………………………………………………...…..43

        E. Day Five……………………………………………………………………………..49

        F. Day Six……………………………………………………………………………….58

        G. Day Seven……………………………………………………………………...……68

        H. Day Eight…………………………       ………………………………………...…..77

        I. Day Nine…………….………………………………………………………...……...88

        E. Day Ten……………………………………………………………………………...96

        F. Day Eleven…………………………………………………………………………...102

IV. Assessment……………………….…………………………………………………………108

        A. Assessment Plan (Types, Data Collection and Exemplars….……….………………108

                1. Pre-Assessment……………………………………………………………...108

                2. Post Assessment……………………………………………………………..115

                3. Formative Assessments……………………………………….…………….128

4.Performance Assessment…………………………………………….............148

        B. Presentation and Interpretation of Data……………………………….……………156

D. Feedback Plan……………………….……………………………………………...167

        E. Assessment Reflection……………………………………………………………...168

V. Final Reflection……………………………………………………………………………..170

        

I. Context

        A. Community

        In 2013, the state of Oregon had an estimated 3.9 million people. The racial makeup of the state is predominantly white, at 88.3%. The largest minority group is Hispanic or Latino, comprising 12.2% of the population. Other racial groups in the state are Asian (4.0%) Black or African American (2.0%), Native American (1.8%) or identified themselves as biracial (3.5%). From 2007-2011, the homeownership rate for the state was at 63.1%, with an average of 2.46 people in each household. The median income is $49,850. Unemployment is at 8.6%. About 15% of the state’s total population live below the poverty line. (US Census Bureau 2012).

22.1% of residents are under 18. Approximately one third of students in Oregon identify as being a racial minority. Slightly over half of all students are on free and reduced lunch. 7% of these students have been identified as TAG (Talented and Gifted). One in ten students is bilingual and 13% receive special education services.

Figure 1: Oregon School Demographics

Figure 1 From Oregon Department of Education 2012

        Salem, the capital city of Oregon, has 156,455 residents. Of these residents, approximately 79% are white, 20.3% identify as Hispanic or Latino, 2.7% identify as Asian, 1.5% are Black or African American, and 1.5% are Native American. The median household income is $43,770. While slightly over 86% of Salem residents have a high school diploma, only 25% have earned a bachelors degree. By far the largest employer is government-- distantly followed by trade, transportation, utility and health services. Unemployment is slightly above the state average at 9.2% (Open Books Project 2013).

        Of the 65 schools in district, 25 of Salem-Keizer schools are listed as receiving Title 1 funds. About 2/3 of the student population for the district are considered to be living in poverty-- with household incomes lower than $3,631 per month. 15% of students are enrolled in English Language Learner Programs, with 63 languages spoken throughout the district. The most popular languages are Spanish, Russian, and Marshallese. 14% of student body receive special education services. 9% of the students have been identified as TAG.  (City of Salem Employees 2013).

B. School Setting/ Staff

        Sprague High School, located in the south of Salem, has an enrollment of 1.727 students. Of these students, slightly less than 80% identify as white and approximately 9.4% as Hispanic. Other minority groups include Asian (3%), Black or African American (1.14%), and Native American (1.6%). In contrast to the rest of Salem-Keizer, only 18.5% of the schools population lives below the poverty line. 36.4% of students are on free and reduced lunches. There are no English Language Development classes offered. Students in need of these classes receive them at neighboring North Salem High school Only .5% are not native English speakers (Oregon Department of Education 2012).

While Sprague does have Professional Learning Communities, each teacher comes up with their own curriculum and lesson plans. However, students who are taking the same classes are expected to be assessed on the same criteria. PLC’s therefore must together create a common assessment by which to grade their students. The two summative assessments in my unit (the grammar test and the Romanticism unit test) were not written by me, but are the standard assessments that all students enrolled in Honors American Literature will  take. However, the curriculum, activities, and formative assessment in the unit have been designed in collaboration between  my supervising teacher and myself in order to prepare the students for these summative assessments.  

C. Classroom Environment

        My classroom is an Honors American Literature Classroom. The class consists of 29 students, all in their junior year. At Sprague High school, there are three options for English during junior year. Students can take English 11, which is considered to be the normal or low track. Students can take Honors American Literature (the class I am teaching), which is considered to be at a slightly elevated track. Or students can take Humanities, a block course that combines English Literature with Advanced Placement United States History. Humanities is considered to be the most rigorous English course for Sprague juniors.

Compared to the two other sections of Honors American Literature offered at Sprague, this group of students is far more differentiated. While most of the students were in Honors English 10 last year, six of the students in this class were in the regular track of English 10 last year and are trying to jump into a higher tract this year. While they all received a recommendation from their English 10 teacher to do so, the first year of being on an honors tract presents difficulties. Having six such students in one group is rare. In addition, there are more Talented and Gifted students in this section of Honors American Literature than in any of the other sections.

        

D. Student Characteristics

        The classroom is predominantly white, with less than 5% of the students identifying as students of color. Most of the students come from a middle to high socio-economic background-- common for the population of Sprague High school. In the class, female students outnumber male students at a 2:1 ratio, with twenty female students and only nine male students. The class has only one student who does not speak English as their primary language. However, this student is an exchange student from Russia, who has had extensive education in the English language in her home country. In addition, eight students in the class have been identified as Talented and Gifted.

        The class has one student with a hearing disability. This student has an interpreter in the class. The student also has a pull-out language development class for one period every day. Due to this students excellent lip reading ability, group work is generally not difficult. Many students in the class also have rudimentary knowledge of American Sign Language due to the strong program offered by the school. However, this student is allowed to request alternative assignments if she feels that they are necessary. In addition, while lectures are rare in the class, the students is given notes prepared by a teacher or another student so that the student can watch the interpreter during the entire lecture.

        There is one student with an IEP and one student with a 504 plan. The student with the IEP, for behavioral management and anger problems, is given preferential seating at the front of the room. He can request alternatives from group assignments or choose to complete these assignments alone. In addition, he can be given release from class to go to the front office or to a counselor if he feels it is necessary. The student on the 504 plan has been diagnosed with generalized anxiety. She is given preferential seating in the class. In addition, she can requested up to 50% more time to complete major tests or assignments.

        

E. Personal Context

        While I had the option to teach other classes at Sprague High School, my rationale for taking on this class was that gives me experience in teaching a very rigorous and challenging honors level course, something I might never have the opportunity to do otherwise.  Prior to my experience at Sprague, students that I have previously worked with have been recent immigrants and homeless youth. All of these students were at a very low socioeconomic level and far behind benchmark levels for their grades. During my student teaching in my third clinical setting, I will be working with middle school students, teaching the same workshop reading and writing skills that I would if I had taken on a lower level high school course. By taking on this course, I wanted to challenge myself to see if I have the skills to teach students how to analyze and comprehend difficult pieces of literature. My mentor teacher also uses group discussions and socratic seminars with this class of students very frequently-- two skills that I want to develop as a teacher.

        I chose to take on this section of Honors American Literature for several reasons. The first was that it is by far the most differentiated of the honors courses. I feel like this group will best prepare me for my future work as a teacher. Second, I wanted the opportunity to work with students with hearing disabilities. While I have had a lot of opportunities in the past to work with students with learning disabilities, I have had very little interaction with students with physical disabilities. This also gives me the opportunity to work with Instructional Assistants and Translators-- skills I would like to have as a teacher.

F. Curriculum Context

        So far this year, the students have studied American Literature from the Puritans and from the Neoclassical era. My unit on transcendentalism will be part of a larger unit on Romantic Literature emerging from the New England Renaissance. Compared to the texts that the class has previously studied, this unit will contain more fiction, figurative language, and the use of imagery to convey thematic meanings. Therefore, in addition to my topical focus, students will work on skills of close reading especially as it pertains to differentiating between literal and figurative meanings.

        The second component of my unit is a review of all the grammar skills my students have learned thus far in the course of the year. An important part of my mentor teacher’s philosophy is that grammar is not separated into its own unit, but is constantly being integrated in the classroom. She has found that students both retain and learn this information much better under a spiral curriculum, where the necessary skills are repeated at increasing difficulties.

        The end of the six-week grading period (before which all Honors American Literature students are required to take the grammar assessment) falls in the middle of my unit-- which is why on the sixth day of my eleven day unit, students will be taking a cumulative grammar assessment. While I was not the initial teachers to introduce these skills, during this unit I will pre-assess the skill with which most students are struggling. After assessing this prior knowledge and ability, I will provide further lessons and practice on the skills with which the students are struggling in order to prepare students for their summative assessment.

In addition, while I did not write the summative assessment for the Romantic unit, I wrote the curriculum of my Transcendentalism unit with this test in mind. When I assess my teaching, I will evaluate how students did of questions pertaining to texts that I taught. I will also be examining data on questions that assess students’ ability to close read texts-- one of the major skills focus of my unit.

        1. Modifications and Adaptations

        The major modification and adaptation that I had to consider for my classroom was involving my deaf students. I had two interpreters in my room who would translate the lectures. In addition, these students could requests for copies of notes from lectures or group discussions, as they could not simultaneously lip-read and write notes at the same time. These arrangements had already been made prior to my arrival in the classroom. Therefore, my primary duty was to make sure that copies of these notes were made and distributed to the students that needed them.

         My deaf students, as well as one of my IEP students, were allowed to ask for alternative assignments when speaking in front of a group. As a presentation (the Walden Assignment) was a summative assessment, I had to offer these students the opportunity to come in at lunch or after school to give their presentation to me alone. In addition, the class had many group discussions. However, students were not graded on their amount of verbal participation, but on the notes they took during the discussion. My deaf students were allowed to write a summary after the discussion (rather than active notes) to prove that they were participating by listening.

        All students were granted as much time as they needed to finish tests. After the initial class period, they would have to arrange their own time during lunch or after school to complete the tests. This satisfactorily met the needs of all the students on 504 plans in the class.

        I had one ELL student in my class. Over the course of the class, I used many SIOP strategies, so I felt that they class could have been very easily adapted to more ELL students. Much of the time, in order to differentiate, the pieces would be segmented, which allowed me to assign portions of the text with more lexical difficulty to students with higher reading ability. Due to the fact that many of the texts are in the public domain, it was quite easy for this student to find copies in her native language online. She would often read the full texts in her native language.

        If I would have had more students who were English Language Learners, I feel like it would have been beneficial to capitalize on the fact that all of the texts we read were in the public domain and therefore, had been translated into many different languages. I feel that providing this resource to my non-native students helped them greatly when they were reading the text for the second time during class in English. In addition, most lessons utilized SIOP strategies-- including visuals, written and verbal directions, graphic organizers, and think-pair-shares in order to help scaffold for any language barriers faced by my ELL students.

        The fact that we were talking about American culture allowed us to bring up a lot of discussions about cultural diversity in the classroom. Students were able to talk about their own experiences of American culture and how the “cannonized” version printed in the textbook both shaped, but also left out, certain versions of what it means to be an American. Bringing up these discussions, as well as their historical context, and allowing students to talk about these things honestly and openly helped to make the classroom a more accepting place of cultural diversity.  

I had two students who had not passed their OAKS reading text. These students were struggling greatly in the class. While they were aided by the segmentation of the class and the scaffolding of group work, in all honesty, they should not have been placed in an honors course. For these students, I would often provide notes or summaries of texts for them to read before they read the full text. The hope was that this would provide them better comprehension while they read the original. I would also try to provide them with more guiding questions while they read, to better prepare them for group discussions on the text.

If I would have had more Special Education students, it would most likely have been necessary to provide them with shortened versions or summaries and outlines of the text. My students who were not strong readers usually read these resources in addition to the stories themselves (in order to aid in their comprehension). It would have been possible to provide shortened versions or excerpts of the text for special education students not capable of doing the full readings. However, as an honors class, this would have not been an ideal situation and I feel that special education students who were not able to complete work with addition scaffolding provided by summaries and outlines, they would be best served in an on-level English Class.

One major barrier to students of low socioeconomic status is the inability to do homework. While it was impossible to forgo giving homework entirely, I tried to negate the impact that homework had on student of lower socioeconomic status by providing ample class time to complete work, giving students notice of any homework they would have several days in advance so they could prepare for it if there schedule was less flexible, and making myself available both during lunchtime and after school to provide students with any homework help that they could not receive at home. In addition, none of my assignments required at home technology. My mentor teacher also had supplies in class for students who did not have supplies available to them at home.

Almost a third of my class was comprised of TAG students. During the jigsaw activities, these students were given more lexically challenging pieces to read. In addition, during the socratic seminar, these students were asked to take a leadership role in their groups. During the socratic seminar, several of these students, who were also very strong speakers, were asked to defend the unpopular view-- something very challenging for many of them, but with which they succeeded greatly.

While I had very few behavior problems in my class, one that I did have to provide moderation for was a student with an inability to do group work because of anger management problems. He also sometime had trouble sitting for long lectures. Due to the fact that he was on an IEP, he was given alternative assignments for groupwork. During the warm up, I would talk to him about the activities we were doing that day, given him individual work to do, and let him work in the hall outside of class. I would check in on him several times during the group work period to make sure that he was both on task and understanding the work that was expected of him.  

        2. Literacy

        Each class, I tried to engage students in reading, writing, listening, and speaking-- in order to increase the functional skills of all the domains of literacy. However, there were two major skills that this unit specifically focused on in order to increase literacy skills.

        The first was close reading-- specifically close reading for both literal and figurative meaning. Very rarely in the pieces we read were the meanings and messages stated outright. Students, based on their knowledge of the time period, had to make inferences in order to discover the thematic meanings of the piece. This ability to contextualize a piece by making connections with historical and other textual knowledge is a key skill across the content areas. The ability to separate literal from figurative meanings is also key to understanding author’s craft-- how and why a piece was written in addition to what it says.

The second literacy skill I wanted students to work on was the ability to perform an antithesis. Being able to acknowledge that multiple perspectives have validity is an important life skill. Being able to acknowledge this opposition, while still maintaining a logical argument, is an important literacy skill.

On the Smarter Balance test that students will be given next year, students will be asked to write a synthesis paper. In this paper, they will be required to gather evidence from multiple texts in order to write a persuasive piece. The rubric provided by the Oregon Department of Education for these synthesis papers shows that they only way that a student will receive an exceeding score on these pieces is if they are able to acknowledge evidence for opposing viewpoints.

Many students struggle with this ability-- both recognizing that arguments in opposition to their own have some validity and conveying this opposition in a logical fashion. Practice using transitional phrases in order to convey opposition that does not automatically dismiss the opposing side is an important literacy skill for students to practice

3. Technology and Resources

        While there was a Smartboard available to me in the classroom, I did not use it due to my lack of training. In fact, while there were Smartboard in every classroom, I never saw teachers utilizing them. Several teachers told me that they had never received training on how to use them and felt much more comfortable using the document camera.

        In addition, while there were computer labs at the high school that I wanted to take advantage of for a project, they were very difficult to schedule as my unit fell right in the midst of state testing. The labs were virtually unavailable for the month of November as the few available slots had already been reserved.

        Many students did not have access to computers at home. While we were able to put up slides and worksheets on the website, they also had to been available in hard copy for students who did not have access to the website at home. This made the online grammar quizzes that we had prepared difficult.

        In addition, due to rampant plagiarism that had occurred during previous years, my mentor teacher had a policy in place of only accepting hand written work. While this made things equal both socioeconomically and took care of plagiarism, I wonder if not allowing students to practice their typing prepared them to be technology literate in the future. It also worries me for students learning the editing process.

II. Curriculum Overview

Topic: Transcendentalists, Anti-Transcendentalism, and Grammar “Boot-Camp”

Subject Area: Honors American Literature Grade Level: 11

Rationale: The Transcendentalist movement is a major landmark is American Literature. It is from this body of text that our society still derives many of ideas about individualism, man’s relationship with nature, and the role of imagination and creativity in our everyday existence.

In addition to being at the cornerstone of foundational 19th century American Literature, Transcendentalism marks the beginning of a shift in literature from nonfiction to fiction. Authors begin to rely on literary devices-- such as metaphor or symbolism-- in order to generate meaning.  With the change in the style of writing, students will be challenged to close read texts-- drawing from them literal and explicit meanings, as well as making inferences about thematic meanings. Reading from this time period, students will also have a unique lense by which to view modern American ideas of individualism and the role of dissidents in society.

A portion of my unit will also be spent helping students review for a cumultive grammar test from information that they have covered over the last twelve weeks. Students writing, especially in their junior year, is becoming much more complex. This has become especially key as the Smarter Balance Test requires that students to be able to write a synthesis-- including acknowledging other viewpoints. As their thoughts-- and therefore, sentence structure-- become more complex, their ability to craft and correctly punctuate their essays becomes much more difficult. It is critical for these students to have a thorough understanding of grammatical rules. It is also essential that this grammar not be isolated into a unit of its own, but instead spread throughout the curriculum-- showing students that the ability to write with correct conventions is always important and meaningful.

Standards:

Unit Focus:

        COGNITIVE

PSYCHOMOTOR

AFFECTIVE

-Classify Sentence types        

-Analyze how figurative language creates both literal and Figurative Meanings

-Compare and Contrast Authors from the same period writing about similar themes

-Identify quintessential passages and evaluate why these passages are pivotal to piece

-Practice generating  simple, complex, compound, and compound-complex sentences (including an antithesis sentence) using proper conventions.

-Verbalize close reading process

-Participate both verbally and nonverbally in group discussions of varying sizes

-Discuss Transcendentalist themes in groups of varying sizes

-Respond to and accept different readings of the same text

Performance Goals:

Overarching Essential Question(s):

-What does it mean to be an individual?

-What is the role of nature in our lives?

- What is the role of idealism in a society?

Topical Foci:

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments

Fireside Poets

  • Longfellow, Holmes, Lowell

Transcendentalists

  •  Emerson, Thoreau

Anti-Transcendentalists

  • Hawthorne

Grammar

  • Phrases, Clauses, and Sentence Types

-Poetry Analysis Activity

-Grammar Worksheets(2)

-Grammar Quiz(1)        

-Class Discussion

-Quotation Mini-Quizzes

-Annotated Bibliography        

-Grammar Unit Test

-Romanticism Unit Test

-Walden Presentations

-Antithesis Paper*

*Assessment will be given after the completion of the work sample

Day 1        

Day 2        

Day 3        

Day 4                

Day 5        

-Lecture: Sentence Types

-Group Work: Longfellow, Holmes, Lowell

-Homework: Study For Grammar Quiz

-Grammar Quiz

-Large Group Discussion: Longfellow, Holmes, Lowell

-Homework: Walden        

-Reading Quiz: Walden

-Mini-Lecture: Transcendentalists

-Group Work: Walden “Instragram”

Activity                

-Return:

Grammar Quiz

-Student Presentations:

Walden

-Homework:

Civil Disobedience

        

-Student Presentations: Walden

-Group Discussion:

Civil Disobedience

-Homework:

Study for Grammar Test

Day 6        

Day 7

Day 8

Day 9        

Day 10                

-Grammar Test

-Homework:

None

-QuickWrite:         Civil Disobedience

-Read: How the Legal System Failed Aaron Swartz-- and Us.

-Philosophical Chairs: Are Hacktivists Civil Disobedients or Cyber-Criminals?

-Reflection on Philosophical Chairs

-Review: What will be on the Romanticism Unit Test

-Mini-Quiz: Quotations Practice

-Read: Nature

-Nature Summary Activity

-Group Discussion

-Introduce: Annotated Bibliography        

-Quickwrite: On Nature

-Mini-Quiz: Quotations

-Self Reliance Activity

-Lecture: Social Groups during the Romantic Period

                        

                

-Mini-Quiz: Quotations

-Self Reliance Activity

-Self Reliance Presentations

-Reflections        

                        

                

Day 11

Day 12*

-Mini-Quiz: Quotations

-Quickwrite: Summary of “Minister’s Black Veil”

-Socratic Seminar

-Reflection

Turn in: Annotated Bibliography

Romanticism Unit Test

*After work sample, not an instructional day

Pre-Requisite Skills and Knowledge:

-Students have a knowledge of literature from both the Puritans and the Neoclassical Era (Previous Unit)

- Students know the Parts of Speech

-Students can identify subjects and verbs in a sentence

-Students have knowledge of figurative language and literary devices

-Students have experience with group discussions of various sizes and ability to work in cooperative learning groups

III. Curriculum Content

A. Day One

Lesson Plan Title: Fireside Poets and Sentence Type Review

Date/Time to be taught: November 15th, 2013.  2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards:

Learning Targets:

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

                        

Teachers Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Grammar Pre-Assessment Review (3-4 minutes)

Using data from pretests and formative assessments, review with students what grammar skills will be reviewed over the next week (determining between phrases and clauses and sentence types) as these were skills that the majority of the class struggled with. Inform students that if they are struggling in an area that will not be reviewed over the course of the week, then they should come in during lunch or after school for extra help.

Students, having received information from  formative assessments, should be evaluating what skills they still struggle with and what studying resources they should access over the next week to improve their grammar scores.         

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

Teacher Actions

Student Actions

Grammar Lecture (8-10 minutes)

Fireside Poets Activity (25 minutes)

Using a flow chart on the document camera, teacher will review how to determine a phrase from a clause. After going over the chart, teacher will check for student understanding with a few examples from the pre-assessment which has been returned and graded.

Using a second flow chart, Teacher will instruct how to determine between simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences. Then, using examples, teacher will check for student understanding.

Put instructions for the Fireside Poets Activity on the document camera.

Read through instructions with class. Ask if students have any questions about activity. Inform students that they have until the end of class to finish assignment. If they do not complete it, it will be homework.

While students work on activity, monitor the room and check for understanding of the activity. Also a time for students to get clarification on grammar lecture.

 

Students are expected to copy both flow charts into their notes.

After each section of the lecture, students are expected to review the examples from the pre-assessment. If they are confused, students are expected to ask for clarification.

Students will be allowed to work in small groups of up to four students. However, each student must complete their own assignment.

Students will read the following four  poems:

“The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“A Psalm of Life” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“The Chambered Nautilus” by Oliver Wendell Holmes

“The First Snowfall” by James Russell Lowell

Each group is expected to read each poem out loud at least twice. Then for each, they will answer the following questions.

1. Give a one to two sentence literal summary of the poem

2. Give a one to two sentence thematic summary of the poem

3. Identify any literary devices utilized by the poet

4. Discuss how these literary devices work to develop the poems theme

After the students finish all of the poems, they will answer the follow questions:

1. Compare and contrast the themes and techniques used in the four poems?

2. Which of the poems did you like best and why?

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

                

                        

Teacher’s Actions

                

                        

Students Actions

                

Review of Weekend Assignments (2 minutes)

Teacher will evaluate how far students have progressed in their poetry activity.

Teacher will hand out grammar practice worksheet to be completed for homework.

Students will inform teacher how close they are to completing poetry activity. Students will pick up a copy of grammar worksheet to be completed for homework.

Literacy Connection:

Understanding and being able to identify sentence types is key to understanding the rationale behind correct punctuation. If students can learn this rationale, then the conventions will improve dramatically, especially reducing mistakes involving comma and semicolon placement (the two punctuation pieces that students with which students most often struggle. This knowledge should increase students writing ability across the subject areas.

Being able to understand and assess a text for multiple meanings is a key component for reading. Having students directly address both literal and figurative meanings-- as well as how authors use literary and rhetorical devices in order to render these multiple meanings-- will help students become close readers and have a better understanding of author’s craft.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

Pre-assessments will be returned to students. During the lecture, students will have the opportunity to address points of confusion. During this time, teacher can also talk to students to evaluate their understanding of the literal and figurative meaning of the four poems. Next class, student homework (both the Poetry Analysis and Grammar Worksheet) can be used to evaluate whether student learning occurred.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

-Document Camera

-Text Book: Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience (All unit literature found in Chapter 4: The New England Renaissance, pages 240- 392)

-Grammar Worksheet (Attached)

-Powerpoint- Grammar Flowchart

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

Utilizing the gradual release model, students will begin to analyze poetry in small groups before they are expected to complete these tasks on their own. Students will be asked to read poems aloud as a group, as well as following along with the written poem. The assignment itself breaks down poetical analysis into small manageable steps in order to make this difficult process manageable.

 In addition, all instructions are delivered both verbally and in writing. During the group work time, which comprises the majority of the class, I will be holding conferences for students who especially struggled on the grammar pre-assessment to ensure that these students have access to resources they need in order to be successful. I will also be monitoring group work between these conferences and available to help any students who struggle with the poetry assignment.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students in the class sit in rows facing the front for the lecture. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

During group work, students are encouraged to physically move their desks to that they can face one another. For this activity, students were allowed to chose their own groups to work with.

Notes From Individual Implementation:

Grammar Worksheet

Grammar Slide Show 1

Grammar Slide 2

Field Log:

Reflection:

        This lesson was my first time giving a lecture. I thought it went well. Having a visual aid to help me helped a lot. As I mentioned as a note for future implementation, if I were to do this lesson again-- especially if I were teaching it to lower level students-- I might make guided notes for the students or a graphic organizer for them to fill out. I feel like these notes are very necessary and therefore, I should do all I can to ensure that every student has a detailed copy of these notes.

        In terms of lecturing, I think there are a few other things that I can work on. I think, for the most part, I controlled my volume quite well. I have been working to put more variation into my voice in order to keep student attention. However, I need to keep practicing speaking at a slow and deliberate pace. In addition, I think I should have more times to check for student understanding. I wish I would have had a few example problems on the board for the entire class to do together. While we referred back to problems from the previous assessment, I think having this implementation would have helped me better check for understanding.

        I enjoyed the poetry work. This lesson was given on a Friday, at the end of a rather long week for the students. I feel like the more self-guided work students can do at the end of the week, the better. I also like the fact that the unit is starting off with something independent. I enjoy starting off the units with self-guided learning.

        This class has very few to no behavior problems. The students are, the majority of the time, on task. I feel like this has given me a lot of freedom with group work. I let the students choose their own groups and will continue to do so throughout the unit. The students have always chosen their groups in this class and I think to implement groups on them at this stage would feel like a punishment.

However, were this my own classroom, I would probably place them in groups. I feel like working with a variety of people is very valuable and a skill I want to teach my students. However, because I am only taking over for a short time, I don’t feel entirely comfortable implementing this switch. I do not want to risk potential behavior problems by getting rid of a system to which the students have become accustomed.

B. Day 2

Lesson Plan Title: Fireside Poets, Day 2

Date/Time to be taught: November 18th, 2013.  2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

                

                        

Teachers Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Homework Grading (5 minutes)

Teacher will put answer key to grammar homework on the document camera. After students have traded and graded homework, students will be given the opportunity to ask any questions or clarifications about the homework. AFter work has been graded, teacher will collect to enter into gradebook.

Students will trade papers with an elbow partner. After papers have been graded, students will have an opportunity to see their scores. Students can then ask any clarifying questions.

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

                

                        

Teacher Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Grammar Quiz (15 minutes)

Poetry Discussion (25 minutes)

Teacher will hand out grammar quiz. While students work on quiz, teacher will record the scores from last nights homework into the gradebook, in addition to monitoring quiz.

Teacher will ask students to take out their poetry assignment from the previous night. Teacher will facilitate discussion of each poem-- having a student read each poem aloud, and  multiple students (at least 2 for each question) sharing their interpretation of the poem. Afterwards, at least five students will share their comparing and contrast of all of the poems. Teacher will facilitate and provide feedback for students on their interpretations.

 

This is an open notes quiz. Students are expected to work on their own. However, they are allowed to use any notes or previous worksheets.

Students are expected to participate in class discussion. One student from class will read poem aloud. Then at least two students will share both their literal interpretations and thematic interpretations of them poem. Afterwards, at least five students will share their comparing and contrast of all of the poems. Students will listen to feedback from both teacher and fellow classmates and are encouraged to add corrective notes to the assignment.

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

                

                        

Teacher’s Actions

                

                        

Students Actions

                

Closing Large Group Discussion (2 minutes)

Students will vote on which poem they liked best and why. Afterwards, teacher will collect poetry assignments and inform students of the homework for next class (Walden excerpts)

Students will evaluate the poems, giving solid evidence for which one most artfully rendered the common theme. Students will turn in their poetry assignments for evaluation.

Literacy Connection:

Understanding and being able to identify sentence types is key to understanding the rationale behind correct punctuation. If students can learn this rationale, then the conventions will improve dramatically, especially reducing mistakes involving comma and semicolon placement (the two punctuation pieces that students with which students most often struggle. This knowledge should increase students writing ability across the subject areas.

Being able to understand and assess a text for multiple meanings is a key component for reading. Having students directly address both literal and figurative meanings-- as well as how authors use literary and rhetorical devices in order to render these multiple meanings-- will help students become close readers and have a better understanding of author’s craft.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

Teacher will collect homework, which will provide feedback on whether students are effectively practicing and understanding the skills that were reviewed the previous class. In addition, teacher will grade grammar quizzes and compare them to previous pretest scores. This will assess how much progress is being made on these skills. The poetry assignment will also be collected and graded. During class discussion, teacher can provide immediate feedback to the class on their understanding. Assignments will also be returned back to individuals for feedback.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

-Document Camera

-Text Book: Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience (All unit literature found in Chapter 4: The New England Renaissance, pages 240- 392)

-Grammar Quiz

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

Students are allowed to use all previous notes and handouts on the grammar quiz. While all students are given the same quiz, students who have IEP or 504 plans will be allowed extra time to complete quiz outside of class. In addition, as many students have been absent and this quiz is largely for formative assessment, students can replace or remove their quiz score if they score higher on the unit test on Friday. This ensures that students who have been absent are not unfairly penalized for these absences, however still receive the same formative feedback to help them study.

The poetry activity was originally completed in groups. Students will be encouraged to take notes on how other students analyzed and interpreted the poems. This allows for differentiation as students who are already successful in this skill are modeling to the class the strategies they used to analyze the poem. In addition, each poem will be read out loud before the class begins to analyze it, to appeal to both audio and visual learners.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students in the class sit in rows facing the front. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

Notes From Individual Implementation:

Field Log:

Reflection:

        The quiz took much longer than I had previously anticipated. Had I known it would have taken so long, I may have made the quiz much shorter. However, because so few students turned in their grammar practice homework, I am glad that I have the data from the quiz to tell me if students are comprehending the material. However, I am wondering if I made the quiz a bit too difficult. This is a major decision that I am still debating as a teacher. Should formative assessments be harder than summative assessments? Or should formative assessments gradually get harder until the hardest assessment (the summative assessment) is given? As a teacher, I think I am much more inclined to the former. Especially with these honors students, who care a lot about their grades and for the most part have very solid studying habits. I feel like difficult formative assessments push them into studying more. However, I worry that with lower achieving students than my class, having too difficult of formative assessments might cause them to give up before the summative assessment is even given.

        I am not completely satisfied with the way in which the group discussion went. I feel like students has a very good understanding of the poems-- both literal and figurative. Students could also identify the literary devices in the poem. However, students struggled at connecting the effects of literary devices to the poems thematic meanings. This is not necessarily the standard that I am measuring at this time, so I don’t know how much time to spend on it. However, I think author’s craft is an important literacy skill. While I provided corrective feedback and instruction during the lecture, I feel like there is still more to be done in this area. However, because the scope of my unit is limited, I won’t have a chance to hit on this skill again. If this were my full-time class, I would try to integrate this skill into the next unit (Post-Civil War Literature)-- which is probably a more appropriate time to talk about and assess this skill.

        C. Day 3

Lesson Plan Title: Walden

Date/Time to be taught: November 18th, 2013.  2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

        

The learner will demonstrate the ability to:

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

                

                        

Teachers Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Reading Quiz: Walden (10 minutes)

Teacher will put Walden reading quiz on the document camera. Teacher will read out each question and the multiple choice answers. After each question, teacher will pause to allow students time to think and answer. After the quiz in completed, teacher will collect students’ work.

On a piece of notebook paper, students will answer the follow four multiple choice questions. (Copy of reading quiz in assessments section of quiz)

Students who were absent or were unpleased with the score they receive on this quiz are able to make up the grade by writing a one page summary of Walden to be turned in within two days.

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment        

Teacher Actions

Student Actions

                

Mini-Lecture: Transcendentalists (10 minutes)

Group Work: Walden “Instragram”

Activity (25 minutes)                

Minilecture of Transcendentalists includes:

-Background information of Emerson (the Thinker)

-Background information of Thoreau (the Doer)

-Background Information on Movement (German movement/ Kant, the oversoul, connection between man and nature)

Key terms that students need to define will be placed on the document camera

 

Each group is given an excerpt from Walden (the piece they should have read the night before). While students work on assignment, Teacher will monitor groups. During this time, teacher can hold conferences with students who are still struggling with grammar. Teacher also has time to grade Walden reading quizzes.

Students are expected to take notes on the lecture.

Each group has been given an excerpt from Thoreau’s Walden. The group will do a close reading of the excerpt together doing the follow activity.

1. Each student, on their own piece of paper, will draw a picture of the images that are described in the passage

2. On the back of the paper, students will provide a brief (one to two sentence summary) of the literal summary that their pictures represent

3. Underneath the image, students will write a one to two sentence “rule” for how transcendentalists should live according to the passage.  

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

                

                        

Teacher’s Actions

                

                        

Students Actions

                

Check in (1 minute)

Teacher will gauge how far along students are on their project. Teacher will then inform students how much time they will have next class before they present their project.

Students will accurately gauge how much more time they need to complete their project. Students are expected to bring their projects back to class the next day.

Literacy Connection:

Being able to practice “close reading” is considered one of the key literacy standards for college and career readiness. In this activity, students are given a short, but highly complex, passage. In small groups, students will read passage out loud and analyze it line by line for both literal and figurative meaning. Students are then expected to make connections between their own close reading to their prior knowledge of transcendentalism (notes they take during the mini-lecture at the beginning of class).

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

Reading quiz will assess how closely students read Walden the previous night. Students who are unsatisfied with their score on this formative assessment (or students who were absent) are able to retake this formative assessment by writing a one page summary of the piece.

Students’ Walden presentation will be assessed on four criteria: their literal summary, their thematic summary, their ability to connect their passage to their knowledge of transcendentalism, and the quality of the overall product (rubric provided in section IV of work sample). These criteria will show whether or not students were able to close read their passage for both literal and figurative meaning. Their ability to transfer their interpretation of the text to their knowledge of transcendentalism will provide proof of true understanding.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

-Document Camera

-Text Book: Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience (All unit literature found in Chapter 4: The New England Renaissance, pages 240- 392)

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

While each student completes their own individual assignment, students will work in groups of their choosing for the Walden activity. Due to the fact that my class has very few students with special needs, and have rarely been assigned to groups in the past, I allow them to chose the groups they are working with. However, in my own classroom or with a different group of students, I would most likely assign groups.

While the passages from Walden are all rich with imagery and can provide for great depth with close readings, some are certainly more difficult than others. Students who are struggling in the class or with literacy were given shorter passages and ones that contained less obscure vocabulary.These students then could focus on close reading the passage for depth rather than being overwhelmed by the language. In addition, the assignment itself is extremely graphic and allows students to pictorially represent their understanding. The few sentences of writing will not be graded for conventions, only for understanding.

In addition, while students work, the teacher can conference with and aid individuals and groups that are struggling with either the assignment or with points of confusion for the grammar test coming up on Friday.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students in the class sit in rows facing the front for the lecture. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

During group work, students are encouraged to physically move their desks to that they can face one another. For this activity, students were allowed to chose their own groups to work with.

Notes From Individual Implementation:

Walden Reading Quiz

        

1. Why does Thoreau not buy the Hollowell Place?

A. He does not have enough         money

B. It is two miles away from the village-- too secluded for him.

C. The owner's wife changed         her mind about selling the property

D. There are still major improvements that need to be made to the house

Which suggestion does Thoreau not give as a way to simplify one's life?

A. Count only as high as ones fingers and toes

B. Eat one meal a day instead of three

C. Stop riding the trains and stay at home

D. Don't seek out new clothes or new friends

E. He suggests all of the above

How does Thoreau feel about poverty and why?

A. He encourages poverty as the poor are more humble than the rich and have a greater chance         of getting into heaven.

B. He encourages poverty because the poor lead more independent lives than the rich and are         not distracted by material possessions

C. He does not hate the poor, but feels pity for them as the poor have little access to books,         newspapers, and art.         

D. He distrusts the poor as they are dependent on the town for their well-being and often live by         dishonest means.

Why does Thoreau leave the woods?

A. His mother is ill

B. He is done writing his book

C. He feels his life there has become too routine

D. Hollowell place is back up for sale

Passages from Walden (given to students on cut-up strips of paper)

All that I could say, then, with respect to farming on a large scale- I have always cultivated a garden- was, that I had had my seeds ready. Many think that seeds improve with age. I have no doubt that time discriminates between the good and the bad; and when at last I shall plant, I shall be less likely to be disappointed. But I would say to my fellows, once for all, As long as possible live free and uncommitted. It makes but little difference whether you are committed to a farm or the county jail

To my imagination it retained throughout the day more or less of this auroral character, reminding me of a certain house on a mountain which I had visited a year before. This was an airy and unplastered cabin, fit to entertain a travelling god, and where a goddess might trail her garments. The winds which passed over my dwelling were such as sweep over the ridges of mountains, bearing the broken strains, or celestial parts only, of terrestrial music. The morning wind forever blows, the poem of creation is uninterrupted; but few are the ears that hear it. Olympus is but the outside of the earth everywhere

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practice resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan- like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience, and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion

Still we live meanly, like ants; though the fable tells us that we were long ago changed into men; like pygmies we fight with cranes; it is error upon error, and clout upon clout, and our best virtue has for its occasion a superfluous and evitable wretchedness. Our life is frittered away by detail. An honest man has hardly need to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest. Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!

Men think that it is essential that the Nation have commerce, and export ice, and talk through a telegraph, and ride thirty miles an hour, without a doubt, whether they do or not; but whether we should live like baboons or like men, is a little uncertain. If we do not get out sleepers, and forge rails, and devote days and nights to the work, but go to tinkering upon our lives to improve them, who will build railroads? And if railroads are not built, how shall we get to heaven in season? But if we stay at home and mind our business, who will want railroads? We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us.

Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in. I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom and detect how shallow it is. Its thin current slides away, but eternity remains. I would drink deeper; fish in the sky, whose bottom is pebbly with stars. I cannot count one. I know not the first letter of the alphabet. I have always been regretting that I was not as wise as the day I was born. The intellect is a cleaver; it discerns and rifts its way into the secret of things.

I do not wish to be any more busy with my hands than is necessary. My head is hands and feet. I feel all my best faculties concentrated in it. My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills. I think that the richest vein is somewhere hereabouts; so by the divining-rod and thin rising vapors I judge; and here I will begin to mine.

I had not lived there a week before my feet wore a path from my door to the pond-side; and though it is five or six years since I trod it, it is still quite distinct. It is true, I fear, that others may have fallen into it, and so help ed to keep it open. The surface of the earth is soft and impressible by the feet of men; and so with the paths which the mind travels. How worn and dusty, then, must be the highways of the world, how deep the ruts of tradition and conformity!

The fault-finder will find faults even in paradise. Love your life, poor as it is. You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poorhouse. The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man's abode; the snow melts before its door as early in the spring. I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace. The town's poor seem to me often to live the most independent lives of any. Maybe they are simply great enough to receive without misgiving.

Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. Turn the old; return to them. Things do not change; we change. Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. God will see that you do not want society. If I were confined to a corner of a garret all my days, like a spider, the world would be just as large to me while I had my thoughts about me.

Everyone has heard the story which has gone the rounds of New England, of a strong and beautiful bug which came out of the dry leaf of an old table of apple-tree wood, which had stood in a farmer's kitchen for sixty years, first in Connecticut, and afterward in Massachusetts -- from an egg deposited in the living tree many years earlier still, as appeared by counting the annual layers beyond it; which was heard gnawing out for several weeks, hatched perchance by the heat of an urn. Who does not feel his faith in a resurrection and immortality strengthened by hearing of this? Who knows what beautiful and winged life, whose egg has been buried for ages under many concentric layers of woodenness in the dead dry life of society, deposited at first in the alburnum of the green and living tree, which has been gradually converted into the semblance of its well-seasoned tomb -- heard perchance gnawing out now for years by the astonished family of man, as they sat round the festive board -- may unexpectedly come forth from amidst society's most trivial and handselled furniture, to enjoy its perfect summer life at last!

I do not say that John or Jonathan will realize all this; but such is the character of that morrow which mere lapse of time can never make to dawn. The light which puts out our eyes is darkness to us. Only that day dawns to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star.

Field Log:

Reflection:

        I really liked using this activity for Walden. From their reading quizzes, and from talking with the students, I know that many of them really struggled with this text. I feel like the questions I asked were fair and a student who was reading carefully should (and did) get all of them write. However, I know that the text is very dense. It is a different style of writing than many of the students were used to reading This activity, I feel, does a nice job of breaking the text down so that students can really grasp its meaning. I feel like it is the type of activity that would work for many different types of learners and for many different age groups. While I do not have any ESOL students, I feel like this would be a great activity for their needs as well, as it allows students to demonstrate understanding pictorially, rather than with words. So far, I also feel that this activity is where I have done the best with differentiation.

        I also like that having students do so much work in groups has allowed me a lot of time to conference with individual students about where they are struggling with grammar. I feel like the students who are scoring very poorly on the pretests and formative assessments are not the types of students who can or would come in for extra help after school or during lunch. I am glad I have this time to work with these students and with small groups. I feel like building in time to have these conferences will be integral to my future teaching.

        One thing I need to work on as a teacher is managing students during transitions. Several students were much more resistant to group work than I had anticipated. Before I handed out the slips for Walden, I should have double-checked that every student was placed in an appropriately sized group. These students have never been placed in groups and I feel like placing them in groups now would be viewed as a punishment. However, in my own classroom, I would probably assign groups for almost all group work. This is partially because I think it would be easier on me from a management standpoint. Mostly, however, because I think it is very important to the classroom community that students have the opportunity to work with many different people from the class.

        D. Day Four

Lesson Plan Title: Walden Presentations

Date/Time to be taught: November 19th, 2013.  2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

                

                        

Teachers Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Return and Debrief Grammar Quiz (5 minutes)

Return graded grammar quizzes to students. Due to students still struggling, several online practice games have been put on the class website. Show students how to access these games and which games address which skills.

Students are expected to assess what grammar skills they still need to work on based on what questions they missed on the quiz.

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

                

                        

Teacher Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Student Presentations:

Walden (40 minutes-

approximately 3 per group)

Teacher will facilitate presentations. This includes:

1. Making sure that every group has a chance to present.

2. Asking follow up questions after the group has presented to make sure that they and everyone in the class has a complete understanding of the passage.

3. Collecting individual assignments after each group has presented

Students will be given five minutes with their groups to organize themselves before the presentations begin.

During the presentations, students are expected to:

1. Show where in the text their passage comes from

2. Read their passage aloud to the class

3. Share at least one group members pictorial representation of the text.

4. Summarize the groups close reading of the text

5. Share the “rule” for what the text says about how to be a transcendentalist

While others are presenting students are expected:

1. Follow along in the text while students are reading

2. Take notes on the meaning of the passage and how it relates to transcendentalism

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

                

                        

Teacher’s Actions

                

                        

Students Actions

                

Note Summary (3 minutes)

Teacher will instruct students to write a three to five sentence summary of transcendentalism based on the presentation notes they have takes.

Teacher will inform class of nights homework: Read Civil Disobedience.

Students will write a three to five sentence summary for the notes they have taken.

Literacy Connection:

Being able to practice “close reading” is considered one of the key literacy standards for college and career readiness. In this activity, students are given a short, but highly complex, passage. In small groups, students will read passage out loud and analyze it line by line for both literal and figurative meaning. Students are then expected to make connections between their own close reading to their prior knowledge of transcendentalism (notes they take during the mini-lecture at the beginning of class).

In addition, students will see close reading modelled by other students and be given verbal feedback on their interpretations from the teacher. They will also be required to take notes during other students’ presentations, practising listening skills. Afterwards, they will be expected to summarize these notes, showing understanding of important themes that were persistent throughout all twelve presentations.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

Students’ Walden presentation will be assessed on four criteria: their literal summary, their thematic summary, their ability to connect their passage to their knowledge of transcendentalism, and the quality of the overall product (rubric provided in section IV of work sample). These criteria will show whether or not students were able to close read their passage for both literal and figurative meaning. Their ability to transfer their interpretation of the text to their knowledge of transcendentalism will provide proof of true understanding.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

-Document Camera

-Text Book: Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience (All unit literature found in Chapter 4: The New England Renaissance, pages 240- 392)

-Class Website

-Grammar Activities put on class website

http://www.funbrain.com/grammar/

http://www.csus.edu/owl/index/sent/clause_quiz.htm

http://eslbee.com/cgi-bin/quiztest.cgi?simplecompoundorcomplex

http://eslbee.com/cgi-bin/quiztest.cgi?helenkeller

http://eslbee.com/cgi-bin/quiztest.cgi?shadrach

http://www.quia.com/rr/126726.html

http://www.glencoe.com/sec/writerschoice/scQuizzes/wcgpQuizGrade9.shtml?EXERCISE=7&BOOK=002&LINKURL=http://www.glencoe.com/sec/writerschoice/gp/hslessons/grade9/index.shtml

http://www.education.com/study-help/article/combining-sentences_answer/

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

While the passages from Walden are all rich with imagery and can provide for great depth with close readings, some are certainly more difficult than others. Students who are struggling in the class or with literacy were given shorter passages and ones that contained less obscure vocabulary.These students then could focus on close reading the passage for depth rather than being overwhelmed by the language. In addition, the assignment itself is extremely graphic and allows students to pictorially represent their understanding. The few sentences of writing will not be graded for conventions, only for understanding. In addition, during this time students can demonstrate their understanding of the text orally and be given immediate feedback. Based on this feedback, students will have a chance to change or alter their individual work before it is turned in.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students in the class sit in rows facing the front. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

Notes From Individual Implementation:

Field Log:

Reflection:

Even though these presentations took a lot longer than expected, I feel like they are really helping students better understand Walden. Before the unit began, my supervising teacher and I debated whether we would put works by Emerson first or works by Thoreau. Traditionally, she has put Emerson’s work in first as he wrote them first and Thoreau was merely following his philosophy. However, even though the passages from Emerson are shorter, I feel like they are much more complex than Walden. During our group discussions about Walden, we have been able to also discuss very complex concepts like the over-soul and self-reliance. I feel like having this philosophical background before they begin will really help students understanding when they tackle Emerson next week.

One thing that I feel like I improved on as these lessons went on was giving feedback. Most of my feedback for these presentations came in the form of questions, asking students to dig a little deeper into the text they were presenting. I was very worried about giving feedback before this presentations started. However, I like doing it in the form of questions because it does not necessarily mean that the group has done good or bad-- it merely indicates the direction that the group should be taking. I feel like this works as a model for the type of questions students should be asking while they are close reading. This is a skill we will work on more as the unit continues.

        E. Day 5

Lesson Plan Title: Final Grammar Review and Civil Disobedience

Date/Time to be taught: November 21st, 2013.  2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

                

                        

Teachers Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Finish Walden Presentations (6 minutes)

Teacher will ask how many group still need to go for their Walden presentations. Based on the number, teacher will assign which order the groups go in. After students present, teacher will provide questing feedback and then collect student work.

During the presentations, students are expected to:

1. Show where in the text their passage comes from

2. Read their passage aloud to the class

3. Share at least one group members pictorial representation of the text.

4. Summarize the groups close reading of the text

5. Share the “rule” for what the text says about how to be a transcendentalist

While others are presenting students are expected:

1. Follow along in the text while students are reading

2. Take notes on the meaning of the passage and how it relates to transcendentalism

                

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

                

                        

Teacher Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Student Presentations: Summary (4 minutes)

 Grammar Activity

(10 minutes)

Group Discussion:

Civil Disobedience (25 minutes)

Teacher will instruct students to write a three to five sentence summary of transcendentalism based on the presentation notes they have takes.

While students write summary, teacher will hand out grammar activity and sticky notes to students.

Teacher will grade papers while students complete grammar worksheet. After majority of students have completed worksheet, teacher will put answer key document camera. After students have graded themselves, teacher will provide explanation to any questions students have about either worksheets or the test tomorrow.

Teacher will read each paragraph of “Civil Disobedience” aloud to class. After each paragraph, teacher will demonstrate will a sticky note a question that could be asked of the text. After each paragraph/ question, teacher will facilitate a small group discussion of the text.

Example questions for sticky notes:

1. Can we trust the populace to make important decisions concerning democracy?

2. What connotations does the word expedient have in Thoreau’s definition of the ideal government?

3. What does Thoreau’s analogy to the wooden gun mean?

4. Under the philosophy of transcendentalism, is government necessary?

Students will write a three to five sentence summary for the notes they have taken.

Students will do grammar worksheet on their own. Once they have finished, they will use the answer key provided in order to grade themselves. After they are finished, they will ask for any necessary clarifications on problems they have missed and still don’t understand.

Students are expected to follow along in their own books while the teacher reads.

Occasionally, after a particularly difficult sentence or section, students will be asked to paraphrase or summarize what was just read to the class.

After each active reading question is modeled, students are expected to participate in class discussion.

If there is time, students will begin to have the opportunity to ask their own active reading questions.

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

Teacher’s Actions                

Students Actions

                

Homework (2 minutes)

Teacher will review students homework verbally (it is also written on the board).

1. Study for Grammar Test Tomorrow

2. Reread Civil Disobedience and, using the four sticky notes provided, ask questions of the text.

Students are expected to write down in a planner or notebooks their assignments for the night.

Literacy Connection:

During the notetaking activity, students will work on effectively and concisely summarize a text. During the presentation, they also worked on active listening skills. During this time, as part of feedback, students were asked questions that they needed to refer back to the text and their close reading of the text to answer.

Questioning the text is an important literacy skill. It both promotes close reading of the text as well as being critical of author’s craft and the authors point of view. During the class discussion, I will demonstrate active reading of the text and, using sticky notes and the document camera, model questioning the text as a method of active reading. Students, as their homework assignment, will be ask to come up with their own active reading questions that will be used in a class discussion on the Monday after Thanksgiving break.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

Students’ Walden presentation will be assessed on four criteria: their literal summary, their thematic summary, their ability to connect their passage to their knowledge of transcendentalism, and the quality of the overall product (rubric provided in section IV of work sample). These criteria will show whether or not students were able to close read their passage for both literal and figurative meaning. Their ability to transfer their interpretation of the text to their knowledge of transcendentalism will provide proof of true understanding.

Students will not turn in their final grammar worksheet for a grade because the test is on the next day. However, students will be provided with the answer key, giving them immediate feedback on how they are performing. After school, my supervising teacher and I will be holding a short study session for students who are still struggling with grammar.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

-Document Camera

-Text Book: Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience (All unit literature found in Chapter 4: The New England Renaissance, pages 240- 392)

-Approximately 150 sticky notes (4 per student)

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

Walden: While the passages from Walden are all rich with imagery and can provide for great depth with close readings, some are certainly more difficult than others. Students who are struggling in the class or with literacy were given shorter passages and ones that contained less obscure vocabulary.These students then could focus on close reading the passage for depth rather than being overwhelmed by the language. In addition, the assignment itself is extremely graphic and allows students to pictorially represent their understanding. The few sentences of writing will not be graded for conventions, only for understanding. In addition, during this time students can demonstrate their understanding of the text orally and be given immediate feedback. Based on this feedback, students will have a chance to change or alter their individual work before it is turned in.

Grammar: Students who are still struggling can come in for a study session after school.

Civil Disobedience: Students have already read this piece once for homework. During this time, I will read it aloud again and explicitly model for the student an active reading activity that should improve their understanding of the text. Students participated in an ungraded class discussion of the text. They will read the text again over the break. Hopefully, this extensive preparation will help all students be prepared for the graded discussion on the piece we will have after their Thanksgiving Break.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students in the class sit in rows facing the front. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

Notes From Individual Implementation:

Field Log:

Reflection:

        Again, I am finding time management to be one of my major issues as a teacher. Because we didn’t finish the Walden presentations last class, we had to begin with them this class. This ate away at our time to do grammar prep and to discuss “Civil Disobedience”. While I agree with my mentor teacher’s philosophy that grammar should not be isolated into its own unit, I am finding it difficult and time consuming to put into every lesson. The activity itself is fine, but the transition from grammar to the literature activity takes so much time. After the break, I will ease up on grammar practice as their summative assessment will be over. However, I feel that in my own classroom, I would consider devoting an entire day to grammar each week, rather than a 15 minute activity at the beginning of the period.

        Our classes discussion on “Civil Disobedience” went very well. I am impressed by how engaged so many students are with current events. Students seem to have a lot of opinions, which makes me very excited for our discussion on next Monday about current events. I always worry that I am putting too much of my own opinions into discussion, but I feel like most of this group of students feels completely comfortable in disagreeing with me. I am very glad that I have developed this rapport with them as lessening the power dynamic between student and teacher is an important part of my teaching philosophy.

        Only a few students showed up to the study session after school, which worries me a bit. The students who showed up were not necessarily the students that I hoped would show up. The students that ended up coming were students who want to move from B+s to As and not students who are failing and on the verge of failing. It makes me question the effectiveness of study sessions. However, I feel like it is necessary to provide students with this access to you. Were I to do a session (it was my mentor teacher running it), I might consider doing one at lunch as well, so students who have after school activities or take the bus could participate as well.

        F.Day 6

Lesson Plan Title: Summative Grammar Test

Date/Time to be taught:

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

Teachers Actions

Student Actions

                

Grammar Test Prep

(5 minutes)

Teacher will give students a few minutes to ask any last minute questions. Teacher will hand out scantron and go over test instructions with students. Teacher will hand out test.

Students are expected to clear desk of any materials, electronic devices, and food. The only thing aloud on desk are the test, a drink, and supplies needed for test (scantron and number 2 pencil).         

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

                

                        

Teacher Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Grammar Test

(40 minutes)

During this time, teacher will monitor room, grade papers, and answer any questions students have on test.

Students will take test with number two pencil. After completing test, students will turn it in at the front of the room. After test is over, student will work quietly on other homework or read silently until everyone has turned in the test.

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

                

                        

Teacher’s Actions

                

                        

Students Actions

                

Post Test

(1 minute)

Will remind students of homework over Thanksgiving Break (to read Civil Disobedience and come up with active reading questions).

Students will write down reminder of homework assignment in notebook or planner.

Literacy Connection:

Understanding and being able to identify sentence types is key to understanding the rationale behind correct punctuation. If students can learn this rationale, then the conventions will improve dramatically, especially reducing mistakes involving comma and semicolon placement (the two punctuation pieces that students with which students most often struggle. This knowledge should increase students writing ability across the subject areas.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

This test, provided by the English department of Sprague, is taken by all students in Honors American Literature (3 sections of students) as well as students in the upper-level Humanities block (1 section of students). Students in English 11 will also take a similar assessment. This test will act as a summative assessment for the students grammatical knowledge and abilities for the semester.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

32 scantron sheets

Scantron Scoring Machine

Summative Grammar Test (copy included in Section IV of this work sample)

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

Several students who have an IEP or a 504 plan will be allowed an extra 50% of time (20 minutes) to take the test if needed. These students will have to arrange this time outside of class either at lunch or after school.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students sit in rows facing the front of the room. Before all tests are given out, students must have all electronic devices turned off and stored away. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

Notes From Individual Implimentation:

Field Log:

Reflection:

        While it was nice to have this summative assessment provided for me, I would have like to have had the experience of writing my own summative evaluation. However, as it is the school’s policy to provide a standard assessment across the grade level, I am sure I will come across this same challenge in many different schools.

        While I thought the majority of the test seemed very solid, I would have like more questions where students applied their knowledge of sentence type and structure to fixing conventions. I think they will focus on this more next semester, but I wonder if being able to tell the difference between sentence types is truly an undering understanding. However, I think knowing the theory behind conventions will help students in the future. Students did well on my pre-assessment at correctly punctuating sentences, however they did not know the theory behind it. I feel like conventions are done by instinct 90% of the time and having this knowledge of the theory behind sentence structure will help students with the trip-ups of the other 10%.

        One performance assessment that my mentor teacher does with her students to test this skill in their own writing is after having written an essay, she asks them to label one of each sentence type. While she grades for conventions for the entirety of the essay, I feel like drawing students attention to the fact that they are both producers and consumers of grammar is important.

        

        

G. Day Seven

Lesson Plan Title: “Civil Disobedience” Day 2

Date/Time to be taught: December 2nd, 2013.  2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

Teachers Actions

Student Actions

                

“Civil Disobedience” Review (5 minutes)

Teacher will ask students to get out the notes they had from the previous discussion on Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience”

Using the document camera, teacher will put up quick-write prompt: How did Thoreau define Civil Disobedience?

After allowing students approximately 3 minutes to write, teacher will call on several students for their definition. Teacher will give verbal feedback on these definitions.

Students will get out notes from previous class discussion.

Students will write for 3 minutes using their notes as aid for the review question.

Students who feel confident in their knowledge will be given a chance to share their definition. Student who feel less confident can take notes on other students answers                 

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment        

Teacher Actions

Student Actions                

Active Reading Assignment (15 minutes)

Philosophical Chairs (20 minutes)

Teacher will hand out copies of the article “How the Legal System Failed Aaron Swartz-- and Us.”

On the document camera, teacher will model the active reading strategy (making connections) using the first paragraph of the essay.

About 10 minutes into the reading (as most students will be finishing up, teacher will put a question on the document camera for students to reflect on and possibly write about while they wait.

Question: Was Aaron Swartz a cybercriminal or was he being civilly disobedient?

Teacher will instruct students to take out their copies of Civil Disobedience and the article they just read.

Teacher will ask which students who believe Schwartz was a criminal. These students will stand on the left side of the room. Students who believe Schwartz was just being civilly disobedient will stand on the right side of the room.

Before debate begins, teacher will model, both verbally and written on the board, how to phrase an antithesis statement.

“Even though student A argued___(antithesis support)____, I believe that _(thesis support)____ is true because _(evidence from text)_.

Teacher will moderate philosophical chairs, making sure each side is following the ground rules and doing all of the following things:

1. Summarizing opponents arguments

2. Using transitional phrases in order to bring up own argument

3. Grounded the discussion in the text.

Students will receive copy of article and watch active reading strategy of making connections modeled on the document camera.

On their own essays, students will underline and write about connections between Schwartz piece and Thoreau’s essay.

After students have finished reading, they can take a few minutes to reflect in writing about the question on the document camera.

Students will stand on the side of the room that they wish to argue for the debate.

Students will have three minutes prior to the debate to come up with a list of points that they wish to bring up during the debate.

During the debate, students will raise their hands to talk.

Before they say their own point, they must first summarize what they last person said and then use a transition phrase in order to provide a counterpoint.

All comments and arguments have to refer back to one of the texts on transcendentalism.  

During the debate, when students are not talking, they are expected to take notes about what other students are saying.

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

Teacher’s Actions                

Students Actions

                

Freewrite (5 minutes)

Teacher will put up freewrite question on the document camera as well as verbally read it.

After students are done writing, teacher will collect students writing from the day.

Students will write about the following prompt:

What was the best argument your opponents side had?

What was the best argument your side had?

Take these two arguments and put them into a thesis/antithesis sentence, using transitions from worksheet.

Literacy Connection:

On the Smarter Balance test that students will be given next year, students will be asked to write a synthesis paper. In this paper, they will be required to gather evidence from multiple texts in order to write a persuasive piece.

The rubric provided by the Oregon Department of Education for these synthesis papers shows that they only way that a student will receive an exceeding score on these pieces is if they are able to acknowledge evidence for opposing viewpoints. Many students struggle with this ability-- both recognizing that arguments in opposition to their own have some validity and using transitional phrases in order to convey opposition that does not automatically dismiss the opposing side.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

Throughout the class, teacher will be able to assess for understanding of both the text (as well as sentence frames to discuss the text) during the debate. Teacher can provide corrective feedback as necessary.

Students will turn in notes from debate to prove their adequate participation in listening.

Sentence frames turned in at the end of class show that students was able to synthesize multiple view points and properly write an antithesis paragraph. Teacher will be able to give any intervention to students who struggle with either the content or frame of sentences before they write antithesis papers next week.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

-Document Camera

-Text Book: Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience (All unit literature found in Chapter 4: The New England Renaissance, pages 240- 392-- “Civil Disobedience” on page 296)

-35 copies (class set) of ”How the Legal System Failed Aaron Schwartz-- and Us” From the NewYorker, 2013.

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

Before class, I talked with my deaf students and students on behavioral IEPs, all of whom are allowed to ask for alternative assignments for presentations I explained to them what would happen during the debate. None of my students opted out of the assignment. Had they, I had an alternative assignment prepared where they could participate by practicing listening skills-- taking notes on presented evidence from other students and then generating this evidence into an antithesis statement.

Students have already read “Civil Disobedience” twice for homework-- once for homework and once aloud as a class where I explicitly modeled for the student an active reading activity that should improve their understanding of the text I modeled the same margin notes activity for students while reading the Schwartz piece.

Students will also have the added scaffolding of working in groups when collecting evidence for the debate.

Using the gradual release model, students will learn to properly form an antithesis sentence-- one that recognizes opposition while still taking an evidence based position. First, the teacher will demonstrate the sentence frame both verbally and in writing. Then, in the debate, students will respond to one another verbally. Lastly, students will write an antithesis sentence on their own as their exit card.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

During the Lecture: Students in the class sit in rows facing the front. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit in the front of the left side of the room.

During Philosophical Chairs: 

Students will stand on opposing sides of the room. Interpreters will stand at the middle, facing deaf students.

Before start of debate, I will go over classroom rules and expectations for group discussion again. I will remind the class that even though we are using a different format for the discussion and they will be standing instead of sitting, the same rules still apply.

Notes From Individual Implementation:

Field Log:

Reflection:

 

        I think this lesson was very successful in reaching my objectives. I think that it was a great way to introduce the antithesis aspect of synthesis. I am very pleased with the way in which the students performed during the debate. I didn’t anticipate how much of a struggle it would be to fit their thoughts into the correct sentence frame. Performing the antithesis using the proper transitions is actually a very difficult task. I felt like the whole class really rose to the challenge. I saw it done right on 95% of the exit cards. This makes me feel very confident going into next week when the students will write their antithesis paper.

I thought the lesson connected well. Again, if I were to do this next time, I would definitely preassign the groups. I think students would have benefitted from automatically having to look at the issue from an opposing side. However, I made the adjustments as necessary. Once the debate began, I think most students adjusted well to the necessary realignment of sides.

Honestly, I am most pleased that this was a topic we got to talk about. I think that students, sadly, very rarely get to talk about current events that really matter to them. Based on the passion I saw in the room from the debate, I know that this is an issue many students care about. As all of the are 17 and will begin voting next year, I am excited that topics like this can keep them civically engaged.

One thing I need to improve on is my own modeling of active reading. I think I needed to emphasize the connections activity much more closely. I wish I would have had more time for this activity. However, with the coverage that is necessary for the post assessment that is coming up, I am just running out of time.

        H. Day Eight

Lesson Plan Title: “Nature”

Date/Time to be taught: December 3nd, 2013.  2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

Teachers Actions

Student Actions        

Quotations Mini-Quiz:

 (10 Minutes)

Teacher will put up quotation on the document camera. Teacher will instruct students to silent answer:

1. Author

2. Title

3. Romantic sub-category

After about two minutes, teacher will ask students to call out the answers to all three.

Class will repeat this process with 4 different quotes from different pieces.

Students will silently read the quotation and then think of answers for quotations 1-3.

Once teacher calls for answers, students will shout out answers to all three questions.

Based on their ability to answer, students will assess what and how much they need to study for the Romantic Unit test coming up in a few classes.                 

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

Teacher Actions

Student Actions

                

Active Reading: Nature (15 minutes)

Group Discussion:

Nature (10 minutes)

Teacher will introduce “Nature” active reading activity.

While students read the text and complete assignment, teacher will pass back papers and Grammar Unit test.

After students have finished reading and group discussion, they will put lingering questions on sticky notes.

Teacher will read questions out loud to class. Class will have a group discussion, facilitated by teacher, in order to answer these lingering questions.

Students will read “Nature”

After each paragraph, students will write a two sentence summary and a question about the paragraph.

After they have finished reading, students will work in groups of 4 to write a summary paragraph for the piece.

After groups have finished writing summary, class will have discussion about any questions of difficult passages students encountered in the piece.

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment        

Teacher’s Actions

Students Actions

                

Introduce: Annotated Bibliography 

(5 minutes)

Teacher will introduce annotated bibliography assignment.

For each piece students have read for the unit (listed on assignment), students will choose 1-2 quintessential passages. They will summarize these pieces and put them into context-- explaining why they are important to the overall meaning of the piece.

Students will review annotated bibliography assignment and ask any questions they have.

Students will make note of assignment and due date in their notebook/ planner.

Literacy Connection:

Making concise summaries and learning how to question a text are two key strategies of active reading. In addition, being able to monitor one’s own reading in order to address points of confusion is a key skill for college and career readiness. Practicing these metacognitive skills for active reading helps improve the students literacy skills across the content area.

In addition, the note taking form offered by the annotated bibliography assignment works to teach effective study habits for acquiring content knowledge. This very text based note taking from will prove useful for students as they move into more content-based, and less skills-based, assessments-- as many will do when they enter college.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

Students will be able to use the quotations mini-quiz as an assessment of their own learning. It allows them to be self-reflective on how prepared they are for the unit test that will be given next week. In addition, the ability of the class to answer these questions will let the teacher know how much review will be necessary before the test next week.

Students will turn in their notes on their active reading of “Nature.” This will allow teacher to assess their ability to summarize the text and should give a relatively good picture of how closely students are reading the text. However, their questions that they ask during the group discussion will most likely prove very telling as a class assessment for the teacher. Teacher will be able to address how closely students are both reading the text and connecting it to the prior knowledge of Transcendentalism based on what types of questions are discussed in class.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

-Document Camera

-Text Book: Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience (All unit literature found in Chapter 4: The New England Renaissance, pages 240- 392)

-Annotated Bibliography Assignment (Attached)

-Quotations Mini-Quiz (Attached)

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

While all students are given the same assignment, students who have IEP or 504 plans will be allowed extra time to complete the assignment outside of class. However, students will have the opportunity to discuss in groups before both the large group discussion and before turning in the assignment. This allows for differentiation as students who are already successful in this skill are modeling to the class the strategies they used to analyze the poem.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students in the class sit in rows facing the front. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

Notes on Implementation.:

For Quotations MiniQuiz

“Devil and Tom Walker”-- Washington Irving

“He was not prone to let his wife into his confidence; but as this was an uneasy secret, he willingly shared it with her. All her avarice was awakened at the mention of hidden gold, and she urged her husband to comply with the black man's terms and secure what would make them wealthy for life.”

William Cullen Bryant

“To A Water Fowl”

Vainly the fowler's eye

Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong,

As, darkly painted on the crimson sky,

Thy figure floats along.

“Thanatopsis”

Earth, that nourish'd thee, shall claim         

Thy growth, to be resolved to earth again,         

And, lost each human trace, surrendering up         

Thine individual being, shalt thou go         

To mix for ever with the elements,         

To be a brother to the insensible rock,         

And to the sluggish clod, which the rude swain                  

Turns with his share, and treads upon. The oak                  

Shall send his roots abroad, and pierce thy         mould.         

        

        

Edgar Allan Poe

        

        

“Fall of the House of Usher”

Our glances, however, rested not long upon the dead --for we could not regard her unawed. The disease which had thus entombed the lady in the maturity of youth, had left, as usual in all maladies of a strictly cataleptical character, the mockery of a faint blush upon the bosom and the face, and that suspiciously lingering smile upon the lip which is so terrible in death         

        

        

“The Raven”

        

Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil!

By that Heaven that bends above us - by that God we both adore -

Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,

It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore -

Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels name Lenore?'         

        

Emerson         

        

“Nature”

In the wilderness, I find something more dear and connate than in streets or villages. In the tranquil landscape, and especially in the distant line of the horizon, man beholds somewhat as beautiful as his own nature.

        

“Self-Reliance”

        

Society is a joint-stock company, in which the members agree, for the better         securing of his bread to each shareholder, to surrender the liberty         and culture of the eater. The virtue in most request is conformity.         Self-reliance is its aversion. It loves not realities and creators, but names and customs.                  

        

        

Henry David Thoreau

        

“Walden”        

Still we live meanly, like ants; though the fable tells us that we were long ago changed into men; like pygmies         we fight with cranes; it is error upon error, and clout upon clout,         and our best virtue has for its occasion a superfluous and evitable wretchedness. Our life is frittered away by detail.         

        

        

“Civil Disobedience”         

                 

This American government — what is it but a tradition, though a recent one, endeavoring to transmit itself         unimpaired to posterity, but each instant losing some of its         integrity? It has not the vitality and force of a single living man;         for a single man can bend it to his will. It is a sort of wooden gun         to the people themselves.         

        

Nathaniel Hawethorne

        

“The Minister's Black Veil”

        

“There had been feverish turns, which tossed him from side to side, and wore away what little strength he had. But in his most convulsive struggles, and in the wildest vagaries of his intellect, when no other thought retained its sober influence,         he still showed an awful solicitude lest the black veil should slip aside.”

        

        

Longfellow

        

“Psalm of Life”

                

Life is real ! Life is earnest!

And the grave is not its goal ;

Dust thou art, to dust returnest,

Was not spoken of the soul.         

        

        

“The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls”

        

The tide rises, the tide falls,

The twilight darkens, the curlew calls;

Along the sea-sands damp and brown

The traveller hastens toward the town,

And the tide rises, the tide falls.

Oliver Wendell Holmes

Thanks for the heavenly message brought by thee,

Child of the wandering sea,

Cast from her lap, forlorn!

From thy dead lips a clearer note is born

Than ever Triton blew from wreathèd horn!

James Russel Lowell

“The First Snowfall”

Thanks for the heavenly message brought by thee,

Child of the wandering sea,

Cast from her lap, forlorn!

From thy dead lips a clearer note is born

Than ever Triton blew from wreathèd horn!

Field Log:

Reflection:

While I think my students met the objectives that I wanted them to meet today, this is probably the lesson I am least satisfied with. I feel like “Nature,” while an important piece to the Transcendentalism movement, is not the most inspiring for students today. I felt like we were just getting through it. I would have much prefered to spend another day on “Civil Disobedience,” which I think was much more engaging for the students. However, because of the common assessment set out by my PLC, I know that there are going to be quite a few questions on Emerson, so I feel like I need more time to cover him.

One thing I wish I would have done better was assess my students background knowledge on this subject before beginning our discussion. We were able to do this a bit during our large group discussions on points of clarification-- where I was able to give students a bit of information of the history of man’s relationship with nature-- however as this is one of the essential question I have set out to have students explore I feel like I need to spend a bit more time having students reflect on their own experiences with nature.

One thing I am debating about quite a bit would be when the best time to give the annotated bibliography assignment. My mentor teacher said give it near the end of the unit so that students would be forced to do and therefore study. However, it is a huge assignment and I feel students are going to be overwhelmed and therefore do it poorly. It is a conundrum for me. In some ways, I wish it were itself a performance assessment-- and that students could use it to prove their knowledge rather than taking the text.

I. Day Nine

Lesson Plan Title: Self-Reliance (Small Group Day)

Date/Time to be taught: December 4, 2013. 2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

Teachers Actions

Student Actions

                

Review of Nature (5 minutes)

Teacher will ask students what they remember about “Nature”-- Emerson’s essay that we read yesterday. Key concepts to make sure students understand: the Over-Soul, Transcendentalist Club , Emerson the thinker vs. Thoreau the doer                

Students will be reviewing their notes from yesterday and answering review questions about “Nature”                

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

                

                        

Teacher Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Self-Reliance Activity (30 minutes)

Teacher will pass out excerpts from Emerson’s “Self-Reliance”. Teacher will give students instructions for how to do the activity.

Key things to make sure students understand about the instructions:

The difference between summarizing and paraphrasing (Make sure that students know they are supposed to be explaining the quotations, not condensing them).

Verbally model what students should be writing down with the first passage

Tomorrow students will have some work time, but will be presenting their understandings of the quotations to the class.

While students are working in small groups, teacher is walking around monitoring groups. Teacher also can use the opportunity to pass back work and conference with students who are struggling.

Students will be paraphrasing excerpts from Emerson’s “Self-Reliance” on their own or in small groups of their choice. There are 12 excerpts total. Students will have 30 minutes today and 15 minutes tomorrow to complete the assignment.

Students will also be receiving feedback from prior assignments at this time. This gives students opportunity to consult teacher on the feedback they received.  

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

                

                        

Teacher’s Actions

                

                        

Students Actions

                

Annotated Bibliography/ Check-in (5 minutes)

Teacher will check-in with students about the “Self-Reliance” paraphrasing. Students will be informed that they only have 15 minutes to finish tomorrow, so they need to do work outside of class if they are behind.

Hand out the Annotated Bibliography assignment. Go over it with the students.

Key points to hit:

-Where in the book they can find explanations of the groupings

-How students should choose quintessential quotations (not just randomly, explain context and why they are important to the piece)

-Go over example

-Due date: 12/16 (day of Unit test)

Students should self-assess how much more time they need to finish the activity. Based on this assessment, students should decide whether or not they will do work at home.

Students should listen to the explanation of the annotated bibliography assignment. They should ask questions where necessary and write down the due date (and date of unit test) in their planner or notebook.

Literacy Connection:

Being able to practice “close reading” is considered one of the key literacy standards for college and career readiness. In this activity, students are given a short, but highly complex, passages. In small groups, students will read passage out loud and analyze it line by line for how the figurative language works to convey literal meanings. Students will also be able to use this new information to connect to and enhance their prior knowledge of Transcendentalism, based on previous pieces they have read by Emerson and Thoreau.

In addition, students will see close reading modelled by other students and be given verbal feedback on their interpretations from the teacher. They will also be required to take notes during other students’ presentations, practising listening skills. Afterwards, they will be expected to summarize these notes, showing understanding of important themes that were persistent throughout all twelve presentations.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

This lesson is extremely self-directed, therefore students will be able to consult with teacher on parts of the passage they don’t understand. In addition, they will be presenting in groups different from the ones they worked in. They will have approximately five minutes during their presentation preparation time to receive feedback from other students on the single passage. In addition, they will hear all of the other groups present, as well as feedback from the teacher about how effectively each group paraphrased the quotation. After the presentations are done (students are allowed to make any necessary changes during presentations), teacher will collect excerpts. They will be graded for completion credit as students need materials back to study for unit test.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

Document Camera

35 copies of Self-Reliance Excerpts

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

Using the gradual release model, students first see the teacher demonstrate how to do the work and then do the work in groups. Then the will work in other groups to get clarification and different perspective on the quotations. Over time, this scaffolding will be removed and students will be able to perform these skills on their own. Students are allowed to work in groups or on their own. While encouraged to work in groups, several students chose to work alone because of learning style.

Very few students in this particular class are on IEPs or have special needs. They tend to work better if they are allowed to chose their own groups. However, in another class I would probably assign the groupings.

In addition, because I will be assigning groups for the presentations, I can be conscientious about which students will be responsible for which quotations. While all quotations are rich in detail and imagery, some are more difficult than others. I can make sure that the more challenging quotes go to students who can handle their difficulty.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students in the class sit in rows facing the front for the lecture. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

During group work, students are encouraged to physically move their desks to that they can face one another. For this activity, students were allowed to chose their own groups to work with. During the presentations, students will be assigned groups.

Notes From Individual Implimentation:

Field Log:

Reflection:

        Today it is very hard to tell whether or not I have met my objective. I think my students are doing very well in their paraphrasing. One thing that is very difficult is that both students who are doing very well at the assignment and students who are doing poorly both take a very long time to do it. I was hoping that students would be mostly done with this assignment so that we could pretty much fully focus on presentations tomorrow.

However, some students have only completed five or six of the quotations. This isn’t because they are off-task. In fact, I feel like some students are going so indepth with their close reading that they legitimately could take the entire class on one to two quotations. I want to encourage this type of close reading and it is very difficult for me to tell students that they are going to in depth and that they should pull back. However, I think at some point we just need to get through the material.

        On the other hand you have students who have been off-task the entire class period and that is why they are only 3-4 questions in. It is quite easy to tell these students apart, however, I am wondering if I should have put strict time limits or broken down the assignment more. Perhaps given each group 10 minutes per quotation and then done the quotations one by one. I feel like maybe with more structure, our class time would be used a bit more productively.

        J. Day 10

Lesson Plan Title: Self-Reliance (Presentation Day)

Date/Time to be taught: December 5, 2013. 2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

Teachers Actions

Student Actions        

Check-in (2 minutes)

Teacher will tell students how much time they need to complete the assignment (15 minutes).         

Students will get out excerpt sheets and their explanations from the previous day        

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

                

                        

Teacher Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Student Work (15 minutes)

Presentation Prep (5 minutes)

Presentations (20 minutes-- 1-2 minutes each)

Teacher will first check in with any students who were absent the previous day and give them the assignments from the day before. These students can work together on one quotations (since they won’t be able to complete all 12).

Teacher will monitor students behavior as well as be available to help students who are struggling with the work.

Teacher will assign groups for presentation (alphabetically from class list) and assign each group a passage.

Teacher will monitor groups for when they are ready to present.

Teacher will facilitate student presentations. Teacher will provide feedback to class if any explanations lack clarity or completeness.

Students will be finishing paraphrasing the excerpts from “Self-Reliance” on their own or in small groups.

Any students who finish work early can get a head start on their homework for the night “The Minister's Black Veil”

Students will compare in groups what their paraphrased passage means.

Students will come to a consensus about what explanation to present (can be combination of two).

While students are presenting, one student will read their groups explanation to the class.

Students will listen and take notes on their own assignments if they were unclear or misread the quotation.

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

Teacher’s Actions

                

Students Actions                

Check-in

Teacher will instruct students to write a brief summary of Emerson on the bottom of their notes. Teacher will collect assignments from students. Teacher will remind students of their homework for tomorrow, reading “The Minister’s Black Veil”

Students will write a one to two sentence summary of what it means to be “Self-Reliant”

Students will turn in assignment and make note of tomorrows homework.

Literacy Connection:

Being able to practice “close reading” is considered one of the key literacy standards for college and career readiness. In this activity, students are given a short, but highly complex, passages. In small groups, students will read passage out loud and analyze it line by line for how the figurative language works to convey literal meanings. Students will also be able to use this new information to connect to and enhance their prior knowledge of Transcendentalism, based on previous pieces they have read by Emerson and Thoreau.

In addition, students will see close reading modelled by other students and be given verbal feedback on their interpretations from the teacher. They will also be required to take notes during other students’ presentations, practising listening skills. Afterwards, they will be expected to summarize these notes, showing understanding of important themes that were persistent throughout all twelve presentations.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

This lesson is extremely self-directed, therefore students will be able to consult with teacher on parts of the passage they don’t understand. In addition, they will be presenting in groups different from the ones they worked in. They will have approximately five minutes during their presentation preparation time to receive feedback from other students on the single passage. In addition, they will hear all of the other groups present, as well as feedback from the teacher about how effectively each group paraphrased the quotation. After the presentations are done (students are allowed to make any necessary changes during presentations), teacher will collect excerpts. They will be graded for completion credit as students need materials back to study for unit test.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

Document Camera

35 copies of Self-Reliance Excerpts

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

Using the gradual release model, students first see the teacher demonstrate how to do the work and then do the work in groups. Then the will work in other groups to get clarification and different perspective on the quotations. Over time, this scaffolding will be removed and students will be able to perform these skills on their own. Students are allowed to work in groups or on their own. While encouraged to work in groups, several students chose to work alone because of learning style.

Very few students in this particular class are on IEPs or have special needs. They tend to work better if they are allowed to chose their own groups. However, in another class I would probably assign the groupings.

In addition, because I will be assigning groups for the presentations, I can be conscientious about which students will be responsible for which quotations. While all quotations are rich in detail and imagery, some are more difficult than others. I can make sure that the more challenging quotes go to students who can handle their difficulty.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

Students in the class sit in rows facing the front for the lecture. Students with IEPs and 504 exemptions are given preferential seating at the front of the room. In addition, two American Sign Language Interpreters are on the left side of the room, behind the teacher. My deaf students also sit on the front side of the front room.

During group work, students are encouraged to physically move their desks to that they can face one another. For this activity, students were allowed to chose their own groups to work with. During the presentations, students will be assigned groups.

Notes from Individual Implementation:

Field Log:

Reflection:

        I definitely needed to give stricter time guidelines for completing this assignment. I think were I to do it again, I would have given each quote individually and then given student an amount of time that they could work on it. Maybe it could have been done as a gallery walk activity of sorts.

        I feel like giving students a better way to organize and present their information would have been helpful. I think a graphic organizer certainly wouldn’t have been out of place for such an activity. Especially if this activity were to be frames as a gallery walk, I feel like it may have made use of class time much more productive.

        However, the downfall of that it that students will rush through and note take time to close read the assignment. I feel like were I to redo this assignment as a gallery walk, it would be important to put less quotes or perhaps shorter quotations.

        Based on the presentations, it was clear however that the students understood the material. In that aspect, the objectives were met. However, I think there is clearly a more efficient way to meet these objectives. I feel like with this coverage time crunch I am facing, finding these more efficient-- and honestly probably more engaging methods, would definitely benefit me were I to teach this unit again.

        K Day 11

Lesson Plan Title: Minister’s Black Veil

Date/Time to be taught: December , 20613. 2nd Period (8:22-9:13 AM)

Instructional Objectives aligned to Oregon Content & Performance Standards

Learning Targets: 

Anticipatory Set:

Activity/ Time-Allotment

                

                        

Teachers Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Summary and Question (10 minutes)

Teacher will put instructions for summary activity and question writing on the document camera.

Teacher will verbally review the instructions with students.

As groups begin to write their discussion questions, teacher will check in with the class to make sure that summary is both correct and complete.

Teacher will collect discussion questions and quickly review them.         

Students will make a list of the major plot point in”The Minister’s Black Veil.”

Afterwards, in groups of 3-4, they will write a discussion question about the text.

Students will share major plot points from the text and take notes as teacher diagrams these plots points on the document camera.         

Instructional Input

Activity/ Time- Allotment

                

                        

Teacher Actions

                        

Student Actions

                

Socratic Seminar (35 minutes)

Using discussion questions written by students are the warm-up, teacher will place questions on the document camera.

After question has been answered, teacher will allow student approximately 5 minutes to discuss questions in small groups.

Teacher will facilitate as each small group answers the discussion question asked.

After groups have satisfactorily answered the discussion question, teacher will place the next question on the board.

Students will work in groups of 3-4 to answer discussion questions.

For each question, a representative from each group is expected to answer.

While other students are talking, students are expected to take notes and reference their text.

Closure

Activity/ Time Allotment

                

                        

Teacher’s Actions

                

                        

Students Actions

                

Reflection (5 minutes)

Teacher will put the reflection prompt on the document camera.

Teacher will collect exit cards at the end of class.

Students will answer prompt:

What does it mean to be an anti-transcendentalist?

Literacy Connection:

Asking questions of a text is a key literacy skill and an active reading strategy. This discussion relies not just on students answers, but on their ability to ask intriguing and engaging questions of the text. This lesson draws on students knowledge of Costa’s levels of questioning-- and their ability to not only answer, but to ask higher-order thinking questions. Knowing how to ask these questions and when these types of questions are appropriate is a literacy skill that can be used in multiple content areas. In addition, the format of group discussions allows student to practice both their speaking and listening skills.

Assessment/Learning Evidence:

The summary activity allows the teacher to formatively assess whether or not students comprehended the story.

The questions students ask, as well as their ability to answer these questions, will help teacher know students understanding of the text as well as their ability to ask higher order thinking questions. In addition, teacher can provide verbal feedback on the questions being asked and students will see the results of higher-order thinking modelled throughout the discussion.

The end reflection allows teacher to assess not only if students understood the story, but are making connections between the story and the larger Romantic Unit. The answer to the question will let teacher know if students are able to contextualize the piece into the larger historical period.

Materials, Resources, Technology:

-Document Camera

-Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience--All unit literature found in Chapter 4: The New England Renaissance, pages 240- 392

-Notecards-- 1 for every 3 students (10 total)

Modifications/Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Diverse or Special Needs:

Before class, I talked with my deaf students and students on behavioral IEPs, all of whom are allowed to ask for alternative assignments for presentations I explained to them what would happen during the socratic seminar. None of my students opted out of the assignment. Had they, I had an alternative assignment prepared where they could participate by practicing listening and synthesis skills in a question asking activity. Students will also have the added scaffolding of working in groups when first summarizing, then asking and answering question in the socratic seminar.

Considerations for Classroom Layout, Logistics, Grouping and Management of Students:

The desks for the class will be arranged in two concentric circles. Each desk in the middle circle will have two desks on the outside. Each middle desk and its two wing desks will work together in groups of 3. An interpreter will sit in a desk across the circle from my deaf students. Students will be given 3 minutes at the beginning and end of class to arrange the circles how they want. Students will be able to chose where they sit-- however students who have not sat in the middle during previous socratic seminars will be the first to be assigned a middle seat if there are no volunteers.

Notes From Individual Implementation:

        - What does the Minister’s Veil Symbolize?

        -Did the Minister wear the veil for himself or for others?

        -What is the role of irony in the story?

        -What does the story say about the nature of human beings?

        -Why did Hawthorne mean by titling the story “a parable”?

        -Why do they bury the minister in the veil?

        -What does the story say about the role of personal relationships in our lives?

Field Log:

Reflection:

        I really liked having the students write their own questions. I think that it made for a very interesting discussion. I think they met the objective of the day with flying colors. It was very interesting to have this opposite perspective of Transcendentalist philosophy and I am glad I got to fit it in at the end of the unit. I think it certainly gives the students a broader idea of the time period. I think it also helps them understand Transcendentalism better if merely by contrast.

        This day highlighted how classroom management is still very much an issue for me as a young teacher. Today was particularly difficult. It was a Friday in December (only 2 weeks away from winter break) and it was snowing. Because the high school is on a hill, very few students showed up for class. I had to improvise with the very distracted students I did receive. It was doable, but it was certainly a challenge.

        One thing that concerns me though is the amount of students who were absents and will be missing the only day we are covering Anti-Transcendentalists. While they are not particularly featured on the unit test, I fear that missing this day could hurt the students with their antithesis paper. While it is my final day, if I were teaching this class full time, I would probably spend an extra day on this piece to make sure that the majority of students got the chance to interact with it.

IV. Assessment

        

A. Assessment Plan (Types, Data, Exemplars)

1. Pre-Assessment        

Grammar Pretest

This pretest was given several days prior to the beginning of my unit. It assessed students knowledge on parts of speech, phrases, clauses, and sentence types. It was used diagnostically to see what skills students still needed to improve upon before they took their cumulative grammar test.  

Student Name

Grammar Pretest

Raw Score (Out of 40)

Grammar Pretest Percentage

Dr. Julius No

25

62.50%

Aristotle Kristatos

29

72.50%

Rosa Klebb

15

37.50%

Dexter Smythe

17

42.50%

Seraffimo Spang

13

32.50%

Elektra King

23

57.50%

Emilio Largo

Sol Horowitz

27

67.50%

Irina Sedova

29

72.50%

Hector Gonzales

25

62.50%

Jack Spang

20

50.00%

Vladimir Scorpius

23

57.50%

Pistols Scaramanga

30

75.00%

Maria Freudenstein

22

55.00%

Alec Trevelyan

26

65.00%

Colonel von Hammerstein

26

65.00%

Victor Zokas

25

62.50%

Franz Sanchez

29

72.50%

Le Chiffre

Elliot Carver

11

27.50%

General Grubozaboyschikov

22

55.00%

Wolfgang Weisen

29

72.50%

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

Tamil Rahani

32

80.00%

Auric Goldfinger

15

37.50%

Perseus Friend

26

65.00%

Sir Hugo Drax

39

97.50%

Milton Krest

24

60.00%

Mr. Sanguinetti

        

Mean: 24.08 (60.20%)

Median: 25 (62.50% )

Mode: 29 (72.50%)

Range: 11-39 (27.5%--97.50%)

Example of student who did not meet standards

Example of student who nearly met standards (developing)

Example of student who met standards

Example of student who exceeded standards

Neoclassicism Unit Test

The summative assessment from the previous unit (on Neoclassicism), while not necessarily a pretest, was integral to the planning of my unit. This test (a multiple guess test written by members of Spragues English PLC) is meant to test content knowledge and comprehension of American Literature. Due to the fact that it is impossible to pretest for content knowledge, I used this test to analyze skills potentially missing that might hinder students from comprehending and retaining this knowledge. A section of the test that students particularly struggled in was matching quintessential quotations to their authors and their piece of origin. This skill-- closely connected to close reading-- was one I decided to focus on in my unit.

Student Name

Unit Test 1 Raw  Score (out of 56)

Unit Test Percentage

Dr. Julius No

23

41.07%

Aristotle Kristatos

50

89.29%

Rosa Klebb

24

42.86%

Dexter Smythe

25

44.64%

Seraffimo Spang

16

28.57%

Elektra King

30

53.57%

Emilio Largo

29

51.79%

Sol Horowitz

44

78.57%

Irina Sedova

49

87.50%

Hector Gonzales

45

80.36%

Jack Spang

45

80.36%

Vladimir Scorpius

41

73.21%

Pistols Scaramanga

47

83.93%

Maria Freudenstein

42

75.00%

Alec Trevelyan

37

66.07%

Colonel von Hammerstein

45

80.36%

Victor Zokas

48

85.71%

Franz Sanchez

40

71.43%

Le Chiffre

25

44.64%

Elliot Carver

17

30.36%

General Grubozaboyschikov

39

69.64%

Wolfgang Weisen

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

Tamil Rahani

39

69.64%

Auric Goldfinger

43

76.79%

Perseus Friend

43

76.79%

Sir Hugo Drax

49

87.50%

Milton Krest

45

80.36%

Mr. Sanguinetti

43

76.79%

        Mean: 37 (66.16%)

        Median: 41 (73.21%)

        Mode: 45 (80.36%)

        Range: 16-50 (28.57%-89%)

2. Post Assessment

Grammar Unit Test

Students had entire class period to finish this scantron test (attached to lesson plan #6). It tested four skills. The first was students ability to identify parts of speech. The second was students ability to identify clause and phrase types. The third was to identify sentence types. The fourth skill was to correctly punctuate sentences. My lessons taught the second and third skills to students. The data below shows students results on the sections of the test that I taught towards.

Student Name

Grammar Post Test Percentage

Dr. Julius No

64.00%

Aristotle Kristatos

89.00%

Rosa Klebb

45.00%

Dexter Smythe

57.00%

Seraffimo Spang

45.00%

Elektra King

79.00%

Emilio Largo

85.00%

Sol Horowitz

89.00%

Irina Sedova

81.00%

Hector Gonzales

74.00%

Jack Spang

Vladimir Scorpius

85.00%

Pistols Scaramanga

83.00%

Maria Freudenstein

58.00%

Alec Trevelyan

Colonel von Hammerstein

74.00%

Victor Zokas

65.00%

Franz Sanchez

94.00%

Le Chiffre

Elliot Carver

43.00%

General Grubozaboyschikov

75.00%

Wolfgang Weisen

83.00%

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

74.00%

Tamil Rahani

87.00%

Auric Goldfinger

58.00%

Perseus Friend

77.00%

Sir Hugo Drax

96.00%

Milton Krest

64.00%

Mr. Sanguinetti

70.00%

        

        Mean: 72.85%

        Median: 74.50%

        Mode: 74.00%

        Range: 43.00%--96.00%

Romanticism Unit Test

This test was given in the week after my work sample was complete. A fill-in-the-blank test, students were expected to be identify the authors and titles of quintessential passages. The test also tested students knowledge of the historical context of the pieces.

Student Name

Unit Test Score (Out of 45)

Unit Test Percentage

Dr. Julius No

33

73.33%

Aristotle Kristatos

36

80.00%

Rosa Klebb

13

28.89%

Dexter Smythe

34

75.56%

Seraffimo Spang

15

33.33%

Elektra King

Emilio Largo

26

57.78%

Sol Horowitz

35

77.78%

Irina Sedova

41

91.11%

Hector Gonzales

27

60.00%

Jack Spang

0.00%

Vladimir Scorpius

32

71.11%

Pistols Scaramanga

37

82.22%

Maria Freudenstein

21

46.67%

Alec Trevelyan

29

64.44%

Colonel von Hammerstein

Victor Zokas

36

80.00%

Franz Sanchez

36

80.00%

Le Chiffre

18

40.00%

Elliot Carver

18

40.00%

General Grubozaboyschikov

22

48.89%

Wolfgang Weisen

37

82.22%

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

29

64.44%

Tamil Rahani

26

57.78%

Auric Goldfinger

15

33.33%

Perseus Friend

26

57.78%

Sir Hugo Drax

41

91.11%

Milton Krest

26

57.78%

Mr. Sanguinetti

23

51.11%

        Mean: 28.15 (60.25%)

        Median: 28 (60.00%)

        Mode: 26 (57.78%)

        Range: 13--41 (29%--91.1%)

Romanticism Exam

1. Governments show thus how successfully men can be imposed on, even

impose on themselves, for their own advantage. it is excellent, we must all ailow; yet this government never of itself furthered any enterprise, but by the alacríty with which it got out of its way. it does not keep the country free. It not settle the West. it does not educate. TITLE

2. l know not how it was-but with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. lsay insufferable; for the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasurable, because poetic, sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural images of the desolate or terrible. TITLE

3. A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of iittle minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do. He may as well concern himself with his shadow on the wall. Speak what you think now in hard words and

tomorrow speak what tomorrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict everything you say today... To be great is to be misunderstood. TITLE

4. Yet not to thine eternal resting place

Shalt thou retire alone, nor coulds’t thou wish

Couch more magnificent. Thou shalt lie down

With patriarchs ofthe infant world-with kings,

The powerful of the earth-the wise, the good,

Fair forms, and hoary seers of ages past,

All in one mighty sepulcher... TITLE

5. Winter Afternoon-

That oppresses, like the Heft

Of Cathedral Tunes-

Heavenly Hurt, it gives

We can no scar,

But internal difference,

Where the Meanings are- Author

6. Author who was encouraged by the older Nathaniel Hawthorne to continue his

writing, and produces an anti-Transcendental work filled with complex sym bolism.

7. In the woods, too, a man casts off his years, as the snake his slough, and at

what period soever of life is always a child. in the woods is perpetual youth. Within these plantations of God, a decorum and sanctity reign, a perennial festival is dressed, and the guest sees not how he should tire of them in a thousand years. TITLE

8. Did he seek to hide it from the dread Being whom he was addressing? Such was the effect of this simple piece of crape TITLE

9. He was not prone to let his wife into his confidence; but os this was on uneosá

secret, he willingly shared it with her. All her avarice wos awakened at the mention of hidden gold, and she urged her husband to comply with the black man’s terms and secure what would make them wealthy for life. TITLE

10. l went to the woods because l wanted to live deliberately, to front only the

essential facts of life, and see if l could not learn what lt had to teach, and not, when l came to die,discover that l had not lived...l wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life...TITLE

11. Arid you O my soul where you stand,

surrounded, detached, in measureless oceans of space,

Ceaselessly musing, venturing, throwing, seeking the

spheres to connect them,

Till the bridge you will need be form'd, till the ductile anchor hold,

Till the gossamer thread you fling catch somewhere, O my soul. AUTHOR

12. Author whose short life produced many Dark tales of horror (often focusing on the depravity of mankind) as well as influential literary criticism.

13. The morning breaks; the steeds in their stalls

stamp and neigh, as the hostler calls;

The day returns, but nevermore

returns the traveler to the shore,

and the tide rises, the tide falls. Author

14. Author whose poetry marked by a characteristic brevity and concision and addressed the solitary life of its creator.

15. Author of Walden

16. Story adapted from a German folk tale which involves stereotyped characters & teaches an important life lesson. Title

17. Term used for the belief the Transcendentalists had in the “universal and benign 'omnipresence...a God known to men only in moments of mystic enthusiasm, whose visitations leave them altered, self-reliant, and purified of petty aims."

18. The election of this president coincides (in many scholars' opinions) with the onset of American Romanticism.

19. Then, with eyes that saw not, l kissed her;

and she, kissing back, could not know

that my kiss was given to her sister,

folded close under deepening snow. AUTHOR

20. In addition to Dark Romantic, which describes "The Fall of the House of Usher”

21. “All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event-in the

living act, the undoubted deed-there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the moldings of it's features from behind the unreasoning mask” Speaker

22. Term for a public literary or scientific society; promoted by transcendentalists.

23. Author of "The Minister’s Black Veil”

24. Author of “The Devil and Tom Walker”

25. Utopian location established by Transcendentalists just outside of Boston.

26. "...I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government. Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it..." Author

27. Of the Transcendentalists, this author was "the Doer” who sought to incorporate Transcendental philosophy into his living.

28. Author whose poetry is marked by long organic verse forms with flowing sentences and extensive listing. '

29. Author who is credited as the first professional American writer, his works often

focused on regional folk tales around New York city, even though he spent a large part of his career writing in Europe.

30. Literary Designation often applied to the works of Hawthorne and Melville.

31. This event marks the end of American Romanticism.

32. Author of "The Fall of the House of Usher"

33. Literary movement preceding Romanticism; helps to explain Romanticism'sreaction against this dominant philosophy.

34. Many minutes, many hours, many clays have I heard it-yet I dared not-oh pity me, miserable wretch that l am-I dared not-I dared not speak! We have put her living in the tomb!" Speaker

35. Romantic author who, after some unsatisfactory time with the Transcendentalists, used his writing to explore ( and come to terms with) his Puritan past. Wrote the novel The Scarlet Letter.

36. Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Alcott School of Thought

37. Irving, Bryant School of Thought

38. Term used to apply to those New England poets, also known as the schoolroom poets, who wrote sentimental and universally enjoyed poems.

39. What grievous affliction hath befallen you...that you should thus darken your eyes forever?" Author

40. German philosopher from whom Transcendentalists took their name.

41. "'The Devil take me,’ said he, "Ifl have made a farthing!’" Speaker

Example of student who did not meet standards

Student who almost met standards (Developing)

Student who met standards

Example of student who exceeded standards

3. Formative Assessments

Grammar Worksheet 1

This worksheet was given to students to complete at home. At the beginning of the next class, students handed the papers in for the teacher to grade. Students were given credit for completion. During student conferences, students got these worksheets back and were able to consult with teacher on points of confusion.

Student Name

Grammar WS 1

Grammar WS 1 Percentage

Dr. Julius No

13

65.00%

Aristotle Kristatos

Rosa Klebb

Dexter Smythe

10

50.00%

Seraffimo Spang

Elektra King

Emilio Largo

Sol Horowitz

19

95.00%

Irina Sedova

17

85.00%

Hector Gonzales

13

65.00%

Jack Spang

14

70.00%

Vladimir Scorpius

17

85.00%

Pistols Scaramanga

Maria Freudenstein

Alec Trevelyan

Colonel von Hammerstein

Victor Zokas

15

75.00%

Franz Sanchez

16

80.00%

Le Chiffre

Elliot Carver

General Grubozaboyschikov

Wolfgang Weisen

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

Tamil Rahani

18

90.00%

Auric Goldfinger

12

60.00%

Perseus Friend

Sir Hugo Drax

19

95.00%

Milton Krest

Mr. Sanguinetti

Mean: 15.25 (76.25%)

Median: 15.5 (77.5%)

Mode: 13 (65.00%)

Range: 10--19 (50%--95%)

Example of student who did not meet standards

 

Example of student who almost met standards (developing)

Example of student who met standards

Example of student who exceeded standards

Grammar Worksheet 2

This worksheet was given to students to complete at home. Students were given credit for completion. Students graded their own papers using an answer key on the document camera. Afterwards, the class was given the opportunity to address points of confusion.

Grammar Quiz

Students took this quiz on day 2 of my work sample. They traded papers and graded one another using an answer key on the document camera. Grades were recorded as a formative quiz grade.

Alias

Grammar Quiz Score (Out of 20)

Grammar Quiz Percentage

20

100

Dr. Julius No

18

90.00%

Aristotle Kristatos

Rosa Klebb

3

15.00%

Dexter Smythe

17

85.00%

Seraffimo Spang

20

100.00%

Elektra King

Emilio Largo

Sol Horowitz

15

75.00%

Irina Sedova

20

100.00%

Hector Gonzales

16

80.00%

Jack Spang

Vladimir Scorpius

16

80.00%

Pistols Scaramanga

18

90.00%

Maria Freudenstein

0.00%

Alec Trevelyan

4

20.00%

Colonel von Hammerstein

13

65.00%

Victor Zokas

17

85.00%

Franz Sanchez

15

75.00%

Le Chiffre

Elliot Carver

18

90.00%

General Grubozaboyschikov

15

75.00%

Wolfgang Weisen

16

80.00%

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

Tamil Rahani

20

100.00%

Auric Goldfinger

17

85.00%

Perseus Friend

13

65.00%

Sir Hugo Drax

19

95.00%

Milton Krest

20

100.00%

Mr. Sanguinetti

        Mean: 15 (17%)

        Median: 17 (82.5%)

        Mode: 20 (100%)

        Range: 3--20 (15%--100%)

Example of student who failed to meet standards

Example of student who almost met standards

Example of student who met standards

Example of student who exceeded standards

Walden Reading Quiz

This four question reading quiz was given at the beginning of day 4 of my work sample. It was recorded as a formative quiz grade. Students who were absent or did not do well on the quiz could make up the points by writing a one page summary of the reading.

Student Name

Walden Reading Quiz (Out of 4)

Walden Reading Quiz Percentage

Dr. Julius No

1

25.00%

Aristotle Kristatos

4

100.00%

Rosa Klebb

3

75.00%

Dexter Smythe

3

75.00%

Seraffimo Spang

4

100.00%

Elektra King

2

50.00%

Emilio Largo

Sol Horowitz

3

75.00%

Irina Sedova

3

75.00%

Hector Gonzales

2

50.00%

Jack Spang

3

75.00%

Vladimir Scorpius

3

75.00%

Pistols Scaramanga

1

25.00%

Maria Freudenstein

1

25.00%

Alec Trevelyan

3

75.00%

Colonel von Hammerstein

4

100.00%

Victor Zokas

2

50.00%

Franz Sanchez

Le Chiffre

0

0.00%

Elliot Carver

3

75.00%

General Grubozaboyschikov

Wolfgang Weisen

2

50.00%

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

Tamil Rahani

4

100.00%

Auric Goldfinger

2

50.00%

Perseus Friend

1

25.00%

Sir Hugo Drax

4

100.00%

Milton Krest

3

75.00%

Mr. Sanguinetti

4

100.00%

        

Mean: 2.7 (67%)

        Median: 3 (75%)

        Mode: 3 (75%)

        Range: 0--4 (0--100%)

Fireside Poets Homework

This homework assignment was given on day one of my work sample. Student were graded with check, check plus and check minus based on the completeness and correctness of their answers.

Student Name

Poetry Activity

Dr. Julius No

3

Aristotle Kristatos

3

Rosa Klebb

1

Dexter Smythe

5

Seraffimo Spang

3

Elektra King

Emilio Largo

Sol Horowitz

5

Irina Sedova

5

Hector Gonzales

3

Jack Spang

5

Vladimir Scorpius

5

Pistols Scaramanga

Maria Freudenstein

Alec Trevelyan

Colonel von Hammerstein

3

Victor Zokas

3

Franz Sanchez

Le Chiffre

1

Elliot Carver

1

General Grubozaboyschikov

3

Wolfgang Weisen

3

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

3

Tamil Rahani

3

Auric Goldfinger

5

Perseus Friend

Sir Hugo Drax

5

Milton Krest

3

Mr. Sanguinetti

Example of student who earned a check-minus

Example of student who earned a check

Example of student who earned a check-plus

Self Reliance Homework

Students verbally shared their answers and were given feedback from teachers and other students. They were given a grade for completing the assignment, but were allowed to keep their work to study for the unit test.

Student Name

Self-Reliance

5

Dr. Julius No

5

Aristotle Kristatos

0

Rosa Klebb

5

Dexter Smythe

5

Seraffimo Spang

5

Elektra King

0

Emilio Largo

5

Sol Horowitz

5

Irina Sedova

5

Hector Gonzales

5

Jack Spang

0

Vladimir Scorpius

5

Pistols Scaramanga

5

Maria Freudenstein

5

Alec Trevelyan

5

Colonel von Hammerstein

5

Victor Zokas

5

Franz Sanchez

5

Le Chiffre

5

Elliot Carver

5

General Grubozaboyschikov

5

Wolfgang Weisen

5

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

5

Tamil Rahani

5

Auric Goldfinger

5

Perseus Friend

0

Sir Hugo Drax

5

Milton Krest

5

Mr. Sanguinetti

0

Exit Cards

These were utilized in lessons 2, 7, 8, 9, and 11. These short answer questions allowed teacher to formatively evaluate the understanding of the class on the days lesson. Students were given participation points for completing assignment.

Annotated Bibliography

This assignment was due on the day of the unit test. Students were graded with check-minus, check, or check-plus based on the completeness of the assignment.

Alias

Annotated Bibliography

Dr. Julius No

10

Aristotle Kristatos

10

Rosa Klebb

0

Dexter Smythe

10

Seraffimo Spang

0

Elektra King

0

Emilio Largo

10

Sol Horowitz

10

Irina Sedova

10

Hector Gonzales

10

Jack Spang

0

Vladimir Scorpius

10

Pistols Scaramanga

10

Maria Freudenstein

5

Alec Trevelyan

10

Colonel von Hammerstein

10

Victor Zokas

10

Franz Sanchez

5

Le Chiffre

0

Elliot Carver

5

General Grubozaboyschikov

5

Wolfgang Weisen

10

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

10

Tamil Rahani

10

Auric Goldfinger

0

Perseus Friend

10

Sir Hugo Drax

10

Milton Krest

10

Mr. Sanguinetti

10

Quotations Mini-Quiz

These verbal quizzes were given at the beginning of class period 9-11. Students used their results of formatively assess and reflect on their own understanding of the literature and how much studying would be required for the unit test.

4. Performance Assessment

Walden Presentations

In order to apply both close reading of imagery and knowledge of Transcendentalism to a real world setting, students used their close readings of metaphors in Walden to make an “instragram” for Henry David Thoreau. Students illustrated the images from the passage and captioned it with a “tweet” in which they translated the philosophical meaning of the metaphor into a concise message. This presentation was done in pairs. Students were graded on the following criteria:

Walden Presentation Rubric

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Overall Presentation

Picture thoughtfully and thoroughly done. It clearly represents the passage and contains lots of detail

Picture thoughtfully, if somewhat hastily, done. It clearly represents the passage and contains some detail.

Picture done hastily or incompletely. There is little to no detail or thought put into presentation.

No picture or picture that does not represent the passage.

Summary

From both picture and from written summary, it is clear that the student understood and did a close reading of the entire the passage.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student understood most of the passage, but perhaps missed a few key details.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student did not understand or misread large portions of the passage.

There is little to no evidence that the student read or understood the passage.

Thematic Understanding

Student thoroughly and completely connects the passage to their understanding of Transcendentalism.

Students understood thematic meaning, but struggled to connect this meaning to larger ideas about Transcendentalism

Students understood the literal passage, but struggled to understand larger thematic meanings of the passage

Students made little to no attempt to understand thematic meaning of passage.

Student Name

Walden Presentations

Dr. Julius No

4

Aristotle Kristatos

3

Rosa Klebb

4

Dexter Smythe

4

Seraffimo Spang

3

Elektra King

Emilio Largo

3

Sol Horowitz

4

Irina Sedova

4

Hector Gonzales

4

Jack Spang

4

Vladimir Scorpius

4

Pistols Scaramanga

1

Maria Freudenstein

2

Alec Trevelyan

4

Colonel von Hammerstein

1

Victor Zokas

4

Franz Sanchez

3

Le Chiffre

2

Elliot Carver

4

General Grubozaboyschikov

2

Wolfgang Weisen

4

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

4

Tamil Rahani

4

Auric Goldfinger

2

Perseus Friend

4

Sir Hugo Drax

4

Milton Krest

4

Mr. Sanguinetti

3

        Mean: 3.3

        Median: 4

        Mode: 4

        Range: 1--4

Example of student who did not meet standards

Walden Presentation Rubric

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Overall Presentation

Picture thoughtfully and thoroughly done. It clearly represents the passage and contains lots of detail

Picture thoughtfully, if somewhat hastily, done. It clearly represents the passage and contains some detail.

Picture done hastily or incompletely. There is little to no detail or thought put into presentation.

No picture or picture that does not represent the passage.

Summary

From both picture and from written summary, it is clear that the student understood and did a close reading of the entire the passage.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student understood most of the passage, but perhaps missed a few key details.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student did not understand or misread large portions of the passage.

There is little to no evidence that the student read or understood the passage.

Thematic Understanding

Student thoroughly and completely connects the passage to their understanding of Transcendentalism.

Students understood thematic meaning, but struggled to connect this meaning to larger ideas about Transcendentalism

Students understood the literal passage, but struggled to understand larger thematic meanings of the passage

Students made little to no attempt to understand thematic meaning of passage.

Example of student who almost met standards (developing)

Walden Presentation Rubric

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Overall Presentation

Picture thoughtfully and thoroughly done. It clearly represents the passage and contains lots of detail

Picture thoughtfully, if somewhat hastily, done. It clearly represents the passage and contains some detail.

Picture done hastily or incompletely. There is little to no detail or thought put into presentation.

No picture or picture that does not represent the passage.

Summary

From both picture and from written summary, it is clear that the student understood and did a close reading of the entire the passage.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student understood most of the passage, but perhaps missed a few key details.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student did not understand or misread large portions of the passage.

There is little to no evidence that the student read or understood the passage.

Thematic Understanding

Student thoroughly and completely connects the passage to their understanding of Transcendentalism.

Students understood thematic meaning, but struggled to connect this meaning to larger ideas about Transcendentalism

Students understood the literal passage, but struggled to understand larger thematic meanings of the passage

Students made little to no attempt to understand thematic meaning of passage.

Example of student who met standards

Walden Presentation Rubric

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Overall Presentation

Picture thoughtfully and thoroughly done. It clearly represents the passage and contains lots of detail

Picture thoughtfully, if somewhat hastily, done. It clearly represents the passage and contains some detail.

Picture done hastily or incompletely. There is little to no detail or thought put into presentation.

No picture or picture that does not represent the passage.

Summary

From both picture and from written summary, it is clear that the student understood and did a close reading of the entire the passage.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student understood most of the passage, but perhaps missed a few key details.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student did not understand or misread large portions of the passage.

There is little to no evidence that the student read or understood the passage.

Thematic Understanding

Student thoroughly and completely connects the passage to their understanding of Transcendentalism.

Students understood thematic meaning, but struggled to connect this meaning to larger ideas about Transcendentalism

Students understood the literal passage, but struggled to understand larger thematic meanings of the passage

Students made little to no attempt to understand thematic meaning of passage.

Example of student who exceeded expectations

Walden Presentation Rubric

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Overall Presentation

Picture thoughtfully and thoroughly done. It clearly represents the passage and contains lots of detail

Picture thoughtfully, if somewhat hastily, done. It clearly represents the passage and contains some detail.

Picture done hastily or incompletely. There is little to no detail or thought put into presentation.

No picture or picture that does not represent the passage.

Summary

From both picture and from written summary, it is clear that the student understood and did a close reading of the entire the passage.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student understood most of the passage, but perhaps missed a few key details.

From both the picture and the written summary, the student did not understand or misread large portions of the passage.

There is little to no evidence that the student read or understood the passage.

Thematic Understanding

Student thoroughly and completely connects the passage to their understanding of Transcendentalism.

Students understood thematic meaning, but struggled to connect this meaning to larger ideas about Transcendentalism

Students understood the literal passage, but struggled to understand larger thematic meanings of the passage

Students made little to no attempt to understand thematic meaning of passage.

B. Presentation and analysis of data

Students did significantly better on the post-test than on the pre-test. The average growth of students was 20.34 percent. Most averaged a 63% on the pretest and then jumped to an 80% (a B) on the post-test. This meant that most students jumped from developing on the profciecny scale of skills to a high meets or even low exceeds. Of my 30 students, 24 were deemed proficient. Of these 24, 10 exceeded expectations. On the pretest, only 11 students were proficient and only 1 had an exceeding score.

The six students who were not deemed proficient, the lowest score on the test was 43 out of 100. On the original proficiency test, this student had received a 9%. This student, while still not passing standards, made one of the largest learning growths in the class. All of the students who did not meet the standard showed learning growth of at least 15%, many of them higher.

Only one student did worse on the post-test than on the pre-test. This student, who happens to be both TAG and an ELL student, got 100% on the pre-test and missed one question on the post test. This student, who has previously taken linguistic classes, had a lot of prior knowledge of grammatical theory. She exceeded both tests and therefore, I am not overly concerned by her negative growth. I would attribute it to the fact that the post-test was perhaps more rigorous than the pretest.  However, in the future, it would be useful to come up with more challenging exercises for students with her extensive grammatical background.

While many students stayed consist on the two unit tests, even with the introduction of teaching new close reading strategies, many students actually did worse on this unit test than they had on the previous one. However, this test was remarkably more difficult than the previous unit test. There was at least twice as much literature covered on this unit test. This test was also fill-in- the-blank, as opposed to the previous which had been multiple-choice. Therefore, I think the fact that so many students stayed consistent in their scores from the previous test is a positive sign.

One thing that I did notice however, on grading the test, were the questions missed most frequently were ones about historical context. I think that this context was perhaps better integrated and emphasized in the previous unit. Perhaps because the historical context was much more integral to the previous literature (and perhaps better known as well as the American Revolution is often emphasized greatly in historical classes, while the Jeffersonian eras are passed over to spend more time on the civil war).

However, most students did remarkably well on the identifying quotes section. On this section, students average a 79% (as opposed to the 65% average on the test as a whole). I would attribute this to the emphasis on close reading during the unit.

One thing to note as well, the grading scale for this test is different than for the grammar test. Everything above a 55% is considering a passing grade, anything above a  70% is considered a B, and everything above an 85% is counted as an A.

        While based on this graph, it appears that my female students did remarkably better than my male students, I would most likely attribute this to the population of the two groups, rather than on my teaching style.

Of the 8 TAG students in my class, 7 of them were female. In addition, females outnumbered males at a 2 to 1 ratio. Of my 10 male students, two of them were on IEPs and had not yet passed their OAKS standardized reading test.

The thing about these graphs that most concerns me is the growth between the two unit tests. As can be seen, while the females in the class did better on both of the grammar tests, the male growth from the pretest to the post test  was remarkably better. However, on the unit test, while females improved with the implementation of close reading strategies, the male scores jumped dramatically.

While I am not entirely sure what to make of these numbers, they are improved somewhat when you removed one male student from the mix. This student received an A on the first unit test and yet, only got a score of 20% on the second unit test. While this students was present every day in class, participated well, and seemed to do well on the formative assessment, this drop in grades was unexpected and alarming. Probably, as a permanent teacher, my next step would be to contact this students parents for a conference.

Once this student’s scores are removed, the male drop in growth is only slight. While still concerning, this still could be explained by the greater difficulty of the test as well as my male population. However, I would still like to work on teaching strategies to better meet the needed of male students in my class.  

        As can be seen, TAG students did consistently better in the class than the general population of the class. Most of my TAG students hovered between a very high meets-expectations and a low exceeds-expectations.

There were three students in my class who were TAG who I felt could have been better challenged and did not make significant growth from pre-test to post test. I feel that I need to come up with more ways to challenge these students. However, none were ever a discipline problem, nor seemed to find the work too easy.

However, the other five, while very bright, seemed to lack the study habits that many of their peers who had not been labelled TAG had already acquired. While they did very well on the tests, many are not doing as well in the class because of missing homework, poorly done projects, and failed quizzes. Had these things been completed, these students would have probably made much greater jumps in learning than they did.

These numbers show that even in an honors class as the high school level, study skills and habits need to be emphasized and taught. I felt like this was done somewhat with the Annotated Bibliography assignment. However, many of my TAG students did not do this assignment. This result was seen in their lack of growth from one test to the next.  

 

        While my first years honors students are doing slightly worse than the class average as a whole, these scores are brought down quite a bit my two of my first-year honors students who have not yet passed the OAKS reading test. In all honestly, these two students have been misplaced and are not ready yet for honors level materials.

        As a whole, however, my first years honors students are doing well. Most are hovering around a 75% in the class and met expectations on both of their unit tests. In addition, they are making far more growth than the rest of the class. I feel like working on close reading skills for an entire unit aided many of these students greatly.

        I have also found that my first year honors students have remarkably better habits than many of the TAG students in my class. Almost all of them have 100% of their homework in and done reasonably well. They also tend to be my best class participators. I think personality-- including classroom behavior-- is what got these students into an honors class, rather than inait academic ability. However, for many, I feel like their hard work and motivation will be enough to carry them through into AP English classes next year, while many of my TAG students might falter as the tests get harder and they have not yet developed the study habits necessary.  

        As can be seen from the graph, the class averages between pre-test and post-test were very pleasing. Students averaged growth of 23% throughout the unit. This was even higher for students who were in honors for the first time, jumping at an average of 31%. TAG students jumped only 16.5%, which was slightly lower than class average, however, there was still growth in most of the students.

As I have explained previously, the differentiation in growth could be attributed to several things. First, the first year honors students had more to learn than the TAG students, and therefore more room for growth. Second, my first years honors students demonstrated much better study habits than my TAG students. And thirdly, one of my TAG students had scores that dropped dramatically during the semester for unexplained reasons, so the results are very possibly skewed to some extent.  

Due to both illness and snow, there were quite a few absences during my 10 day unit. However, there does not appear to be a correlation between missed classes and scores on the unit tests.

I feel like the class I was placed in already had a very strong system of informing students what they would miss if they were absent, which could attribute to students not falling behind.

At the beginning of the week, I placed the schedule on the class website. (This was a loose version of the homework that would be assigned). This allowed students to get ahead if they knew they were going to have a busy week or be absent for any reason.In addition, my teacher could update the blog on the website for any notes or changes that came up in class for students who were absent.

This website was accessible on smartphones, making it very accessible to many students. However, as Sprague is a fairly wealthy demographic, I wonder if this teaching website would be as useful or as helpful for classrooms for students who may not have the same access to resources.  

C. Feedback Plan

        I relied on group instruction, especially large group discussion, a lot during my instruction. Therefore, most of my feedback to students was verbal. One thing I really tried to improve upon during this works ample was asking students follow up questions and pushing them with specific and guided feedback, rather than simply answering if they were correct or incorrect. I found this to be most useful during the students Walden presentation and during our socratic seminar on the last day. It was probably most difficult during the fireside poets activity, where I feel that many of the students struggled, and therefore, my feedback was relied much more on direct instruction.

        During students individual work time was the time I was able to give the most individualized feedback. During this time, I was not only able to hand back work, but also talk to struggling students about questions or concepts that they were not understanding. I found this time to be very valuable for both differentiation and for building relationships with my students.

Intouch (the Salem-Keizer student grade reporting website) was updated regularly. This website was very useful in updating both students and parents on their grades for assignments and tests. This informed students and parents not only what grade they had in the overall class, but also any missing assignments they had and scores on tests and quizzes.

        Of course, the data from this website was raw and unanalyzed. Parents who were concerned with their students work had my mentor teachers email address. She sent them a note at the beginning of the year informing them that this was the best way to contact her. Parents could email her here about any question they had about the grades on Intouch and set up conferences with her.

In addition, during the middle of my worksample, the entire school had parent teacher conferences. These occur once per semester. I got the opportunity to meet and talk with about half of the parents of students in my class.  While many parents who had students struggling in the class had already come in and conferenced with my mentor teacher, this was a great opportunity to meet with parents whose students were meeting and exceeding the class standards. With these parents, we were able to come up with academic and behavioral goals for their students beyond the scope of the class (for example, one parent wanted to see her daughter improve social skills in group work and another knew his son wanted to be a journalist, so as a group we came up with some extra reading materials that he might be interested in.)

D. Assessment Reflection

        Personally, I have found assessments to be one of the most challenging tasks facing me as an instructor. I have actually found that creating formative assessments is much easier for me than summative assessments. With the assessment provided for me by my PLC, I tried my best to frame my instruction around this assessment. However, I often found that the qualities that the assessment was testing were very different from the qualities that it claimed to be assessing. I found that I was charged with the task of prioritizing between the test that the students would be given and the true enduring understandings that I wanted them to derive from the materials.

        That being said however, I feel that backwards planning is very valuable-- and helps me give direction to my unit planning. I think it is a valuable skill that I will be able to take with me into student teaching. I also think that I did a very good job in this unit of formatively assessing my students. I feel that I used a variety of techniques and the feedback that I was able to get from my students and that I was able to give to them was very valuable.

One thing that I think I still need to work on in terms of assessment is performance assessments-- or assessments that are more subjective in nature. As can be seen by my data-- my students scored much higher on their performance assessments (the Walden Presentation) than they did on the unit test. I think this is partially because the unit test was so difficult. However, I also think that my rubric was far too vague and did not call for the rigorous standards that I would like to see from my students. I think the creation of and grading by rubrics is one thing I would like to continue to work on as I continue my teaching education.

V. Final Reflection

        

        The thing that I think I improved the most upon while doing my work sample was in my ability to lead large group discussions while providing feedback to my students on their ideas. I was fortunate enough to have a bright class with a lot of ideas and a lot of opportunities to lead them in large group discussions. These large group discussions were very challenging for me at the  beginning of my work sample. First, I was not quite yet comfortable speaking in front of such a large group of students. This was especially intimidating for me because I am a very young teacher-- and was actually only 5 or 6 years older than most of my students. However, I think my comfort with this grew over time. The other role I had to grow comfortable in was being a discussion facilitator and leader, rather than participant. While this is something I am still needing of work on, I think I made great strides over the course of my work sample. I learned to provide feedback and ask questions that would lead to more discussions, rather than answer. Being able to encourage this sort of higher order thinking in the setting of large group discussion is very important to my philosophy of learning-- as I wish to place more of the burden for both hard work and creativity onto the students shoulders. I am glad that I made great progress in this area.

        Another area that I felt I improved greatly was my classroom management. While I was blessed with a very well behaved class, they were a very talkative and social bunch. As I developed relationships with individual students, I found it to be much easier to redirect student attention back into productive tasks. I feel that over my time, I was able to build a very positive rapport with my class. I feel like they grew to respect me much more over my time teaching them. However, while I am lucky that there were no malicious students are real behavior problems, I also don’t know if I have the tools to call upon the correct resources should a more systemic or destructive behavior problem. While hopefully my classroom management skills have improved to the point that these problems can be prevented, I think as a new teacher who had not yet faced this sort of difficulty, it is something of which I certainly need to be aware.

        I feel like my greatest accomplishment as part of my work sample was the 20% increase on the students grammar tests. Most of my students jumped from not meeting or barely meeting the requirement to A’s and B’s. While the credit for these improved scores should, of course, go to the students who achieved them, I feel like, along with my mentor teacher, we did a great job of making all the resources that the students needed to achieve available. I was also very pleased with the fact that all of the students who came to my after school study group the day before the test got A’s (this included students from the other periods of Honors American Literature as well). While these are motivated students, I think that it does speak to my ability to explain and teach as well.

        One thing that I still want to work on as a move into my second clinical placement is differentiation. While many of the lessons I created for this unit were differentiated, I feel like a lot more could be done to help match students learning needs and interests. I feel like I could have done a much stronger job of this as my group of students for this class was very diverse ability wise. However, as a new teacher, I found this process to be very difficult.

        Personally, I found it much more difficult to differentiate for my TAG students than it was to provide scaffolding for students who were performing below grade-level. I think this lack of challenge for my TAG students was demonstrated in their much lower learning growth numbers over the course of the unit. While they still did better than the class as a whole, I feel that I could and should expect and challenge more growth from these students in the future.

Overall, I am very pleased with my unit. I feel like my lessons were well planned for the assessments that I wanted my students to be able to partake in. I feel like I effectively practiced backwards design while completing this unit-- making sure that my lessons were directed towards the meeting of these goals. While I feel I could still do a better job in differentiating these lessons, I think that they were effective for the majority of my students. I was especially pleased with the growth that many of my below-level students gained from practicing the active reading strategies.

One of the biggest lessons that I learned that I did not address at all over the course of my work sample (until now) was that I realized that highschooler, even honors level juniors, are still very much children. This might seem like an obvious realization. However, because these students are only five years younger than me, I often think that I underestimated how formative and important these five years are. Many of these students were still greatly in need of study skills.  While my students were bright, creative, compassionate, and incredibly intelligent, many lacked some very basic organizational and behavioral habits that they need in order to succeed in school. I realized through this practicum how important it is to integrate these skills into the curriculum.

 Understanding this also helped me shape the way in which I addressed students. While I respected and liked all of my students, I think seeing them in this manner also helped me shape my relationship with them. For example, one of the biggest problems I had with my students was that many of them forgot their text books. My tendency at the beginning of the practicum was to lend them my own book. However, this became a problem of them not returning my book, or multiple students forgetting, or the same student constantly forgetting the book. Eventually, I had to address this problem with the entire class. I realized my role as a teacher was not to solve the problem for them by lending them my own book, but help students solve their own problems.

This became even more important when students were having problems with study habits, other students, or the school administration. I felt good that students were very comfortable to approach me with their problems. However, learning to keep an appropriate. distance was important for my learning to manage the classroom. One of the major points of my own personal philosophy of learning is to lessen the power-balance between the teacher and the students. I have found that the more power I give my students, the better they behave. Initially, when a student came to me with a problem, my instinct was to act as one of their friends and try to help them solve this problem. However, I realized this does not aid the balance of power and is actually me overstepping my role as a teacher. My job as a teacher is to empower my students to solve their own problems. I need to ingrain this philosophy of self-advocacy and empowerment into my lesson plans.

This experience really reaffirmed my philosophies of learning-- but also made me realize difficult it is to carry out this philosophy. I found that my students, when they were challenged, both on their skills and opinions, really rose to show their individuality in both skills and opinions. I also felt that it was true, the more work I transferred onto my students, and the less I took myself out of the equation, the more that they were able to learn and grow. It especially made me realize how difficult it is to assess learning-- true understanding of a topic. This assessment piece still holds too much of the balance of power for me. I am still looking for ways to make assessments opportunities for students to prove to me what they know, rather than for me to test them for what I want them to know.