MILITARY POLICE CORPS BADGE.JPEG

MISCELLANEOUS WORLD WAR ONE

INFORMATION RELATING TO MILITARY POLICE

Contents:

  1.  Information on Port Sections of MFP.
  2. Information on the murder of P/3479 Detective Sergeant H A Collison, DCM, MSM. MFP.
  3.  Information on Military Police Traffic Control/Squadrons
  4.  Extract from War Diary, 4 Dismounted Traffic Control Coy.
  5.  Lost 1914 found 1917
  6.  Escort to an Emperor
  7.  Award of 6 Military Medals to No. 1 Traffic Control Coy.
  8.  First Close Protection Detail ?

1.MILITARY FOOT POLICE, PORT SECTIONS

NCO’s employed in the Military Foot Police, Ports Sections seem to have been recruited by a department of MI5, at the War Office, Whitehall, London SW1.

They were employed at all major ports in the United Kingdom and were attached to Protection Companies of the Royal Defence Corps or Infantry battalions employed in Port protection.  

They appear to have been of a low medical category and some obtained rapid promotion.

The wore green cap covers on their service dress caps instead of the normal scarlet cover worn by MMP & MFP.   They were nicknamed ‘ The bloody Irish’ by soldiers referring to the green cap cover.

Below is a copy of an NCO in the MFP Port Section Articles of Clothing & Necessaries in Possession showing his green cap cover and armlet scarlet.

port police 001.JPG

A green cap cover was again adopted in 1937 for the FSP Wing, CMP, (Field Security Police)

The following are letters found in Service Records of MFP recruited into the Port Section.

                                                                                War Office

                                                                                Whitehall

                                                                                SW 1

184451. M.I.5.H                                                                4th June 1917.

Commandant

Military Foot Police

Aldershot

     Herbert Donaldson, 57th R. D. (Regimental District) Recruiting Area, Mill Hill, will be enlisted in the Military Foot Police for posting to the Military Ports Police on or about the 11th inst.

     We should be very glad if this man could be posted to the Military Ports Police at Gravesend.

                                                        (sd) E J Radcliffe, Capt.

                                                                  for Colonel GS

Found in service record of P/10973 L/cpl H Donaldson.

  ______________________________________________________

M.I.5.

                                                                                  War Office

                                                                                     Whitehall

                                                                                        S.W.1.

O.C. Depot

   Military Police Corps,

      Aldershot

     I send herewith the three nco’s mentioned in your letter of 16/7/20 No. 217/7/D/M.M.P. for demobilisation.   The papers have already been returned to you, with the exception of the Medical Board papers of L/Cpl Jeffries herewith.

     In the case of L/cpl Hunter, who is employed on special duties, were are very anxious for him to return to London today (30/7/20) as were are employing him in a civil capacity after demobilisation, and require his services on Saturday.   I have asked A.G.3. (P.M.) who concur and are communicating direct to you to this effect.

M.I.5.

30/7/1920                                                                (signed) J A Richmond, Capt.                                                                                             for Col G.S.

Found in the service record of P/3268 L/Cpl J B Jeffries.

_________________________________________________________

S.F 50/2/1/P/GP.

                                                                                M.I.5.

                                                                                War Office

                                                                                London S.W.1.

                                                                                July, 1919

Dear Colonel Innes,

     With reference to medals for service abroad for the MFP ( Ports Section) employed here, several of them went out on special jobs to Italy and returned on completion of duty.

     I do not know if this qualifies them for any medal or medal ribbons, but, in case it does, here are the names and numbers of the men, and where they went:-

  1.  P/3600 L/Cpl W Smith

                  P/14354 L/Cpl G Christian

embarked on 22nd May, 1918, proceeding to Padua and Vicenza, returning to England on the 1st June, 1918.

     (2)     P/3600 L/Cpl W Smith

                P/3268 L/Cpl J B Jeffries

left London on the 10th July and proceeded to the Aerodrome Nr, Vicenza, returning to London on the 20th July, 1918.

     They were in charge of certain very confidential packages to the Headquarters of the British Expeditionary Force in Italy.

                                                        

                                                                        Yours sincerely,

                                                                        (sgd) G. M Omerod.

Lt. Col C. F. Innes,

Commandant.

Found in the service record of P/3268 L/Cpl J B Jeffries.

_________________________________________________________

This letter was found in the Service Record of P/3268 L/Cpl J B Jeffries who was claiming a sick pension and claimed to be suffering from Rheumatism & Catarrh of the Stomach.   Making confidential enquiries for M.I.5.

                                                                        19th July 1920

Re No. P/3286 L/cpl Jeffries. 2.B.

     With reference to the attached letter 217/7/DMMP, dated 16 instant from the Commandant, Military Police, Aldershot.   I beg to report that L/cpl Jeffries, who has been attached to M.I.5. since June 1917, has been principally engaged on observation duty (watching and following suspects) which necessitated him remaing outdoors  for many hours together and was consequently exposed to wet and cold weather.

     During the past seven months he has on two or three occasions reported getting his clothes  soaked whilst on duty in the rain and there appears to be no reason to doubt that the same thing has happened to him on many previous occasions.

     Attached is his statement herewith.

     He was absent from duty from 20th May last to 5th June inclusive, during which time he apparently was suffering from rheumatism vide attached medical certificate.

                                                                        John Ottaway

                                                                        B5.      ?????

     The above statement is correct.   When on observation duty, he had to remain at his post no matter how wet or cold the weather might be.

                                                                        J A Richmond, Capt

                                                                Attached General Staff.

_________________________________________________________

This letter was found in the service record of P/16320 L/Cpl M Lorenzi.

6177/M.I.5.E                                                                          7th August 1918.

Lt. Colonel G. F Innes.

   Military Police Record Office

        Aldershot

       Pte Mario LORENZI

No. 95351, G. Coy, 5th Bn. Middlesex

Great Lines, Chatham

     We have applied for the above man to be enlisted in the Military Foot Police, for posting to the Ports Police, and have requested he should be instructed to report to you.

            signed ????????

Major G.S.

(In pencil) To report 2/10/1918

_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

2. THE MURDER OF NO. P/3479 DETECTIVE SERGEANT H A COLLISON, DCM, MSM, MILITARY FOOT POLICE, GHQ, BEF, DETECTIVE BRANCH

        

The following information was found in the service record of Sgt Collison from the proceedings of a court of enquiry held at No.6 Rest Camp, Calais, France.   All the documents are handwritten and have damage to the left and right margins.   Where the words and phrases are illegible they have been replaced with a series of dashes ---------------    ---------..   Later Typewritten statements were found in the Court Marshal papers of 2/Lt Paterson and these have been copied and filled in most of the unreadable words.

STATEMENT OF P/1199 DETECTIVE L/CPL W STOCKTON, MFP.

(Statement recorded by P/12185 Detective L/Cpl H J Choules,MFP).

AT ABOUT 6.30 PM ON THE 3RD JULY 1918, I WAS WITH DETECTIVE SERGEANT H COLLISON.   WE SAW A BRITISH OFFICER WITH A FEMALE AT PONT COULOGNE.   THEY PASSED OVER THE WOODEN FOOTBRIDGE.   WE FOLLOWED THEM ALONG THE ROAD IN THE DIRECTION OF COULOGNE VILLAGE.   JUST BEFORE ENTERING THE VILLAGE,  SERGEANT COLLISON SPOKE TO THE OFFICER AND SAID, “I AM A DETECTIVE SERGEANT OF THE MILITARY POLICE, YOU ANSWER THE DESCRIPTION OF AN OFFICER WE WANT.   WOULD YOU MIND TELLING ME YOUR NAME PLEASE?”   THE OFFICER SAID “I AM 2ND LT BARFORD, 1 ESSEX REGIMENT.”  

SGT COLLISON ASKED HIM IF HE COULD PRODUCE ANYTHING TO IDENTIFY HIMSELF IN THAT NAME.   HE TOOK FROM HIS POCKET A WALLET AND SOME PAPERS, BUT HAD NOTHING TO PROVE HIS IDENTITY.  

HE SAID, “IF YOU CARE TO COME TO BEAUMARIS CAMP YOU WILL FIND OUT WHO I AM.”  

 THE OFFICER AND A WOMAN WALKED ON ALONG THE ROAD AND WE FOLLOWED THEM.   THEY WENT THROUGH COULOGNE VILLAGE  TO ST PIERRE HALTE WHERE THEY TURNED TO THE RIGHT IN THE DIRECTION OF BEAUMARIS.   WHEN ABOUT 100 YARDS FROM THE DUNKIRK  ROAD THE OFFICER TURNED BACK ON US.   HE  SAID, “SEE HERE SERGEANT I AM 2/LT PATERSON, I THINK I AM THE OFFICER YOU ARE LOOKING FOR.   I JUST WANT TO GO AND HAVE TEA WITH THIS YOUNG LADY IN THAT HOUSE OVER THERE,” POINTING TO A HOUSE AMONGST SOME TREES.   “DO YOU MIND WAITING FOR ABOUT HALF AN HOUR.”  

SGT COLLISON SAID, “I FELT QUITE SURE ALL THE TIME THAT YOU WERE THE OFFICER.  I DON’T MIND WAITING WHILE YOU HAVE SOME TEA.”  

THE OFFICER AND THE WOMAN WENT ACROSS THE FIELD TO THE HOUSE MENTIONED.   WE SEPARATED; SERGEANT COLLISON KEPT WATCH ON THE FRONT SOUTH EAST CORNER OF THE HOUSE WHILST I MYSELF KEPT WATCH FROM THE RAILWAY ON THE SIDE.   THE TIME WOULD THEN BE ABOUT 7.30PM.   AT ABOUT 8.45PM THE OFFICER CAME DOWN THE GARDEN TO ME.  

HE SAID,  “I HOPE YOU ARE NOT TIRED OF WAITING, I AM NOT RUNNING AWAY, I AM JUST HAVING A TALK WITH THE GIRLS IN THE HOUSE.”  

 I SAID,  “ I DO NOT MIND WAITING, BUT HAVE YOU EXPLAINED TO THE SERGEANT?”  

HE SAID “O YES, AND IT IS QUITE ALRIGHT”.   HE WENT BACK INTO THE HOUSE.   ABOUT 9.20PM I SAW SERGEANT COLLISON AND THE OFFICER TOGETHER IN THE YARD OF THE HOUSE AND SERGEANT COLLISON CALLED TO ME TO COME ALONG.   I CAME DOWN THE RAILWAY AND UP THE GARDEN PATH, WHICH LEADS FROM THE RAILWAY THROUGH THE YARD AT THE BACK OF THE HOUSE.   JUST AS I ENTERED THE YARD A REVOLVER SHOT RANG OUT.   I HEARD SERGEANT COLLISON SAY, “WHAT’S THAT?”

JUST THEN I SAW THE OFFICER POINT A REVOLVER AT THE SERGEANT AND FIRED AT HIM.   I WAS THEN AT THE GATEWAY BETWEEN THE GARDEN AND THE YARD, AND ABOUT 8 YARDS FROM THE OFFICER.    I SAW SERGEANT COLLISON STAGGER.   THE OFFICER MADE A RUSH TOWARDS THE GARDEN GATE WHEN WHEN HE FIRED ANOTHER SHOT TOWARDS ME.   I SHOUTED TO TWO SOLDIERS WHO WERE ON THE CORNER WHERE SGT COLLISON AND I FIRST SEPARATED.   I RETURNED IMMEDIATELY TO THE YARD AND THE TWO SOLDIERS FOLLOWED ME.   THE SERGEANT WAS BEING HELD IN A SITTING POSITION BY A CIVILIAN.   I UNFASTENED HIS CLOTHES AND TOOK OFF HIS BANDOLIER.   I NOTICED HE WAS BLEEDING FROM THE NOSE.   HE DID NOT SPEAK TO ME.   ONE OF THE SOLDIERS HAD ARRIVED ON THE SCENE.   I ASKED THE ONE OF THE WOMEN IN THE HOUSE TO FETCH SOME WATER.   I WENT TO BEAUMARIS CAMP TO GET MEDICAL AID.   I RETURNED TO THE HOUSE WITH THE MEDICAL OFFICER  AND FOUND SGT COLLISON WAS BEING REMOVED IN AN AMBULANCE CAR.   I DID NOT SEE ANYTHING MORE OF THE OFFICER OR THE WOMAN,

                                                        SIGNED, W STOCKTON

                                                                       DETECTIVE L/CPL, MFP.

L/Cpl Stockton was not armed.

---------------------------------------------------

STATEMENT OF MLLE. AUGUSTINE DUQUENOY, AGE 22 YEARS, 16 ROUTE

DE DUNKIRQUE, CALAIS.   STATED THROUGH AN INTERPRETER:

(STATEMENT WRITTEN THROUGH AN INTERPRETER BY P/12185 DETECTIVE L/CPL H J CHOULDES, MFP).

A BRITISH OFFICER AND MYSELF LEFT THE RESTAURANT LEON ABOUT 12’0 CLOCK NOON ON 3RD JULY 1918 AND WENT FOR A WALK AROUND FORT NIEULAY.   WE WERE GOING TO FONTINETTEN, FOR DINNER, BUT AFTERWARDS THE OFFICER ASKED ME TO GO WITH HIM TO COULOGNE TO HAVE TEA WITH HIM IN A RESTAURANT HE KNEW THERE.   WE ARRIVED AT PONT DE COULOGNE BRIDGE AND NOTICED A BRITISH SERGEANT LEANING ON THE FOOT BRIDGE  OVER THE CANAL.   AS THE OFFICER PASSED I NOTICED  THE SGT LOOKED AT HIM.   I NOTICED THAT  THE SGT AND A CPL WHO HAD JOINED WERE FOLLOWING US.  I DID NOT SAY ANYTHING TO THE OFFICER UNTIL WE HAD NEARLY GOT TO THE VILLAGE OF COULOGNE.   WHEN I SAID “LOOK THE SGT AND CPL WHO ARE FOLLOWING YOU.   I THINK THEY WANT SO SPEAK TO YOU”.   THE SGT CAME AND SPOKE TO THE OFFICER.   THE OFFICER TOLD ME TO WALK AWAY   WHEN THE OFFICER CAME BACK I ASKED HIM WHAT THE SERGEANT HAD SAID.   HE REPLIED “HE ASKED ME FOR THE CAMP AT BEAUMARIS.   I TOLD HIM THAT I WAS GOING THAT WAY AND HE WAS TO FOLLOW.   WE CONTINUED OUR WAY TO BEAUMARIS.   THE SERGEANT AND CORPORAL FOLLOWED US AT SOME DISTANCE.  ON ARRIVING AT THE RAILWAY CROSSING I ASKED THE OFFICER TO WITH THEM TO BEAUMARIS CAMP.   THE OFFICER SAID HE HAD SHOWN THEM THE WAY AND THAT HE WAS GOING INTO THE HOUSE TO HAVE TEA WITH ME.   THE SERGEANT WENT TOWARDS THE DUNKIRK ROAD AND THE OFFICER MADE ME GO TO THE HOUSE ALONG THE RAILWAY.   THE OFFICER CAME TO MY HOUSE TO HAVE SOME TEA AND WHEN I WENT OUT INTO THE YARD I SAW THE SERGEANT STANDING OUTSIDE.   I ASKED THE OFFICER TO GO OUTSIDE AND SPEAK TO THEM  BUT HE WOULD NOT DO SO.   HE STAYED IN THE HOUSE TO TAKE HIS TEA.   WHEN WE ARRIVED AT THE HOUSE IT WAS ABOUT 7.30PM OR 7.45PM.   MY MOTHER WENT OUT INTO THE YARD AND THE SERGEANT SPOKE TO HER.   SHE CAME BACK INTO THE HOUSE AND SAID TO ME “THE SERGEANT WISHES TO SEE THE OFFICER”.   THE OFFICER WENT OUT TO SPEAK TO THE SERGEANT.   I HEARD THE OFFICER HEARD THE OFFICER TELL THE SERGEANT THAT HE WAS GOING TO HAVE SOMETHING TO EAT IN THE HOUSE AND THAT HE WOULD HAVE TO WAIT FOR HIM.   THE OFFICER CAME INTO THE HOUSE AND STAYED SOME TIME AND HAD HIS TEA.  ABOUT 9 O’CLOCK OR 9.O5 PM THE OFFICER WENT OUT TO SPEAK TO THE SERGEANT.   THE OFFICER WAS VERY CROSS, AND SNATCHED UP HIS HAT AND SAID,  “THE FUCKING BASTARDS;  IF THEY DO NOT GO AWAY, I WILL FIGHT THE TWO OF THEM, AND IF I AM NOT STRONG ENOUGH FOR THE TWO OF THEM I WILL TAKE MY REVOLVER (JE VAIS PRENDRE MON REVOLVER)”   AT THAT MOMENT TO TOOK A REVOLVER FROM HIS HIP POCKET AND PUT IT INTO THE RIGHT HAND POCKET OF HIS TUNIC.   I TOLD HIM BEFORE HE WENT OUT THAT HE MUST NOT USE HIS REVOLVER.   IF HE DID SO I WOULD CALL THE POLICE.   HE SPOKE TO THE SERGEANT FOR ABOUT TEN MINUTES IN THE YARD AND ALL THE TIME HE HAD HIS HAND IN HIS RIGHT HAND POCKET.   I DID NOT THINK THAT HE WAS GOING TO FIRE AT THE SERGEANT.   I WAS INSIDE THE HOUSE WITH MY BABY WHEN I HEARD A MUFFLED EXPLOSION AND DIRECTLY AFTERWARDS I HEARD ANOTHER EXPLOSION.   I DISTINCTLY HEARD THE SECOND SHOT AND I RUSHED TO THE DOOR TO SEE WHAT WAS HAPPENING.   WHEN I ARRIVED I SAW THE OFFICER RUNNING AFTER THE CORPORAL.   I RAN AFTER HIM AND SCREAMED.   WHEN I ARRIVED I SAW THE OFFICER RUNNING AFTER THE CORPORAL.   I RAN AFTER HIM AND SCREAMED, CAUGHT HIM UP JUST AS HE GOT TO THE GATE AND CAUGHT HOLD OF HIS CLOTHES TO HOLD HIM BACK, AND IN TURNING IT WAS THEN THAT I SAW THE SERGEANT FALLING.   THE OFFICER THEN TOOK MY HAT, STILL HOLDING THE REVOLVER IN HIS HAND, SO THAT I SHOULD HAVE TO GO WITH HIM.   I DID NOT WANT TO GO WITH HIM BUT HE FORCED ME AT THE POINT OF THE REVOLVER.   HE MADE ME GO THROUGH THE FIELDS AND ALONG THE RAILWAY LINE, WHICH WE FOLLOWED UNTIL WE GOT TO PETIT COURGAIN AND MADE OUR WAY TO CALAIS.   WE ARRIVED AT THE CAFE BELGE, PLACE DE LA GARE, AT ABOUT 11O’ CLOCK.   wE STAYED IN THE HOTEL UNTIL THE MORNING OF THE 5TH JULY, 1918, AND LEFT BETWEEN 8.30 AND 9.0’ CLOCK.   WHILE IN THE HOTEL I SAW THAT HE WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG.   I ASKED THE OFFICER WHY HE HAD FIRED AT THE SERGEANT.   HE SAID “I HAVE ONLY WOUNDED HIM”.   I ASKED HIM WHY HE HAD RUN AFTER THE CORPORAL.   HE SAID “IT WAS TO WOUND HIM ALSO”.   HE DID NOT FIRE AT THE CORPORAL.   THE OFFICER SAID HE DID NOT LIKE TO BE ARRESTED BY THE SERGEANT, BUT THAT IF IT HAD BEEN THE A.P.M. OR ANOTHER OFFICER HE WOULD HAVE GONE QUIETLY.   THE OFFICER WAS ABLE TO TALK FRENCH FLUENTLY.

                                        SIGNED MME AUGUSTINE DUQUENOY

                                        SIGNED JUVAL MOY INTERPRETER.

IN EVIDENCE OF THIS SECOND WITNESS  WAS TO THE BEST OF MY ABILITY INTERPRETED AND TRANSLATED BY ME.

                                                           ______________________

STATEMENT OF NOEMI DUQUENOY, AGE 26 YEARS, RESIDING AT ROUTE DE DUNKERQUE, CALAIS.  

THROUGH AN INTERPRETER STATED:

ABOUT 7.30 PM LAST WEDNESDAY (3RD JULY 1918) MY SISTER AUGUSTINE AND A BRITISH OFFICER CAME TO MY HOME.   AFTER GIVING THEM SOME COFFEE THE  BRITISH SGT WAS IN THE LANE WAITING ON THE DUNKIRQUE ROAD TO THE HOUSE.   I ASKED THE OFFICER IF IT ----------- OUT.   AT ABOUT 9 PM I SAW THE OFFICER AND SGT TALKING AND THEN I WENT INTO MY ROOM TO PUT MY BABY TO BED ------I HEARD A SHOT, IT WAS NOT VERY DISTINCT AND ANOTHER WHICH WAS DISTINCT.   IT WAS THEN THAT I THOUGHT THERE WAS SOMETHING WRONG.   I WENT TO THE DOOR OF THE HOUSE AND SAW IN THE YARD A BRITISH SGT ---------- LYING FACE DOWNWARDS, I WENT TO GET MY FATHER WHO -----------TO THE FALLEN MAN.   I DID NOT SEE THE BRITISH OFFICER AGAIN.

                                                SIGNED MOEMI DUQUENOY

                                                SIGNED JUVAL MOY INTERPRETER.

THE EVIDENCE OF THIS THIRD WITNESS WAS TO THE BEST OF MY ABILITY INTERPRETED AND TRANSLATED BY ME.

                                               ________________________

SHORT STATEMENTS FROM THE 3 SOLDIERS WHO ARRIVED AT THE SCENE WERE:

41046 PTE J CAMPBELL, 11 ARGYLL & SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS.

     ON THE 3RD JULY, 1918, BETWEEN 9.20 AND 9.30 PM I WAS STANDING OUTSIDE A PRIVATE HOUSE ON THE DUNKIRK ROAD NEAR THE NEW RAILWAY CROSSING AT BEAUMARIS.   I WAS WITH A FRENCH CIVILIAN.  WE WERE STANDING ABOUT 8 YARDS FROM THE RAILWAY WHEN A SAW A BRITISH OFFICER COMING DOWN THE RAILWAY LINE TOWARDS ME.   HE WAS WITH A FRENCH GIRL.   THEY WERE COMING DOWN THE RAILWAY LIEN ON THE LEFT SIDE AND GOING TOWARDS THE AMERICAN CAMP   THE OFFICER WAS NEAREST THE HEDGE AND WAS CROUCHING AS HE HURRIED ALONG.   HE WAS CARRYING HIS CAP IN HIS RIGHT HAND.   HE HAD NO BELT.   I THINK HE HAD “SLACKS”.   THE GIRL SEEMED TO BE ABOUT A PACE IN FRONT OF HIM DRAGGING HIM BY THE RIGHT ARM.   I WENT ROUND TO THE BACK OF THE HOUSE AND WATCHED THE COUPLE FOR ABOUT 20 YARDS.   THEN UI RETURNED TO THE HOUSE.   A GIRL CAME TO THE HOUSE AND MADE A STATEMENT TO ME.   I RAN TO THE HOUSE WHICH SHE POINTED OUT TO ME AND SAW A CROWD AROUND A SERGEANT WHO WAS LYING ON HIS BACK WITH HIS TUNIC OFF AND SHIRT OPEN.   THE SERGEANT APPEARED TO ME TO BE DEAD.   HE HAD A WOUND ON HIS RIGHT BREAST.

653905 PTE C ROPER 2 BEDFORDSHIRE REGIMENT.

      ABOUT 9 O CLOCK ON THE 3RD, JULY, 1918, I WAS SITTING IN A CAFE IN A SMALL LANE OFF THE CALAIS DUNKIRK ROAD WHEN I HEARD A SHOT FIRED.   I IMMEDIATELY RAN IN WHAT I THOUGHT WAS THE DIRECTION OF THE REPORT.   I MET A CORPORAL ON THE RAILWAY.   HE MADE A STATEMENT TO ME.   I LEFT THE CORPORAL AND WENT UP THE RAILWAY LINE UNTIL I CAME TO THE COTTAGE GARDEN PATH.  I WENT UP THE PATH TO THE YARD OF THE HOUSE.   I FOUND A CIVILIAN LIFTING A SERGEANT UP.   I TOOK THE SERGEANT’S COAT OFF AND OPENED HIS SHIRT.   I SAW A WOUND IN THE RIGHT BREAST.   I PUT MY FIELD DRESSING ON THE WOUND.   THAT WAS THE ONLY WOUND I COULD SEE.   I REMAINED WITH THE SERGEANT UNTIL THE ARRIVAL OF A CAPTAIN AND A LIEUTENANT.   THE CAPTAIN ORDERED ME TO SEARCH THE SERGEANT’S POCKETS, AND I FOUND FROM HIS PAY BOOK THAT HE BELONGED TO THE CMP.    

202616 PTE J K LANDAU 5 NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT.  

      ABOUT 9.20 PM 3RD JULY, 1918, I WAS GOING TO BEAUMARIS CAMP WHEN I HEARD A SHOT FIRED.   I TURNED ROUND AND SAW A CORPORAL RUNNING TOWARDS ME.   HE MADE A STATEMENT TO ME.   I RANT TO THE FARM WHICH THE CORPORAL INDICATED AND SAW A SERGEANT LYING ON THE GROUND UNCONSCIOUS.   HIS HEAD WAS BEING SUPPORTED ON A FRENCHMAN’S KNEE.   I FOUND HE WAS STILL ALIVE, AND PHONED FOR AN AMBULANCE.

                                             __________________________

STATEMENT OF LT J G ALLEN, ROYAL  ARMY MEDICAL CORPS (SPECIAL RESERVE).

ON 3RD JULY 1918 I WAS ON DUTY AS ORDERLY MEDICAL OFFICER FOR THE CAMP AT BEAUMARIS.   AT 9.55PM ONE OF THE ORDERLIES FROM THE MEDICAL HUT ACCOMPANIED BY A CPL MADE A REPORT TO ME THAT A SGT OF POLICE HAD BEEN SHOT AT A COTTAGE NEAR THE RAILWAY CROSSING.   I PROCEEDED TO THE COTTAGE IMMEDIATELY AND ON ARRIVAL ABOUT 10.15PM WAS SHOWN THE BODY COVERED WITH A BLANKET LYING IN THE COURTYARD IN FRONT OF THE COTTAGE.   THE TUNIC AND SHIRT HAD BEEN REMOVED AND THE WOUND DRESSED BEFORE MY ARRIVAL.   I EXAMINED THE MAN AND FOUND THAT LIFE WAS EXTINCT.   THERE WAS A SMALL ENTRANCE WOUND ON THE RIGHT BREAST IN THE REGION OF THE 5TH RIB CLOSE TO THE NIPPLE LINE.   THERE WAS LITTLE BLOOD AROUND THE WOUND AND VERY LITTLE BRUISING.   SO FAR AS I COULD MAKE OUT THERE WAS NO EXIT WOUND.   DEATH MUST HAVE TAKEN PLACE ONLY A VERY FEW MINUTES PRIOR TO MY ARRIVAL AS THE BODY WAS STILL QUITE WARM.   DEATH WAS DUE TO INTERNAL HAEMORRHAGE CAUSED BY THE BULLET WOUND TO THE CHEST.

THE COURT HERE ADJOURNED TO VIEW THE BODY.  THE WITNESS IN THE PRESENCE OF THE COURT IDENTIFIED THE BODY AS THE ONE WHICH HE SAW ON THE NIGHT OF 3 JULY 1918.   SIGNED J G ALLEN, RAMC.

A PLAN MARKED “A” AND PERSPECTIVE VIEW MARKED “B” ARE ATTACHED TO THE PROCEEDINGS.   (Not found in service record).

FINDINGS

THE COURT HAVE CONSIDERED THE FOREGOING EVIDENCE FIND THAT NO. P/3479 DETECTIVE SERGEANT COLLISON H A MFP GHQ DETECTIVE STAFF MET HIS DEATH WHILST IN THE EXECUTION OF HIS DUTY FROM INTERNAL HAEMORRHAGE RESULTING FROM THE EFFECTS OF A BULLET FIRED FROM A REVOLVER BY A BRITISH OFFICER BELIEVED TO BE 2/LT PATERSON.

SIGNED AT CALAIS THIS 9TH DAY OF JULY 1918:

PRESIDENT.  J M MILLIGAN MAJOR ⅙ ROYAL SCOTS ATTACHED 1/9 BLACK WATCH.  

MEMBERS. M M K  ACTWILL CAPTAIN, 1/1 CAMBRIDGESHIRE REGIMENT.

J W FITZPATRICK, CAPTAIN,  ?

CONFIRMED

I CONCUR WITH THE OPINION OF THE COURT AS TO THE CIRCUMSTANCES UNDER WHICH SGT COLLISON MET HIS DEATH.   I CONSIDER THAT HAD HE ACTED WITH MORE PROMPTITUDE AND ARRESTED 2/LT PATERSON WHEN HE MET HIM AT PONT DE COULOGNE AT ABOUT 6.30 PM ON THE 3RD INST THE FATALITY WOULD HAVE BEEN AVOIDED.

     I CONSIDER, THEREFORE THAT THE DECEASED NCO IS, FOR THIS REASON PARTLY TO BLAME.

     I CONSIDER THE CONDUCT OF L/CPL STOCKTON OPEN TO QUESTION.

                                                        F. W RADCLIFFE.

CALAIS                                                BRIGADIER GENERAL

19 JULY 1918                                        BASE COMMANDANT

--------------------------------------------------------------------

 (The above comments made by Brigadier General Radcliffe partly blaming Sgt Collison for his own death I feel are unfair.   This reflects the class snobbery within the country and armed forces as this time.   During World War I, 302 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot at dawn, but in the same period only 3 officers were executed.   2 for absence and one for murder.   Officers who failed to step up to the mark were sent home to England and cashiered or were transferred to less stressful employment.   At this time a Military Police NCO would have little or no contact with officers and their discipline.   Any discipline concerning officers would have been dealt with by the Assistant Provost Marshal in the area.)

No. P/3479 Detective A/Sgt Harold Arthur Collison, MFP. DCM. MSM

He formerly  served 7 years in the Royal Artillery, No.14573, 7 years colour service and 5 years in the Reserve.   He served 3 ½ years in the Royal Horse Artillery then transferred to the Royal Garrison Artillery.   18/3/03 discharged and joined the Middlesbrough Borough Police, No. PC 6.   Later promoted to Sgt.   3/12/1915 he re enlisted in the Royal Artillery. No.126485, age 38.2 years, born Staplehurst, Kent.   11/7/1916 he transferred to Military Foot Police.   3/7/1918 killed in the execution of his duty by 2/Lt J H Paterson, 1 Essex Regiment who was later executed for murder.   Sgt Collison is  buried in La Barques Military Cemetery, Sangatte, Plot IV. C. 13.

2/Lt John Henry Paterson, 3 Essex Regiment attached 1 Essex Regiment, name also spelt Patterson

Prior to the war Paterson had been a trader in West Africa and returned to England in February 1914.  In April 1915 he enlisted in the 17 Middlesex Regiment, No.F/1239 and was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and War Medals.  He went out to France in November 1915 and was wounded on the Somme and later at Beaumont Hamel.    Commissioned in the 3 Essex Regiment, London Gazette 30339, page 10696, dated 18 October 1917, Special Reserve of Officers, the undermentioned from Officer Training Units to be 2/Lt’s 26 September 1917, Essex Regiment, John Henry Paterson.  

He shot and murdered Sgt H A Collison MFP at Calais on 3/6/1918.   He was charged with three offences - Absence, (When on active service deserting His Majesty’s Service, in that he, in the field on 26 March, 1918, absented himself from a working party near Zillebeke and remained absent until arrested at St. Omer on 22 July 1918). -   Murder ( When on active service committing the offence of murder, in that he on 3 July 1918, murdered No. P/3479 Detective Sergeant H A Collison, Military Foot Police). -  Forgery ( When on active service, committing a civil offence, that is to say forgery, in that he at Calais on 10 April, 1918, 26 April 1918, 29 April 1918 and 13 May 1918, with intent to defraud, forged cheques for £5, £20 in total, purporting to be drawn by C H Anderson, 2?Lt, 1 Essex Regiment).  

He was later arrested at St Omer by French Gendarmes.   At a General Court Martial, Boulogne he was found guilty on all charges and on the 24 Sept 1918 he was executed at Boulogne for murder and buried in Terlincthun Cemetery in plot IV, grave B. 48.  

He is shown in Register of Soldiers Effects 1901-1929 as having left a credit of 3/6d. 5/2/1920 next of kin received £14 War Gratuity.

A record of his trial can be found in the National Archive ref No WO 71/1028.   A certificate at the front of this file from the Secretary of State for Defence states:

This document records that 2nd Lt J H Paterson of the 3rd Battalion, Essex Regiment who was executed for desertion on 24 September 1918 is pardoned under Section 359 of the Armed Forces Act 2006.   The pardon stands as recognition that he was one of many victims of the First World War and that execution was not a fate he deserved.

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3. MILITARY POLICE TRAFFIC CONTROL UNITS ORDER OF BATTLE

MMP TRAFFIC CONTROL SQUADRONS (formed July 1917).

NO.1 SQUADRON   WITH SECOND ARMY 7/17.  :  THIRD ARMY 12/17.  :  FIRST ARMY 2/18 TO 11/11/18.

NO.2 SQUADRON   WITH SECOND ARMY 7/17.  :  FIFTH ARMY 9/17.  :  SECOND ARMY 11/17.  :  THIRD ARMY 12/17.  :  FIFTH ARMY 2/18.  :  FOURTH ARMY 5/18.  : ½ WITH FOURTH ARMY 7/18 AND ½ WITH FIFTH ARMY. 7/18.  :  FOURTH ARMY 10/18 TO 11/11/1918.

NO.3 SQUADRON  WITH SECOND ARMY 7/17.  :  FIFTH ARMY 9/17.  :  FOURTH ARMY 12/17.  :  SECOND ARMY 5/18 TO 11/11/1918.

NO.4 SQUADRON  WITH SECOND ARMY 7/17.  :  FIFTH ARMY 9/17.  :  THIRD ARMY 12/17 TO 11/11/1918.

MFP TRAFFIC CONTROL COMPANIES (formed July 1917).

Also shown as Dismounted Mobile Traffic Control Units.

NO.1 COMPANY   WITH SECOND ARMY 7/17.  : ½ COY WITH FIFTH ARMY 9/17 AND ½ COY. WITH SECOND ARMY 9/17.  :  SECOND ARMY 11/176.  :  FOURTH ARMY 12/17.  :  FIRST ARMY 2/18.  :  ½ COY. FIRST ARMY 7/18.  :  ½ COY. WITH FIFTH ARMY 7/18.  :  HQ AND 1 ½ PLATOONS FIRST ARMY AND 1 ½ PLATOONS FIFTH ARMY 10/18 TO 11/11/1918.

NO.2 COMPANY  WITH SECOND ARMY 7/17.  :  FIFTH ARMY 9/17.  SECOND ARMY 11/17.  :  THIRD ARMY 12/17.  :  FIFTH ARMY 8/2/1918.  :  FOURTH ARMY 5/18 TO 11/11/1918.

NO.3 COMPANY WITH SECOND ARMY 7/17.  :  FIFTH ARMY 9/17.  :  FOURTH ARMY 12/17.  :  SECOND ARMY 5/18 TO 11/11/1918.

NO.4 COMPANY WITH SECOND ARMY 7/17.  :  FOURTH ARMY 9/1917.  :SECOND ARMY 11/17.  :  THIRD ARMY 12/17 TO 11/11/1918.

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4. Extract from the War Diary (WO 95/409) of No. 4 Dismounted Traffic Control Company.

6/4/1917 Company formed at Fillievres (between Hesdin and Frevent).   Officers from the Army Cyclist Corps.   Company consisted of 74 other ranks from Army Cyclist Corps and Military Foot Police.  Other ranks were mounted on cycles.

Unit transport: 2 GS limbers and 4 light draught horses.

31/12/17 The health and discipline of troops under my command is good.   During the year the unit has won 11 Military Medals.   Capt R W Thompson.

During the period of the diary 6/4/17 to 11/11/18 the unit had 7 Killed in Action and 9 Wounded.

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5. LOST 1914 & FOUND 1917

The following story was found in the documents of Sergeant Major J Eade, MMP regarding the loss and recovery of his Queen’s South Africa Medal.

LETTER DATED 25/11/17 FROM THE INTELLIGENCE OFFICE, ROUEN, NO. R.6665 TO THE EFFECTS BRANCH (MEN), GHQ, 3RD ECHELON.

THE ENCLOSED ARE FORWARDED TO YOU FOR YOUR DISPOSAL AS YOU THINK FIT. THEY WERE FORWARDED TO ME BY A LADY WHO OBTAINED THEM FROM A FRENCH SOLDIER WHO HAD TAKEN THEM FROM THE BODY OF A DEAD GERMAN.

PLEASE ACKNOWLEDGE RECEIPT.

ROUEN, 25/11/17. SIGNED J H LECHE, CAPTAIN, GS.

LETTER FROM EFFECTS BRANCH TO OFFICER I/C CAVALRY RECORDS (DRAGOONS), CANTERBURY, DATED 27/11/17.

5147 PTE J EADE, 7 DRAGOON GUARDS.

FORWARDED HEREWITH ARE THE QUEEN’S SOUTH AFRICA MEDAL AND 5 BARS, INSCRIBED AS ABOVE TOGETHER WITH A CERTIFICATE AS INSTRUCTOR, ROSARY AND CRUCIFIX. A COPY OF THE COVERING MEMORANDUM RECEIVED THEREWITH, SHOWING THE CIRCUMSTANCES UNDER WHICH THEY WERE RECOVERED IS ATTACHED, BUT A MAN BEARING THESE PARTICULARS CANNOT BE TRACED AS HAVING SERVED IN THE DRAGOON GUARDS HERE. WHEN ACKNOWLEDGING RECEIPT WILL YOU KINDLY FILL IN THE DETAILS BELOW, SHOWING THE DESCRIPTION UNDER WHICH THIS MAN WAS SERVING WITH THE BEF AT THE TIME OF HIS DEATH.

LETTER PASSED TO O/IC MILITARY POLICE RECORDS, ALDERSHOT.

PASSED TO YOU, PTE. EADE WAS TRANSFERRED TO MMP ON 8/12/05.

SIGNED G C WYMHAM, COLONEL, I/C CAVALRY RECORD.

LETTER FROM O I/C RECORDS, MILITARY POLICE CORPS. ALDERSHOT 5/12/17 TO O I/C/ CAVALRY SECTION, GHQ, 3 ECHELON, BEF.

REF THE ATTACHED COPY OF CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE SOUTH AFRICAN MEDAL, CERTIFICATE AS INSTRUCTOR, ROSARY AND CRUCIFIX, BELONGING TO NO. 5147 PTE J EADE, 7 DRAGOON GUARDS NOW NO. 660 L/CPL (A/SGT) J EADE, MILITARY MOUNTED POLICE, WILL YOU PLEASE CAUSE THIS NCO TO BE INFORMED THAT THESE ARTICLES ARE IN MY POSSESSION FOR SAFE CUSTODY.

WILL YOU KINDLY OBTAIN AND FORWARD TO ME A STATEMENT FROM A/SGT EADE AS TO HOW AND WHEN HE LOST THESE ARTICLES.

REPORT FROM S/SSM J EADE, IN THE FIELD, DATED 14/12/17.

REPORT TO AMP 61 DIVISION

SIR,

I BEG TO REPORT RE ATTACHED CORRESPONDENCE THAT THE LAST TIME THAT I SAW THE ARTICLES MENTIONED WAS IN SEPTEMBER 1914 DURING THE BATTLE OF THE AISNE. I WAS WITH 11 INFANTRY BRIGADE AT THAT TIME AND SOME OF OUR BASE KIT BAGS WERE BROUGHT UP TO US AND WE WERE INSTRUCTED TO TAKE OUT WHAT WE WANTED AND RETURN THEM SO THAT THEY COULD BE SENT BACK AND THE ARTICLES IN QUESTION WERE LEFT BY ME IN MY BASE KIT BAG TOGETHER WITH SEVERAL OTHER THINGS INCLUDING MY ARMY RESERVE PAPER AND CHARACTER. THE ONLY WAY THAT I CAN ACCOUNT FOR THEM COMING INTO THE POSSESSION OF A GERMAN IS THAT THE BAG WAS NOT RETURNED TO THE DIVISION BY THE BRIGADE, BUT WAS LEFT THERE AND THE GROUND WAS AFTERWARDS OCCUPIED BY THE GERMAN FROM THE FRENCH (ABOUT JANUARY 1915).

SIGNED J EADE, A/SSM. M M POLICE.

SSM J EADE WAS AWARDED THE QUEEN’S SOUTH AFRICA MEDAL WITH CLASPS: CAPE COLONY, ORANGE FREE STATE, TRANSVAAL, SOUTH AFRICA 1901 AND SOUTH AFRICA 1902. ALSO AWARDED THE 1914 STAR WITH CLASP AND ROSE, VICTORY AND WAR MEDALS AND MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

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6. ESCORT TO AN EMPEROR

By J A Davis

     Members of the Corps of Royal Military Police perform many unusual tasks of which the general public hears but little.   One such which occurred just after the First World War, is mentioned in Gordon Brook-Shepherd’s recently published book on the Emperor Charles of Austria, which is entitled The Last Habsburg.

     The very name of the Emperor Charles is probably almost unknown outside Austria to all but historians, for he is overshadowed by his predecessor Franz Joseph, who reigned for 68 of the last 70 years of the existence of the Austrian Empire,   Even in Austria itself Charles seems to be largely forgotten and the average tourist might well be forgiven for thinking that the only interesting figures in Austrian history were Maria Theresa and the persons involved in the Mayerling affair.

     Charles reigned from 21st November, 1916, to 11th November 1918, when he formally renounced his power as Emperor.   On the following day Austria became a republic and the presence of the Emperor Charles on Austrian soil an embarrassment to the new government.

     At first it seemed possible that the Emperor and his family might be allowed to retire to the little schloss at Eckartsau near the Hungarian border and stay there, but by February 1919 it became apparent that it was only a matter of time before the Imperial Family would be compelled to leave Austria.   Though the vast proportion of their subjects do not seem to have been ill disposed towards them, Austria was in a very unsettled state politically, gangs of disbanded soldiery, many of whom were armed and starving roamed the countryside, and it seemed not unlikely that the Imperial Family might share the fate of the Tzar of Russia and his family who had been shot and battered to death at Ekaterinburg in July 1918.   There were rumours that the Imperial Family and court were living in considerable luxury though in fact they were little better off than many of their countrymen, at least in some respects.

     At this point the Empress’s two brothers appealed to his late Majesty King George the Fifth of Great Britain to help, and he took the somewhat unusual step of ordering that an officer of the British Army should be sent to assist the Imperial Family.   This officer was subsequently superseded by Lt Col Lisle Strutt, DSO, of the Royal Scots, and it was he who was responsible for involving the Military Police in the Emperor’s departure from Austria.

     On the 17th March, 1919, Colonel Strutt received a telegram from London informing him that it was highly desirable that the Emperor should leave Austria at once and that the “British Government could in no way guarantee his journey”.   The Austrian Government was becoming increasingly difficult in its attitude to the Imperial Family, there were rumors of rioting in Hungary which had formed part of the old empire, the Emperor was insistent that he had not abdicated, and that he would not leave the country without the Empress and his family, and the Empress refused to see any necessity for leaving at all.   Colonel Strutt, having had a number of interviews with the Austrian Chancellor, Renner, became convinced that it the Imperial Family did not go soon they might not be able to go at all, and finally persuaded them they must leave.   He then looked round for a means of moving them.   He thought it unsafe to send them through Vienna where they would almost certainly be recognised, and decided to use the Imperial Train which had survived the war and was in a siding in Vienna.   Colonel Strutt had the train sent up the light track to Kopfstetten near Eckartsau.   The authorities seem to have made no difficulties about this and one cannot help reaching the conclusion that their secret desire was to see the Imperial Family and colonel Strutt safely over the border.   Colonel Strutt however having met one of the gangs of armed ex-soldiers not far from Eckartsau, became alarmed at the possibility of an attack on the train and looked found for an escort.   He found it in the persons of one NCO and six British Military Police who might be called on to defend eight carriages and open trucks with the Emperor’s staff, family and baggage, a number of members of the court, and a fortune in jewellery.   Colonel Strutt himself was carrying in his pocket the Empress’s pearls which she had handed to him at Eckartsau.

     At Innsbruck the military policemen assisted the Emperor’s hound, cleared the platform of some Italian soldiers who were climbing on each others shoulders in an attempt to look into the carriages.   There were no other incidents and at Imst a guard of 25 men of the HAC (Honourable Artillery Company) presented arms to His Majesty, the only official notice taken of the last Habsburg Emperor, and that by his ex-enemies, as he left the country.

     The train ran on into Switzerland and at Buchs  halted.   The military police dismounted and formed up on the platform, and the Emperor spoke to each man and shook hands with him.   A Court official “presented each man, on behalf of His Majesty with a watch bearing the Imperial monogram, and a cigarette case embossed with the Austro-Hungarian and Habsburg arms”.

From the RMP Journal, page 21 by kind permission of the Regimental Secretary.

 This incident is also recorded in the book “The Last Habsburg by Gordon Brook-Shepherd, published by Weybright and Talley, New York, published in 1968.   Library of Congress catalogue No. 69-15585.

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7. AWARD IF SIX MILITARY MEDALS TO NO. 1 TRAFFIC CONTROL COMPANY, MFP

In the London Gazette No. 31469, page 9349 dated 23/7/1919 the following members of No.1 Traffic Control Company, MFP were all awarded the Military Medal:

P/412 Sgt Huntley, A J from Plaistow.

862 Sgt Stretton W from Ealing W.

P/3041 Pte (L/Cpl) Barker T from Leeds.

P/5366 Pte (L/Cpl) Langridge H E from Seaford.

P/5376 Pte (L/Cpl) Manklow A E from Bexhill.

P/5063 Pte (L/Cpl) Montgomery F T from Battersea.

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8. THE FIRST CLOSE PROTECTION DETAIL?

The letter shown below was found in the army record of P/1870 Cpl J C Marshall, MFP, no idea why it was in there.

kings body gd.jpeg

Below is a copy of the above with a few added details:-

COPY

Sir,

     Reference the attached correspondence, I beg to state that the following n.c.o’s, M.F.P did duty at the Chateau near AYRE during the King’s visit October 1915, and were each awarded £1 note as an appreciation of the services rendered by them in connection with the safeguarding of the King during his visit.   I myself being awarded the Royal Victorian Medal (silver).

___________________________________________________________________Regt No.     Rank and Name                         Regt No.            Rank and Name

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P/1504       L/Cpl J G Ford MFP                     P/1703              L/Cpl J Starkie MFP

P/1869       L/Cpl T Rabbett MFP                   P/931                L/Cpl G Mills MFP

P/1798       L/Cpl A Shaw MFP                       P/1871              L/Cpl F A Marks MFP

P/1835       L/Cpl T Runniger MMP                 P/1289              L/Cpl H Armitt MFP

P/1268       L/Cpl J P Fitzgerald MFP             P/1797               L/Cpl C Turnock MFP

P/1833       L/Cpl F Ryall MFP                        P/1834               L/Cpl E Tanner MFP

                   (spelt Royal above)

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No. 1 Area,                                                    Signed  No. 533 F Willis

6th September 1919                                      Sergt. Major

                                                                       Military Mounted Police

L/Cpl Ford arrived in France on the 5/7/15 all the others listed arrived on the 11/10/15 probably with the King as his security guards.   Was this the first Close Protection detail carried out by the Corps?

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