Emails, Sadie Kliner, senior work and family communications manager, National Partnership for Women & Families, March 18 and 19, 2014

1:42 p.m.

To start, attached is the table we use (B20017), which is different than the one you sent (S2402). As you can see in B20017, men who worked full time, year round in the past 12 months had median earnings of $43,160. Women who worked full time, year round in the past 12 months had median earnings of $35,301. That makes women’s earnings 82 percent of men’s, as our fact sheet says: http://www.nationalpartnership.org/research-library/workplace-fairness/fair-pay/texas-women-and-the-wage-gap.pdf

 

As for why there is a difference, the tables appear to present slightly different data.

 

B20017:

“Median earnings in the past 12 months (in 2011-inflation-adjusted dollars) by sex by work experience in the past 12 months for the population 16 years and over with earnings in the past 12 months)”

 

S2402:

“Occupation by sex and median earnings in the past 12 months (in 2011 inflation-adjusted dollars) for full-time, year-round civilian employed population 16 years and over”

 

It’s possible that the difference is due to different universes – all workers versus civilian-only. We use the universe of all workers, not civilian workers only. It’s also possible that there’s a difference between the terms “employed population” and “population with earnings.” I’d suggest you reach out to the Census Bureau on that.

 

I hope that’s helpful. If you’re looking for a quote or further explanation, I can set you up with one of our policy experts. One other point for clarification is that the 82 percent is not a comparison of wages for the same job – as clearly noted in the piece you sent from July. And lastly, as I mentioned, updated data were released in September of 2013, so these are not the most recent numbers. Just a heads up on that.

 

Sadie

 

sadie kliner

senior work and family communications manager

national partnership for women & families

11:26 a.m.

March 19, 2014

As for not limiting the data to civilian workers, we believe B20017 is a more complete view of the workforce. It is also the chart that has been used historically, so it allows for comparisons over time.

 

sadie kliner

senior work and family communications manager

national partnership for women & families