Black-Centered Resources for Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Editorial Team:

Dora Gao (@doraygao)

Nadhira Hill (@nadhirawho)

Sam Ross (@SamJ_Ross)

Zoé Elise Thomas (zethomas@utexas.edu)

bit.ly/BLMtoAMS

This document was created in response to the need within Classics (here called Ancient Mediterranean Studies) to address our role within the perpetuation of the myth of Western Civilization and engage in Black theory and scholarship to make our discipline more diverse and inclusive. It is currently curated by graduate students, who are not able to spend the all the time needed for the curation/organization of this doc; we appreciate your patience!

 

The resources included here are intended as a reference to highlight and promote the work and scholarship of Black thinkers. As such, we have only presented the work of Black scholars in the field of Ancient Mediterranean Studies and AMS-adjacent fields, though we acknowledge that many non-Black scholars have contributed important work to questions of race, ethnicity, and Blackness in antiquity. There are a variety of excellent resources already available to those looking to diversify their research and classroom in this regard, such as the MRECC’s Principles of Antiracist Teaching and Reflection. We do not wish to repeat that work. Recognizing the unique lack of representation and citation of Black scholars who study the Ancient Mediterranean, this document is meant to promote Black voices within our field and the academy.

Please feel free to add any resources by Black scholars that have not yet been included in the “Place Suggestions Here!” section. The editorial team will review your suggestions and add them to the proper sections. Thank you for contributing!!

PS: if there already exists a resource like this, please let us know so we can promote and center that one instead of this one, especially if it is run by a scholar of color. If you have any concerns about the scholarship listed here (or about the phrasing of the introduction) please feel free to leave a comment on the document. If you don’t want to leave a comment publicly, please feel free to send a DM to anyone on the editorial team.

Table of Contents

Place suggestions here!

Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Ancient Mediterranean Studies-Adjacent

Inclusive Pedagogy

Classical Reception

Religious Studies

Archaeology

Related Methodologies

Anthropological Theories

Creolization

Decolonization and Indigenous Theory

Postcolonial

Violence and the Body

Black Feminist Theory

Critical Race Theory

Ethnography, Geography, and Identity

Specific Ethnographic Studies

Black Athena and Related Debates

Complete Bibliography from A-Z

Links

Place suggestions here!

Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Aigbedion, I. A. 2019. “Atalanta, The Soul of Atlanta? Rewriting Ovid in W. E. B. Du

Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk (1903).” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 26.1: 27-37.

Allen, Danielle. 1997. ‘Imprisonment in Classical Athens.’ The Classical Quarterly 47.1:

121–135.

Allen, Danielle. 2000. The World of Prometheus: The Politics of Punishing in

Democratic Athens. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Allen, Danielle. 2010. Why Plato Wrote. Oxford: Wily-Blackwell.

Bryant, K. Edwin. 2016. Paul and the Rise of the Slave: Death and Resurrection of the Oppressed in the Epistle to the Romans (Leiden: Brill).

Byron, Gay L. 2002. Symbolic Blackness and Ethnic Difference in Early Christian Literature. London and New York: Routledge.

Cook, William W., and James Tatum. 2010. African American Writers and Classical

Tradition. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press.

Davis, G. Parthenope: The interplay of ideas in Vergilian Bucolic. Vol. 346, 2012, pp. 1–191.

Davis, G. Virgil's eclogues. 2010, pp. 1–91.

Davis, G. A Companion to Horace. 2010. Scopus. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/book/10.1002/9781444319187 

Davis, G. Aimé Césaire. Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Davis, G. Polyhymnia: The Rhetoric of Horatian Lyric Discourse. University of California Press, 1991.

Davis, G. Non-Vicious Circle: Twenty Poems of Aimé Césaire. Stanford University Press, 1984.

Davis, Gregson. The Death of Procris "Amor" and the Hunt in Ovid's Metamorphoses. 1983.

Davis, G., and M. Davis. Antigua Black: Portrait of an Island People. Scrimshaw Press, 1971.

Derbew, Sarah. 2019. “(Re)membering Sara Baartman, Venus, and Aphrodite.” Classical Receptions Journal 11: 336-354. https://academic.oup.com/crj/article/11/3/336/5530894 

DuBois, W.E.B. 2007. The World and Africa. Oxford University Press. NB: includes a

chapter on Egypt, another on “Ethiopians” as understood in the Greco-Roman world, and chapters on various African civilizations. Part of the “Oxford W.E.B. DuBois” series edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Gates Jr., Henry Louis, D. Bindman, and K. Dalton, eds. 2010. The Image of the Black in Western Art: From the Pharoahs to the Fall of the Roman Empire. Vol. 1. Harvard University Press.

Gates, Jr., Henry Louis, and D. Bindman, eds. 2010. The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume II: From the Early Christian Era to the “Age of Discovery.” 2 parts. Belknap.

Greenwood, Emily. 2020. “Middle Passages: Mediating Classics and Radical Philology in Marlene Nourbese Philip and Derek Walcott”, in Classicisms in the Black Atlantic, eds. Ian Moyer, Adam Lecznar, and Heidi Morse. Oxford University Press: 29-56. https://www.academia.edu/42320599/_Middle_Passages_Mediating_Classics_and_Radical_Philology_in_Marlene_Nourbese_Philip_and_Derek_Walcott_

Greenwood, Emily. 2020. “Thucydideses: Authorship, Anachrony, and Anachronism in Greek historiography.” Classical Receptions Journal 12.1: 32-45.

Greenwood, Emily. 2020. “Postcolonial Receptions of Homer”, in The Cambridge Guide to Homer, ed. Corinne Pache. Cambridge University Press: 240-46.

Greenwood, Emily. 2019. “Subaltern Classics in Anti- and Post-Colonial Literatures in English”, in The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature, vol. 5: 1880-2000, ed. Kenneth Haynes. Oxford University Press: 576-607. https://www.academia.edu/42320655/_Subaltern_Classics_in_Anti-_and_Post-Colonial_Literatures_in_English_

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Adapting Homer Via Pope”, in Cy Twombly: Fifty Days at Iliam, ed. Carlos Basualdo. Yale University Press: 68-83.

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Multimodal Twenty-First Century Bards: from Live Performance to Audiobook in the Homeric Adaptations of Simon Armitage and Alice Oswald”, in Epic Performances from the Middle Ages into the Twenty-First Century, eds. Fiona Macintosh, Justine McConnell, Stephen Harrison, and Claire Kenward. Oxford University Press: 275-288. https://www.academia.edu/42320636/_Multimodal_Twenty-First_Century_Bards_from_Live_Performance_to_Audiobook_in_the_Homeric_Adaptations_of_Simon_Armitage_and_Alice_Oswald_

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Pericles’ Utopia: A Reading of Thucydides and Plato”, in How to Do Things with History, eds. D. Allen, P. Christesen, and P. Millett. Oxford University Press: 55-80. https://www.academia.edu/37431393/Pericles_Utopia.pdf

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Surveying Greatness and Magnitude in Herodotus”, in Interpreting Herodotus, eds. T. Harrison and E. Irwin. Oxford University Press: 163-186. https://www.academia.edu/37431392/Surveying_Greatness_and_Magnitude_in_Herodotus.pdf

Greenwood, Emily. 2017. “Thucydides on Sicily and the Sicilian Expedition”, in The Oxford Handbook of Thucydides, eds. R. Balot, S. Forsdyke, and E. Foster. Oxford University Press: 161-177. https://www.academia.edu/35024382/Thucydides_On_the_Sicilian_Expedition

Greenwood, Emily. 2016. “Seeing Citizens: re-reading Gyges’s ring of invisibility (Plato Republic 359c6 – 360b2)”, in Invisibility ed. Arien Mack - a special issue of Social Research: An International Quarterly,  83.4: 821-847.

Greenwood, Emily. 2016. “Futures Real and Unreal in Greek Historiography: From Herodotus to Plato”, in Knowing Future Time in and Through Greek Historiography. ed. A. Lianeri. De Gruyter: 79-100. https://www.academia.edu/35024381/Futures_Real_and_Unreal_in_Greek_Historiography_From_Herodotus_to_Plato

Greenwood, Emily. 2016. “Reception studies: the cultural mobility of Classics”, Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 145.2: 41-49.

Greenwood, Emily. 2015. “On Translating Thucydides”, in  A Handbook to the Reception of Thucydides, eds. Christine Lee and N. Morley. Wiley-Blackwell: 91-121. https://www.academia.edu/14437044/On_Translating_Thucydides

Greenwood, Emily. 2012. “The Greek Thucydides: Venizelos’ Translation of Thucydides”, in Thucydides: Reception, Reinterpretation & Influence, eds. N. Morley and K. Harloe. Cambridge University Press: 157-177. https://www.academia.edu/14436152/The_Greek_Thucydides_Venizelos_Translation_of_Thucydides

Greenwood, Emily. 2012. “Corruption and the Corruptibility of Logos in Greek Historiography”, Acta Classica Supplementum IV: 63-83. https://www.academia.edu/14435893/Corruption_and_the_Corruptibility_of_Logos_in_Greek_Historiography

Greenwood, Emily. 2011. “Dislocating Black Classicism: Classics and the Black Diaspora in the Poetry of AiméCésaire and Kamau Brathwaite”, in African Athena: New Agendas, eds. Daniel Orrells, Gurminder K. Bhambra, and Tessa Roynon. Oxford University Press: 362-380. https://www.academia.edu/14438906/Dislocating_Black_Classicism_Classics_and_the_Black_Diaspora_in_the_Poetry_of_Aim%C3%A9_C%C3%A9saire_and_Kamau_Brathwaite

Greenwood, Emily. 2011. “The Politics of Classicism in the Poetry of Phillis Wheatley”, in Ancient Slavery and Abolition: From Hobbes to Hollywood, eds. Edith Hall, Richard Alston, and JustineMcConnell. Oxford University Press: 153-179. https://www.academia.edu/14437113/The_Politics_of_Classicism_in_the_Poetry_of_Phillis_Wheatley

Greenwood, Emily. 2010. Afro-Greeks : Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press. https://www.academia.edu/14435389/Afro-Greeks_Dialogues_Between_Anglophone_Caribbean_Literature_and_Classics_in_the_Twentieth_Century

 Greenwood, Emily. 2010. “Mimicry and Classical Allusion in V.S. Naipaul’s The Mimic Men”, in Classics and National Cultures, eds. S. Stephens and P. Vasunia. Oxford University Press:100-120. https://www.academia.edu/14436465/Mimicry_and_Classical_Allusion_in_V.S._Naipauls_The_Mimic_Men

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Sounding Out Homer: Christopher Logue’s Acoustic Homer”, Oral Tradition 24.2: 503-518. https://www.academia.edu/14435911/Sounding_Out_Homer_Christopher_Logues_Acoustic_Homer

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Shades of Rome in the Poetry of Derek Walcott”, in Living Classics: Greece and Rome in Contemporary Poetry in English, ed. S. Harrison. Oxford University Press: 255-74. https://www.academia.edu/14437274/Shades_of_Rome_in_the_Poetry_of_Derek_Walcott

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Re-rooting the Classical Tradition: New Directions in Black Classicism”, Classical Receptions Journal 1: 87-103. https://www.academia.edu/14435831/Re-rooting_the_Classical_Tradition_New_Directions_in_Black_Classicism

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Postcolonialism”, in The Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies, eds. G. Boys-Stones, B. Graziosi, and P. Vasunia. Oxford University Press: 653-664.

Greenwood, Emily. 2008. “Fictions of dialogue in Thucydides.” In The End of Dialogue in Antiquity, ed. Simon Goldhill. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press: 15-28. https://www.academia.edu/14438866/Fictions_of_Dialogue_in_Thucydides

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Arriving Backwards: the return of the Odyssey in the English-Speaking Caribbean”, in Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds, eds. L. Hardwick et al. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 192-210. https://www.academia.edu/14438893/Arriving_Backwards_the_return_of_the_Odyssey_in_the_English-Speaking_Caribbean

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Between Colonialism and Independence: Eric Williams and the Uses of Classics inTrinidad in the 1950s and 1960s”, in The Blackwell Companion to Classical Receptions, eds. L. Hardwick and C. Stray. Oxford: Blackwell: 98-112. https://www.academia.edu/14438884/Between_Colonialism_and_Independence_Eric_Williams_and_the_Uses_of_Classics_in_Trinidad_in_the_1950s_and_1960s

Greenwood, Emily and Barbara Graziosi, eds. 2007. Homer in the Twentieth-Century: Between World Literature and the Western Canon. Oxford: Oxford University Press. https://www.academia.edu/14435675/Homer_in_the_Twentieth_Century_Between_World_Literature_and_the_Western_Canon

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Logue’s Television: Reading Homer from a distance”, in Homer in the TwentiethCentury: Between World Literature and the Western Canon, eds. B. Graziosi and E.Greenwood. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 145-76. https://www.academia.edu/14436527/Logues_Television_Reading_Homer_from_a_Distance

 Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Bridging the narrative (5.23-7).” In Reading Herodotus: a study of the logoi in Book 5 of Herodotus' Histories, eds. Elizabeth Irwin and Emily Greenwood. Cambridge; New York : Cambridge University Press: 128-145. https://www.academia.edu/14438915/Bridging_the_Narrative_5.23-7

Greenwood, Emily and Elizabeth Irwin, eds. 2007. Reading Herodotus: a study of the logoi in Book 5 of Herodotus' Histories. Cambridge; New York : Cambridge University Press.

Greenwood, Emily. 2006. Thucydides and the Shaping of History. London: Duckworth.

Greenwood, Emily. 2005. “Still going on: Temporal Adverbs and the View of the Past in Derek Walcott's Poetry”, Callaloo 28.1: 132-145. https://www.academia.edu/14435590/Still_going_on_Temporal_Adverbs_and_the_View_of_the_Past_in_Derek_Walcotts_Poetry

Greenwood, Emily. 2005. “‘We speak Latin in Trinidad’: uses of Classics in Caribbean Literature”, in Classics and Colonialism, ed. Barbara Goff. London: Duckworth: 65-91.

Greenwood, Emily. 2004. “Classics and the Atlantic Triangle: Caribbean Readings of Greece and Rome via Africa”, Caribbean Connections. Forum for Modern Language Studies 40.4: 365-376.

Greenwood, Emily. 2004. “Making words count: freedom of speech and narrative in Thucydides.” In Free Speech in Classical Antiquity, eds. Lneke Sluiter and Ralph M. Rosen. Leiden; Boston: Brill: 175-195.

Greenwood, Emily and Paul Cartledge. 2002. “Herodotus as a critic: truth, fiction, polarity.” In Brill’s Companion To Herodotus, eds. Egbert J. Bakker, Irene J.F. De Jong and Hans Van Wees. Leiden; Boston: Brill: 351-371.

Haley, Shelley. 2009. “Be Not Afraid of the Dark: Critical Race Theory and Classical Studies.” In Laura Nasrallah and Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza (eds.), Prejudice and Christian Beginnings: Investigating Race, Gender and Ethnicity in Early Christian Studies, 4 Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 2009: 27-50. https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Be-Not-Afraid-of-the-Dark-Critical-Race-Theory-and-Haley/b4e885480691ee26be44b995dea45ee8d2c267e7

Haley, Shelley. 2002. “Lucian’s ‘Leaena and Clonarium’: Voyeurism or a Challenge to Assumptions?” in Among Women: From the Homosocial to the Homoerotic in the Ancient World, edited by Nancy S. Rabinowitz and Lisa Auanger, Austin, Texas: The University of Texas Press: 286-303.

Haley, Shelley. 1995. “Self-definition, community and resistance : Euripides' Medea and Toni Morrison's Beloved.” Thamyris: mythmaking from past to present, Vol. 2, No. 2: 177-206.

Haley, Shelley. 1993. "Black Feminist Thought and Classics: Re-membering, Re-claiming, Re-empowering" in Feminist Theory and the Classics, eds. Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz & Amy Richlin, New York & Oxford: Routledge.

Haley, Shelley. 1990. “Livy, passion, and cultural stereotypes.” Historia: Zeitschrift fur Alte Geschichte 39.3: 375-381.

Haley, Shelley. 1985. “The Five Wives of Pompey the Great.” Greece and Rome 32: 49–59.

Haley, Shelley. 1983. “Archias, Theophanes, and Cicero: The Politics of the Pro Archia.” The Classical Bulletin 59: 1-4.

Hairston, Eric Ashley. 2013. The Ebony Column: Classics, Civilization, and the African

American Reclamation of the West. 1st ed. Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press.

Houston, Drusilla Dunjee. 1926. Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire.

Vol. I. Black Classic Press.

Johnson, Matthew V., James A. Noel, and Demetrius K. Williams, eds. 2012. Onesimus Our Brother: Reading Religion, Race, and Culture in Philemon (Minneapolis: Fortress).

Keita, Maghan. 1994. “Deconstructing the Classical Age: Africa and the Unity of the Mediterranean World.” The Journal of Negro History 79: 147-66.

Keita, Maghan. 2000. Race and the Writing of History: Riddling the Sphinx. Oxford University Press. NB: This deals with race and historiography in broad terms but has several chapters dedicated specifically to classical scholarship, e.g. blackness in ancient history, the work of Frank Snowden, and the Black Athena debates

Lonis, Raoul. 1969. Les usages de la guerre entre Grecs et Barbares; des guerres médiques au milieu du IVe s. avant J-C. Les Belles Lettres.

Lonis, Raoul. 1979. “Les Éthiopiens du Pseudo-Scylax; myth ou réalité géographique?” Revue française d’histoire d’outre-mer 66: 101-10.

Lonis, Raoul. 1981. “Les trois approches de l’Éthiopien dans l’opinion gréco-romaine.” Ktema 6: 66-87.

Lonis, Raoul. 1993. “La condition des réfugiés politiques en Grèce: statut et privilèges.” Collection INSTA 491: 209-25.

McDonald, William P. 1975. “The Blackness of Medea.” College Language Association Journal 19: 20-37.

O’Meally, Robert. 2007. Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey. New York: D.C. Moore.

Murray, J. 2002. “Waking up to Iliad 7.434" CQ 52:2 (580-81).

Murray, J. 2004. “The Metamorphoses of Erysichthon: Callimachus, Apollonius and

Ovid” in M.A. Harder e.o. (eds.) Hellenistica Groningana 7: Callimachus II (Leuven, 2004). 207-241.

Murray, J. 2005. “The Constructions of the Argo in Apollonius’ Argonautica” in A. Harder

and M. Cuypers (eds.) Beginning from Apollo: Studies in Apollonius Rhodius and the Argonautic Tradition. Caeculus 6 (2005). 88-106.

Murray, J. 2007. “Gendered voice in Hellenistic Epigram” with Jonathan M. Rowland, in

Peter Bing and Jon Bruss (eds.) Brill Companion to Hellenistic Epigrams (Leiden, 2007). 211-232.

Murray, J. 2008 Review of M. Fantuzzi and R. Hunter, Tradition and Innovation in

Hellenistic Poetry, Ancient History Bulletin 20: 146-147.

Murray, J. 2009 Review of A Guide to Hellenistic Literature (Blackwell Guides to

Classical Literature) by Kathryn Gutzwiller. Phoenix 63: 390-391.

Murray, J. 2010. “Hellenistic Elegy: Out from under the shadow of Callimachus” in

James J. Clauss and Martine Cuypers (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Hellenistic Literature (Oxford, 2010). 106-116.

Murray, J. 2011. “Shipwrecked Argonauticas: Lucan and Apollonius” in Paolo Asso

(ed.), Brill’s Companion to Lucan (Leiden, 2011). 57-79.

Murray, J. 2012. “Burned After Reading:  The So-Called List of Alexandrian Librarians in

P.Oxy.X.1241” Aitia 2 http://aitia.revues.org/544 

Murray, J. 2014. “Anchored in Time: the date in Apollonius’ Argonautica” in M.A. Harder

e.o. (eds.) Hellenistica Groningana 20: Hellenistic Poetry in Context (Leuven, 2014). 247-284.

Murray, J. 2016. “Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica: Text & Commentary” in Hellenistic

Greek Poetry: A Selection. Ed. David Sider (Ann Arbor, 2016). 64-97.

Murray, J. 2017. “New Light on the Meridian, Obelisk, and Ara Pacis of Augustus”

co-authors Bernie Frischer, Karl Galinsky, John Pollini, Nicholas Cipolla, Giuseppina Capriotti, John Fillwalk, Chrystina Häuber, John Miller, Michelle Salzman, Molly Swetnam-Burland. SDH, 1, 1, Article 2. 45-48.

Murray, J. 2018. “Silencing Orpheus: The fiction of Performance in Apollonius’

Argonautica” in M.A. Harder e.o. (eds.) Hellenistica Groningana 23: Poetry and Performance (Leuven) 201-224.

Murray, J. 2019. "Poetically Erect: The female oriented humor in Callimachus’ Hymn to

Demeter." Hellenistica Groningana 24: New Perspectives in Callimachean Scholarship (Leuven) 249-263.

Murray, J. 2019. “W. E. B. Du Bois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece: The Education of

Black Medea.” TAPA 149.2: 143-62. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/742080

Mveng, Engelbert. 2005. Greek Sources of African History: From Homer to Strabo.

Karnak House.

Mveng, Engelbert. 1972. Les sources grecques de l’histoire négro-africaine depuis Homère jusqu’à Strabon. Paris: Présence Africaine.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-El. 2018. “Ecology, Epistemology, and Divination in Cicero De Divinatione 1.90–94.” Arethusa 51, no. 3: 237-267. ProjectMuse. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/719086.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-El. 2017. “Circulation’s Thousand Connectivities.” In Rome, Empire of Plunder. The Dynamics of Cultural Appropriation, ed. by Matthew P. Loar, Carolyn MacDonald, and Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017): 261-70.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-el. 2017. “Slave Religiosity in the Roman Middle Republic.” Classical Antiquity 36 (2): 317–69.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-el. 2019. “Some Thoughts on AIA-SCS 2019.” Medium. January 7, 2019. https://medium.com/@danelpadillaperalta/some-thoughts-on-aia-scs-2019-d6a480a1812a.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-el. 2019. “Etruscan Negro.” Paper, Johns Hopkins University, February 12.

Patterson, Orlando (1982), Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study. Cambridge, MA & London: Harvard University Press.

Rankine, P. (2006) Ulysses in Black: Ralph Ellison, Classicism, and African American Literature. Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press.

Rankine, Patrice D. (2013), Aristotle and Black Drama: A Theater of Civil Disobedience. Waco: Baylor University Press.

Rankine, Patrice D. “Black Is, Black Ain’t: Classical Reception and Nothingness in Ralph Ellison, Derek Walcott and Wole Soyinka.” Revue De Littérature Comparée 344 (2012): 457-74, 511-512, 514. https://www.cairn.info/revue-de-litterature-comparee-2012-4-page-457.htm#

Rankine, Patrice D. "The Classics, Race, and Community-Engaged or Public Scholarship." American Journal of Philology 140, no. 2 (2019): 345-359. doi:10.1353/ajp.2019.0018. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/726222

Sellassie, Sergew Hable. 1964. “Beziehungen Äthiopiens zur griechisch-römischen Welt.” Dissertation, History (?), Bonn, Germany.

Samuels, Tristan. "Herodotus and the Black Body: A Critical Race Theory Analysis" . Journal of Black Studies 46.7 (2015): 723-741. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282052004_Herodotus_and_the_Black_Body_A_Critical_Race_Theory_Analysis

Scarborough, William Sanders. 2005. The Autobiography of William Sanders

Scarborough: An American Journey from Slavery to Scholarship. edited, introduced and annotated by Michele Ronnick. Forward by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (Detroit: Wayne State University Press).

Scarborough, William Sanders. 2006. The Works of William Sanders Scarborough:

Black Classicist and Race Leader. edited, introduced, annotated by Michele Ronnick. Forward by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (New York: Oxford University Press).

Scarborough, William Sanders. 2019. William Sanders Scarborough’s First Lessons in

Greek: A Facsimile of the 1881 First Edition, edited, introduced, annotated by Michele Ronnick. Forward by Ward W. Briggs, Jr. (Chicago: Bolchazy-Carducci).

Sechrest, Love. 2009. A Former Jew: Paul and the Dialectics of Race. London: T&T Clark.

Smith, Mitzi J. and Yung Suk Kim. 2018. Toward Decentering the New Testament: A Reintroduction (Eugene, OR: Cascade). (Mitzi Smith is an African-American scholar of the New Testament)

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1947. “The Negro in Classical Italy.” American Journal of Philology 68: 266-92.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1948. “The Negro in Ancient Greece.” American Anthropologist 50: 31-44.

Snowden, Jr., Frank M. 1970. Blacks in Antiquity: Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press

Snowden, Jr. Frank M. 1983. Before Color Prejudice: The Ancient View of Blacks. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1990. “Romans and Blacks: A Review Essay.” American Journal of Philology 111: 543-57.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1993. “Response [to S.O.Y. Keita]” Arethusa 26: 319-27.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1997. “Misconceptions About African Blacks in the Ancient Medierranean World: Specialists and Afrocentrists.” Arion 4: 28-50.

Thompson, Lloyd and John Ferguson, eds. 1969. Africa in Classical Antiquity: Nine Studies. Ibadan University Press.

Thompson, Lloyd. 1989. Romans and Blacks. Routledge.

Thompson, Lloyd. 1993. “Roman Perceptions of Blacks.” Scholia 2: 17-30.

Walters, Tracey L. 2007.  African American Literature and the Classicist Tradition: Black Women Writers from Wheatley to Morrison. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

Wimbush, Vincent L. 2003. The Bible and African Americans: A Brief History (Minneapolis: Fortress).

Wimbush, Vincent L. 2012. White Men’s Magic: Scripturalization as Slavery (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Ancient Mediterranean Studies-Adjacent

Battle-Baptiste, Whitney. 2011. Black Feminist Archaeology. Walnut Creek, Calif: Left Coast Press.

Callahan, Allen Dwight. 2006. The Talking Book: African Americans and the Bible (New Haven: Yale University Press).

Crenshaw, Kimberlé. 1991. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color.” Stanford Law Review 43 (6): 1241-1299.

Crenshaw, Kimberlé Williams, Luke Charles Harris, Daniel Martinez HoSang, and George Lipsitz, eds. 2019. Seeing Race Again: Countering Colorblindness Across the Disciplines. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

Diop, Cheikh Anta. 1955. The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality. Translated

by Mercer Cook. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books.

Ferreira da Silva, Denise. 2009. “No-Bodies: Law, Raciality, and Violence.” Griffith Law Review 18 (2): 212–36.

Firmin, Joseph-Anténor. 1885. The Equality of the Human Races. Translated by Asselin

Charles. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Garvey, Marcus. 1925. “Who and What Is a Negro?” In Philosophy and Opinions of

Marcus Garvey, edited by Amy Jacques-Garvey, Second edition, II:18–21. New York: Augustus M. Kelley.

Junior, Nyasha. 2019. Reimagining Hagar: Blackness and Bible (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Junior, Nyasha, and Jeremy Schipper. 2020. Black Samson: The Untold Story of an American Icon (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Mbembe, Achille. 2003. “Necropolitics.” Translated by Libby Meintjes. Public Culture 15 (1): 11–40. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/39984

Nelson, Charmaine. 2007. The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America. University of Minnesota Press.

Sharpe, Christina. 2016. In the Wake: On Blackness and Being. Duke University Press.

Trouillot, Michel-Rolph. 1997. Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History. Boston: Beacon Press.

Yancy, G. “Colonial Gazing: The Production of the Body as Other.” Western Journal of Black Studies 32, (2008): 1–15.

Inclusive Pedagogy

 

hooks, bell. 2014. Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom. Routledge.

        http://sites.utexas.edu/lsjcs/files/2018/02/Teaching-to-Transcend.pdf

Rankine, Patrice D. "The Classics, Race, and Community-Engaged or Public Scholarship." American Journal of Philology 140, no. 2 (2019): 345-359. doi:10.1353/ajp.2019.0018.

        https://muse.jhu.edu/article/726222/pdf

Classical Reception

Works on Reception

Aigbedion, I. A. 2019. “Atalanta, The Soul of Atlanta? Rewriting Ovid in W. E. B. Du

Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk (1903).” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 26.1: 27-37.

Cook, William W., and James Tatum. 2010. African American Writers and Classical

Tradition. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press.

Derbew, Sarah. 2019. “(Re)membering Sara Baartman, Venus, and Aphrodite.” Classical Receptions Journal 11: 336-354. https://academic.oup.com/crj/article/11/3/336/5530894

Greenwood, Emily. 2004. “Classics and the Atlantic Triangle: Caribbean Readings of Greece and Rome via Africa”, Caribbean Connections. Forum for Modern Language Studies 40.4: 365-376.

Greenwood, Emily. 2005. “Still going on: Temporal Adverbs and the View of the Past in Derek Walcott's Poetry”, Callaloo 28.1: 132-145. https://www.academia.edu/14435590/Still_going_on_Temporal_Adverbs_and_the_View_of_the_Past_in_Derek_Walcotts_Poetry

Greenwood, Emily. 2005. “‘We speak Latin in Trinidad’: uses of Classics in Caribbean Literature”, in Classics and Colonialism, ed. Barbara Goff. London: Duckworth: 65-91.

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Arriving Backwards: the return of the Odyssey in the English-Speaking Caribbean”, in Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds, eds. L. Hardwick et al. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 192-210. https://www.academia.edu/14438893/Arriving_Backwards_the_return_of_the_Odyssey_in_the_English-Speaking_Caribbean

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Between Colonialism and Independence: Eric Williams and the Uses of Classics inTrinidad in the 1950s and 1960s”, in The Blackwell Companion to Classical Receptions, eds. L. Hardwick and C. Stray. Oxford: Blackwell: 98-112. https://www.academia.edu/14438884/Between_Colonialism_and_Independence_Eric_Williams_and_the_Uses_of_Classics_in_Trinidad_in_the_1950s_and_1960s

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Logue’s Television: Reading Homer from a distance”, in Homer in the TwentiethCentury: Between World Literature and the Western Canon, eds. B. Graziosi and E.Greenwood. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 145-76. https://www.academia.edu/14436527/Logues_Television_Reading_Homer_from_a_Distance

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Re-rooting the Classical Tradition: New Directions in Black Classicism”, Classical Receptions Journal 1: 87-103. https://www.academia.edu/14435831/Re-rooting_the_Classical_Tradition_New_Directions_in_Black_Classicism

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Shades of Rome in the Poetry of Derek Walcott”, in Living Classics: Greece and Rome in Contemporary Poetry in English, ed. S. Harrison. Oxford University Press: 255-74. https://www.academia.edu/14437274/Shades_of_Rome_in_the_Poetry_of_Derek_Walcott

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Sounding Out Homer: Christopher Logue’s Acoustic Homer”, Oral Tradition 24.2: 503-518. https://www.academia.edu/14435911/Sounding_Out_Homer_Christopher_Logues_Acoustic_Homer

Greenwood, Emily. 2010. Afro-Greeks : Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press. https://www.academia.edu/14435389/Afro-Greeks_Dialogues_Between_Anglophone_Caribbean_Literature_and_Classics_in_the_Twentieth_Century

 Greenwood, Emily. 2010. “Mimicry and Classical Allusion in V.S. Naipaul’s The Mimic Men”, in Classics and National Cultures, eds. S. Stephens and P. Vasunia. Oxford University Press:100-120. https://www.academia.edu/14436465/Mimicry_and_Classical_Allusion_in_V.S._Naipauls_The_Mimic_Men

Greenwood, Emily. 2011. “Dislocating Black Classicism: Classics and the Black Diaspora in the Poetry of AiméCésaire and Kamau Brathwaite”, in African Athena: New Agendas, eds. Daniel Orrells, Gurminder K. Bhambra, and Tessa Roynon. Oxford University Press: 362-380. https://www.academia.edu/14438906/Dislocating_Black_Classicism_Classics_and_the_Black_Diaspora_in_the_Poetry_of_Aim%C3%A9_C%C3%A9saire_and_Kamau_Brathwaite

Greenwood, Emily. 2011. “The Politics of Classicism in the Poetry of Phillis Wheatley”, in Ancient Slavery and Abolition: From Hobbes to Hollywood, eds. Edith Hall, Richard Alston, and JustineMcConnelfl. Oxford University Press: 153-179. https://www.academia.edu/14437113/The_Politics_of_Classicism_in_the_Poetry_of_Phillis_Wheatley

Greenwood, Emily. 2012. “The Greek Thucydides: Venizelos’ Translation of Thucydides”, in Thucydides: Reception, Reinterpretation & Influence, eds. N. Morley and K. Harloe. Cambridge University Press: 157-177. https://www.academia.edu/14436152/The_Greek_Thucydides_Venizelos_Translation_of_Thucydides

Greenwood, Emily. 2015. “On Translating Thucydides”, in  A Handbook to the Reception of Thucydides, eds. Christine Lee and N. Morley. Wiley-Blackwell: 91-121. https://www.academia.edu/14437044/On_Translating_Thucydides

Greenwood, Emily. 2016. “Reception studies: the cultural mobility of Classics”, Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 145.2: 41-49.

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Adapting Homer Via Pope”, in Cy Twombly: Fifty Days at Iliam, ed. Carlos Basualdo. Yale University Press: 68-83.

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Multimodal Twenty-First Century Bards: from Live Performance to Audiobook in the Homeric Adaptations of Simon Armitage and Alice Oswald”, in Epic Performances from the Middle Ages into the Twenty-First Century, eds. Fiona Macintosh, Justine McConnell, Stephen Harrison, and Claire Kenward. Oxford University Press: 275-288. https://www.academia.edu/42320636/_Multimodal_Twenty-First_Century_Bards_from_Live_Performance_to_Audiobook_in_the_Homeric_Adaptations_of_Simon_Armitage_and_Alice_Oswald_

Greenwood, Emily. 2019. “Subaltern Classics in Anti- and Post-Colonial Literatures in English”, in The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature, vol. 5: 1880-2000, ed. Kenneth Haynes. Oxford University Press: 576-607. https://www.academia.edu/42320655/_Subaltern_Classics_in_Anti-_and_Post-Colonial_Literatures_in_English_

Greenwood, Emily. 2020. “Middle Passages: Mediating Classics and Radical Philology in Marlene Nourbese Philip and Derek Walcott”, in Classicisms in the Black Atlantic, eds. Ian Moyer, Adam Lecznar, and Heidi Morse. Oxford University Press: 29-56. https://www.academia.edu/42320599/_Middle_Passages_Mediating_Classics_and_Radical_Philology_in_Marlene_Nourbese_Philip_and_Derek_Walcott_

Greenwood, Emily and Barbara Graziosi, eds. 2007. Homer in the Twentieth-Century: Between World Literature and the Western Canon. Oxford: Oxford University Press. https://www.academia.edu/14435675/Homer_in_the_Twentieth_Century_Between_World_Literature_and_the_Western_Canon

Hairston, Eric Ashley. 2013. The Ebony Column: Classics, Civilization, and the African

American Reclamation of the West. 1st ed. Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press.

Haley, Shelley. 1995. “Self-definition, community and resistance : Euripides' Medea and Toni Morrison's Beloved.” Thamyris: mythmaking from past to present, Vol. 2, No. 2: 177-206.

Murray, J. 2019. “W. E. B. Du Bois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece: The Education of

Black Medea.” TAPA 149.2: 143-62. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/742080

Nelson, Charmaine. 2007. The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America. University of Minnesota Press.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-El. 2015. Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to the Ivy League. Penguin Random House.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-El. 2015. “Barbarians Inside the Gate, Part I: Fears of immigration in ancient Rome and today.” Eidolon. https://eidolon.pub/barbarians-inside-the-gate-part-i-c175057b340f#.5vx427eal.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-El. 2015. “Barbarians Inside the Gate, Part II: Immigrant labor and its discontents.” Eidolon. https://eidolon.pub/barbarians-inside-the-gate-part-ii-c22c5becd228#.5sw20ol37.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-El. 2015. “From Damocles to Socrates: The Classics in/of Hip-Hop.” Eidolon. https://eidolon.pub/from-damocles-to-socrates-fbda6e685c26#.z9fwc35oc.

Rankine, P. (2006) Ulysses in Black: Ralph Ellison, Classicism, and African American Literature. Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press.

        https://muse.jhu.edu/book/8678

Rankine, Patrice D. (2013), Aristotle and Black Drama: A Theater of Civil Disobedience. Waco: Baylor University Press.

Rankine, Patrice D. “Black Is, Black Ain’t: Classical Reception and Nothingness in Ralph Ellison, Derek Walcott and Wole Soyinka.” Revue De Littérature Comparée 344 (2012): 457-74, 511-512, 514.

        https://www.cairn.info/revue-de-litterature-comparee-2012-4-page-457.htm#

Rankine, P. D. 2019. “Afterlife: Du Bois, Classical Humanism, and the Matter of Black Lives.” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 26.1: 86-96.

Walters, Tracey L. 2007.  African American Literature and the Classicist Tradition: Black Women Writers from Wheatley to Morrison. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

Classical Reception in Fiction and Non-Fiction

Morrison, Toni. 1987.  Beloved. 1st edition, Knopf.

Obioma, Chinozie.  2019.  An Orchestra of Minorities.  Little, Brown and Company.

   

Religious Studies

Laughlin, Vivian A. 2014. “The Buddha and the Christ: Looking at Jesus through Buddhist Eyes.” Journal of Adventist Mission Studies 10: 78-87. https://www.academia.edu/30699239/The_Buddha_and_the_Christ_Looking_at_Jesus_through_Buddhist_Eyes

Laughlin, Vivian A. 2015. “A Brief Overview of al Jinn within Islamic Cosmology and Religiosity.” Journal of Adventist Mission Studies 11: 67-78.

Smith, Mitzi J. and Yung Suk Kim. 2018. Toward Decentering the New Testament: A Reintroduction (Eugene, OR: Cascade).

Archaeology

Ako-Adounvo, Gifty. 1999. “Studies in the Iconography of Blacks in Roman Art.” Ph.D diss. McMaster University.

Ashby, Solange. 2018. "Dancing for Hathor: Nubian Women in Egyptian Cultic Life." Dotawo: A Journal of Nubian Studies 5: 63-90. https://www.academia.edu/38317431/Nubian_Women_in_Egyptian_Cultic_Life.pdf

Battle-Baptiste, Whitney. 2011. Black Feminist Archaeology. Walnut Creek, Calif: Left Coast Press.

Eaverly, Mary Ann. 2013. Tan Men/Pale Women: Color and Gender in Archaic Greece and Egypt, a Comparative Approach. University of Michigan Press.

Laughlin, Vivian A. 2016. "The Architectural Patronage and Political Prowess of Herod the Great." Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology 3: 13-24. https://www.academia.edu/30958583/The_Architectural_Patronage_and_Political_Prowess_of_Herod_the_Great

Lonis, Raoul. 1994. La Cité dans le Monde Grec. Structures, fonctionnement, contradictions. Nathan.

Lonis, Raoul. 1979. Guerre et religion en Grèce à l’époque classique. Recherches sur les rites, les dieux, l’idéologie de la victoire. Les Belles Lettres.

Related Methodologies

Anthropological Theories

Nota Bene: this is a very basic starter list and includes both pieces focusing on the theoretical framework as well as scholarship applying that theoretical framework (primarily to the ancient Mediterranean but not always).

Creolization

Decolonization and Indigenous Theory

Cote-Meek, Sheila. 2014. Colonized Classrooms. Racism, trauma and resistance in

post-secondary education. Fernwood Publishing, Halifax and Winnipeg.

Postcolonial

Greenwood, Emily. 2020. “Postcolonial Receptions of Homer”, in The Cambridge Guide to Homer, ed. Corinne Pache. Cambridge University Press: 240-46.

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Postcolonialism”, in The Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies, eds. G. Boys-Stones, B. Graziosi, and P. Vasunia. Oxford University Press: 653-664.

Greenwood, Emily. 2019. “Subaltern Classics in Anti- and Post-Colonial Literatures in English”, in The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature, vol. 5: 1880-2000, ed. Kenneth Haynes. Oxford University Press: 576-607. https://www.academia.edu/42320655/_Subaltern_Classics_in_Anti-_and_Post-Colonial_Literatures_in_English_

Yancy, G. “Colonial Gazing: The Production of the Body as Other.” Western Journal of Black Studies 32, (2008): 1–15.

Violence and the Body

Ferreira da Silva, Denise. 2009. “No-Bodies: Law, Raciality, and Violence.” Griffith Law Review 18 (2): 212–36.

        https://www.academia.edu/8409408/No-bodies_Law_Raciality_and_Violence

Mbembe, Achille. 2003. “Necropolitics.” Translated by Libby Meintjes. Public Culture 15 (1): 11–40.

        https://muse.jhu.edu/article/39984

Black Feminist Theory

Battle-Baptiste, Whitney. 2011. Black Feminist Archaeology. Walnut Creek, Calif: Left Coast Press.

Crenshaw, Kimberlé. 1991. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color.” Stanford Law Review 43 (6): 1241-1299.

Haley, Shelley. 1993. "Black Feminist Thought and Classics: Re-membering, Re-claiming, Re-empowering" in Feminist Theory and the Classics, eds. Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz & Amy Richlin, New York & Oxford: Routledge.

Hill Collins, Patricia. 2019. Intersectionality as Critical Social Theory. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Critical Race Theory

Crenshaw, Kimberlé Williams, Luke Charles Harris, Daniel Martinez HoSang, and George Lipsitz, eds. 2019. Seeing Race Again: Countering Colorblindness Across the Disciplines. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

Harris, Angela, Richard Delgado, Richard and Jean Stefancic, eds. 2012. Critical Race Theory: An Introduction, Second Edition. New York. www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qg9h2.

Ferreira da Silva, Denise. 2009. “No-Bodies: Law, Raciality, and Violence.” Griffith Law Review 18 (2): 212–36.

Haley, Shelley. 2009. “Be Not Afraid of the Dark: Critical Race Theory and Classical Studies.” In Laura Nasrallah and Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza (eds.), Prejudice and Christian Beginnings: Investigating Race, Gender and Ethnicity in Early Christian Studies, 4 Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 2009: 27-50.

Samuels, T. "Herodotus and the Black Body: A Critical Race Theory Analysis" . Journal of Black Studies 46.7 (2015): 723-741.

Sharpe, Christina. 2016. In the Wake: On Blackness and Being. Duke University Press

Ethnography, Geography, and Identity

Specific Ethnographic Studies

Sellassie, Sergew Hable. 1972. Ancient and Medieval Ethiopian History. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: United Printers.

Black Athena and Related Debates

This is the one section of this resources document that is not comprised of only Black scholars. The reason for this is because Black Athena sparked, and continues to spark, many academic controversies within our field which fan the flames of racism and/or are directly racist. We have intentionally removed Lefkowitz’s work from this bibliography, because our intent is to focus on positive Black-centered scholarship and not give a larger platform to racist or otherwise problematic scholarship within the field of ancient Mediterranean studies. We recommend reading any of the numerous responses to Bernal’s and Lefkowitz’s work included in this bibliography if you are interested in learning more about the debate.

*under review, not all pieces are related directly to Black Athena

Anselin,  A.  Some Notes  about  an  Early African  Pool of  Cultures from  which

Emerged  the Egyptian Civilisation. in Egypt in its African Context. Proceedings of the Conference held at The Manchester Museum, University of Manchester (ed. Exell, K.) 43–53 (Oxford, BAR International, 2009).

Bernal, Martin (1987), Black Athena: The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilization.

Volume 1: The Fabrication of Ancient Greece 1785-1985.  London: Free Association Books.

Bernal, Martin. 1996. “Whose Greece?” London Review of Books 18:24.

https://www.lrb.co.uk/the-paper/v18/n24/martin-bernal/whose-greece 

Bowerstock, Glen. 1996. “Rescuing the Greeks”, The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/1996/02/25/books/rescuing-the-greeks.html

Crubézy, E. Le peuplement de la vallée du Nil. Archéo-Nil 20, 25–42 (2010).

https://www.archeonil.fr/revue/AN20-2010-Crub%C3%A9zy.pdf

Daniels, Megan. 2018. “Black Athena, 30 Years On: Why Bernal Still Matters to Classics”, Eidolon. https://eidolon.pub/black-athena-30-years-on-5a78253028cc

Gourdine, J., Keita, S., Gourdine, J., & Anselin, A. (2018, August 16). Ancient Egyptian

Genomes from northern Egypt: Further discussion. Ankh 28/29, 2019-2020: 154-161https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327065612_Ancient_Egyptian_Genomes_from_northern_Egypt_Further_discussion NB: Critique of Schuenemann, V., Peltzer, A., Welte, B. et al. Ancient Egyptian mummy genomes suggest an increase of Sub-Saharan African ancestry in post-Roman periods. Nat Commun 8, 15694 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15694

James, George G. M. (1954), Stolen Legacy: The Greeks were not the Authors of Greek Philosophy, but the People of North Africa, Commonly Called the Egyptians. New York: Philosophical Library.

Jayesh, A. K. "Black Hellas? A Footnote to the Black Athena Debate", Journal of Literary Theory 7, 1-2: 86-110, doi: https://doi.org/10.1515/jlt-2013-0004

Keita, S.O.Y. 1993. “Black Athena: “Race,” Bernal, and Snowden.” Arethusa 26: 295-314. NB: Snowden’s and Bernal’s responses appear in the same volume.

McCoskey, Denise E. 2018. “Black Athena, White Power: Are we Paying the Price for Classics’ Response to Bernal?”, Eidolon. https://eidolon.pub/black-athena-white-power-6bd1899a46f2

Takács, G. Chapter III:  Some problems of Egyptian’s position within Afro-Asiatic and among  African   languages.   in  Etymological   Dictionary  of   Egyptian:  Volume 1:  A Phonological Introduction.  35-48. (Leiden, Brill 1999)

Wengrow, D., Dee, M., Foster, S., Stevenson, A. & Ramsey, C. B. Cultural convergence in the Neolithic of the Nile Valley: a prehistoric perspective on Egypt’s place in Africa. Antiquity 88, 95–111 (2014)

 

Complete Bibliography from A-Z

Aigbedion, I. A. 2019. “Atalanta, The Soul of Atlanta? Rewriting Ovid in W. E. B. Du

Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk (1903).” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 26.1: 27-37.

Ako-Adounvo, Gifty. 1999. “Studies in the Iconography of Blacks in Roman Art.” Ph.D diss. McMaster University.

Allen, Danielle. 1997. ‘Imprisonment in Classical Athens.’ The Classical Quarterly 47.1:

121–135.

Allen, Danielle. 2000. The World of Prometheus: The Politics of Punishing in

Democratic Athens. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Allen, Danielle. 2010. Why Plato Wrote. Oxford: Wily-Blackwell.

Ashby, Solange. 2018. "Dancing for Hathor: Nubian Women in Egyptian Cultic Life." Dotawo: A Journal of Nubian Studies 5:63-90. https://www.academia.edu/38317431/Nubian_Women_in_Egyptian_Cultic_Life.pdf

Battle-Baptiste, Whitney. 2011. Black Feminist Archaeology. Walnut Creek, Calif: Left

Coast Press.

Bryant, K. Edwin. 2016. Paul and the Rise of the Slave: Death and Resurrection of the Oppressed in the Epistle to the Romans (Leiden: Brill).

Byron, Gay L. 2002. Symbolic Blackness and Ethnic Difference in Early Christian Literature. London and New York: Routledge.

Crenshaw, Kimberlé. 1991. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color.” Stanford Law Review 43 (6): 1241-1299.

Crenshaw, Kimberlé Williams, Luke Charles Harris, Daniel Martinez HoSang, and George Lipsitz, eds. 2019. Seeing Race Again: Countering Colorblindness Across the Disciplines. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

Cook, William W., and James Tatum. 2010. African American Writers and Classical

Tradition. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press.

Cote-Meek, Sheila. 2014. Colonized Classrooms. Racism, trauma and resistance in

post-secondary education. Fernwood Publishing, Halifax and Winnipeg.

Davis, G. Parthenope: The interplay of ideas in Vergilian Bucolic. Vol. 346, 2012, pp. 1–191.

Davis, G. Virgil's eclogues. 2010, pp. 1–91.

Davis, G. A Companion to Horace. 2010. Scopus. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/book/10.1002/9781444319187 

Davis, G. Aimé Césaire. Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Davis, G. Polyhymnia: The Rhetoric of Horatian Lyric Discourse. University of California Press, 1991.

Davis, G. Non-Vicious Circle: Twenty Poems of Aimé Césaire. Stanford University Press, 1984.

Davis, Gregson. The Death of Procris "Amor" and the Hunt in Ovid's Metamorphoses. 1983.

Davis, G., and M. Davis. Antigua Black: Portrait of an Island People. Scrimshaw Press, 1971.

Derbew, Sarah. 2019. “(Re)membering Sara Baartman, Venus, and Aphrodite.” Classical Receptions Journal 11: 336-354. https://academic.oup.com/crj/article/11/3/336/5530894 

DuBois, W.E.B. 2007. The World and Africa. Oxford University Press. NB: includes a

chapter on Egypt, another on “Ethiopians” as understood in the Greco-Roman world, and chapters on various African civilizations. Part of the “Oxford W.E.B. DuBois” series edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Diop, Cheikh Anta. 1955. The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality. Translated

by Mercer Cook. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books.      

Eaverly, Mary Ann. 2013. Tan Men/Pale Women: Color and Gender in Archaic

Greece and Egypt, a Comparative Approach. University of Michigan Press.

Ferreira da Silva, Denise. 2009. “No-Bodies: Law, Raciality, and Violence.” Griffith Law Review 18 (2): 212–36.

Firmin, Joseph-Anténor. 1885. The Equality of the Human Races. Translated by Asselin Charles. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Garvey, Marcus. 1925. “Who and What Is a Negro?” In Philosophy and Opinions of

Marcus Garvey, edited by Amy Jacques-Garvey, Second edition, II:18–21. New York: Augustus M. Kelley.

Gates Jr., Henry Louis, D. Bindman, and K. Dalton, eds. 2010. The Image of the Black in Western Art: From the Pharoahs to the Fall of the Roman Empire. Vol. 1. Harvard University Press.

Gates, Jr., Henry Louis, and D. Bindman, eds. 2010. The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume II: From the Early Christian Era to the “Age of Discovery.” 2 parts. Belknap.

Greenwood, Emily. 2020. “Middle Passages: Mediating Classics and Radical Philology in Marlene Nourbese Philip and Derek Walcott”, in Classicisms in the Black Atlantic, eds. Ian Moyer, Adam Lecznar, and Heidi Morse. Oxford University Press: 29-56. https://www.academia.edu/42320599/_Middle_Passages_Mediating_Classics_and_Radical_Philology_in_Marlene_Nourbese_Philip_and_Derek_Walcott_

Greenwood, Emily. 2020. “Thucydideses: Authorship, Anachrony, and Anachronism in Greek historiography.” Classical Receptions Journal 12.1: 32-45.

Greenwood, Emily. 2020. “Postcolonial Receptions of Homer”, in The Cambridge Guide to Homer, ed. Corinne Pache. Cambridge University Press: 240-46.

Greenwood, Emily. 2019. “Subaltern Classics in Anti- and Post-Colonial Literatures in English”, in The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature, vol. 5: 1880-2000, ed. Kenneth Haynes. Oxford University Press: 576-607. https://www.academia.edu/42320655/_Subaltern_Classics_in_Anti-_and_Post-Colonial_Literatures_in_English_

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Adapting Homer Via Pope”, in Cy Twombly: Fifty Days at Iliam, ed. Carlos Basualdo. Yale University Press: 68-83.

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Multimodal Twenty-First Century Bards: from Live Performance to Audiobook in the Homeric Adaptations of Simon Armitage and Alice Oswald”, in Epic Performances from the Middle Ages into the Twenty-First Century, eds. Fiona Macintosh, Justine McConnell, Stephen Harrison, and Claire Kenward. Oxford University Press: 275-288. https://www.academia.edu/42320636/_Multimodal_Twenty-First_Century_Bards_from_Live_Performance_to_Audiobook_in_the_Homeric_Adaptations_of_Simon_Armitage_and_Alice_Oswald_

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Pericles’ Utopia: A Reading of Thucydides and Plato”, in How to Do Things with History, eds. D. Allen, P. Christesen, and P. Millett. Oxford University Press: 55-80. https://www.academia.edu/37431393/Pericles_Utopia.pdf

Greenwood, Emily. 2018. “Surveying Greatness and Magnitude in Herodotus”, in Interpreting Herodotus, eds. T. Harrison and E. Irwin. Oxford University Press: 163-186. https://www.academia.edu/37431392/Surveying_Greatness_and_Magnitude_in_Herodotus.pdf

Greenwood, Emily. 2017. “Thucydides on Sicily and the Sicilian Expedition”, in The Oxford Handbook of Thucydides, eds. R. Balot, S. Forsdyke, and E. Foster. Oxford University Press: 161-177. https://www.academia.edu/35024382/Thucydides_On_the_Sicilian_Expedition

Greenwood, Emily. 2016. “Seeing Citizens: re-reading Gyges’s ring of invisibility (Plato Republic 359c6 – 360b2)”, in Invisibility ed. Arien Mack - a special issue of Social Research: An International Quarterly,  83.4: 821-847.

Greenwood, Emily. 2016. “Futures Real and Unreal in Greek Historiography: From Herodotus to Plato”, in Knowing Future Time in and Through Greek Historiography. ed. A. Lianeri. De Gruyter: 79-100. https://www.academia.edu/35024381/Futures_Real_and_Unreal_in_Greek_Historiography_From_Herodotus_to_Plato

Greenwood, Emily. 2016. “Reception studies: the cultural mobility of Classics”, Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 145.2: 41-49.

Greenwood, Emily. 2015. “On Translating Thucydides”, in  A Handbook to the Reception of Thucydides, eds. Christine Lee and N. Morley. Wiley-Blackwell: 91-121. https://www.academia.edu/14437044/On_Translating_Thucydides

Greenwood, Emily. 2012. “The Greek Thucydides: Venizelos’ Translation of Thucydides”, in Thucydides: Reception, Reinterpretation & Influence, eds. N. Morley and K. Harloe. Cambridge University Press: 157-177. https://www.academia.edu/14436152/The_Greek_Thucydides_Venizelos_Translation_of_Thucydides

Greenwood, Emily. 2012. “Corruption and the Corruptibility of Logos in Greek Historiography”, Acta Classica Supplementum IV: 63-83. https://www.academia.edu/14435893/Corruption_and_the_Corruptibility_of_Logos_in_Greek_Historiography

Greenwood, Emily. 2011. “Dislocating Black Classicism: Classics and the Black Diaspora in the Poetry of AiméCésaire and Kamau Brathwaite”, in African Athena: New Agendas, eds. Daniel Orrells, Gurminder K. Bhambra, and Tessa Roynon. Oxford University Press: 362-380. https://www.academia.edu/14438906/Dislocating_Black_Classicism_Classics_and_the_Black_Diaspora_in_the_Poetry_of_Aim%C3%A9_C%C3%A9saire_and_Kamau_Brathwaite

Greenwood, Emily. 2011. “The Politics of Classicism in the Poetry of Phillis Wheatley”, in Ancient Slavery and Abolition: From Hobbes to Hollywood, eds. Edith Hall, Richard Alston, and JustineMcConnell. Oxford University Press: 153-179. https://www.academia.edu/14437113/The_Politics_of_Classicism_in_the_Poetry_of_Phillis_Wheatley

Greenwood, Emily. 2010. Afro-Greeks : Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press. https://www.academia.edu/14435389/Afro-Greeks_Dialogues_Between_Anglophone_Caribbean_Literature_and_Classics_in_the_Twentieth_Century

 Greenwood, Emily. 2010. “Mimicry and Classical Allusion in V.S. Naipaul’s The Mimic Men”, in Classics and National Cultures, eds. S. Stephens and P. Vasunia. Oxford University Press:100-120. https://www.academia.edu/14436465/Mimicry_and_Classical_Allusion_in_V.S._Naipauls_The_Mimic_Men

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Sounding Out Homer: Christopher Logue’s Acoustic Homer”, Oral Tradition 24.2: 503-518. https://www.academia.edu/14435911/Sounding_Out_Homer_Christopher_Logues_Acoustic_Homer

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Shades of Rome in the Poetry of Derek Walcott”, in Living Classics: Greece and Rome in Contemporary Poetry in English, ed. S. Harrison. Oxford University Press: 255-74. https://www.academia.edu/14437274/Shades_of_Rome_in_the_Poetry_of_Derek_Walcott

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Re-rooting the Classical Tradition: New Directions in Black Classicism”, Classical Receptions Journal 1: 87-103. https://www.academia.edu/14435831/Re-rooting_the_Classical_Tradition_New_Directions_in_Black_Classicism

Greenwood, Emily. 2009. “Postcolonialism”, in The Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies, eds. G. Boys-Stones, B. Graziosi, and P. Vasunia. Oxford University Press: 653-664.

Greenwood, Emily. 2008. “Fictions of dialogue in Thucydides.” In The End of Dialogue in Antiquity, ed. Simon Goldhill. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press: 15-28. https://www.academia.edu/14438866/Fictions_of_Dialogue_in_Thucydides

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Arriving Backwards: the return of the Odyssey in the English-Speaking Caribbean”, in Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds, eds. L. Hardwick et al. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 192-210. https://www.academia.edu/14438893/Arriving_Backwards_the_return_of_the_Odyssey_in_the_English-Speaking_Caribbean

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Between Colonialism and Independence: Eric Williams and the Uses of Classics inTrinidad in the 1950s and 1960s”, in The Blackwell Companion to Classical Receptions, eds. L. Hardwick and C. Stray. Oxford: Blackwell: 98-112. https://www.academia.edu/14438884/Between_Colonialism_and_Independence_Eric_Williams_and_the_Uses_of_Classics_in_Trinidad_in_the_1950s_and_1960s

Greenwood, Emily and Barbara Graziosi, eds. 2007. Homer in the Twentieth-Century: Between World Literature and the Western Canon. Oxford: Oxford University Press. https://www.academia.edu/14435675/Homer_in_the_Twentieth_Century_Between_World_Literature_and_the_Western_Canon

Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Logue’s Television: Reading Homer from a distance”, in Homer in the TwentiethCentury: Between World Literature and the Western Canon, eds. B. Graziosi and E.Greenwood. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 145-76. https://www.academia.edu/14436527/Logues_Television_Reading_Homer_from_a_Distance

 Greenwood, Emily. 2007. “Bridging the narrative (5.23-7).” In Reading Herodotus: a study of the logoi in Book 5 of Herodotus' Histories, eds. Elizabeth Irwin and Emily Greenwood. Cambridge; New York : Cambridge University Press: 128-145. https://www.academia.edu/14438915/Bridging_the_Narrative_5.23-7

Greenwood, Emily and Elizabeth Irwin, eds. 2007. Reading Herodotus: a study of the logoi in Book 5 of Herodotus' Histories. Cambridge; New York : Cambridge University Press.

Greenwood, Emily. 2006. Thucydides and the Shaping of History. London: Duckworth.

Greenwood, Emily. 2005. “Still going on: Temporal Adverbs and the View of the Past in Derek Walcott's Poetry”, Callaloo 28.1: 132-145. https://www.academia.edu/14435590/Still_going_on_Temporal_Adverbs_and_the_View_of_the_Past_in_Derek_Walcotts_Poetry

Greenwood, Emily. 2005. “‘We speak Latin in Trinidad’: uses of Classics in Caribbean Literature”, in Classics and Colonialism, ed. Barbara Goff. London: Duckworth: 65-91.

Greenwood, Emily. 2004. “Classics and the Atlantic Triangle: Caribbean Readings of Greece and Rome via Africa”, Caribbean Connections. Forum for Modern Language Studies 40.4: 365-376.

Greenwood, Emily. 2004. “Making words count: freedom of speech and narrative in Thucydides.” In Free Speech in Classical Antiquity, eds. Lneke Sluiter and Ralph M. Rosen. Leiden; Boston: Brill: 175-195.

Greenwood, Emily and Paul Cartledge. 2002. “Herodotus as a critic: truth, fiction, polarity.” In Brill’s Companion To Herodotus, eds. Egbert J. Bakker, Irene J.F. De Jong and Hans Van Wees. Leiden; Boston: Brill: 351-371.

Hairston, Eric Ashley. 2013. The Ebony Column: Classics, Civilization, and the

African American Reclamation of the West. 1st ed. Knoxville: The University of

Tennessee Press.

Haley, Shelley. 2009. “Be Not Afraid of the Dark: Critical Race Theory and Classical Studies.” In Laura Nasrallah and Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza (eds.), Prejudice and Christian Beginnings: Investigating Race, Gender and Ethnicity in Early Christian Studies, 4 Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress Press, 2009: 27-50. https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Be-Not-Afraid-of-the-Dark-Critical-Race-Theory-and-Haley/b4e885480691ee26be44b995dea45ee8d2c267e7

Haley, Shelley. 2002. “Lucian’s ‘Leaena and Clonarium’: Voyeurism or a Challenge to Assumptions?” in Among Women: From the Homosocial to the Homoerotic in the Ancient World, edited by Nancy S. Rabinowitz and Lisa Auanger, Austin, Texas: The University of Texas Press: 286-303.

Haley, Shelley. 1995. “Self-definition, community and resistance : Euripides' Medea and Toni Morrison's Beloved.” Thamyris: mythmaking from past to present, Vol. 2, No. 2: 177-206.

Haley, Shelley. 1993. "Black Feminist Thought and Classics: Re-membering, Re-claiming, Re-empowering" in Feminist Theory and the Classics, eds. Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz & Amy Richlin, New York & Oxford: Routledge.

Haley, Shelley. 1990. “Livy, passion, and cultural stereotypes.” Historia: Zeitschrift fur Alte Geschichte 39.3: 375-381.

Haley, Shelley. 1985. “The Five Wives of Pompey the Great.” Greece and Rome 32: 49–59.

Haley, Shelley. 1983. “Archias, Theophanes, and Cicero: The Politics of the Pro Archia.” The Classical Bulletin 59: 1-4.

Harris, Angela, Richard Delgado, Richard and Jean Stefancic, eds. 2012. Critical Race Theory: An Introduction, Second Edition. New York. www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qg9h2.

Houston, Drusilla Dunjee. 1926. Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire.

Vol. I. Black Classic Press.

hooks, bell. 2014. Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice

of Freedom. Routledge.

                http://sites.utexas.edu/lsjcs/files/2018/02/Teaching-to-Transcend.pdf

Johnson, Matthew V., James A. Noel, and Demetrius K. Williams, eds. 2012. Onesimus Our Brother: Reading Religion, Race, and Culture in Philemon (Minneapolis: Fortress).

Junior, Nyasha. 2019. Reimagining Hagar: Blackness and Bible (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Junior, Nyasha, and Jeremy Schipper. 2020. Black Samson: The Untold Story of an American Icon (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Keita, Maghan. 1994. “Deconstructing the Classical Age: Africa and the Unity of the Mediterranean World.” The Journal of Negro History 79: 147-66.

Keita, Maghan. 2000. Race and the Writing of History: Riddling the Sphinx. Oxford University Press. NB: This deals with race and historiography in broad terms but has several chapters dedicated specifically to classical scholarship, e.g. blackness in ancient history, the work of Frank Snowden, and the Black Athena debates

Laughlin, Vivian A. 2014. “The Buddha and the Christ: Looking at Jesus through Buddhist Eyes.” Journal of Adventist Mission Studies 10: 78-87. https://www.academia.edu/30699239/The_Buddha_and_the_Christ_Looking_at_Jesus_through_Buddhist_Eyes

Laughlin, Vivian A. 2015. “A Brief Overview of al Jinn within Islamic Cosmology and Religiosity.” Journal of Adventist Mission Studies 11: 67-78.

Laughlin, Vivian A. 2016. "The Architectural Patronage and Political Prowess of Herod the Great." Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology 3: 13-24. https://www.academia.edu/30958583/The_Architectural_Patronage_and_Politica_Prowess_of_Herod_the_Great

Lonis, Raoul. 1969. Les usages de la guerre entre Grecs et Barbares; des guerres médiques au milieu du IVe s. avant J-C. Les Belles Lettres.

Lonis, Raoul. 1979. “Les Éthiopiens du Pseudo-Scylax; myth ou réalité géographique?” Revue française d’histoire d’outre-mer 66: 101-10.

Lonis, Raoul. 1981. “Les trois approches de l’Éthiopien dans l’opinion gréco-romaine.” Ktema 6: 66-87.

Lonis, Raoul. 1993. “La condition des réfugiés politiques en Grèce: statut et privilèges.” Collection INSTA 491: 209-25.

McDonald, William P. 1975. “The Blackness of Medea.” College Language Association Journal 19: 20-37.

O’Meally, Robert. 2007. Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey. New York: D.C. Moore.

Mbembe, Achille. 2003. “Necropolitics.” Translated by Libby Meintjes. Public Culture 15 (1): 11–40. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/39984

Morrison, Toni. 1987.  Beloved. 1st edition, Knopf.

Murray, J. 2019. “W. E. B. Du Bois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece: The Education of

Black Medea.” TAPA 149.2: 143-62. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/742080

Murray, J. 2019. "Poetically Erect: The female oriented humor in Callimachus’ Hymn to

Demeter." Hellenistica Groningana 24: New Perspectives in Callimachean Scholarship (Leuven) 249-263.

Murray, J. 2018. “Silencing Orpheus: The fiction of Performance in Apollonius’

Argonautica” in M.A. Harder e.o. (eds.) Hellenistica Groningana 23: Poetry and Performance (Leuven) 201-224.

Murray, J. 2017. “New Light on the Meridian, Obelisk, and Ara Pacis of Augustus”

co-authors Bernie Frischer, Karl Galinsky, John Pollini, Nicholas Cipolla, Giuseppina Capriotti, John Fillwalk, Chrystina Häuber, John Miller, Michelle Salzman, Molly Swetnam-Burland. SDH, 1, 1, Article 2. 45-48.

Murray, J. 2016. “Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica: Text & Commentary” in Hellenistic

Greek Poetry: A Selection. Ed. David Sider (Ann Arbor, 2016). 64-97.

Murray, J. 2014. “Anchored in Time: the date in Apollonius’ Argonautica” in M.A. Harder

e.o. (eds.) Hellenistica Groningana 20: Hellenistic Poetry in Context (Leuven, 2014). 247-284.

Murray, J. 2012. “Burned After Reading:  The So-Called List of Alexandrian Librarians in

P.Oxy.X.1241” Aitia 2 http://aitia.revues.org/544

Murray, J. 2011. “Shipwrecked Argonauticas: Lucan and Apollonius” in Paolo Asso

(ed.), Brill’s Companion to Lucan (Leiden, 2011). 57-79.

Murray, J. 2010. “Hellenistic Elegy: Out from under the shadow of Callimachus” in

James J. Clauss and Martine Cuypers (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Hellenistic Literature (Oxford, 2010). 106-116.

Murray, J. 2009 Review of A Guide to Hellenistic Literature (Blackwell Guides to

Classical Literature) by Kathryn Gutzwiller. Phoenix 63: 390-391.

Murray, J. 2008 Review of M. Fantuzzi and R. Hunter, Tradition and Innovation in

Hellenistic Poetry, Ancient History Bulletin 20: 146-147.

Murray, J. 2007. “Gendered voice in Hellenistic Epigram” with Jonathan M. Rowland, in

Peter Bing and Jon Bruss (eds.) Brill Companion to Hellenistic Epigrams (Leiden, 2007). 211-232.

Murray, J. 2005. “The Constructions of the Argo in Apollonius’ Argonautica” in A. Harder

and M. Cuypers (eds.) Beginning from Apollo: Studies in Apollonius Rhodius and the Argonautic Tradition. Caeculus 6 (2005). 88-106.

Murray, J. 2004. “The Metamorphoses of Erysichthon: Callimachus, Apollonius and

Ovid” in M.A. Harder e.o. (eds.) Hellenistica Groningana 7: Callimachus II (Leuven, 2004). 207-241.

Murray, J. 2002. “Waking up to Iliad 7.434" CQ 52:2 (580-81).Mveng, Engelbert. 2005. Greek Sources of African History: From Homer to Strabo. Karnak House.

Mveng, Engelbert. 1972. Les sources grecques de l’histoire négro-africaine depuis Homère jusqu’à Strabon. Paris: Présence Africaine.

Nelson, Charmaine. 2007. The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America. University of Minnesota Press.

Obioma, Chinozie.  2019.  An Orchestra of Minorities.  Little, Brown and Company.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-El. 2018. “Ecology, Epistemology, and Divination in Cicero De Divinatione 1.90–94.” Arethusa 51, no. 3: 237-267. ProjectMuse. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/719086.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-El. 2017. “Circulation’s Thousand Connectivities.” In Rome, Empire of Plunder. The Dynamics of Cultural Appropriation, ed. by Matthew P. Loar, Carolyn MacDonald, and Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017): 261-70.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-el. 2017. “Slave Religiosity in the Roman Middle Republic.” Classical Antiquity 36 (2): 317–69.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-el. 2019. “Some Thoughts on AIA-SCS 2019.” Medium. January 7, 2019. https://medium.com/@danelpadillaperalta/some-thoughts-on-aia-scs-2019-d6a480a1812a.

Padilla Peralta, Dan-el. 2019. “Etruscan Negro.” Paper, Johns Hopkins University, February 12.

Patterson, Orlando (1982), Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study. Cambridge, MA & London: Harvard University Press.

Rankine, P. (2006) Ulysses in Black: Ralph Ellison, Classicism, and African American Literature. Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press.

Rankine, Patrice D. (2013), Aristotle and Black Drama: A Theater of Civil Disobedience. Waco: Baylor University Press.

Rankine, Patrice D. “Black Is, Black Ain’t: Classical Reception and Nothingness in Ralph Ellison, Derek Walcott and Wole Soyinka.” Revue De Littérature Comparée 344 (2012): 457-74, 511-512, 514. https://www.cairn.info/revue-de-litterature-comparee-2012-4-page-457.htm#

Rankine, Patrice D. "The Classics, Race, and Community-Engaged or Public Scholarship." American Journal of Philology 140, no. 2 (2019): 345-359. doi:10.1353/ajp.2019.0018. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/726222

Rankine, P. D. 2019. “Afterlife: Du Bois, Classical Humanism, and the Matter of Black Lives.” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 26.1: 86-96.

Sellassie, Sergew Hable. 1964. “Beziehungen Äthiopiens zur griechisch-römischen Welt.” Dissertation, History (?), Bonn, Germany.

Samuels, Tristan. "Herodotus and the Black Body: A Critical Race Theory Analysis" . Journal of Black Studies 46.7 (2015): 723-741. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282052004_Herodotus_and_the_Black_Body_A_Critical_Race_Theory_Analysis

Scarborough, William Sanders. 2005. The Autobiography of William Sanders

Scarborough: An American Journey from Slavery to Scholarship. edited, introduced and annotated by Michele Ronnick. Forward by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (Detroit: Wayne State University Press).

Scarborough, William Sanders. 2006. The Works of William Sanders Scarborough:

Black Classicist and Race Leader. edited, introduced, annotated by Michele Ronnick. Forward by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (New York: Oxford University Press).

Scarborough, William Sanders. 2019. William Sanders Scarborough’s First Lessons in

Greek: A Facsimile of the 1881 First Edition, edited, introduced, annotated by Michele Ronnick. Forward by Ward W. Briggs, Jr. (Chicago: Bolchazy-Carducci).

Sechrest, Love. 2009. A Former Jew: Paul and the Dialectics of Race. London: T&T Clark.

Sellassie, Sergew Hable. 1972. Ancient and Medieval Ethiopian History. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: United Printers.

Sharpe, Christina. 2016. In the Wake: On Blackness and Being. Duke University Press.

Smith, Mitzi J. and Yung Suk Kim. 2018. Toward Decentering the New Testament: A Reintroduction (Eugene, OR: Cascade).

Snowden, Jr., Frank M. (1970), Blacks in Antiquity: Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press

Snowden, Jr. Frank M. (1983), Before Color Prejudice: The Ancient View of Blacks. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1947. “The Negro in Classical Italy.” American Journal of Philology 68: 266-92.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1948. “The Negro in Ancient Greece.” American Anthropologist 50: 31-44.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1990. “Romans and Blacks: A Review Essay.” American Journal of Philology 111: 543-57.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1993. “Response [to S.O.Y. Keita]” Arethusa 26: 319-27.

Snowden Jr., Frank M. 1997. “Misconceptions About African Blacks in the Ancient Medierranean World: Specialists and Afrocentrists.” Arion 4: 28-50.

Thompson, Lloyd and John Ferguson, eds. 1969. Africa in Classical Antiquity: Nine Studies. Ibadan University Press.

Thompson, Lloyd. 1989. Romans and Blacks. Routledge.

Thompson, Lloyd. 1993. “Roman Perceptions of Blacks. Scholia 2: 17-30.

Trouillot, Michel-Rolph. 1997. Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History. Boston: Beacon Press.

Walters, Tracey L. 2007.  African American Literature and the Classicist Tradition: Black Women Writers from Wheatley to Morrison. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

Wimbush, Vincent L. 2003. The Bible and African Americans: A Brief History (Minneapolis: Fortress).

Wimbush, Vincent L. 2012. White Men’s Magic: Scripturalization as Slavery (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Yancy, G. “Colonial Gazing: The Production of the Body as Other.” Western Journal of Black Studies 32, (2008): 1–15.

Links

The Sportula: Microgrants for Classics Students: “a group of Classics Graduate Students and Junior Faculty committed to making sure that students from working-class and historically looted communities (like the ones we ourselves come from) don’t fall through the cracks left by traditional scholarship programs” (description taken from The Sportula FAQ)

CripAntiquity Pedagogy Resources: resources and bibliography for teaching neurodiverse and disabled students

ReMeDhe: A working group for Religion, Medicine, Disability, Health, and Healing in Late Antiquity

Race/Ethnicity in Greek and Roman Antiquity Bibliography: “a starter bibliography of scholarship related to race/ethnicity in Greek and Roman antiquity (including some Early Christian and Medieval)” (description taken from bibliography page, hosted by Prof. Futo-Kennedy on her blog)

Race & Medieval Studies: A Partial Bibliography

Resources for Teaching Race and Ethnicity, Immigration, and Marginality in Classical Antiquity

Race and Classics Classroom Packet from Eidolon

Anti-Racist Literature Recommendations by @victoriaalxndr

Pharos: Doing Justice to the Classics. Pharos is a platform where classical scholars, and the public more broadly, can learn about and respond to appropriations of Greco-Roman antiquity by hate groups online.

Ethnic/Immigrant Associations in Antiquity--from Associations in the Graeco-Roman World: An Expanding Collection of Inscriptions, Papyri, and Other Sources in Translation

Eos--Africana Receptions of Ancient Greece and Rome. “Eos exists to create a supportive, dedicated community for studying Africana receptions of ancient Greece & Rome and to foster collaborative research and pedagogy between Classics and other disciplines.”

Everyday Orientalism: “a platform through which students, academics, and citizens can reflect on how history and power shape the way in which human societies define themselves through the ‘Other’.”

Classics at the Intersections: https://rfkclassics.blogspot.com/: Blog containing original research on issues of race and ethnicity and the Ancient Mediterranean, and white supremacism in Classics

Multiculturalism, Race & Ethnicity in Classics Consortium (MRECC): here is linked a bibliography which contains works specifically dealing with antiracism and white supremacism in Classics, but also includes pedagogical resources, fictional works on Race/Racism outside of Classics, and personal narratives by Black scholars in Classics

Mountaintop Coalition: The Mountaintop Coalition was founded in 2018. It is composed of students and scholars of the ancient Mediterranean world and its reception (broadly defined) with a shared interest in advancing the professional goals of Classicists who identify as members of ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in the field. Such interests will include scholarly approaches to the study of race and ethnicity in antiquity, but the group’s activities will focus on practical issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, and access in professional settings.