Lydia Georgieva

EDTECH 503 (Spring 2013)

Instructional Design Project

Submitted to: Dr. Yu-Hui Ching


May 12, 2013

Project Title: Primary Research for Extended Essay in IB Economics.

Table of contents

Synthesis/Reflection Paper………………………………………………………….         2

Part 1. Topic  ………………………………………………………………………....         4

1a. Stated learning goal  …………………………………………………….        4

1b. Description of the audience …………………………………………….        4

1c. Rationale…….……………………………………………………………        4

Part 2. Analysis Report ………………………………………………………………        6

2a. Description of the needs…………………………………………………        6

2a1: Needs assessment survey …………………………………….        6

2a2: Needs assessment data report ……………………………….        8

2b. Description of the learning context …………………………………….        12

2b1: Learning context ………………………………………………..        12

2b2: Transfer context …………………………………………………        13

2c: Description of the learners ………………………………………………         14

2d: Task analysis flow chart …………………………………………………………        15

Part 3. Planning …………………………………….…………………………………        21

3a: Learning objectives  (list) ………………………………………………..        23

3b: Objectives and assessment matrix table ………………………………        23

3c: ARCS Table …………………………………….…………………………        25

Part 4. Instructor Guide …………………………………….………………………..        29

Part 5. Learner Content …………………………………….………………………..        33

5a: Learning materials ……………………………………………………….        33

5b: Assessment materials ……………………………………………………         34

5c: Technology tool justification ……………………………………………..        35

Part 6. Formative Evaluation Plan …………………………………………………..         36

6a: Expert Review plan ……………………………………………………….        36

6b: One-to-One evaluation plan ……………………………………………..        37

6c: Small Group evaluation plan …………………………………………….        37

6d: Field Trial evaluation plan ………………………………………………..        37

Part 7. Formative Evaluation Report ………………………………………………...         39

7a: Evaluation survey or rubric ……………………………………………….         39

7b: Report the results of the expert review ………………………………….         39

7c: Comments on Change …………………………………………………….         40

Part 8. AECT Standards Grid …………………………………………………………        41

Appendices …………………………………….……………………………………….

Appendix A :Learning Materials ………………………………………………………         47

Appendix B: Flowchart of Instruction ………………………………………………...         50

Appendix C: Expert Review Mr. Loren Baron ………………………………………          51

Appendix D: Expert Review Mr. Jacob Solomon …………………………………        55

Synthesis/Reflection Paper

The instructional design process is very much like designing and building a house. In the analysis phase you need to analyze the location, the terrain, the sun direction, the needs you want to fulfill and the costs. This all relates to the goal- what exactly type of house one wants. During the strategy phase one starts thinking about the different rooms, types of materials to be used, the functionality, the time frame in which one wants the house to be completed. It is very important to control the quality of the materials and work and to be able to imagine the sequence of events in the building process. Having one’s dream house depends on good planning and thoughtful consideration of the many constraints that are present. The minor details are also of importance as they will ensure one’s satisfaction with the result and achievements of the goal set.

The first part of the project, ID Project #1, helped me see the bigger picture of the instruction, determine the instructional goal, address specific learners’ needs, define sound and achievable objectives. I also had to determine the tools and activities to be used in the instruction and also plan suitable ways to achieve the objectives set. It helped me plan the instruction in an organized and sequential manner. I found it quite challenging, as I needed to follow certain structure.

The next phase of the project, ID Project #2 helped me step back from the instructor role and put on the hat of a teacher and this helped me create the steps in which other teachers are most likely to deliver the instruction. The Smith and Ragan text was very useful in my aim to create effective instruction. It also made me realize that future reviews in the implementation of instruction are something very natural and can only help to improve the instruction.  Another very important aspect of instructional design, outlined in the Smith and Ragan text is that “Perfection is neither a goal nor an option in design. All design involves trade-offs, even the most elegant and widely admired designs. Instructional designers, seek to analyze, plan, implement, and evaluate in such a waythat their work will do the most good with the least harm and to learn from mistakes to improve.” [1]

My experience in designing instruction up to the moment when I started this EDTECH course has mostly relied on my gut feeling of what is right for achieving certain learning goals. But going through the instructional design process step by step helped me realize that there is a better way to keep instruction focused and allowed me to see some faults in the design of the online course I developed before.

This knowledge of designing effective instruction will be valuable in the future as I am looking for opportunities to be part of developing online courses and as I am planning to create a few Professional Development courses to help teachers integrate technology in the curriculum across subjects. The Smith and Ragan text give a valuable start in this and presents various instructional models, which I hope to be able to try in the future.

Part 1. Topic

        1a. Stated learning goal

Having decided on a well-focused, narrow Extended Essay research for EE in Economics, students conduct primary research in the form of survey and process the obtained data in a suitable visual format.

        

1b. Description of the audience

The learners are high school students, following the IB Diploma program, who have chosen to write their EE in Economics. Their age is between 16-18 and one of their subject choices is Economics, most likely at Higher Level.

        

1c. Rationale:

Need

There is the need for better primary research skills resulting in better primary data included in the Extended Essay in Economics. This need has been pointed out in the Extended Essay subject reports and the lack of instruction on primary research skills in the Economics subject syllabus is evident to me as a teacher of the subject.

The approach to instruction will be predominantly supplantive, facilitating students in the information processing, with an element of generative where they will have to transfer the knowledge acquired to the context of their chosen Extended Essay research. This approach will guide them through the process of creating appropriate survey questionnaires, conducting the surveys, processing, analyzing and presenting the data collected in an appropriate manner. It also will allow them to organize and elaborate on the collected data, integrate it with existing theoretical knowledge of the subject to build a convincing argument in the Extended Essay body.

Major Instructional Strategy

Instructional strategies for problem solving will be the main instructional strategies as students will learn how to combine their existing knowledge of the subject with the procedures learned for conducting primary research and generating primary research data to answer their Extended Essay research question, an original question they have chosen to research.

In the process of instruction there will be elements of expository strategy for learning procedures, as students will be presented with examples of correct procedures for conducting a valid survey and defining suitable sampling methods.  

Why This Strategy

The reason for choosing supplantive approach to learning is that the outcome of the instruction is closely related with processes and procedure learning. Another reason is the time limit of the lesson and supplantive approach is more likely to be effective when time is limited.

Some of the generative aspects of the lesson are that learners have to work towards their own Extended Essay question and topic and have to transfer the acquired knowledge to that specific context. But these generative aspects of the instruction occur within the supplantive-learning as the learners are guided by the instructor and should follow pre-defined series of steps in meeting the learning outcomes.

Part 2. Analysis Report

        2a. Description of the needs

                2a1. Needs assessment survey

The needs assessment is based on the IBO statistical bulletin data for the period of time between May 2009- May 2012. It should be noted that the numbers of the IB candidates registered for the May sessions is much higher than those registered for the November examination session due to the majority of IB schools being in the Northern Hemisphere and following the May session calendar.

The data extracted from the statistical bulletins shows that from all students registered for the IB Diploma, between 34 to 36% take a Group 3 subject (Humanities such as History, Geography, Economics, Business Management, Psychology). There is nothing surprising in this as IB Diploma Candidates need to take at least one subject from each subject group of 1-5.

Table 1

Year

Total IB Candidates

Group 3 subjects (English) %

May-09

211,106

34.38

Nov-09

16,101

33.10

May-10

234,209

36.11

Nov-10

16992

35.05

May-11

249245

36.81

Nov-11

19136

34.37

May-12

277151

36.21

Table 2

Year

Group 3 subjects (English)(statistics)

Econ HL +SL( statistics)

% of students taking Economics

May-09

72,582

12196

16.80

Nov-09

5330

1761

33.04

May-10

84,584

13749

16.25

Nov-10

5955

1893

31.79

May-11

91759

15096

16.45

Nov-11

6577

1950

29.65

May-12

100368

16334

16.27

Table 2 above shows the percentage of students taking Economics as one of their DP subjects based on the statistical data from the IB bulletins for the respective years.

The percentage of students choosing to write their Extended Essay in a group 3 subject are most likely to be students that have chosen IB Economics at a Higher Level.

The needs assessment survey was conducted online by using Surveymonkey. Participants in the survey were students enrolled in my online section of Economics Higher level. The aim of the survey was to establish whether students possess the necessary skills for conducting surveys as a method of collecting primary data and whether they have been taught such skills as part of their Economics class or another subject, or as part of their introduction to the EE in Economics, either presented by their EE supervisor or another teacher in charge.

The survey questions are below:

                

2a2. Needs assessment data report

The survey was answered by 6 students in my online IB Economics HL course section. From the answers it is clear that 100% of the students are familiar with what primary research is (Question 1).

When asked to choose between three primary research methods (interview, observation, survey) it is evident that some students plan to use more than one primary research methods and that five out of six students intend to use surveys to collect data (figure 1).

Figure 1

To question 3 ‘Have you ever been taught primary research skills as part of the IB Economics subject, all six students answered negatively.

Question 4 aimed to find out whether the necessary skill of conducting survey as a way to collect primary data has been presented or introduced to learners as part of their introduction to the Extended Essay project. Schools usually organize introduction to the Extended Essay to all students in their first year of the IB Diploma Program, after which students are assigned an EE supervisor. 5 out of 6 respondents answered that they have not been presented with such skills during the EE introduction process, and only one confirmed that those skills have been part of the EE introduction (figure 2)

Figure 2

Question 5 aimed to find out whether students have been taught the primary research skills, in particular survey skills as part of the instruction for another subject, to which 1 respondent answered positively and 5 respondents answered negatively.

Figure 3 below shows that 5 respondents do not feel well prepared to conduct a survey appropriate for their Extended Essay in Economics and Figure 4 shows that only one respondent has previously had experience in conducting a survey.

Figure 3

Figure 4

One out of the six respondents answered negatively to the question whether further training in the skills needed to conduct a survey will be beneficial (Q8).

Question 9 aimed to establish whether learners are familiar with sampling methods, and 100 % of the learners answered negatively and confirmed that they will benefit from getting familiar with the various sampling methods (Q.10)

In conclusion, it is evident that majority of IB learners have the need to develop skills in primary research. The limitations of the survey conducted to establish the needs for the instruction is the limited population on which the survey was conducted and the low level of response. Probably also more suitable questions could have been asked.

        

2b. Description of the learning context

The learning context for my ID project is International Baccalaureate schools which enroll IB students for IB online courses with the organization I work for. The IB online courses give IB schools the opportunity to expand their subject choices. The Extended Essay requirement is a core requirement for IB Diploma candidates, meaning that each student registered for the diploma needs to meet this requirement. From the IBO statistical bulletin it is evident that almost half of the IB Diploma candidates choose to write their Extended Essay in a Group 3 subject (table 4 below).

Table 4

Year

Total IB Candidates

EE in G3/%

May-09

211,106

51.72

Nov-09

16,101

46.74

May-10

234,209

49.56

Nov-10

16992

47.61

May-11

249245

50.89

Nov-11

19136

47.56

May-12

277151

49.35

Extended Essay is a research report of 4000 words, written by the student under the guidance and supervision of a supervisor, who is required to be a teacher in the school. The time spent by the supervisor with the student should not exceed 5 hours, including reading the first draft, giving advice and guidance for improvement, conducting the viva voce interview to establish that the academic honesty policy of the IBO has been complied with by the student.

The Extended Essay, together with the Theory of Knowledge can add up to 3 bonus points to the student’s overall IB grade. The Extended Essay research is very stressful process for high school students as this is the first such research assignment for them. But mastering suitable research skills during the EE research process is valuable experience for students as it prepares them well for future research assignments when they enroll in higher education. The EE process is also stressful for teachers as it adds to their workload and in many cases these additional responsibilities are considered to be part of their job description.

This online instruction will be focused on students enrolled in our online subject courses who wish to write their Extended Essay in the Humanities subjects. We currently deliver Economics, Business Management and Psychology from the Group 3 subjects as online courses. Thus, we think there will be quite high need of supervision of Extended Essays in those subjects and the online environment can make this supervision more cost-efficient for the organization, the teachers and the students. 

                2b1: Learning context

The instruction will take place via online delivery. The online Learning Management System to be used is Desire2Learn. Students possess the necessary skills and experience to navigate the Learning Management System as they are already enrolled in one of the IB online courses and have been exposed to the LMS procedures. Students who are enrolled in the EE online course but not enrolled in any of the other IB online courses would have undergone orientation training in navigating the LMS successfully.

Instructors for the EE online course would be subject teachers who already act as online instructors in Economics. The instructors are trained IB teachers, with years of experience in teaching IB Economics in face-2-face class and also in the online environment. They also have experience in Extended Essay supervision in the subject of Economics, are familiar with the Extended Essay requirements and assessment criteria which are available in the IBO Extended Essay Subject guide. Some of the instructors are also as Extended Essay examiners, involved in assessment of Extended Essays in Economics.

                2b2: Transfer context

The transfer context is different from the learning environment. Students will be able to transfer their skills and knowledge to their future university studies when posed with similar research tasks resulting in producing a report on a topic.

Learners will also be able to utilize the skills required in other requisite internal assessments for achieving the IB Diploma, such as the Internal Assessment for the Business and Management subject.

        

2c. Description of the learners

The students are 16-19 year old learners, following the IB Diploma program. They fit the IB Learner Profile characteristics and are knowledgeable, inquisitive, critical learners. They have skills in navigating the Learning Management System, have developed critical thinking, analytical and evaluative skills during their study of IB subjects. They are highly motivated in achieving good results in their IB Diploma and are likely to have strong aptitude for the subject of Economics, in which they choose to write their Extended Essay. They are also likely to consider a major in Economics for their further studies at university level.

Table 4 for May 2012 examination sessions shows that almost half of the IB Diploma candidates write their EE in one of the G3 subjects and Economics is a group 3 subject (figure 5):

Figure 5

And the data from the survey shows that 71 % of the learners who have chosen to write their EE in Economics do not feel well prepared for the task and will benefit from instruction in the skills needed. (Figure 6)

Figure 6

        

2d. Task analysis flow chart

Please make screenshots of your task analysis flow charts and include the images here. Your flow charts need to include both the major steps and detailed steps. The goal is for the readers of your design document to obtain a clear idea what the learning task entails

Information-processing flow chart

Step 1 Pre-requisite analysis: Determine a suitable sampling method to conduct survey

Step 2 Prerequisite analysis: Discriminate types of questions used in surveys

Step 3 Prerequisite analysis: Determine suitable population to conduct survey

Step 4 Prerequisite analysis: Conduct survey

Step 5 Prerequisite analysis: Use Excel to present results of qualitative and quantitative questions

Step 6 Prerequisite analysis: Evaluate the process

Part 3. Planning

        3a. Learning objectives (list)

Learning objectives: 

1/ Distinguish between various sampling methods.  

2/ Determine suitable sampling method to collect primary data

2a/ Students determine the most suitable sampling method in relation to their EE research

2b/ Students  analyze the sampling method chosen to collect primary data

2c/ Students explain the rationale behind their choice of sampling method

3/ Discriminate between different question types used in surveys

        3a/ Students match different questions types with given categories

        3b/ If unable to categorize the questions types correctly, students read description and sample questions and attempt the categorizing task again

4/Construct suitable quantitative and qualitative survey questions

4a/ Students create appropriate questionnaire in relation to their EE research

4b/ Students categorize their own  questions under ‘quantitative’ and ‘qualitative’ categories

4c/ Students write a brief rationale explaining how the questions will help them answer the EE research question

4d/ Students analyze the relevance of the questions to collect appropriate primary data in relation to their EE research

5/ Students determine the demographic characteristics of the population to survey

        5a/ Students write a brief outline: population to be surveyed, location(s), time(s), day(s), suitability of the chosen sampling method, limitations

        5b/ After receiving feedback from peers, students review and make changes and submit to the teacher

        5c/ Students integrate teacher’s feedback

6/ Use a suitable word processing application/ online application to create and conduct survey

        6a/ Students determine the form in which they will conduct their survey- face-to-face or online

        6b/ Students create their questionnaire- either printed or using an online application

        6c/ Students conduct their survey

7/ Process collected data

        7a/ Students group the answers according to ‘quantitative’, ‘qualitative’.

7b/ Students create visual presentation of the collected data using Excel

7c/ Students determine whether the collected primary data is appropriate to answer the EE research question

8/ Students evaluate the results of their survey

        8a/ Students determine whether the collected data confirms or refute the economic theories and concepts used to build the EE argument

        8b/ Students determine the need of further survey or appropriate secondary research to support their EE argument

        8c/ Students analyze the limitations of the survey, the need for further survey, unanswered questions and best approach to handle those

        8d/ Students submit their analysis to the teacher

        8e/ Students integrate teacher feedback and integrate the analysis in their EE body

        

3b. Objectives and assessment matrix table

Matrix of Objectives, Bloom's Taxonomy, Assessment Plan

Learning Objectives (a)

Bloom’s Taxonomy Classification (b)

Format of Assessment (c)

Description of test form (d)

Sample items
(e)

1/ Distinguish between various sampling methods:

    Comprehension          

Paper-and-pencil

Matching exercise

A company X chose to survey every 10th person of the population. This is an example of: a) quota sampling, b) random sampling; c) stratified random sampling

2/ Determine suitable sampling method to collect primary data

Comprehension

Paper-and-pencil

Short –answer questions

Which sampling method best fits your EE research? Explain the rationale behind your choice

3/ Discriminate between different question types used in surveys

Comprehension

Paper-and pencil

grouping exercise

Group the question on the left under the headings on the right

4/Construct suitable quantitative and qualitative survey questions

Synhtesis

Paper and pencil

Criteria-based assessment

Checklist to check the questions against specific criteria, peer-assessment

5/ Students describe the demographic characteristics of the population to survey

comprehension

Paper and pencil

Write an outline

Rubric will be based upon: description of the population characteristics; planning location and time; sampling method and rationale for the choice

6/ Use a suitable word processing application/ online application to create and conduct survey

Synthesis

Word processing software

Criteria-based assessment

Checklist, peer assessment, instructor assessment

7/ Process collected data

synthesis

Excel

Criteria-based assessment

Self-assessment, Instructor feedback

8/ Students evaluate the results of their survey

evaluation

Paper and pencil

Criteria-based assessment

Self-assessment based on checklist provided by the instructor, Instructor feedback based on criteria for analysis of research data

3c ARCS Table

I especially liked the ARCS simplified design matrix (p.9 Keller 2000, ARCS Lesson Planning) and decided that it will be useful to start with it before making decisions on motivational tactics.

Design Factors

ARCS Categories

Attention

Relevance

Confidence

Satisfaction

Learner Characteristics

Own choice to write on Economics topic(+)

Interest in the topic (+)

High motivation (+)

Committed to succeed (+)

Knowledge of bonus points to IB Diploma (+)

Knowledge of assessment criteria (+)

Confident in existing knowledge on the subject (+)

Lack of knowledge for the task(-)

Eager to get high score(+)

New group of students (-)

Teacher unfamiliar (-)

Learning Task (learners attitude towards)

Recommended type of research (+)

EE is mandatory (+)

New skills (+)

 

Successful examples to be presented (+)

Possible present or future use (+)

Possible interest (+)

First exposure  (-)

May seem difficult (-)

Positive outcome for the EE (+)

High satisfaction of own work (+)

Medium of delivery (online)

Variety of media to be used (+)

Possible software conflicts(-)

Online (+)

May contradict with learners’ experiences and perception of relevance (-)

Internet/expired hyperlinks issues (-)

Learners may feel unwilling to share, participate, give feedback (-)

Quick feedback (+)

Opportunities for trial and correction (+)

Motivational Tactics for the lesson

Minimal tactics required:

-Emphasize importance of the learning

  • Relate to assessment criteria
  • Demonstrate transfer of skills
  • Clear step-by-step instructions

Tactics required:

-examples of successful EE shown

-point out the value of including primary research as supporting the argument

Tactics:

-set clear learning outcomes

-emphasize the added value that the skill will bring to EE

-encourage learners to participate

-check hyperlinks and replace if needed

-adept instruction

Tactics:

-quick feedback

-monitor and guide discussions

-encourage and support application of skill to individual research chosen.

-provide opportunities for interaction

Based on the characteristics identified above, the following motivational tactics have been determined

ARCS Motivational Tactics Table

ATTENTION

A.1 Perceptual Arousal

  • The workshop will begin by viewing a video about sampling methods (http://youtu.be/be9e-Q-jC-0) and a video of conducting a survey (http://youtu.be/eC71QIqqs8s)
  • Examples/ non-examples of questionnaires used for various survey purposes will be presented to students at different points of instruction
  • Successful examples of primary research data and its use in EE in Economics will be shown to learners.

A2. Inquiry Arousal

  • Instructor will monitor learners brainstorm ideas for appropriate sampling method to their chosen EE research questions
  • Instructor will give reading assignment to learners to get familiar with the different question types and methods of conducting surveys (http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/survtype.php)
  • Instructor will support learners to organize/categorize different type of questions under given categories and headings; they will be able to distinguish between good survey questions and not so suitable ones
  • Instructor will provide individual help and support to learners to construct their own surveys and post in a forum for peer-feedback, alongside with their EE research question

A3. Variability

  • Instructor includes videos, reading, matching exercise and brainstorming throughout the lesson, peer feedback and ability to comment and share ideas with peers.
  • Instructor ensures that learners receive appropriate peer feedback, and also provides feedback.
  • Instructor guides and supports learners in their use of technology to create survey and process results- with appropriate instruction documents, Jing casts, etc.

RELEVANCE

R1. Goal orientation

  • Instructor outlines the relevance of the skills to be learned in relation to the Extended Essay research and guides learners to connect and apply those skills to existing knowledge in their research.
  • Instructor explains how the skills acquired through instruction relate to the EE assessment criteria.
  • Instructor shares with the learners sample(s) of primary research data included in an excellent EE so that they are familiar with what the examiners value.

R2. Motive matching

  • Instructor supports and encourages learners to create their own survey questionnaires; determine the sampling method, in a way to match those with the topic of research they have chosen for their EE.
  • Instructor reminds learners to use their existing knowledge and perception of the context of their EE

R3. Familiarity

  • Instructor provides feedback, support and guidance that will help learners connect their survey with prior knowledge on the chosen EE topic at different points of the instruction.
  • Instructor determines clear deadlines for conducting survey, collecting and processing data.  

CONFIDENCE

C1. Learning requirements

  • Learners possess the prerequisite content knowledge and identify easily the primary data they need to enhance their research. Instructor provides the support needed.
  • The learning tasks are separated and performed in small chunks.  

C2. Success opportunities

  • Peer and instructor feedback is given at some points in the lesson, self-assessment is provided with clear rubric and checklists
  • Sample of relevant primary research and its integration in an Extended Essay which has achieved a grade of A is presented to the learners

C3. Personal control

  • Self-assessment opportunities provided throughout the instruction
  • Opportunities for repeating and refining the learning outcomes are provided
  • Personalized feedback and support from the instructor is provided
  • Technology use and choice of visual presentation of data

SATISFACTION

S1. Natural consequences

  • Learners will work in a group and help each other with ideas

Learners are given the opportunity to trial their survey in a friendly environment  and correct/edit it for conducting to the pre-planned population

S2. Positive consequences

  • At the end of the lesson learners will have their surveys ready for application
  • At the conclusion of the lesson learners have sample of result analysis which they can transfer to the future results of the survey conducted on the planned population
  • Learners will be provided with instructor feedback to their work in relation to their individual EE research.

S3. Equity

  • The usefulness of the instruction is clearly related to the EE assessment criteria from the start of the lesson
  • The success of achieving the goal of the lesson by all students will be pointed out


Part 4. Instructor Guide

INSTRUCTOR GUIDE

Instructor Guide aims to facilitate teachers in guiding learners to preparing appropriate survey materials in relation to their Extended Essay research.

INTRODUCTION

A welcome note to students in the General discussion forum/or the front page of the website.

Clear instructions posted in the Help Forum to direct students to ask questions when they encounter difficulties.

The instructor explains to students how the successful completion of the lesson relates to their EE research.

  1. Gain learner’s attention- instructor directs students to examples of successful EE primary research from past essays
  2. Establish Purpose
  1. the instructor provides learners with the learning goal to be achieved at the end of the instruction
  2. the instructor provides students with the information flow chart showing the steps required to complete the instruction and achieve the learning goal
  3. the instructor indicates that on completion of the required tasks learners will have appropriate survey, relevant primary data and a sample of data analysis which they can use to answer their EE research question.

  1. Stimulate Learner’s Attention/Motivation
  1. the instructor will explain to learners the importance of choosing appropriate sampling method and creating appropriate questionnaire related to their EE research.
  2. the instructor will reinstate the benefits of the skill learners will acquire during the instruction- not only for their EE research but also for application to other subjects.

  1. Preview the learning activity and provide overview
  1. Instructor refers the learners to the information flow chart, showing the steps of the process

BODY

  1. Stimulate recall of relevant prior knowledge
  1. Instructor asks students to outline briefly EE research topic and economic theories in a discussion forum.
  2. Instructor shows selected comments from EE subject reports and assessment criteria requirement.
  3. Instructor guides students to brainstorm what type of primary data they think will be appropriate to support their individual EE research.
  4. Instructor monitors the relevant discussion forums, provides feedback and suggestions throughout the process of instruction.

2. Present information and examples

Step 1. Determine a suitable sampling method to conduct survey:

  1. students view a video about sampling methods (http://youtu.be/be9e-Q-jC-0) and

a video of conducting a survey (http://youtu.be/eC71QIqqs8s)

  1. Instructor prompts learners to complete a matching exercise
  2. Instructor provides learners with feedback on the matching exercise

Step 2. Determine suitable sampling method to collect relevant primary data

  1. Instructor prompts learners to reflect and describe which sampling method is most suitable for their EE research
  2. Instructor prompts learners to submit their reflection for feedback, together with their EE chosen title
  3. Instructor provides feedback to individual students on the suitability of the sampling method chosen

Step 3. Discriminate between different types of questions used in surveys

  1. Instructor directs students to the reading about different types of questions used in surveys
  2. Instructor directs learners to complete the reading task on types of questions used in surveys
  3. Instructor demonstrates examples of question types
  4. Instructor directs learners to completing the organizing exercise- students need to put different question types under the correct category
  5. Instructor directs learners who found it difficult to review the reading and attempt the task again.

Step 4. Construct suitable quantitative and qualitative survey questions

  1. Instructor directs learners to open a Word doc on their computers and brainstorm suitable questions
  2. Instructor directs students to categorize their own questions under ‘quantitative’ and ‘qualitative category
  3. Instructor directs learners to reflect on the relevance of their questions and write a short outline on what data they are hoping to collect and the relevance of it to their EE research
  4. Instructor provides individual help to students who need support to construct their own survey questionnaires
  5. Instructor prompts learners to submit their questionnaires for feedback
  6. Instructor provides brief feedback to learners to the suitability of their questionnaires to collect relevant primary data for their EE research

Step 5. Determine suitable population to conduct survey

  1. Instructor directs students to a template to complete for an outline of suitable population to survey
  2. Instructor monitors submissions and prompts individual students to present their outline to the discussion forum if they have delayed
  3. Instructor provides individual support and hints as required
  4. Instructor monitors discussion and peer comments
  5. Instructor prompts students to integrate peer feedback and submit for instructor feedback
  6. Instructor gives feedback to the outline after integrating peer feedback and editing

Step 6. Use a suitable word processing application/ online application to create and conduct the survey.

  1. Instructor prompts students to share their decision on the survey form with peers in a discussion forum
  2. Instructor provides suggestions for the form of the survey and provides feedback on the final survey
  3. Instructor supports students if required in decisions of conducting the survey
  4. Instructor gives a deadline by which students have to conduct the survey and collect the data

Step 7. Use Excel to present results of qualitative and quantitative questions from the survey

  1. instructor demonstrates how to input data and create different types of charts in Excel, e.g. pie chart, column graph
  2. Instructor demonstrates how to group various data for ease of presentation
  3. Instructor responds to individual students’ questions by Jing presentations and other suitable presentations about the use of Excel
  4. Instructor presents a rubric to learners on the visual presentation of the collected data and analysis for students to use for self-assessment
  5. Instructor prompts those learners who found that they need more data to resume the process from Step 4 onward.

Step 8 Evaluation of data

  1. Instructor prompts learners to use the criteria-based rubric to self-assess the suitability of the data presentation and the analysis of the data
  2. Instructor prompts students to submit their data presentation and analysis.
  3. Instructor uses a criteria-based rubric for giving feedback to students.

CONCLUSION

  1. Provide summary and review
  1. Instructor summarizes the instruction and the resulting skills acquired by the learners.
  2. Instructor prompts learners to ask questions and share their impression of the experience
  1. Instructor provides positive feedback on the work learners have done and the skills acquired and practices
  2. Instructor wraps up what has been learned and reminds the learners about the availability of resources in the site which they can continue using if they face the need to collect more primary data.

Part 5. Learner Content

5a: Learning materials

The learners will use several materials during the workshop. Materials include a website for the instruction and all other learning materials are linked to the website. The learners will also be given access to a wiki for the length of the instruction.

Lesson Website tabs (Website link)

Learner materials

Start

About

Sampling

Questionnaires

Preparing survey

Conducting Survey

Data Processing

Evaluation

Two sample Extended Essays with the marks

Extracts from EE subject reports in relation to primary research as part of the Extended Essays in Economics

Sampling worksheet

Types of questions – worksheet

How to design a good questionnaire

YouTube videos

Other websites linked to the lesson website

Screenshot of the website (close to completion):

Macintosh HD:Users:lydiageorgieva:Desktop:Screen Shot 2013-05-05 at 6.32.27 PM.png

The learners will be able to use wiki linked to the instructional website for all class discussions, for peer and teacher feedback.

Wiki discussions

Website (Link to website)

Internet access

Computer

5b: Assessment materials - formative

Formative assessment will be utilized during the instruction throughout the duration of the instruction. Due to the nature of the Extended Essay and the fact that it should be own individual work of the learners, formative assessment is considered the most suitable type of assessment during the instruction.

The learning tasks require students to submit their questionnaires, primary research data together with outline of their EE research, economic theories and concepts included, in the discussion forums on several occasions. Students will then receive peer and instructor feedback of the suitability of questionnaires, data collected and visual presentation of results.

5c: Technology tool justification

This course depends heavily on technology. Technology tools used include: website, computer with Internet access, Microsoft Office tools such as Word and Excel, Flash.

The tools serve the following functions:

Technology Tool

Justification

Computer with Internet access

The learners enrolled in my online school come from various parts of the world and thus they need a computer with Internet access to be able to participate and take advantage of the instruction. Some materials come from the web and learners need to have computers and Internet access to be able to access those.

Microsoft Office

Learning materials include practice such as matching exercises, for which students need to have Microsoft Word installed on their computers. The materials also require that students use Excel to process and visualize the results of the surveys.

Course Website

The website is needed as a one-stop place for the learners and the instructor. All instructions, exercises, links to learning materials can be found there. Learners can also go back to the same materials after the workshop if they need to conduct additional research.

Wiki

The wiki is needed as place where learners and the instructor can give feedback, ask questions, discuss issues and get ideas how to overcome challenges. The specific wiki pages are linked to the website.

Part 6. Formative Evaluation Plan

6a: Expert Review plan

The SME I asked to review my ID project is Mr. Loren Baron (baronlor@gmail.com), an IBDP Coordinator and IB Economics Teacher with many years of experience in not only teaching IB Economics but also supervising and marking Extended Essays in the subject and Mr. Jacob Solomon (jacobsol@netvision.net.il), an IBDP senior moderator and examiner for the IB with many years of experience in teaching IBDP Economics and supervising Extended Essays in the subject.

The questions I asked the two subject experts to reflect upon and write their feedback are summarized in the table below:

Effectiveness

Goals

Content

Technology

Message Design

Are the goals and objectives for the instruction accurate?

Is the content accurate and up-to-date

Does the content present a consistent perspective of the requirements of primary research in EE as defined by the IBO?

Does the technology chosen function properly(website, links to external websites, wiki pages, downloadable documents)

Are the learning materials chosen easy to access?

Is the designed website easy to navigate?

Are the supporting graphics, embedded videos good ways to enhance learning?

Is the timeframe of 3-5 hours of instruction appropriate?

Are directions clear for all tasks?

Efficiency

Goals

Content

Technology

Message design

Are the goals and objectives clearly stated for each step?

Are the samples, activities and feedback points realistic?

Is the purpose of the workshop stated clearly?  

Is the structure of the website appropriate and easy to navigate?

Is the pedagogical approach consistent with instructional methods used in the IB online Economics courses?

Is it made easy to access the instructor and peers?  

Is the vocabulary chosen appropriate for the target audience?

Do tabs organize the content well?    

Appeal

Goals

Content

Technology

Message design

Are the goals relevant to the learners?

Is the content appealing?

Is the instruction appropriate for creating positive attitudes in learners?

Is navigation of the website easy and straightforward?

Are the message and media chosen pleasing?

6b: Oneto-One evaluation plan

One-to One Evaluation will include a couple of individual learners and the purpose will be to identify problems in the instruction such as typographical errors, unclear or missing directions, inappropriate examples, etc.

The key questions to be answered:

For this type of evaluation and based on the fact that the instruction I planned is designed for computer-based instruction I liked the idea presented in S&R about the “read-think-aloud “ technique. Learners will be asked to read and think aloud while interacting with the instructional materials. This can be taped and later on transcribed.

6c: Small Group evaluation plan

In the small group evaluation the purpose will be to revise the efficacy of instruction for a varied group of learners. The questions to be asked:

6d: Field Trial evaluation plan

Field trial aims to determine the effectiveness of the revisions made during small-group evaluation and validate the instruction with larger sample of the target audience. It also will help to ascertain any problems that may arise in the administration of the materials in a real instructional environment.

The questions to be answered at this stage and to inform further revisions are:

Part 7. Formative Evaluation Report

7a: Evaluation survey or Rubric:

Effectiveness

Goals

Content

Technology

Message Design

Are the goals and objectives for the instruction accurate?

Is the content accurate and up-to-date

Does the content present a consistent perspective of the requirements of primary research in EE as defined by the IBO?

Does the technology chosen function properly(website, links to external websites, wiki pages, downloadable documents)

Are the learning materials chosen easy to access?

Is the designed website easy to navigate?

Are the supporting graphics, embedded videos good ways to enhance learning?

Is the timeframe of 3-5 hours of instruction appropriate?

Are directions clear for all tasks?

Efficiency

Goals

Content

Technology

Message design

Are the goals and objectives clearly stated for each step?

Are the samples, activities and feedback points realistic?

Is the purpose of the workshop stated clearly?  

Is the structure of the website appropriate and easy to navigate?

Is the pedagogical approach consistent with instructional methods used in the IB online Economics courses?

Is it made easy to access the instructor and peers?  

Is the vocabulary chosen appropriate for the target audience?

Do tabs organize the content well?    

Appeal

Goals

Content

Technology

Message design

Are the goals relevant to the learners?

Is the content appealing?

Is the instruction appropriate for creating positive attitudes in learners?

Is navigation of the website easy and straightforward?

Are the message and media chosen pleasing?

7b: Report the results of the expert review

The expert evaluation was extensive and complete and sent to me by email. The questionnaire for the expert reviewer had three sections related to effectiveness, efficiency and appeal. Overall the evaluation was positive and constructive. Several points came up from Mr. Loren Baron’s report, on which further work needs to be done:

  1. A suggestion was made to include an example of a mock survey for learners’ collaborative work, alongside with mock Extended Essay research question.
  2. Website needs more work to make it good and easy to follow

Mr. Jacob Solomon’s report was also very constructive and actually suggested that the instruction is aimed at the student’s own EE research.

7c: Comments on Change

Some of the changes suggested by the two subject experts make good sense. Some work still needs to be completed on the website and the wiki for this project but in general the instruction is relatively well organized. My concern is that the instruction may take longer time than originally required by this project and will need some further refinement.

 

Professional Standards Addressed (AECT)

The following standards, developed by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT), and used in the accreditation process established by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), are addressed to some degree in this course. The numbers of the standards correspond to the numbers next to the course tasks show on the list of assignments. Not all standards are addressed explicitly through student work.

Assignments meeting standard in whole or part

Standard 1: DESIGN

1.1 Instructional Systems Design (ISD)

X

ID Project

1.1.1 Analyzing

X

ID Project; ID Case Analysis

1.1.2 Designing

X

ID Project

1.1.3 Developing

X

ID Project

1.1.4 Implementing

X

ID Project

1.1.5 Evaluating

X

Selected Discussion Forums; ID Project

1.2 Message Design

1.3 Instructional Strategies

X

ID Project

1.4 Learner Characteristics

X

ID Project

Standard 2: DEVELOPMENT

2.0 (includes 2.0.1 to 2.0.8)

X

ID Project

2.1 Print Technologies

X

Reading Quiz; ID Project

2.2 Audiovisual Technologies

2.3 Computer-Based Technologies

X

(all assignments)

2.4 Integrated Technologies

Standard 3: UTILIZATION

3.0 (includes 3.0.1 & 3.0.2)

3.1 Media Utilization

X

(all assignments)

3.2 Diffusion of Innovations

3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization

X

ID Project

3.4 Policies and Regulations

Standard 4: MANAGEMENT

4.0 (includes 4.0.1 & 4.0.3)

4.1 Project Management

4.2 Resource Management

4.3 Delivery System Management

4.4 Information Management

Standard 5: EVALUATION

5.1 Problem Analysis

X

5.2 Criterion-Referenced Measurement

X

ID Project

5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation

X

ID Project

5.4 Long-Range Planning

COURSE GOALS & OBJECTIVES

The overall goal for the course is for each student to consider and use the systematic process of instructional design to create an instructional product. To achieve this goal, students will engage in activities that promote reflective practice, emphasize realistic contexts, and employ a number of communications technologies. Following the course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the historical development of the practice of instructional design with regard to factors that led to its development and the rationale for its use

  1. Describe at least two reasons why instructional design models are useful

  1. Identify at least six instructional design models and classify them according to their use

  1. Compare and contrast the major elements of three theories of learning as they relate to instructional design

  1. Define “instructional design.”

  1. Define the word “systematic” as it relates to instructional design

  1. Define “learning” and synthesize its definition with the practice of instructional design

  1. Relate the design of instruction to the term “educational (or “instructional”) technology”

  1. Describe the major components of the instructional design process and the functions of models in the design process

  1.  Provide a succinct summary of various learning contexts (declarative knowledge, conceptual, declarative, principle, problem-solving, cognitive, attitudinal, and psychomotor)

  1.  Build an instructional design product that integrates major aspects of the systematic process and make this available on the web.

  1. Describe the rationale for and processes associated with needs, learner, context, goal, and task analyses

  1. Create and conduct various aspects of a front-end analysis

  1. Identify methods and materials for communicating subject matter that are contextually relevant

  1. Describe the rationale for and processes associated with creating design documents (objectives, motivation, etc.)

  1. Construct clear instructional goals and objectives

  1. Develop a motivational design for a specific instructional task

  1. Develop assessments that accurately measure performance objectives

  1. Select and implement instructional strategies for selected learning tasks

  1. Select appropriate media tools that support instructional design decisions

  1. Describe the rationale and processes associated with the formative evaluation of instructional products
  1. Create a plan for formative evaluation

  1.  Identify and use technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities.

  1.  Apply state and national content standards to the development of instructional products

  1.  Meet selected professional standards developed by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology

  1.  Use various technological tools for instructional and professional communication


AECT STANDARDS (Applicable to EDTECH 503)

1.0 Design

1.1 Instructional Systems Design

1.1.a Utilize and implement design principles which specify optimal conditions for learning.

1.1.b Identify a variety of instructional systems design models and apply at least one model.

1.1.1 Analyzing

1.1.1.a Write appropriate objectives for specific content and outcome levels.

1.1.1.b Analyze instructional tasks, content, and context.

1.1.2 Designing

1.1.2.a Create a plan for a topic of a content area (e.g., a thematic unit, a text chapter, an interdisciplinary unit) to demonstrate application of the principles of macro-level design.

1.1.2.b Create instructional plans (micro-level design) that address the needs of all learners, including appropriate accommodations for learners with special needs.

1.1.2.d Incorporate contemporary instructional technology processes in the development of interactive lessons that promote student learning.

1.1.3 Developing

1.1.3.a Produce instructional materials which require the use of multiple media (e.g., computers, video, projection).

1.1.3.b Demonstrate personal skill development with at least one: computer authoring application, video tool, or electronic communication application.

1.1.4 Implementing

1.1.4.a Use instructional plans and materials which they have produced in contextualized instructional settings (e.g., practica, field experiences, training) that address the needs of all learners, including appropriate accommodations for learners with special needs.

1.1.5 Evaluating

1.1.5.a Utilize a variety of assessment measures to determine the adequacy of learning and instruction.

1.1.5.b Demonstrate the use of formative and summative evaluation within practice and contextualized field experiences.

1.1.5.c Demonstrate congruency among goals/objectives, instructional strategies, and assessment measures.

1.3 Instructional Strategies

1.3.a Select instructional strategies appropriate for a variety of learner characteristics and learning situations.

1.3.b  Identify at least one instructional model and demonstrate appropriate contextualized application within practice and field experiences.

1.3.c Analyze their selection of instructional strategies and/or models as influenced by the learning situation, nature of the specific content, and type of learner objective.

1.3.d Select motivational strategies appropriate for the target learners, task, and learning situation.

1.4 Learner Characteristics

1.4.a  Identify a broad range of observed and hypothetical learner characteristics for their particular area(s) of preparation.

1.4.b  Describe and/or document specific learner characteristics which influence the selection of instructional strategies.

1.4.c  Describe and/or document specific learner characteristics which influence the implementation of instructional strategies.

2.0 Development

2.0.1 Select appropriate media to produce effective learning environments using technology resources.

2.0.2 Use appropriate analog and digital productivity tools to develop instructional and professional products.

2.0.3 Apply instructional design principles to select appropriate technological tools for the development of instructional and professional products.

2.0.4 Apply appropriate learning and psychological theories to the selection of appropriate technological tools and to the development of instructional and professional products.

2.0.5 Apply appropriate evaluation strategies and techniques for assessing effectiveness of instructional and professional products.

2.0.6 Use the results of evaluation methods and techniques to revise and update instructional and professional products.

2.0.7 Contribute to a professional portfolio by developing and selecting a variety of productions for inclusion in the portfolio.

2.1 Print Technologies

2.1.3 Use presentation application software to produce presentations and supplementary materials for instructional and professional purposes.

2.1.4 Produce instructional and professional products using various aspects of integrated application programs.

2.3 Computer-Based Technologies

2.3.2 Design, produce, and use digital information with computer-based technologies.

3.0 Utilization

3.1  Media Utilization

3.1.1 Identify key factors in selecting and using technologies appropriate for learning situations specified in the instructional design process.

3.1.2 Use educational communications and instructional technology (SMETS) resources in a variety of learning contexts.

3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization

3.3.1 Use appropriate instructional materials and strategies in various learning contexts.

3.3.2 Identify and apply techniques for integrating SMETS innovations in various learning contexts.

3.3.3 Identify strategies to maintain use after initial adoption.

4.0 Management

        (none specifically addressed in 503)

5.0 Evaluation

5.1 Problem Analysis

5.1.1 Identify and apply problem analysis skills in appropriate school media and educational technology (SMET) contexts (e.g., conduct needs assessments, identify and define problems, identify constraints, identify resources, define learner characteristics, define goals and objectives in instructional systems design, media development and utilization, program management, and evaluation).

5.2 Criterion-referenced Measurement

5.2.1 Develop and apply criterion-referenced measures in a variety of SMET contexts.

5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation

5.3.1 Develop and apply formative and summative evaluation strategies in a variety of SMET contexts.

SMET = School Media & Educational Technologies

Appendix A: Learning Materials

1. Online Learning Materials

  1. YouTube video on sampling methods: YouTube video on sampling methods
  2. YouTube video on conducting a survey: How are surveys conducted
  3. You Tube video on different types of surveys: Types of surveys
  4. Document with tips on designing questionnaires: Designing a good questionnaire
  5. Survey Monkey tips: Survey Question types
  6. Guidelines on questionnaire design: Questionnaire design

2. Sampling Methods Worksheet

Objective: to distinguish between the various sampling methods.

Match the sampling method in the right-hand column with the description in the left-hand column.

Description

Sampling method

1. This method is similar to random sampling. This method is the process of selecting a predetermined random member from a sampling list, e.g. every 4th person entering the supermarket.

a. Simple Random Sampling

2. In this method each item of the data (population) has the same probability of being selected in the sample. The selection is usually made with the help of random numbers.

b. Stratified Sampling

3. This sampling method often determines the groups to survey by geography.

c. Systematic Sampling

4. With this sampling method, groups and subgroups are listed within the greater population by factors they have in common and then the percentage of each group’s representation is determined and a proper number from each group is selected in order to represent the population as a whole.

d. Cluster sampling

5. A type of non-probability sampling which involves the sample being drawn from that part of the population which is close to hand, i.e. a population is selected because it is readily available and convenient.  

e. Quota sampling

6. The population is first segmented into mutually exclusive groups and then judgment is used to select the subjects or units from each segment based on a specified proportion.

f.  Convenience sampling

3. Types of questions worksheet

Group the questions below under the different categories in the table:

A. Open-ended/qualitative questions

B. Closed-ended (quantitative questions)

Multiple choice

Categorical

Likert scale

Ordinal

Numerical

Questions:

  1. What is your current age? (select one) 
      Less than 18 
      18 to 29 
      30 to 39 
      40 to 49 
      50 or older

  1. Example 

    Please rank the importance of the following qualities in a team leader. (Please fill in your rank order in the spaces provided using the numbers 1 through 5) 
      A team leader that is sincere 
      A team leader that gets resources for the team 
      A team leader that is an advocate for the team 
      A team leader that is a strong disciplinarian 
      A team leader that is a good motivator

  1. Example

    How important do you think SAT scores are to a college student’s success? (select one):

Not very important   1     2     3     4     5   Extremely important

  1. What is your gender?
      Male 
      Female

  1. Example 

    What is your current marital status? (Select one.) 
      Single 
      Married 
      Divorced 
      Separated 
      Widowed

  1. Describe your relationship with your parents. 

4. Survey Question Types

http://www.utexas.edu/academic/ctl/assessment/iar/teaching/plan/method/survey/survey_tables_questiontypes.pdf

Appendix B: Flowchart of instruction

Appendix C

Expert Review of Mr. Loren Baron

Effectiveness

Goals

Are the goals and objectives for the instruction accurate?

Learning objectives are utilized to structure the course and come directly from the IBO’s Economics syllabus

Content

Is the content accurate and up-to-date

Does the content present a consistent perspective of the requirements of primary research in EE as defined by the IBO?

The content of the project is primarily accurate and up to date.  The videos utilized and the links to additional readings are current and accessible.  The only difficulty was with accessing the EE samples and the extracts from the EE subject report on the “About” page of the website.

The use of surveys for data collection in an Economics extended essay is recognized by the IBO in their EE subject guide as a legitimate and valued form of data collection.

Technology

Does the technology chosen function properly(website, links to external websites, wiki pages, downloadable documents)

Are the learning materials chosen easy to access?

Is the designed website easy to navigate?

Are the supporting graphics, embedded videos good ways to enhance learning?

There are a few typos here and there throughout the website, but as this is a draft, I am sure they will be addressed.

Message Design

Are directions clear for all tasks?

Throughout the lesson the content emphasized is the conduct of a survey for collection of economic data for an Extended Essay.  

Efficiency

Goals

Are the goals and objectives clearly stated for each step?

The objectives for the EE instructional course are clear and are approached throughout in a pragmatic way that will allow the student who is only beginning the EE process in Economics to follow the procedures from the selection and refinement of an EE research question, to building an appropriate survey, to analyzing the results of the survey as well as the effectiveness of the survey itself.

Content

Are the samples, activities and feedback points realistic?

Is the purpose of the workshop stated clearly?  

The worksheets and videos, were clear and reasonable.  The Youtube videos utilized in the project are excellent teaching resources for understanding different sampling strategies and their strengths and limitations.  The worksheets are a good exercise for processing the information learned in the videos.  The additional reading resources are also informative and can be very helpful if the student chooses to utilize them, though there is no requirement that this be the case, thus leaving it to the motivation of the students.  Since the basic video and reading requirements do cover the objectives outlined in the activities, I am comfortable with the additional resources as a tool at the student’s discretion, keeping in mind the expected motivational level of the students engaged in the extended essay process.

The feedback will come from the teacher in the form of critique of the students’ work submissions and the peer reviews and comments on the various activity wikis.  The student feedback will be invaluable so the student producing the work can have a better understanding of how the average individual will read and consider the work.  That said, there are occasions when peer review is less critical and accurate, so having the teacher feedback for the activities at each stage of the process will be critical.

One addition I might suggest in this section is an example of some sort presented by the teacher, built into the course, that will allow students to work together to build a mock survey.  The teacher might supply the EE research question and the context for the survey, and the students, using either discussion platform and/or a wiki page, would consider the appropriate survey, the means of delivery, and the questions to ask.  Once that is done, the teacher might provide fake data that will allow students to continue the process of evaluation of the data and the survey process as a whole.

Technology

Is the structure of the website appropriate and easy to navigate?

Is the pedagogical approach consistent with instructional methods used in the IB online Economics courses?

Is it made easy to access the instructor and peers?

Website comments:

Start:

Flow chart is not complete.  First box is empty, other boxes cut off.

Not sure the purpose of the credit.  Brings me to a link about Beijing.

About:

Could not connect to the EE samples or EE subject report.  Received error window

Message design

Is the vocabulary chosen appropriate for the target audience?

Do tabs organize the content well?      

Yes, quite appropriately chosen.

Appeal

Goals

Are the goals relevant to the learners?

The goals are very relevant for the learners and the task at hand.

Content

Is the content appealing?

Is the instruction appropriate for creating positive attitudes in learners?

The instruction involved in the EE course is positive and encouraging.  The flow charts and other resources show students that there is room for reflection and revision of projects.  The opportunity for peer feedback through discussion, as well as teacher feedback, will serve to support students throughout the course and the EE process.

Technology

Is navigation of the website easy and straightforward?

The instruction in the Economics EE course is appropriate for students in the online IB Economics course.  The 16-18 year old students have received introductions to the course platform, Desire to Learn, and are able to easily maneuver in this course.  The videos are clear and the language utilized throughout the course is appropriate for this audience.  

Message design

Are the message and media chosen pleasing?

Good structure

Appendix D

Expert Review of Mr. Jacob Solomon

Effectiveness

Goals

Are the goals and objectives for the instruction accurate?

Goals are absolutely in line with the IB extended essay requirements, according the criteria for student to be entered in 2015.

Content

Is the content accurate and up-to-date

Does the content present a consistent perspective of the requirements of primary research in EE as defined by the IBO?

Very much so. It goes further than that in enabling the students to actually carry out the precise research mandated by the IB program.

Technology

Does the technology chosen function properly(website, links to external websites, wiki pages, downloadable documents)

Are the learning materials chosen easy to access?

Is the designed website easy to navigate?

Are the supporting graphics, embedded videos good ways to enhance learning?

Very much so. There is are clear distinctions between the main road by which the student picks up the essential research skills,  the opportunities the student has to apply them to EE research, and the facility consolidate and advance those faculties to critical analysis of methods used and results obtained.

Message Design

Are directions clear for all tasks?

The website content, presentation, and navigation procedures currently under construction seem to be all clear, use-friendly, with attractiveness-potential that should fully engage the serious EE economics student. The main content of the course including interactive activities should fit into the above timeframe, though obviously more hours will need to be put in for effective student follow-up of the suggested links.

Efficiency

Goals

Are the goals and objectives clearly stated for each step?

Yes – as outlined in the above comment.

Content

Are the samples, activities and feedback points realistic?

Is the purpose of the workshop stated clearly?  

Absolutely – it is indeed a counterpart to the material that they already effectively employ.

Technology

Is the structure of the website appropriate and easy to navigate?

Is the pedagogical approach consistent with instructional methods used in the IB online Economics courses?

Is it made easy to access the instructor and peers?

Certainly.

Definitely, as long as it is appropriately marketed to teachers. Perhaps they could have a free introductory session with the company as a way of drawing them in to this form of education.

Message design

Is the vocabulary chosen appropriate for the target audience?

Do tabs organize the content well?      

 Yes to both

Appeal

Goals

Are the goals relevant to the learners?

.

Content

Is the content appealing?

Is the instruction appropriate for creating positive attitudes in learners?

As long as feedback to the more open-ended questions is immediate and individual-based. Remember that the average student is there for his or her project

Technology

Is navigation of the website easy and straightforward?

Message design

Are the message and media chosen pleasing?

Yes – it should look terrific when finished, and catch the enthusiasm of the students.

Bibliography


[1] Smith, Patricia L. (2012-10-10). Instructional Design, 3rd Edition (Wiley/Jossey-Bass Education) (Page 4). Wiley. Kindle Edition.